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Academic Catalog

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Adolescent Literature

Summer
Summer 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Learn how adolescent literature meets the developmental needs of middle and high school ages (grades 6-12). We’ll look at the literature in historical perspective, study young adult development in reading, and consider genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique several genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, library science

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Mondays  9a - 1p

Located in: Olympia

Advanced GIS

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Advanced GIS is a fast-paced course designed to teach graduate students to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for mapping, spatial data management, and spatial data analysis. Instruction is based on reading assignments, lectures, and weekly hands-on labs using ArcGIS 10.1, including both desktop and online mapping tools for collaboration and presentation. 

Evaluations are based on the quality of student-produced map and analysis products and two quizzes. Students should have experience with quantitative software and must be able to demonstrate a solid understanding of MS Windows file management practices. Students will be expected to use the Esri software suite outside of class, for performing hands-on mapping assignments.  Student versions of the ArcGIS software will be made available, but support is limited to college computers (note: ArcGIS Desktop software runs only under MS Windows, see requirements: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/system-requirements/10.1 ).

Faculty Biography
Mike Ruth, M.Sc., is a professional GIS practitioner for Esri (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc).  Mike has been a project manager and consultant for Esri, helping a wide variety of agencies learn and exploit geographic information systems.  His clients have included major non governmental organizations, tribal and state governments, and US federal agencies.  Mike studied Environmental Science in college, later specializing in Geology at George Washington University.  For his Masters degree, Mike completing a field mapping project studying the geology of the western Dominican Republic along the Haiti border area.  After completing his Master of Science degree, Mike worked for the Spot Image Corporation, developing GeoTIFF and other satellite imagery methods for GIS integration.  Now at Esri, Mike has focused on Africa projects for non-profit organizations over the past few years.  Recent projects address the applications of GIS technology for improving polio vaccination success in Nigeria, agricultural improvement for small holder farmers in Tanzania, and participatory community conservation activities in the western Serengeti, among other projects.

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Students will have completed MES's Introduction to GIS or be able to show significant experience using ArcMap for Desktop software in either professional or academic settings. Students who have not completed Introduction to GIS should email a brief description of their previous experience with GIS to the MES Director (Kevin Francis, francisk@evergreen.edu ) and Faculty (Mike Ruth, ruthm@evergreen.edu ). Registration priority will be given to students who have taken Research Design and Quantitative Methods. To register, you must email the MES Director for approval (Kevin Francis, francisk@evergreen.edu ).

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Mon

Located in: Olympia

Aquatic Ecology

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by


Inland waters are some of the most threatened ecosystems on Earth. Yet they provide critical ecosystem services: providing food and freshwater, regulating climate, and detoxifying pollutants.  In this course, we will examine inland waters (focusing on rivers and streams) as ecological systems that interact with their drainage basin and the atmosphere.  We will also explore how physical, chemical, and biological processes operate and impact the organisms found within each ecosystem. Finally, we will study the way inland waters, as hotspots of biogeochemical activity, contribute to fluxes of greenhouse gasses.  Case studies of real-world problems will be used to assess the effect of anthropogenic changes on inland waters and watersheds.  This program will include lectures, laboratories, and field trips to gain experience with sampling techniques in aquatic ecology.

Faculty Biography
Erin Martin, Ph.D. , is an aquatic biogeochemist whose research focuses on examining the role of rivers in the global carbon cycle. Rivers are large sources of carbon to both the atmosphere and the ocean and are consequently critical to our understanding of the global carbon cycle.  While working in the Amazon Basin, her research demonstrated that bacteria living in the river produce high levels of carbon dioxide through respiration, and this carbon dioxide is subsequently lost to the atmosphere.  Her current research in the Mekong Basin (i.e. Cambodia) focuses on characterizing the type of organic carbon that is exported by large rivers to the ocean.  Specifically, she uses molecular tracers to determine where in the watershed the carbon originates from, and uses radiocarbon analyses to determine the age of this material.  Such information is necessary in order to understand the preservation of terrestrial carbon in the ocean, which can affect atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over long time scales.  Through her training (master’s and doctoral degrees from the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington), Erin has research experience working in streams, rivers, lakes, and the ocean.  Additional interests include ocean acidification, estuarine ecology, evaluating the impacts of dams on downstream processes, and microbial ecology.  Her past and present research has been conducted through collaborations with colleagues in Brazil, Cambodia, and the Pacific Northwest.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Case Studies and Thesis Design

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Students will examine in detail a variety of environmental problems, using the skills they gained in their first year of MES core studies to carry out individual or small group projects. Students and faculty will also work together to apply what has been learned throughout the core sequence about interdisciplinary environmental research to design individual thesis research plans that will be ready to carry out by the end of the fall quarter of the student's second year.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

Climate Solutions in a Diverse World

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Course Description

Developmental pathways and technological changes, especially those taking place beyond Europe and the United States, are transforming societies and energy systems. Indigenous innovations in renewable energy are more often appropriate and practical than pathways and technologies imported from more "developed" countries. Moreover, they might also serve as models for making all energy systems more sustainable. This elective will explore the current social, economic, and energy status of several countries around the globe and will try to better understand their unique contributions to a less fossil fuel intensive, more renewable energy focused future.

Faculty Biography
Kathleen M. Saul, M.A., M.E.S., received her BA in French and BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame and MA in Management from the Wharton School of Business (University of Pennsylvania) before turning her attention to environmental issues and eventually joining the MES program at Evergreen.  After completing her degree in 2009, she taught Statistics in the Evening and Weekend studies program and Qualitative Methods, an Energy elective and gCORE in the Graduate Program on the Environment. Kathleen then moved to the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy at the University of Delaware to pursue her PhD. Her dissertation research focuses on the displacement of people that results from large scale technology projects, with a focus those involving nuclear technology.  While at Delaware, she participated in research projects looking into the energy policy implications of the Fukushima nuclear disaster as well as alternative administrative forms for organizations devoted to energy conservation, efficiency, and sustainable energy options. She also taught in the undergraduate Introduction to Energy Policy and Sustainable Energy Policy and Planning courses.  Her engineering acumen, business sense, and environmental awareness all come together in understanding modern energy systems and the green energy economy.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Monday 6-10

Located in: Olympia

Conserving and Restoring Biodiversity

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course focuses on the biology that underlies conservation and restoration issues around the world. There are many ways to approach the study of conservation and restoration biology and this course will mostly emphasize the scientific elements of these disciplines. The course will also will provide you with a practitioner's perspective of the relationship of biology and policy from work done in Washington State. This course will introduce you to the literature, controversies, and promising methodologies for a variety of conservation/restoration biology applications. In addition, a number of local experts will come in and provide perspectives on their work in applied fields of conservation. We will read, discuss, and write on a variety of topics. Your assignments include written and oral exercises, and peer evaluations aimed at helping you develop your ideas and increase your ability to communicate those ideas. This course will introduce you to the principal concepts and methodologies of conservation and restoration biology, enrich your understanding of the scientific contributions necessary for solving conservation problems, foster your understanding of the scientific process in general and as applied in conservation settings, and further your powers of analysis and ability to communicate effectively.

Faculty Biography
Timothy Quinn, Ph.D., has served as chief scientist of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s habitat program since 1999. Quinn recently served on the Science Working Group that came up with scientific underpinnings and a technical framework for the development of the Puget Sound Partnership. He has a B.S. in Biology from Western Washington University (1979), an M.S. in Physiological Ecology of Marine Fish from Western Washington University (1987), and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology from University of Washington (1993).

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Disease Ecology: Parasites, Pestilence and Populations

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course provides an introduction to the field of disease ecology, an area of study that has developed rapidly over the past three decades, and addresses some of the most significant challenges to human health and biological conservation. Students will obtain an appreciation for the incredible diversity of parasitic organisms, arguably the most abundant life forms on the planet, and examine how parasites invade and spread through host populations. Ecological interactions between hosts and parasites will be examined from an individual and population-level perspective. Students will gain a basic understanding of the population biology of micro- and macro- parasites, mechanisms of transmission and causes and consequences of ecological and genetic heterogeneity. Laboratory exercises will introduce students to medical microbiology techniques and ecological research using an experimental approach. Specific topics include types of pathogens and their ecological properties, epidemiology and impacts on host populations, strategies used by parasites to exploit hosts, strategies used by hosts to evade parasites, role of ecology and evolution in the emergence of new diseases, and the role of parasites in biodiversity and conservation. The main objectives of this course are to increase student awareness and understanding of (i) the role parasites play in the ecology and evolution of animal populations, including humans; and (ii) the relevance of ecological and evolutionary considerations in managing infectious diseases in individual human or animal hosts and populations.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Additional details:

Wednesdays 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ecological and Social Sustainability

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Addresses central issues in contemporary sustainability studies on theoretical and practical levels. Emphasis is on ways to promote both environmental and social sustainability. Areas covered may include environmental quality at regional, national and global scales; energy use and alternative energies; resource availability and access to resources; social and cultural issues of sustainability; and indicators to guide policy. As part of this program, students write and present a research paper to provide evidence of their readiness to advance to candidacy. Candidacy is outlined in the student handbook .

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

Elevation in GIS: The Third Dimension

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Elevation is an important dimension of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) for mapping and analyzing many types of spatial phenomena.  Studies of watershed dynamics, habitat suitability and forest health, ocean bathymetry, and many other themes can be improved through better understanding the elevation properties of the landscape.   Elevation data – the “Z” dimension” - brings unique insights - and challenges - to the discipline of GIS.  The ability to visualize and analyze and integrate the third dimension opens up a variety of engaging terrain visualizations and lines of spatial analysis.

This class is a hands-on learning workshop to allow students to learn how to create elevation-oriented maps.  Practical exercises will lead students through the analysis of slope and aspect, creation of profiles and contours, computation of viewsheds, imagery "drapes", and 3D flythrough visualizations. Students will use ArcGIS software at the Evergreen CAL, and a wide variety of public domain elevation data sources ranging from continental scale to highly detailed Lidar data.  All learning will take place in the classroom, over a long weekend (there will be no homework or final project requirement). 

To be eligible to take this course, students must have completed Introduction to GIS or have equivalent experience in the use of ArcGIS for Desktop software (ArcMap and Arc Catalog), version 10.2 or later.   The class will begin on Friday evening and take place all day Saturday and Sunday, concluding at 5:00 on Sunday afternoon.

This course is open to MES students who have taken Introduction to GIS. If you have already taken Introduction to GIS and you are interested in this course, please contact Mike at ruthm@evergreen.edu . Please contact the faculty to discuss whether your prior experience is sufficient to ensure your ability to execute the course exercises successfully. 

2

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

NEW: Course is now open to Jr/Sr students with signature. Students need to contact the faculty to discuss their interest in GIS, their awareness of elevation particularly (since "the third dimension" is the focus of my summer syllabus), and any previous skills or exposure to GIS of any kind.

To be eligible to take this course, students must have completed Introduction to GIS or have equivalent experience in the use of ArcGIS for Desktop software (ArcMap and Arc Catalog), version 10.2 or later.  This course is open to MES students who have taken Introduction to GIS. If you have already taken Introduction to GIS and you are interested in this course, please contact Mike at ruthm@evergreen.edu . Please contact the faculty to discuss whether your prior experience is sufficient to ensure your ability to execute the course exercises successfully. 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 15
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Weekend intensive course: Friday, July 28 to Sunday, July 30

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-06-15Offering is now open to Junior and Senior students with a signature from faculty

Environmental Advocacy

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Prevention and resolution of environmental problems depends significantly on effective environmental advocacy.  Science, government regulation, and market mechanisms are insufficient without it.  The purpose of this elective is to learn and practice skills needed to be an effective environmental advocate, including analysis of a contested policy situation, development of an effective strategy to affect its outcome, and methods for implementing the strategy through organized, collective action.  This knowledge is useful for those working within government, the private sector, environmental advocacy groups, and as citizen activists.  We will study cases that illustrate the successes and failures of various attempts to influence events, including guest lectures by participants in those cases.  We will learn to practically apply social science theoretical frameworks in ways that help create effective strategy.  The course provides a critical survey of approaches to environmental advocacy – from global to local – emphasizing strengths and weaknesses.  Students will research, write and present on a case of their choosing, preferably from their own experience, that illustrates the principles we study.  After taking the course, students should have improved abilities to diagram the sequence of events leading to an environmental policy decision, locate decision points and key players, find pivotal opportunities for intervention, assemble coalitions capable of effecting change, and act ethically and appropriately to carry out strategy from within their role in the public or private sector.

Faculty Biography:

Ted Whitesell, Ph.D., is a broadly trained cultural geographer with special interests in political ecology and conservation.  As a freshman at the University of Colorado, Ted co-founded the CU Wilderness Study Group. After graduation, Ted ran the Colorado Wilderness Workshop, the only statewide preservation organization at the time. From 1975 to 1985, he was a leader of the Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, campaigning to secure designation of the first wilderness areas in the Tongass National Forest. He was recognized as the most accomplished environmental leader in the country of 25 years of age or less by the Tyler Foundation.  Later, he earned a Ph.D. in geography from the University of California, Berkeley, investigating grassroots proposals for conservation and development in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil. Ted came to The Evergreen State College in 1998 and is affiliated with two planning units – Environmental Studies and Sustainability & Justice.  His students published a major book in April 2004, called Defending Wild Washington (The Mountaineers Books). His most recent research was a collaborative investigation of tribal perspectives on marine protected areas in western Washington.

 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Education

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

It is widely agreed that an environmentally literate and concerned citizenry is crucial to environmental quality and long-term sustainability--but how and where is environmental and sustainability literacy fostered? And where "environmental education" occurs, is it effective?  This class explores the history, philosophical underpinnings, and current trends in environmental education for both youth and adults, in both formal sectors (schools and colleges) and non-formal ones. This class provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the field of environmental education and interpretation. It will be useful to students interested in environmental teaching or communications as a career, or to those whose environmental work might involve education or outreach components. Note: A one-day Saturday field trip will be taken to Northwest Trek Wildlife Park in Eatonville, Washington; students should expect to pay a nominal entrance fee.

Course Outcomes:

  • A theoretical grounding in environmental education (EE): its precursor fields and their various rationales, and the working principles to which EE professionals aspire. 
  • An introductory understanding of learning theory and of the types of educational settings that foster meaningful, lasting learning.
  • A working knowledge of several arenas in which environmental education is practiced, with attention to both the opportunities and challenges for volunteer and professional environmental educators.
  • A framework for evaluation of environmental education programs.
  • An understanding of the increasingly politically charged nature of environmental education and implications for professional practice.
  • The student's own construction of the promise of environmental education as well as some of its shortcomings and tensions----and a more complex "concept map" of the field.
  • An introductory understanding of social marketing approaches to fostering environmentally responsible behaviors.
  • A heightened awareness of environmental literacy as a global imperative.  

Faculty Biography:

Jean MacGregor, M.S., is a Senior Scholar at the Washington Center for Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education at The Evergreen State College. She directs the Curriculum for the Bioregion Initiative, a faculty and curriculum development initiative, whose mission is to prepare undergraduates to live in a world where the complex issues of environmental quality, community health and wellbeing, environmental justice, and sustainability are paramount.  The Curriculum for the Bioregion initiative involves hundreds of faculty members at colleges and universities throughout Washington State. Prior to work at Evergreen, she helped develop the environmental studies program at Warren Wilson College near Asheville, North Carolina.  Earlier in her career, she developed and/or evaluated environmental education programs for both youth and adults at nature centers and science museums, and in various outdoor and wilderness learning settings.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Humanities: Argument as Art/Art as Argument

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Discourse in environmental governance, law, and policy consists almost entirely of argumentative writing. But how does art make arguments? Insofar as effective art and literature provoke feeling and reflection by invoking uncertainty and ambiguity, what do they have to do with argument? By what strategies do artists and writers communicate the transformation of their own point of view, their own movement from ignorance to knowledge? And what might we learn from them about how to translate our insights, persuade others of the validity of our perspectives, and teach new ways of seeing and knowing to myriad audiences? This creative and critical writing class will explore and experiment with argument as art, and art as argument.

We are often urged to think about audience when we compose arguments. Who are we trying to convince, and why? What should our attitude be towards (the question of) audience? How can we better understand the mutable and contingent relationship between writer and audience (readers, listeners, interlocutors)? How can we use our imagination to help clarify form, content, tone, and mode of address? The study of artists and writers concerned with environmental issues can help us think about our audiences and the most effective ways of engaging, challenging, educating, or motivating them.

The course will entail weekly readings and occasional screenings that exemplify artistic approaches to arguments concerned in a range of ways with environmental questions. Course readings will serve as models of argumentation as well as objects of analysis and inquiry. Creative and critical exercises will help students develop their academic writing and their ability to communicate effectively with diverse audiences.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Mon

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Leadership

Summer
Summer 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
24
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Accelerated environmental change is the new normal. This dynamic course will begin with a review of the current status of global and local impacts of such change. We will identify opportunities and methods that will help students develop the necessary leadership skills to address this emerging crisis. The class will first explore past environmental successes and examine a variety of approaches and collaborations used in Washington state, looking closely at what has worked and what hasn’t, and what techniques will be most useful for successful environmental stewardship in the future. The following is a list of past successes for review and analysis:

• The Early Winters project in the Methow Valley, ca 1980’s

• The proposed gravel mine on Maury Island, ca 2008

• The Pit to Pier project in eastern Jefferson Co., ca 2014

• The creation of the Teanaway community forest in Kittitas Co., ca 2013

• The SSA Marine proposed coal terminal at Cherry Point, Whatcom Co., ca 2016

By clearly understanding the process and manner of resolving these past challenges, in the second phase of this class, students will apply this knowledge to propose innovative solutions to the following current environmental challenges:

• The Dept. of Natural Resources trust land plan for conservation of the marbled murrelet in Western Washington

• The Dept. of Ecology’s efforts to create a no-discharge zone in the Puget Sound

• Ongoing efforts to curtail carbon emissions in Washington.

These case studies will be student led, working in small teams, with the goal of understanding the essential role of leadership in shaping solutions across diverse interest and political groups. Student teams will examine and evaluate the role and leadership qualities of members of the public and responsible officials in crafting success. Team presentations will demonstrate thorough research, critical thinking and professional presentation skills of the issues under study. Peer evaluations will be part of each presentation. Two planned field trips, one in the Hood Canal area and one on the Columbia river, will provide the class with an opportunity to talk with environmental leaders, view the project area, and discuss the realities of both past and current mega projects and their potential impacts. The ultimate goal of this class is to inspire and equip students with the knowledge and skills needed to become effective environmental leaders.

Students can enroll for 2 credits first session, 2 credits second session, or 4 credits full session. If you registering for the second session only, please contact the faculty for required preparatory readings.

Peter Goldmark has a lifelong involvement with agriculture, conservation, science, education, and public service. In January 2017, Peter completed his second elected term as Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. He obtained his B.S. from Haverford College in 1967 and went on to complete a PhD in Molecular Biology at UC Berkeley. He has published research papers in national and international journals and instructed class at Heritage college and UC Berkeley. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

state/federal environmentally related agencies, NGO's, educational institutions, land management businesses, elected and appointed office

24

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6-10p plus optional Saturday field trips (specific dates to be determined)

Located in: Olympia

Fall 2016 Approved MPA Courses for MES Students

Fall
Fall 2016 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 0
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

MES students have the option of taking up to two 4-credit MPA electives for MES elective credit.  Each quarter, MES will publish approved MPA courses that MES students can take.  This quarter, students are eligible to take:

Comparative & International Administration

Design Thinking for Public Service

Economic and Community Development

Public Finance Policy

Science Policy to Action (2 cr)

If you find an MPA course not on this list that you think will complement your educational goals, please consult with the MES Director for approval.

MPA electives fill very quickly, so MES students should not be surprised if they are waitlisted at first.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 0
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Located in: Olympia

graduate Conceptualizing Our Regional Environment (gCORE)

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program provides a framework for understanding current environmental issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will begin to develop the skills to become producers of new knowledge, rather than being strictly learners of information already available. Multiple methods of data acquisition and analysis will be introduced through examples drawn from many fields of study. The philosophy of science and the problematic relationship between science and policy are also introduced.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$100 field trip fee to Pack Forest, October 6-7, 2016.

Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

Introduction to GIS

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course will teach students how to use the versatile technology of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).  GIS is more than map-making.  A GIS integrates computer hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information across a wide variety of disciplines. GIS technology is increasingly used by physical and social scientists, policy makers, businesses, environmental and conservation organizations, utilities, public health providers, the military, and educators, to name a few.  More and more organizations are using spatial data and analysis to help them make decisions relating to acceptable land uses, allocation of resources and assets, fairness and social wellbeing, and many other needs. Instruction will rely strongly on weekly hands-on labs and homework exercises to guide students through a public policy decision process from beginning to end over the duration of the quarter.  Students will learn to manage spatial data and tools, mainly using the Esri suite of software commonly known as ArcGIS. No previous experience with GIS is required.  Student versions of the ArcGIS software suite will be made available for home use (but technical support is limited to college computers).

Faculty Biography
Michael Ruth, M.Sc., is a professional GIS practitioner for Esri (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc).  Mike has been a project manager and consultant for Esri, helping a wide variety of agencies learn and exploit geographic information systems.  His clients have included major non governmental organizations, tribal and state governments, and US federal agencies.  Mike studied Environmental Science in college, later specializing in Geology at George Washington University.  For his Masters degree, Mike completing a field mapping project studying the geology of the western Dominican Republic along the Haiti border area.  After completing his Master of Science degree, Mike worked for the Spot Image Corporation, developing GeoTIFF and other satellite imagery methods for GIS integration.  Now at Esri, Mike has focused on Africa projects for non-profit organizations over the past few years.  Recent projects address the applications of GIS technology for improving polio vaccination success in Nigeria, agricultural improvement for small holder farmers in Tanzania, and participatory community conservation activities in the western Serengeti, among other projects.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Mon

Located in: Olympia

Learning Across Differences: Collaborations in Conservation and Sustainability in Prisons

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This class will explore provocative, intersectional topics including restorative, social, and environmental justice, ecotherapy, mass incarceration, ecological restoration, Just Sustainability, institutional operations, institutional racism, prison abolition, transformative and punitive rehabilitation, and returning citizens’ experiences of reintegration. The Sustainability in Prisons Project (SPP) will serve as the case study. The SPP partnership supports more than 100 science, sustainability, and education programs statewide. Referencing SPP, we will consider limitations and opportunities for social, economic, and environmental sustainability in prisons. Diverse guest speakers will contribute critiques and potential innovations. Students will be challenged to think holistically and propose realistic solutions which would benefit incarcerated individuals, returning citizens, and communities.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-09-07Course now has 5 Junior-Senior seats available
2016-06-21New fall opportunity added.

Master of Environmental Studies Thesis

WinterSpring
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

To complete their degree, MES students are required to complete a 16 credit thesis, the prospectus for which is finished in the Fall quarter during Case Studies. At the end of Case Studies, and prior to Winter quarter, students are assigned a faculty mentor, or "reader."  Each reader is assigned a CRN (course reference number) for Winter quarter and a different CRN for Spring quarter, and students will be notified of their reader's CRN by email from the MES office prior to registration for each quarter.  Students will take eight thesis credits each quarter. In addition to the thesis, students are required to attend an evening thesis workshop, which is usually offered on occasional Tuesday or Thursday evenings throughout the Winter and Spring quarters.  Students will be notified of exact details during Fall quarter. See our Thesis Resources page for more information.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p on occasional Tue or Thu

Located in: Olympia

Organizational Sustainability in Theory and Practice

Fall
Fall 2016 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Communities and organizations have substantial environmental and social impacts at both local and global scales. How do we evaluate the positive and negative values of those impacts? How do we define and assess organizational practices and associated impacts? What should we be measuring and tracking? And how do we use assessments to stimulate and guide positive organizational change?

To understand the theoretical and practical dimensions of these questions, this class will explore a variety of assessment tools designed for corporations and other organizations, communities, and colleges/universities. Students will develop a broad understanding of organizational sustainability and assessment tools, and a deeper understanding of the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) developed by AASHE, the Association for the Advancement of Higher Education. (Evergreen faculty and staff, along with MES students, helped develop the pilot version of STARS.) Class work will include planning for and beginning the data collection for Evergreen’s first AASHE STARS assessment of organizational sustainability since 2011. Students will have the opportunity to continue this work in subsequent quarters through internships.

Faculty Biographies

Scott Morgan, M.P.A., is the Director of Sustainability at The Evergreen State College. He has a B.S. in Chemistry from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana, with an emphasis upon organic chemistry and biochemistry, and a Master of Public Administration from The Evergreen State College. Evergreen’s Office of Sustainability coordinates and guides on campus sustainability efforts as well as institutional collaborations with community-based groups. Scott has worked in agriculture and private industry, founded and managed a small non-profit, taught GED and pre-college classes, and has spent the past few years immersed in the public sector. This diverse set of perspectives informs his recognition that long-term sustainability will require a dynamic harmony between environmental, social, and economic health. He is also actively engaged with the Thurston Climate Action Team, a public/private partnership dedicated to creating a healthy and sustainable future for Thurston County, WA by encouraging, coordinating, and leading action on climate change.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Mon

Located in: Olympia

Research Design and Quantitative Methods

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Students learn how to integrate the use of inferential statistics and qualitative data analysis to conduct rigorous examinations of the social, biological, and physical aspects of environmental issues. This knowledge will prepare students for their own research and for understanding and critiquing research articles and reports in fields of their choosing.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p, Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

Restoration Ecology

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Course Description: Restoration Ecology is a 4-credit MES program elective. The field of restoration ecology is fairly young, relative to other scientific disciplines. However, ecological restoration has occurred throughout human history, as various cultures have initially disrupted and then attempted to recover vital ecosystem services provided by intact, functioning ecosystems. Identifying priority restoration targets for nearly any ecosystem is one of the largest challenges for the conservation community, as it requires a complex understanding of the historical, social, political and ecological influences on restoration success.
This 4-credit graduate level course will explore both the objective and the subjective facets of restoration ecology, including various cultural perspectives on the value of restoration, how economic and political realities influence restoration targets, and the integrated structural and functional components of ecosystems that contribute to the success or failure of any restoration project. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate small- to large-scale restoration projects, in the Pacific Northwest and around the world, as well as take part in active ecological restoration.
NOTE: One weekend field trip to the Elwha Dam (dates TBD but likely weekend of 2/11).

 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$200 for overnight field trips, food, vans, and lodging.

Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wednesday 6-10. Field trip to Elwha River--date TBD

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-06$200 fee added.

Spring 2017 Approved MPA Courses for MES Students

Spring
Spring 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 0
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

MES students have the option of taking up to two 4-credit MPA electives for MES elective credit.  Each quarter, MES will publish approved MPA courses that MES students can take.  This quarter, students are eligible to take:

Entrepreneurship And Social Enterprise

Ethics & Leadership in Public Service

Managing Human Systems

NonProfit Theory & Practice

Public Health Policy (2 cr)

Transportation Policy (2 cr)

If you find an MPA course not on this list that you think will complement your educational goals, please consult with the MES Director for approval.

MPA electives fill very quickly, so MES students should not be surprised if they are waitlisted at first.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 0
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Located in: Olympia

Sustainable Forestry in Fire-prone Landscapes

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This class provides an introduction to 21st-century forest ecosystem management, the design of forest restoration treatments, and the role of fire in dry forests. A three-day field trip will emphasize the unique issues facing restoration management of fire prone landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. The course materials will explore the underlying science and practice of sustainable forestry, and the interface with societal and economic forces including adapting policies to address 100 years of fire suppression, and climate change. The overall course objective is to increase student literacy and effectiveness in addressing natural resources management issues.

Faculty Biography
Richard Bigley, Ph.D., is a forest ecologist who teaches sustainable forestry and on occasion a forest ecology class. His current work focuses on the restoration of riparian forests to older forest conditions in western Washington, and the ecology and management of headwater streams and wetlands. He works for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Over the last 21 years with DNR, he has served as the team leader for the Forest Ecology, Wildlife Science and the Habitat Conservation Plan Monitoring and Adaptive Management Teams. He also advises other organizations on the development of conservation plans. Before DNR, he worked as an ecologist for the Forest Service PNW Experiment Station and private industry. Richard earned a Ph.D. in Forest Ecology and Silviculture and a M.Sc. in Botany from the University of British Columbia. He has been an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, College of the Environment, School of Forestry since 1994. As member of the Northern Spotted owl “5-year review” panel in 2004, Richard was a contributor to the first comprehensive evaluation of the scientific information on the Northern Spotted owl since the time of its listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1990. After his family, his passions are the science of natural resources management and conservation, and boating.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$120 for 3-day field trip.

Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Mon

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-05-09Fees updated.

Winter 2017 Approved MPA Courses for MES Students

Winter
Winter 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 0
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

MES students have the option of taking up to two 4-credit MPA electives for MES elective credit.  Each quarter, MES will publish approved MPA courses that MES students can take.  This quarter, students are eligible to take:

Nonprofit Development

Project Management

If you find an MPA course not on this list that you think will complement your educational goals, please consult with the MES Director for approval.

MPA electives fill very quickly, so MES students should not be surprised if they are waitlisted at first.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 0
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Located in: Olympia

Master in Teaching Year 1

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Graduate
Class Size: 45
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

More than two decades ago, educator Marilyn Cochrane-Smith asked, "Can prospective teachers learn to be both educators and activists, to regard themselves as agents for change, and to regard reform as an integral part of the social, intellectual, ethical and political activity of teaching?”  In the MiT 2015-17 program, we take up this challenge as we prepare teachers who recognize teaching as a political activity and knowingly take on the role of activist based on a commitment to eliminate the inequities that exist in classrooms and the broader community.

 If we are to be effective advocates for our students and to empower our students to transform their own lives, we must deepen, and perhaps challenge, our current beliefs about teaching and learning.  As teachers we must develop within ourselves the emotional and intellectual attributes needed to understand, support, and teach our future students, and to meet their diverse needs.

 Future teachers can expect to see a more diverse population of students. The MiT program prepares teachers who can draw on the strengths of students from a wide range of ethnic origins, languages, abilities, and socio-economic backgrounds. Further, these students will live in a society requiring people to engage diverse cultures through effective collaboration and creative problem-solving grounded in integrated technological skills and active use of a wide range of information resources. Thus, the MiT program will support candidates to develop as critical, reflective educators who not only care deeply about issues of race, class, poverty, and justice but are prepared to act on these issues to support student achievement.

Experiences in classrooms serve as vital parts of the MiT program. Field experiences in urban, rural, and suburban communities enable teacher candidates to mediate their understanding of theoretical ideas and concepts presentedin program coursework. Likewise, our academic investigations inform teacher candidates’ experiences in the field. These two sites for learning are bridged through meaningful activities that require teacher candidates to integrate what they learn across classrooms and coursework.

 Among the questions that will engage our study and practice are:

  • What effective teaching practices encourage students' curiosity and lead them to shape their own questions and pursue their own answers using critical and reflective thinking?
  • How does teachers’ knowledge of learning theory, research-based pedagogy and neurobiology contribute to children's and adolescents' learning and development?
  • How are questions of democracy, equity and excellence related to success or failure in our public schools and civic engagement in a democratic society?
  • How are the more traditional literacies of reading, writing, and quantitative reasoning related to personal, economic, and political oppression and power?
  • How can teachers respond to and work with family and cultural belief systems that shape children's lives? How can teachers draw on community resources to connect content knowledge to students' lived experiences?

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Teaching or further graduate work

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Candidates must pay a required fee of $41.75 plus processing fees to an Education Service District (ESD) for finger-printing and background check before fall quarter begins. Candidates also pay for gas or for public transportation to public schools for field experiences during fall, winter, and spring quarters.  These placements may be anywhere within a 40 mile radius of the Olympia campus and are determined by the MiT Field Placement Officer.  

Fees:

$25 in fall for a reader.

Website:
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 45
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Additional details:

to be announced in July

Located in: Olympia

Master in Teaching Year 2

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Graduate
Class Size: 45
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Teacher candidates in the Master in Teaching program benefit from two full-time, 10-week, student teaching experiences. Consistent with our goals for graduate-level teacher preparation, the winter quarter is provided between the two student teaching assignments for personal reflection, continued growth in classroom teaching knowledge and skills, attention to professional activities and development of a professional growth plan.

Having two internship placements at different grade levels and in different schools provides teaching experiences in subject endorsement area/s with a variety of public school students. Candidates are placed in classrooms where cooperating mentor teachers have been identified by school districts as appropriate mentors for our teacher candidates. One student teaching placement is in a diverse, urban setting.

The first experience begins in late August or early September in accordance with the public school calendar. This model is based on research indicating that having a student teaching experience in the opening weeks of the school year contributes positively to the success of a first-year teacher.

The second assignment begins in early spring and continues toward the end of the academic year. With this second opportunity, candidates: (a) enhance their teaching practices, (b) gain an understanding of how teachers organize the curriculum in the closing months of the school year (c) make comparisons between different school settings and grade levels and (d) demonstrate ability to gain entry and get to know the assets in new communities.

The narrative evaluation of student teaching performance is based on the Evergreen faculty supervisor’s observations in combination with the assessment of the cooperating mentor teacher. We use Danielson’s model for assessment (adapted for pre-service teacher education), which is one of the 3 assessment models used in Washington State for continuing teachers. As required by the state of Washington, candidates must demonstrate a positive impact on student learning. They must also pass a state-required Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) administered and evaluated by Pearson to be recommended for certification.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Teaching and further graduate work

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

In the second year of the program, candidates complete a master's project.  The minimum expense for binding will be at least $65; the cost will be higher if candidates order more than one copy of the project.  In addition, the State of Washington requires that candidates seeking certification in Washington take the edTPA which will occur during fall student teaching.  This assessment will cost  $300 and will be paid directly to the company that manages the assessment procedure.  Candidates also pay for gas or public transportation to their student teaching sites.

In spring upon completion of student teaching and recommendation for certification, candidates will pay a $74 certification fee to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for their teaching certificate.

Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 45
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Additional details:

Weekly late afternoon/early evening seminar during fall and spring student teaching, times to be announced.

Winter coursework hours to be announced.

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research Methods

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Advanced Research Methods (ARM) is a required course for the MPA's Public Policy Concentration, and is open as an elective for other MPA students. In order to take this course, students must have completed the MPA first year Core program and either be enrolled in, or completed, the MPA second year Core program. Advanced undergraduate students can apply for instructor permission to enroll on a space available basis.

Advanced Research Methods examines advanced and multivariate statistical methods from a practical viewpoint using SPSS and Microsoft Excel. Our aim is to introduce students to a variety of statistical research techniques as well as enhance their ability to read and interpret research findings.  

Though this course takes place over of two intensive weekends, the learning will not be hurried. Our focus will be on becoming better users and readers of research and workplace data. Our task – and it is an important task – is to learn how to analyze data sensibly and in context to enhance decision-making and organizational performance.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Oct 14-16, Oct 28-30 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Analytical Techniques for Public Service I & II PNAPP

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 60
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 60
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Thurs

Located in: Olympia

Comparative & International Administration

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course will explore two beliefs that are strongly held by many Americans: that we have little to learn from other countries, and that we are better off going it alone rather than working through alliances or supranational organizations such as the United Nations. But the US has much to gain by learning from the administrative and policy experiences of other countries.  And problems such as climate change, strengthening the global financial system, and unequal development require global solutions and working through both international and supranational organizations.We will explore the theory and reality of such organizations: why they are needed but also why they are very difficult to manage and lead.  We will also compare the US with political and administrative systems elsewhere and examine how they have crafted policy solutions that provide useful examples for the US.  We will also study the challenges to performing comparative research, the role of nongovernmental organizations,  and the cultural knowledge/skills needed to work effectively at the global level.  We will use lectures, seminars, films and workshops to explore these issues.  

 

 

 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Oct 8-9, Nov 13, Dec 3-4, 9a-5p

Located in: Olympia

Creating Culturally Competent Organizations

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The organizational shift from diversity to one of Diversity & Inclusion requires a shift of mindset. Diversity and Inclusion are interrelated in that you cannot have one without the other which also begs the traditional “chicken and egg” question of which one do government leaders go after to effect the most positive change? Before we can create external change, we must first look internally. This course will cover three main areas of how we can become more culturally competent, bring cultural competency to our workplace, and effect organizational change towards systemic cultural competency.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

April 7-9, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Design Thinking for Public Service

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 10
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this course, we apply a design thinking perspective to contemporary administrative, social, and physical problems and challenges. Design thinking brings together people from different disciplines to effectively explore, in collaboration, human-centered approaches to contemporary challenges. While we'll study the theory of design thinking, the main focus of this course is on the application of design thinking in communities and administration. We will examine both design as a physical element to create/make/sustain communities as well as design as a method for social innovation, service delivery, and management. We'll study design thinking, cases of social and communal innovation using design thinking, and work together to apply design thinking to real-world situations. Our learning laboratory is the City of Tenino. This course is applicable for students interested in social and administrative innovation, city planning, and community building.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 10
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

 Tues-Oct 4, 18, Nov 1, 15, 29, 6-10p, Sat-Oct 22 & Dec 3, 9a-5p

Located in: Olympia

Design Thinking for Public Service 2-Credit

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 10
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this course, we apply a design thinking perspective to contemporary administrative, social, and physical problems and challenges. Design thinking brings together people from different disciplines to effectively explore, in collaboration, human-centered approaches to contemporary challenges. While we'll study the theory of design thinking, the main focus of this course is on the application of design thinking in communities and administration. We will examine both design as a physical element to create/make/sustain communities as well as design as a method for social innovation, service delivery, and management. We'll study design thinking, cases of social and communal innovation using design thinking, and work together to apply design thinking to real-world situations. Our learning laboratory is the City of Tenino. This course is applicable for students interested in social and administrative innovation, city planning, and community building.

Use this CRN to register for 2-credit option:  10334

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 10
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

 Tues. Oct 4, 18,  & Nov 1, 6-10p , Sat. Oct 22, 9a-5p

Located in: Olympia

Designing Indigenous Research for Equitable & Sustainable Futures

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course covers ways to design research and create a plan to carry out research that develops appropriate source material with an emphasis on indigenous communities, underserved populations and environmental policy issues, especially those relating to environmental and social justice.  We will work beyond official sources to develop strategies for gathering and using references and information original research relevant to in-depth research papers like capstones, thesis and other formats as well as examine research strategies in some large grants

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

This class begins prior to the first official day of Summer quarter. If you receive financial aid, it will not be dispersed until Summer quarter officially begins on June 26th.

Jun 17, 6-10p, Jun 18, 9a-5:30p, Jun 19, 7-9p & July 21-23, Fri 5-9p, Sat/Sun 9a-5p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-01Meeting dates changed

Diversity in the Public Sector

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Diversity in the public sector can refer to a number of things but many limit this topic to workplace gender and race/ethnicity topics.  This course will expand the conversation to include additional categories used in the public sector.  We will discuss diversity of the people we serve, how they are served, how we collect data and define measures of success regarding “diversity” in the public sector.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Aug 18-20, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Doing Democratic Public Administration PNAPP

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 55
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 55
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thurs 6-10p, Sat Jan 28, 9a-5p

Located in: Olympia

Doing Democratic Public Administration TG

Winter
Winter 2017
TribalTribal MPA
Tribal MPA
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 35
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 35
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jan 13-15, 27-29, Feb 10-12, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

TribalTribal MPA

Located in: Tribal MPA

Economic and Community Development

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Is community and economic development different or are the objectives similar? This course will provide a foundation of development while comparing and contrasting community and economic development approaches. Additionally, local and global development perspectives will be explored analyzing different economic and community development decisions. The intersection of community and economic development will be framed as well as the desired outcomes of each approach. This course will be split into lecture and discussion for part of the class as well as in class projects and group assignments for the remainder. Attendance is critical to the success of this class and will provide the best learning environment for this conversational exchange of ideas. A final group project will be a culmination of concepts and ideas throughout the semester and this paper and presentation will be completed by analyzing case studies of communities where there is an intersection of economic and community development.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Education Policy

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In their 2017-19 Strategic Action Plan the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) defines two state goals to be attained by 2023:

All adults in Washington will have a high school diploma or equivalent

At least 70 percent of Washington adults will have a postsecondary education

The overarching big question for this class will be: What policy strategies would be most effective in achieving these goals? In the process, we will explore the role and limitations of state policy in addressing state education goals, always keeping the focus on what Washington is doing to address these issues. During our weekend together, students will choose and explore in depth a policy strategy that they believe would be an effective approach to help Washington achieve these goals. Independent time will be provided for individual students to research in depth their chosen strategies.

.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Feb 24-26, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Emotional Intelligence

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The course focuses on how leaders, teams, and individuals can excel under pressure by practically applying emotional intelligence (EI) concepts. Students gain an understanding of leadership styles, EI competencies, and key aspects of communication, including various communication styles, verbal/nonverbal elements of communication, conflict management, and how their EI and communication style may impact their effectiveness, self-control, and personal adaptability.
2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jan 20-22, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Ethics and Leadership in Public Service

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this course you will be given the opportunity to work through issues relevant to management of people in public and nonprofit organizations and the role professional ethics plays in those issues.  We will examine different frameworks relevant to professional settings in the hope that this approach will provide a context to help you more clearly understand the interactions you observe in your workplace, and help you consider possible appropriate actions in ambiguous and complex situations.  This course will examine some real world dilemmas you could encounter as a leader, dilemmas not necessarily covered in a text book.  You will not walk away with a set of answers to these situations; however, one goal of the course is to have you recognize how your moral compass influences the professional ethical choices you may have to make.  Another goal is to explore other influences at your disposal when making (and justifying) ethical decisions. 

NB  One of the sources to be used in the classroom and for discussion will be the third season of The Wire (HBO series--rated Mature for language, some nudity, adult subject matter).  It is recommended (but not required) that you watch the first two seasons of The Wire by the start of Spring Quarter.  The DVDs are available at the Daniel J. Evans Library (Evergreen). Resource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wire

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Foundations of Public Policy

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

“Public Policy” is the sexy alter ego of public administration. The study of policymaking tantalizes us. It suggests that if we can unlock the secrets to how and when big policy decisions are made, and have an impact on those decisions, we can also benefit groups and causes we care about. The reality is more nuanced. The models describing the policy process don’t provide any magic buttons to push, but they do provide a variety of helpful frames for making sense of a complex reality. And despite the advent of “fact-free” campaigning, the study of policy analysis and mastery of policy analysis skills remain critical to effective governance.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tues 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Grant Writing

Summer
Summer 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Use hands-on practice to learn to write successful grants! We will start with an introduction to grants and their place in the development of nonprofit organizations and learn the sound planning skills needed for strong proposals. Students will write a grant for a nonprofit organization, getting feedback on each section as it is developed. A list of organizations seeking grant writing assistance will be provided**. Using interactive learning and assigned tasks, we will focus on planning, research, evaluation techniques, budgeting and how to effectively communicate issues and needs in a clear and concise manner.

**NOTE: If you have a non-profit or government agency you wish to write for, you MUST contact me in advance of the first day of class, so that I can send a form to be filled out by the agency and review their readiness.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Housing Policy

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course explores the historical evolution of federal, state and local housing policy. Students will learn about how analytical and political frameworks are used to create, evaluate and shape housing programs, projects and services. We will examine the continuum of subsidies and programs that are provided to everyone from high income earners and investors to people who are chronically homeless. We will compare and contrast how different housing policies are used to provide shelter, stimulate the economy, protect the environment and support sustainable growth.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Feb 10-12, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Intergovernmental Relations

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 35
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 35
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Feb  24-26, March 10-12, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Internal Audit and Public Stewardship

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In an era of recession, corporate malfeasance and political upheaval, how does a public organization maintain a responsible course and achieve the purpose for which it was created?

We’ll answer this question by first examining the function of audit in a democratic society—the function of oversight as a collective expectation and a political mandate, as well as a means for safeguarding and optimizing the use of communal resources and infrastructure.  With this historical and social background as our context, we will then explore the internal audit function as a crucial activity in the organizational life of a public entity, with special emphasis on the practical methods by which students can reasonably assure the success of the organizations they lead. 

We’ll study the purposes, standards, and best practices of internal audit as it is (or should be) practiced in public organizations, with special emphasis on the concepts of risk, control, assurance and governance.  As civic leaders, we’ll also explore how to promote and engage with the internal audit function to achieve desired outcomes for our organizations and the public we serve.  The course will provide practical insight into organizational architecture and processes, and offer opportunities to reflect on professional commitments, public expectations, and the strategies available for achieving organizational success through internal audit and oversight.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jan 27-29, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Managing Human Systems

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

People are one of the most important assets critical to the functions of contemporary government. The effective management of personnel in public agencies requires investing in these assets so that the organizations can accomplish their missions. In the public sector, personnel management requires working within the confines of law to provide a diverse and motivated workforce that is effective and fair in the implementation of policies. Civil servants are vital organizational assets and public personnel management is a key tool for holding these civil servants accountable for serving the public interest. Contemporary public personnel management is situated in a politicized environment that requires managing the tensions between merit and patronage. In addition, public personnel management takes place both within organizations, as well as outside traditional organizational boundaries.  Managing within these complex human systems is a crucial task for today’s public leaders.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Marketing for Public Service

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Karen Alman

“Can we sell brotherhood like soap?”  Yes, we can!  In Marketing for the Public Service students will learn how to apply the basic principles of marketing for bringing about positive social change in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors—and how to do so in the most effective and resourceful ways.  The course is specifically designed for those interested in public outreach, community-based initiatives, non-profit organizations, and NGOs.  The highlight of this intensive weekend offering is the opportunity to work on selected cases to create strategic plans that address key marketing challenges.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

May 5-7, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Nonprofit Development

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This considers methods, techniques, and directed experiences in fund raising and resource development practices. Theories of fund raising, donor motivation, leadership and ethical considerations are highlighted. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about methods and techniques by which voluntary, nonprofit organizations plan, budget and raise funds. This is accomplished through an exploration of the theories and practice of philanthropy, non-profit operations and leadership. Students will also develop a deeper sense of abundance and scarcity of resources as well as the historical significance of philanthropy in American society.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

NonProfit Theory and Practice

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Compared to most “developed” countries, US law and civic practice encourages people to band together to try to solve public problems.  As a result, our society relies heavily on nonprofit entities to deliver social and health services, support the arts, and assist with many other important tasks.  But although interest in nonprofits has exploded, the reality that nonprofits can’t be run either like businesses or government agencies is poorly appreciated.  It is critical for students of public administration to better understand the sector, and how to run nonprofit organizations with skill.   This course will focus on the unique characteristics and topics of the nonprofit sector.  It aims to provide an introduction to the sector, its close linkages with the philanthropy and government sectors, and will explore how to manage a nonprofit effectively.  This course is applicable to students aiming for a career in nonprofit management, who have an interest in the sector, or who might one day want to be a member of a nonprofit board and want to understand how nonprofits function in the US and elsewhere.  

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

April 29-30, May 27-28, June10, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Organizational Resiliency

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

We will focus on sustaining delivery of services essential to your clients, even in the worst of times. Continuity Planning helps organizations fulfill a social responsibility to protect their patrons, community, and employees when things go awry. How can your agency, non-profit, or tribal entity quickly resume functioning and deliver the services critical to your mission? Don’t think terrorist attack. Consider more likely events: a major earthquake, a devastating computer virus, pandemic disease, widespread flooding, or the sudden departure of your executive director.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Nov 18-20, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Participatory Leadership

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Like never before, the world we face today is increasingly complex, fragmented and uncertain. The political climate is polarizing, and in many places trust in government and our other institutions is eroding. This two-credit course is for both emerging and mature leaders who understand that more and more of our modern challenges are ones that call for a new kind of collective action. Such action requires that we move beyond adversarial agendas and into new kinds of consultative process and engagement strategies that bring out the best in our organizations and communities and foster true collaboration. The intent of this course is to help you to create resilient teams, organizations and communities and to support the development of people around you. Foundational elements of this course will include a look at different leadership styles and approaches, systems dynamics and complexity theory, and a host of participative process methodologies and principles.

 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Oct 21-23, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Path to Sovereignty

Fall
Fall 2016
TribalTribal MPA
Tribal MPA
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 40
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 40
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Nov 18-20, Dec 2-4, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

TribalTribal MPA

Located in: Tribal MPA

PNAPP Capstone

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 55
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 55
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Thurs & one Sat TBD

Located in: Olympia

Project Management

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

What does success look like? In this course we will endeavor to respond to this question on both personal and professional levels. It takes integrated thinking and discipline to become a successful project manager. Tools are only tools. In addition to building an awareness of your own management style, we will use real world client based applications to explore and understand the nuances of successful project management. Students will work hands on with a pre-selected client organization to apply their learning and develop a viable project management plan.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jan 10, Feb 28, Mar 7  6-9p, Jan 21-22 & Feb 11-12 9a-4p

Located in: Olympia

Promises, Pitfalls, and Ethics in Multisector Contracting

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The issue of public ethics is particularly important when government works with private contractors. The term “public ethics” is often used to suggest acting with compassion and empathy while ensuring thorough analysis and competence as we serve the public interest while seeking justice under the law. When public agencies rely on vendors to carry out their work a focus on ethical behavior is essential. In this course we will examine how contracts between government and various vendors can fail. In addition, we will examine the possibilities for government and their vendors to achieve contracting’s true win-win potential. In other words, we will use ethics as a lens to study how public managers materialize the promises while avoiding the pitfalls of multisector contracting in the twenty first century.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jun 30-Jul 2, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Public Finance Policy

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Public Finance Policy will review finance and fiscal policy challenges facing federal, state, and local governments. We will examine issues central to public expenditure programs, and taxation policies. Students will seek practical solutions to planning, implementation, and reporting problems in public finance. The course will discuss budgetary formation, deliberation, adoption, implementation and execution. Further, each aspect of finance policy will be examined in order to understand the process, functions, and history of public budgeting reform. The course will discuss revenue policy, the spending of public resources, dynamics of changing budget processes, and issues associated with balancing budgets. Students –  in the role of citizens, administrators, and public officials –  shall engage public finance policy issues of concern to them in pursuit of fairness.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Public Health Policy

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Public health protects the health of people and communities by promoting healthy lifestyles, preventing injuries, and identifying solutions to detect and prevent disease. During this weekend intensive seminar we will examine public health policy development, implementation, and evaluation.  This course will provide an overview of the public health system and essential services. We will explore diverse public health topics and current public health initiatives and efforts. We will discuss economic feasibility, legal and ethical considerations, the role of the science and public opinion, efforts to address health disparities, and other issues that impact policy decisions.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

May 19-21, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Public Law

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Law and policy are two sides of the same coin—you can't make one without the other. Agency and non-profit administrators interface with the law every day, be it administrative regulations, litigation impacting program mission, public records, or public service ethics laws. This course seeks to give MPA students a solid grounding in the areas of the law that relate to policy-making. It will explore administrative rule-making, including how agencies get the authority to do what they do (i.e., constitutional law), how they make rules, the public’s role in the rule-making procedure, and how these rules are challenged. This course will also consider the interplay between law and policy, including from a budgeting perspective, and touch on areas of law most salient in public administration, such as the Public Records Act, employment law, and ethics laws. Overall, we will explore the civil (and occasionally criminal) justice system with the idea that a better understanding of our third branch of government makes us better citizens and better leaders.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Aug 11-13, 25-27, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Public Policy, Finance & Budgeting for Public Administration PNAPP

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 55
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 55
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Thurs

Located in: Olympia

Public Policy, Finance & Budgeting for Public Administration TG

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 35
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 35
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

April 7-9, April 21-23, May 5-7, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Public Service Delivery Networks

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

An important contemporary administrative issue is the delivery of public goods and services to citizens. This course will review how governments deliver services, primarily focusing on contracting and the resulting delivery networks. As Laurence O’Toole proclaims “Those tasked with public management must often seek to operate on structurally uncertain terrain, firmament that can include ties with patterns of not-for-profits and profit-seeking entities as well as multiple formally governed institutions”. Public sector organizations – at the federal, state, and local levels – form working relationships with communities, other governments, nonprofit, and for-profit firms through contracts. The course will discuss the tools managers need to form, operate, terminate, or transform these contracts. Students will examine contracting environments of their own interests and understand the dynamics, technical, and political aspects of contracting with different types of vendors in public service delivery networks. 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Public Speaking

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Oral eloquence still counts when you need to explain, persuade, collaborate, and lead.  This intensive weekend course will help you learn to use your voice, body, and personal presence with confidence when speaking to others.  You will learn to channel stagefright into creative energy and to organize your thoughts into a structure your audience can grasp. Students will write, revise, rehearse and present a short speech; they will also have opportunities to practice speaking impromptu.  Credit will be awarded in Public Speaking.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Aug 4-6, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Science Policy to Action

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Imagine sitting at “the table,” negotiating science policy with international leaders. Or, researching and drafting a new invasive species law at the governor’s request. This course provides an introduction to science policy, with the goal of translating concepts into implementable action. We will study the actors in the science policy arena; analyze how the United States and international political institutions and processes govern science policy; and experience the roles of scientists and policymakers in creating and implementing policies through case studies covering a wide range of policy areas (e.g., water, health, climate, energy, environment). We also will explore how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts, and the role of scientific information and uncertainty in this process. Background readings and in-class case studies focused on reaching a policy objective will prepare students for authoring a policy memo, and applying these skills to professional experiences. Science policy will come alive!

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Nov 4-6, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

The Context of Public Administration PNAPP

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Graduate
Class Size: 55
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 55
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Thurs

Located in: Olympia

The Context of Public Administration TG

Fall
Fall 2016
TribalTribal MPA
Tribal MPA
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 35
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

6

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 35
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sept 30-Oct 2, Oct 14-16, Oct 28-30, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

TribalTribal MPA

Located in: Tribal MPA

The Welfare State: A Comparative Policy Perspective

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Given our current system, in the U.S. we are quite unaccustomed to interrogating the role of the state in ensuring well-being. Yet, most other countries take seriously this question, and their arrangements of benefits and income assurance are much more generous than ours. This course examines notions of the welfare state, considering why some societies insist on universal, state-controlled arrangements of social welfare and others implement heavily privatized, patchwork systems. Through considering how historical forces and values, ethics, and beliefs about human rights relate to the welfare state, students will be prepared for social welfare policy analysis and advocacy. 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Jul 7-9, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Transportation Policy

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 15
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Whether you are a program manager at a non-profit, a policy analyst in a government agency, or simply a citizen trying to get to work your life is affected by the challenges of transportation. During this weekend intensive seminar we will analyze and discuss the wide range of transportation choices. This introductory course will focus on understanding how transportation policy is formed at the various levels of government by examining statutory and regulatory frameworks, institutions involved in transportation policy, and the stakeholders who shape transportation programs and procedures. The class will look at modes of surface transportation including motor vehicles, public transportation, bicycling and walking. We will examine the relationship between transportation policy and other critical regional policy issues including economic development, public health, land use, and climate change.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 15
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

April 28-30, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

Tribal Organizations

Spring
Spring 2017
TribalTribal MPA
Tribal MPA
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Graduate
Class Size: 35
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Class Standing: Graduate
Class Size: 35
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

May 19-21, June 2-4, 1-5p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

TribalTribal MPA

Located in: Tribal MPA

Working with Conflict

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Using conflict as a generative tool: How skillfully harnessing contrasting points of view can be a catalyst for learning and growth

In most collaborative environments, conflicts are feared and avoided. Yet the longer we go without addressing rising conflict, the farther away we move from each other and the most stuck we become in our positions. Skillful leaders must learn how to get the conflict out into the open and use it as a source of creativity and as a catalyst for learning and growth. The theories you will learn and the skills that you will practice in this course will increase you capacity to succeed in turbulent times by showing you how to work with differences in a group and turning destructive conflict into creative tension.

Much of the content of this course will be drawn from the Lewis method of Deep Democracy developed in post-apartheid South Africa and practiced in over 20 countries around the world. Deep Democracy is a psychologically based facilitation methodology particularly useful for working with relationship and group dynamics that are emotionally charged or marked by difference. 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-SeniorGraduate
Class Standing: Junior–Graduate
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Aug 4-6, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun

Located in: Olympia

"As Real as Rain": The Blues and American Culture

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

“The blues is no joke. The blues is real as rain.” – David Ritz, music writer

This program will provide an introduction to, and overview of, that magnificent and enduring American art form we know as “the blues”: its musical elements, African and African American roots and precursors, historical and stylistic evolution, major practitioners, and its influence on other musical genres (most notably, jazz, rhythm & blues, rock & roll, rock, and rap/hip hop). Equally importantly, we will examine its impact on American culture and, among other ventures, apply a blues theory of aesthetics to U.S. literature in general, and African American literature in particular.

Program texts will include biographical and autobiographical selections, fiction, poetry (including music lyrics), and scholarly articles on the blues. Weekly film screenings will include a range of fiction works and documentaries such as Martin Scorsese’s critically acclaimed series, The Blues: A Musical Journey. Finally, there will be extensive listening assignments that will provide the soundtrack for our journey from Africa to the southern United States, to the urban North, throughout our nation, and across the globe.

We will devote two weekly seminars to close readings of written texts, films, and music. In addition to short weekly writing assignments, students will produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. There will be a weekly open mic opportunity for musicians—whether aspiring or experienced—to play and share the blues, as well as possible trips to area blues performances.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

humanities and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-04-27New spring opportunity added.

21st Century Photography

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 15
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Important note: This program is taught by Steve Davis. A bug is displaying Stacey Davis instead of Steve Davis.

This class is an introduction to photographic expression using contemporary photographic techniques, and will explore the usage of photography through social media, archival inkjet printing, and multimedia (video.) 

Students will learn to use prosumer and professional grade full-frame and medium format cameras. You will learn to edit and manage collections with Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop, and work in Photoland’s photography studios. You will have full access to the Digital Imaging Studio and to our darkroom facilities. Digital cameras are available through Media Loan. Class requirements include scheduled assignments, research, and a final project consisting of new, photographically-derived, digital work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

photography, art, picture editing, teaching photography and media, photojournalism

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$50 for printing materials

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 15
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Tue/Wed, 9am - 3pm

Located in: Olympia

A Brief Survey of Western Art: From Cave Paintings to Urinals

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This class is designed to introduce students to the historical trajectory of Western art through its turbulent succession of movements and practices. We will explore the early development of representational images and how ancient civilizations came to lay the groundwork for almost 2,000 years of European art. The class will look closely at the broader implications of how developments in visual representation and stylistic forms were almost always tied to social, political, religious, and sexual / gendered battles happening on the ground. We will examine the sociopolitical implications of form and content in bodily and spatial representation in painting, sculpture, and photography. From Giotto's reintroduction of Greek Classicism and Humanism into 14th century religious painting to Neoclassicism's usurping of Rococo as a visual analogy of The Reign of Terror, and the total reorganization of artistic thought and practice brought about by Dadaism and photography, students will consistently seek to identify and contextualize the underlying factors of Western art's formal transformations. We will explore the disintegration of mimetic representation in the 19th and 20th centuries and the rise of abstraction, Modernism and Postmodernism. 

Students will be expected to write close, critical analysis of artists and movements covered in the class. Students will write a final paper investigating the critical responses to a post-19th century artist and explore the ramifications of that artist and the public/critical responses to their work. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Art history, visual arts, media arts, visual culture

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Monday - Thursday, 10am - 2pm

Located in: Olympia

A Writer's Paradise

Summer
Summer 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 10
816
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Fiction! Essays! Non-fiction! Creative non-fiction! Academic writing! Journalism! Poetry! Dive into any of these genres in  Writer’s Paradise . This craft-intensive program offers weekly peer-critique groups, copious feedback from faculty, seminars on fiction and creative non-fiction, workshops to sharpen skills and generate ideas, and one-on-one and online critique. Deepen your engagement with your own writing, build critical reading skills, and refine your editorial eyes and ears. We’ll work with stories, essays, a novel, and poems that allow us to study writing strategies. Students will be introduced to close, critical reading practices, and, in short, learn to read like writers.

In addition to intensive writing and study of the craft, you’ll engage in writing-related activities that explore the creative process and the written word, including weekend day-only retreats to delve deep into your writing process in the peace and tranquility of Evergreen's Organic Farm. 

Writer’s Paradise is designed to help beginning and accomplished writers to develop skills that they can use artistically, academically, and professionally. Regular weeknight sessions will include lectures, workshops, seminar, and guided critique group opportunities. Classroom work emphasizes the critique process, fine tuning, generating work, close reading, and practices of literary study.

Some students will choose to engage in a series of local or regional hikes along with sensory exercises to expand the creative process. These techniques will enable you to engage in and maintain a creative space regardless of what your future holds.

Other students will develop varied writing-related group activities to fortify their writing experiences with support from the faculty.

*This program may help future Master in Teaching Students to fulfill the 12-credits in expository and other writing.  The program may also help current MIT students to meet English Language Arts endorsements. Please contact faculty, parkesn@evergreen.edu , to further discuss this, or see me at academic fair for summer.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Writing, Communications, Media and Social Media

816

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 10
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

 

Mon/Wed 5-9:30pm and 10am-4pm 2 weekends (first session: July8/9 and July 22/23, second session: Aug 12/13, Aug 26/27). See the Schedule details description for more information.

Additional details:

This schedule is designed for students who can attend evenings and some weekends.  We will meet from 5 to 9:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; the 5 to 6 p.m. hour will be for on-site critique groups.  We will meet from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on two weekends each session in "retreat style" without an overnight.  First session weekend dates are Sat. July 8 and Sun. July 9; Sat. July 22 and Sun. July 23.  Second session weekend dates will be Sat. Aug. 12 and Sun. Aug. 13; Sat. Aug. 26 and Sun. Aug. 27. 

Located in: Olympia

Abnormal Psychology

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Academic Writing at Evergreen

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This writing intensive course has two purposes. The first is to help students develop as academic writers, to engage in writing as intellectual work. We will work on developing "rhetorical reading" skills--noticing not only what something is about, but also how it is put together. Building on common readings, students will write and revise several academic essays. Students with more academic experience will have the option of writing essays in areas related to their academic concentrations. A key element for all students will be engaging in productive revision processes. We will also explore academic writing at Evergreen--in particular, the purpose and practice of Evergreen's Academic Statement. This course can serve as an introduction to academic writing; for more advanced students, it offers the opportunity to develop a stronger practice of revision.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays, 6-10 pm. First meeting Monday, September 26, 6pm, Sem II A2105.

Located in: Olympia

Adaptation: Evolutionary Patterns in Biological Space-Time

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The vast majority of complexity in the observable universe is due to one process—selection, or the tendency for some patterns to out-compete alternatives for either resources, mates, or both. And though the basics of evolutionary selection can be summarized in a single phrase ("survival of the fittest"), details and diversity of patterns are surprising in the extreme, raising profound questions at every juncture. For example, why has a simple, shared drive to increase reproductive success taken aardvarks and spruce trees in such different directions? And why would a peahen choose to burden her sons with a giant handicap to their movement by mating with a peacock carrying genes for a massive tail?

We will take a broad approach to selection, studying what is known but focusing on that which remains mysterious. The adaptive interplay between genetic, epigenetic (regulatory), and cultural traits will be of particular interest. We will also place special emphasis on understanding the tension between selection exerted by mates and that exerted by environmental factors.

Fall quarter will be spent constructing a basic toolkit for evolutionary analysis: What is an adaptation and how can it be recognized? How can we infer function? What is the relationship between a trait's short- and long-term adaptive value? We will scrutinize structures, behaviors, and patterns found in the wild, and refine our ability to understand them through the language of game theory. Winter quarter we will focus on pushing our model of selection to its limits and beyond by applying it to the most complex and surprising adaptive patterns in nature, with a special emphasis on adaptive patterns manifest in Homo sapiens .

We will read books and articles, have lecture, and engage in detailed discussions. Discussions will be central to our work. Students will be expected to generate and defend hypotheses and predictions in a supportive and rigorous environment. We will go out and look at nature directly when conditions are right. There will be assignments, but the program will be primarily about generating deep predictive insight, not about producing a large volume of work. It is best suited to self-motivated students with a deep commitment to comprehending that which is knowable, but unknown. This program will focus on how to think, not what to think.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, medicine, psychology, and public policy. This program will focus on how to think, not what to think. As such, it will be useful to in any career in which critical thinking is important.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$250 in fall and $350 in winter for overnight, required field trips.

Upper division science credit:

Upper-division credit will be awarded on the basis of novel analytical insight and innovation.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 9am (Sem II B2109)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-12Winter fee increased (from $250 to $350).

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Abir Biswas studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires, and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies, taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology, or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation, and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements.

Lalita Calabria focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as, field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

Dylan Fischer studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of the Southwest and western Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project ( blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/ ). See more about his lab's work at: blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology . Students participating in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students study leaf litter decomposition in streams as a major input of organic material to aquatic systems. In addition, she conducts research on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic fungal biomass and standard water quality and hydrology measurements in stream and river environments.

Paul Przybylowicz conducts research on soil fungi, mushroom cultivation and potential uses for fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol applications of fungi, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties. 

Alison Styring studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics and avian monitoring and research in Evergreen’s campus forest and other nearby locations. Bioacoustic research includes field monitoring of local birds using audio recordings and microphone arrays, and editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from the campus forest as well as tropical forest sites in Borneo. Local research projects in the campus forest and nearby locations include Pacific wren mating and life-history strategy, cavity formation and use by cavity-nesting birds (and other cavity-dependent species), and monitoring long-term trends in bird populations and communities using a variety of standard approaches.

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral, and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry.

Pauline Yu studies the developmental physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates. She is interested in the biochemistry of the seawater-organism interface, developmental nutritional biochemistry and metabolic depression, invasive species, carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification), and cultural relationships with foods from the sea. Students have the opportunity to collaboratively develop lines of inquiry for lab and/or field studies in ecology, developmental biology, physiology, marine carbonate chemistry and mariculture.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, freshwater science, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy, and zoology.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with A. Biswas

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Abir Biswas studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

geology and earth sciences.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with A. Styring

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Alison Styring studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics and avian monitoring and research in Evergreen’s campus forest and other nearby locations. Bioacoustic research includes field monitoring of local birds using audio recordings and microphone arrays, and editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from the campus forest as well as tropical forest sites in Borneo. Local research projects in the campus forest and nearby locations include Pacific wren mating and life-history strategy, cavity formation and use by cavity-nesting birds (and other cavity-dependent species), and monitoring long-term trends in bird populations and communities using a variety of standard approaches.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ornithology.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with C. LeRoy

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students study leaf litter decomposition in streams as a major input of organic material to aquatic systems. In addition, she conducts research on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic fungal biomass and standard water quality and hydrology measurements in stream and river environments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology and freshwater science.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with D. Fischer

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Dylan Fischer studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of the Southwest and western Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project ( blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/ ). See more about his lab's work at: blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology . Students participating in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with E. Thuesen

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine science.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with G. Chin-Leo

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine studies and oceanography.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with L. Calabria

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Lalita Calabria's research focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as, field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

 lichen, bryophyte, and plant ecology and herbarium-based research.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with P. Przybylowicz

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Paul Przybylowicz  conducts research on soil fungi, mushroom cultivation and potential uses for fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol applications of fungi, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

mycology and ecology

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-03-09New spring opportunity added.

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with P. Yu

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Pauline Yu studies the developmental physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates. She is interested in the biochemistry of the seawater-organism interface, developmental nutritional biochemistry and metabolic depression, invasive species, carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification), and cultural relationships with foods from the sea. Students have the opportunity to collaboratively develop lines of inquiry for lab and/or field studies in ecology, developmental biology, physiology, marine carbonate chemistry and mariculture.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies,  marine science, and zoology.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Adventures in Archaeology

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program will introduce students to the science, methods, and theories of archaeology, both globally and locally. For the global component, we will examine the material remains of past civilizations, including architecture, artifacts, mortuary remains, and written sources. Our investigation takes us, virtually, to every corner of the globe and to many different periods in history, from the Mediterranean to Easter Island, and from the Neolithic Middle East to Colonial America. Primarily, we explore how the remains of past civilizations provide archaeologists and historians with clues that unlock the secrets of ancient societies. Students will gain a broad understanding of global prehistory and history, the rise and fall of civilizations, and human impact on the environment throughout history. We will examine how humans lived (the development of urbanism), how they organized their societies (experiments in politics), what they ate (hunter-gatherer to agriculture), how they worshiped (religion and myth), how they treated others (warfare and sacrifice), and how they explained the inexplicables of human existence (such as the afterlife). This course will also consider the history of the discipline and the ethics of archaeological inquiry.

The local component of this offering includes work with local archaeologists, archaeological sites, and museums: multiple field trips, including a behind-the-scenes trip to the Burke Museum and the Squaxin Museum, will explore the region's archaeological treasures. We will also visit archaeological sites such as the Mud Bay site, and students may (pending a permit) be able to engage in archaeological survey and/ or excavation themselves. Students will meet archaeologists who work for universities, museums, state agencies, and independently, and will be introduced to the variety of careers archaeologists occupy. Students may also work in the Evergreen archaeology lab, conserving, studying, and researching many of the artifacts found at a local historical site. A research presentation tailored to students' specific interests will be the capstone of this program. This program assumes no prior knowledge of archaeology, and will be of interest to any student wishing to learn more about the ancient world, history, or who is interested in pursuing archaeological fieldwork in the future. Students should note that this program is taught on a condensed schedule from August 14th to September 1st. Variable credit options for this offering are possible, and should be discussed with the instructor.

Students interested in taking this program for 4 credits can contact the faculty for more information and permission to register.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Anthropology, archaeology, history, teaching.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$66 fee for entrance fees and field supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Condensed schedule: August 14th-September 1st

Mon-Thu, 9 am - 3 pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-304 credit option added
2017-04-10Session Change: Now offered second session

Advocating for a Sustainable Future

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

How can we advocate for positions and promote informed decision-making about issues in the public sphere?  In this program, we will begin by looking at advocacy and proposals targeting a just transition to clean energy.  Is this an extreme case or a reachable goal?  As a class, we will work down from global environmental and social justice concerns to local issues of interest.  Guest speakers will provide current information about local issues, and we will take day-long field trips to view areas at risk and see some positive outcomes of local advocacy and action.  Student groups will select an issue on which to focus and develop a panel presentation, pamphlet, article, social media campaign, or other product that serves as effective advocacy.  The objective of the advocacy could range from educating the public to engaging citizens in action to influencing decision makers.  In the process, methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis will be introduced and combined with scientific and public policy research to assess the complex landscape of proposals for a sustainable future. Students will work to improve their own fluency with numerical information and will focus on developing ways to highlight, clarify, and effectively communicate numerical data. Academic and journalistic writing, storytelling methods, and other modes of communication will be developed to create informative, influential products intended for specific audiences.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Sustainability Studies, Environmental Policy, Journalism/New Media

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

$15 for purchase of online strengths assessment tool.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

 Mon (Sept. 26; Oct. 10; Oct 24; Nov. 14; Nov. 28; Dec. 5) and Wed (all)6-9:30p,  and one weekend day only field trip Oct. 22,23 9:30 to 5:30. First meeting Monday Sept 26, 6:00pm, Sem II A1107.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-07-25$15 Special Expense added
2016-04-28Program Title Changed (was Energy, Environment, and Justice)

Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

9:30-11:30a Sat. First meeting Sat October 1, 9:30a, COM 209.

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat 9:30-11:30a. First meeting Saturday, January 14th, 9:30a, Communications Building Room 209.

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat 12-2p. First meeting October 1, NOON, in COM 209.

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

12-2p Sat. First meeting is Sat, January 14, Noon in Communications Building Room 209.

Located in: Olympia

Agroforestry Systems

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Agroforestry is a land management system that combines cultivated trees with crops and/or livestock in ways that are beneficial to humanity and the environment. In this science-intensive and rigorous program, students will read, discuss, and write summaries of popular books and peer-reviewed scientific literature to understand how ecological theory and technical agroforestry practices are applied to design windbreaks, alley cropping, silvopasture, riparian buffers, and forest farming production systems. Growth characteristics and cultural practices of perennial fruit- and nut-bearing species used in agroforestry systems will be taught. Day and overnight field trips will highlight opportunities and challenges to implementing agroforestry concepts, with particular emphasis on forest farming and edible forest gardens. Students will complete and present an agroforestry research project that includes a scientific literature review and applied design project of their choice.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

agriculture, forestry, horticulture, land management, and permaculture design.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$300 for overnight field trips and registration.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First Class Meeting: Tuesday, September 27 at 9am (Sem II D2107)

Located in: Olympia

Alchemy of Ancient Jewelry Techniques

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Experience the eureka moments embedded in early metalsmithing technology. In this class we will explore the rich history of jewelry making through a survey of ancient techniques, including fusing metals, weaving fine silver loop-in-loop chains, silver granulation, filigree, and casting and shaping ingots and ancient alloys.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$180 fee for supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Class meets for two weekends: Friday, 6-10 pm, Saturday and Sunday, 9 am - 5 pm, July 7, 8, 9 and July 21, 22, and 23

Located in: Olympia

Algebraic Thinking

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Students who want a broad overview of introductory college-level mathematics to prepare them for further study, as well as students who are looking for a mathematics survey course are a good fit for Algebraic Thinking.  The emphasis on collaborative learning, context-based problems and data analysis make this a good course for educators. The topics included in Algebraic Thinking are: functions (linear, polynomial, exponential), modeling, and introductory trigonometry.  A good foundation in intermediate algebra is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Science, education, economics, social science, mathematics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

A graphing calculator is required

Fees:

$11 required fee for course materials

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 6-8pm. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 6pm, Seminar 2 A2107.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-06$11 required fee added

American Crime and Punishment: Exploring Incarceration and Its Human Consequences

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Today, the United States incarcerates more people -- both in raw numbers and per capita -- than any other nation on the planet.  How have we arrived at this place in the world and where do we go from here?

This program will examine the history, the present, and the future of criminal imprisonment in the U.S. We will study the formal institutions driving incarceration policies over the course of American history and we will look at who are the people behind the bars, their families, their communities, and what are public attitudes towards them.

Students will learn about the U.S. legal system, from the trial courts in our own communities to the appellate court decisions that establish the framework for the criminal law. We will study the evolution of the U.S. criminal justice system and its roots in the political and economic forces affecting our nation throughout its history. We will consider particular historical touchstones that still echo in our prisons and courts today, including the Jim Crow laws of the post-Reconstruction South, the origins of the War on Drugs, the Red Scares of the early and mid-20th century, and post-9/11 law enforcement. We will also explore creative alternatives to crime and punishment and the economic and political obstacles to reforming the criminal law.

Our work will include learning how to read and understand relevant Supreme Court precedent and how to do basic legal research to better understand these cases. We will also study and critique existing statutory laws that affect the rights of defendants.

We will complement this theoretical understanding with the voices of prisoners themselves, reading literature, essays and poetry written about and by the men and women who have been imprisoned, or even executed, by the state. Students will read prison writers and poets such as Eugene Debs, Eldridge Cleaver, Etheridge Knight, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Troy Davis, and Mumia Abu-Jamal, as well as writers like James Baldwin, who wrote eloquently on behalf of the incarcerated. We will explore the importance of storytelling in legal advocacy for the accused and convicted and in related social change movements.

During the quarter, students will build skills in critical reading, writing, and collaboration, as well as independent self-directed research. We hope to spend time in the community observing the actual practice of the criminal justice system by visiting trial courts and the Washington State Supreme Court. Program content will also include film and video, in-class speakers, and meeting with community groups working towards criminal justice reform.

This program will be repeated in winter quarter. Students who take this program in fall should not register for the winter quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

American history, law, literature, public administration, and political science.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First Class Meeting: Tuesday, September 27 at 9am (Sem II B1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-03-28New fall opportunity added.

American Crime and Punishment: Exploring Incarceration and Its Human Consequences

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is a repeat of the program in fall quarter.  Students who take the program in fall should not register for the winter quarter program.

Today, the United States incarcerates more people -- both in raw numbers and per capita -- than any other nation on the planet.  How have we arrived at this place in the world and where do we go from here?

This program will examine the history, the present, and the future of criminal imprisonment in the U.S. We will study the formal institutions driving incarceration policies over the course of American history and we will look at who are the people behind the bars, their families, their communities, and what are public attitudes towards them.

Students will learn about the U.S. legal system, from the trial courts in our own communities to the appellate court decisions that establish the framework for the criminal law. We will study the evolution of the U.S. criminal justice system and its roots in the political and economic forces affecting our nation throughout its history. We will consider particular historical touchstones that still echo in our prisons and courts today, including the Jim Crow laws of the post-Reconstruction South, the origins of the War on Drugs, the Red Scares of the early and mid-20th century, and post-9/11 law enforcement. We will also explore creative alternatives to crime and punishment and the economic and political obstacles to reforming the criminal law.

Our work will include learning how to read and understand relevant Supreme Court precedent and how to do basic legal research to better understand these cases. We will also study and critique existing statutory laws that affect the rights of defendants.

We will complement this theoretical understanding with the voices of prisoners themselves, reading literature, essays and poetry written about and by the men and women who have been imprisoned, or even executed, by the state. Students will read prison writers and poets such as Eugene Debs, Eldridge Cleaver, Etheridge Knight, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Troy Davis, and Mumia Abu-Jamal, as well as writers like James Baldwin, who wrote eloquently on behalf of the incarcerated. We will explore the importance of storytelling in legal advocacy for the accused and convicted and in related social change movements.

During the quarter, students will build skills in critical reading, writing, and collaboration, as well as independent self-directed research. We hope to spend time in the community observing the actual practice of the criminal justice system by visiting trial courts and the Washington State Supreme Court. Program content will also include film and video, in-class speakers, and meeting with community groups working towards criminal justice reform.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

American history, law, literature, public administration, and political science.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 9am (Sem II B1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-21Five sophomore seats have been reserved for first year students who have transferred in with credit.
2016-03-28New winter opportunity added.

American Sign Language I (A)

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language I uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

3-5p Tue/Thu. First meeting Tuesday, Sept 27, 3:00pm, Sem II B2109.

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language I (B)

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu. First meeting Tuesday, September 27, 5:30p, Sem II B2109.

 

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language I - at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 8
0% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course introduces the two basic skills of American Sign Language (ASL): receptive and expressive communication skills. Students will study American Sign Language within its cultural context. Credits awarded will be 4 Evergreen credits.

NOTE: Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 5:30 – 7:45 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 -- IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Tuesday, September 20. Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 15.

The textbook for this course can be purchased at SPSCC Bookstore. The text will be listed under the course ID ASL&121, and can be found at this address: http://www.spsccbookstore.com

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 8
0% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 5:30 – 7:45 pm at South Puget Sound Community College BLDG 21, Room 286

 

IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Tuesday, September 20.

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512 -

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 5:30 – 7:45 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 -- Course begins on September 20.

American Sign Language II (A)

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

 In American Sign Language II we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

3-5p Tue/Thu. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 3pm in Seminar 2 D3107.

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language II (B)

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In American Sign Language II we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 5:30p in Seminar 2 D3107.

 

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language III (B)

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In American Sign Language III we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu

 

Located in: Olympia

An Ethics of Generosity: Community In and Through Creative Writing, 2D Design and Visual and Literary Theory

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this program in experimental creative writing, two-dimensional design and visual and literary theory, we will work to look past the commodity function of art toward more social, political, and utopian possibilities.  In doing so, we will emphasize the importance of the gifting traditions that weave together individuals and communities in Northwest Indigenous nations, as well as the push for new languages and alternative routes for circulation in and among poetic communities. Along the way, we will engage in artistic research, drawing and digital design, as well as pursue experiments in constraint-based writing, close reading, and academic essay writing.

Through two-dimensional drawing and design we will explore and research the historical and contemporary perspectives of traditional and innovative Indigenous artists from the Pacific Northwest regions.  We will address diverse visual languages, design strategies, pattern recognition, and regional traditions. Working only on paper, students will learn to create unique images and illustrations that are guided by the principles and elements of design. Students will create a conceptual body of work that will interact with their creative writing practice.

In our creative writing practice, we will explore how collecting, shaping and re-shaping found language might bring the surprise of self-recognition, strike a familiar chord in an unfamiliar way. We will ask how working within the constraints of found or overheard textual material might disrupt our senses of self and offer new ways of accessing one another and our shared symbolic order. In an attempt to produce creative work differently, our creative writing will take up experimental procedures, e.g., using source texts as material to manipulate, distort, transform and otherwise “translate” language using combinatorial play, de-structuring and re-structuring.  Students will spend the quarter working on a series of creative writing pieces that will be brought together, edited and self-published as individual “chapbooks” in our end-of-the-quarter final creative writing projects.

We invite students to take up these practices in the spirit of collaboration and art-making beyond the acquisition of skills.  We will situate our practices in relation to the dominant art canon and contemporary world(s) of art.  We will also work to develop different forms of literacies, including poetic, visual, cultural and political.

In art history and practice, we will read from texts such as S'abadeb the Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists , Contemporary Coast Salish Art , and The Truth About Stories: A Native Narrative.  Our literary and poetic interlocutors will likely include recent and contemporary critical theorists, poets, and philosophers such as Derrida, Barthes, Blanchot, Sianne Ngai, Lyn Hejinian, Kwame Anthony Appiah, as well as Freud, Kristeva, and others.

This program will be repeated in winter and spring quarters. Students who take this program in fall should not register for the winter or spring quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

psychology, writing, counseling, humanities, social work, human services, visual arts, graphic design, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$60 for museum entrance fees and a drawing kit.

Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 26th at 1pm (Sem II A1107)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-02-12New opportunity added.

An Ethics of Generosity: Community In and Through Creative Writing, 2D Design and Visual and Literary Theory

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is a repeat of the program in fall quarter.  Students who take the program in fall should not register for the winter quarter program.

In this program in experimental creative writing, two-dimensional design and visual and literary theory, we will work to look past the commodity function of art toward more social, political, and utopian possibilities.  In doing so, we will emphasize the importance of the gifting traditions that weave together individuals and communities in Northwest Indigenous nations, as well as the push for new languages and alternative routes for circulation in and among poetic communities. Along the way, we will engage in artistic research, drawing and digital design to include Adobe Photoshop and InDesign, as well as pursue experiments in constraint-based writing, close reading, and academic essay writing.

Through two-dimensional drawing and design we will explore and research the historical and contemporary perspectives of traditional and innovative Indigenous artists from the Pacific Northwest regions.  We will address diverse visual languages, design strategies, pattern recognition, and regional traditions. Working only on paper, students will learn to create unique images and illustrations that are guided by the principles and elements of design. Students will create a conceptual body of work that will interact with their creative writing practice.

In our creative writing practice, we will explore how collecting, shaping and re-shaping found language might bring the surprise of self-recognition, strike a familiar chord in an unfamiliar way. We will ask how working within the constraints of found or overheard textual material might disrupt our senses of self and offer new ways of accessing one another and our shared symbolic order. In an attempt to produce creative work differently, our creative writing will take up experimental procedures, e.g., using source texts as material to manipulate, distort, transform and otherwise “translate” language using combinatorial play, de-structuring and re-structuring.  Students will spend the quarter working on a series of creative writing pieces that will be brought together, edited and self-published as individual “chapbooks” in our end-of-the-quarter final creative writing projects.

We invite students to take up these practices in the spirit of collaboration and art-making beyond the acquisition of skills.  We will situate our practices in relation to the dominant art canon and contemporary world(s) of art.  We will also work to develop different forms of literacies, including poetic, visual, cultural and political.

In art history and practice, we will read from texts such as S'abadeb the Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists , Contemporary Coast Salish Art , Bill Holm's Northwest Coast Indian Art , and selections from Bill Reid's  Solitary Raven . Our literary and poetic interlocutors will likely include recent and contemporary critical theorists, poets, and philosophers such as Jordan Abel, dg nanouk okpik, Lyn Hejinian, Adam Phillips, as well as Saussure, Wittgenstein, Freud, and others.

This program will be repeated in spring quarter. Students who take this program in winter should not register for the spring quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

psychology, writing, counseling, humanities, social work, human services, visual arts, graphic design, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$80 for museum entrance fees and drawing kit.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 10am (Sem II A2109)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-02Fee increased to $80. Special Expenses cancelled.
2016-11-21Five sophomore seats have been reserved for first year students who have transferred in with credit.
2016-11-15Texts updated.

An Ethics of Generosity: Community In and Through Creative Writing, 2D Design and Visual and Literary Theory

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
86% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is a repeat of the program in fall and winter quarters.  Students who take the program in fall or winter should not register for the spring quarter program.

In this program in experimental creative writing, two-dimensional design and visual and literary theory, we will work to look past the commodity function of art toward more social, political, and utopian possibilities.  In doing so, we will emphasize the importance of the gifting traditions that weave together individuals and communities in Northwest Indigenous nations, as well as the push for new languages and alternative routes for circulation in and among poetic communities. Along the way, we will engage in artistic research, drawing and digital design to include Adobe Photoshop and InDesign, as well as pursue experiments in constraint-based writing, close reading, and academic essay writing.

Through two-dimensional drawing and design we will explore and research the historical and contemporary perspectives of traditional and innovative Indigenous artists from the Pacific Northwest regions.  We will address diverse visual languages, design strategies, pattern recognition, and regional traditions. Working only on paper, students will learn to create unique images and illustrations that are guided by the principles and elements of design. Students will create a conceptual body of work that will interact with their creative writing practice.

In our creative writing practice, we will explore how collecting, shaping and re-shaping found language might bring the surprise of self-recognition, strike a familiar chord in an unfamiliar way. We will ask how working within the constraints of found or overheard textual material might disrupt our senses of self and offer new ways of accessing one another and our shared symbolic order. In an attempt to produce creative work differently, our creative writing will take up experimental procedures, e.g., using source texts as material to manipulate, distort, transform and otherwise “translate” language using combinatorial play, de-structuring and re-structuring.  Students will spend the quarter working on a series of creative writing pieces that will be brought together, edited and self-published as individual “chapbooks” in our end-of-the-quarter final creative writing projects.

We invite students to take up these practices in the spirit of collaboration and art-making beyond the acquisition of skills.  We will situate our practices in relation to the dominant art canon and contemporary world(s) of art.  We will also work to develop different forms of literacies, including poetic, visual, cultural and political.

In art history and practice, we will read from texts such as S'abadeb the Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists , Contemporary Coast Salish Art , Bill Holm's Northwest Coast Indian Art , and selections from Bill Reid's Solitary Raven.  Our literary and poetic interlocutors will likely include recent and contemporary critical theorists, poets, and philosophers such as Jorden Abel, dg nanouk okpik, Lyn Hejinian, Adam Phillips, as well as Saussure, Wittgenstein, Freud, and others.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

psychology, writing, counseling, humanities, social work, human services, visual arts, graphic design, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$80 for museum entrance fees and drawing kit.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
86% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3rd at 10am (Sem II A2109).

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-02-28A small number of seats have been opened to sophomores to accommodate first year students who have transferred in credit and thus become sophomores by spring.
2016-12-02Fee increased to $80. Special expenses cancelled.

Anatomy and Physiology I

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and functions of the organs and organ systems of a living body.  Students will conduct scientific investigations using scientific knowledge and methodology that will enable them to make educated conclusions based on critical thinking and problem-solving skills. First session areas studied will integrate biology and chemistry and will include: anatomical terminology, organization of the body, chemical basis for life, cells and tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system and bone identification, the muscular system, muscle naming and actions, the nervous system and special senses. An emphasis will be placed on real-world applications, and active-learning exercises will be included along with laboratory experiences. Students will be guided through optional dissections of the brain and eye to supplement hands-on learning. By the end of this course, students will have an even greater appreciation of the complexity and wonder of the human body.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, health fields

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-9:30 PM

Located in: Olympia

Anatomy and Physiology II

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and functions of the organs and organ systems of a living body.  Emphasis during the second session will focus on the unique workings of each organ system along with their contribution to the homeostatic balance of the body as a whole. The areas studied integrate biology and chemistry and will include: endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic and immune systems, respiratory systems, digestive system and metabolism, urinary system, and reproductive system. An emphasis will be placed on real-world applications, and active-learning exercises will be included along with laboratory experiences. Students will be guided through optional dissections of individual organs including the heart and kidney along with all organs systems of the fetal pig to supplement hands-on understanding. By the end of this course, students will have an even greater appreciation of the complexity and wonder of the human body.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology and health areas

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Anatomy and Physiology I

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays and Wednesdays 6-9:30 PM

Located in: Olympia

Aquaria: Science and Society

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 35
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

An aquarium is a tank with at least one transparent side allowing observation of its water-dwelling inhabitants. For almost two millennia humans have been keeping organisms in aquaria for observation and investigation. This program will examine husbandry of organisms in aquaria. We will study the theory and practice of keeping a modern aquarium. The diversity of organisms suitable for aquarium life, metabolic demands of these organisms, aquarium water chemistry, and other areas related to successful maintenance of aquatic organisms will be covered. Topics in applied chemistry and applied biology directly related to aquarium science require that students have previous laboratory skills in biology and chemistry. In seminar, we will explore the history of private and public aquaria, and we will consider ethical questions surrounding captive animals in aquaria. Students will work in small groups to manage their own aquaria. Some students will have the opportunity to spend one week visiting public aquariums on the Pacific Coast, and we will to learn about large scale aquarium management.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

zoology, marine science and aquaculture.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

One year of chemistry with lab and one year of biology with lab, both at the college level, are required. These prerequisites will be verified the first day of class.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$460 for those students participating in the overnight field trip to Oregon and California to visit public aquaria.

Upper division science credit:

12 credits of Upper Division Science Credit may be earned upon successful completion of program learning objectives.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 35
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 9am (Lab I 043)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-21Amy Cook joins the program.
2016-05-02New winter opportunity added.

Archives of the Present

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

What is knowledge? What is information? What is a document, a category, a medium, or a network? What does it mean to be asking these questions today, as we interface with multiple archives? In this reading- and writing-intensive program we’ll explore real and virtual archives, emphasizing reading and research skills as well as media literacy. We’ll be centering many of our activities on the Evergreen Library.

We’ll critically engage with various library resources while developing research skills that will be valuable for future academic and creative projects. As we practice our skills in the use of various knowledge organization systems, including the Dewey and Library of Congress classifications, subject indexes, and keyword-based retrieval, we will also examine their conceptual underpinnings and social contexts. What does the structure of a system imply about the organization of the world? What values and assumptions does it express? Who is the presumed audience? What interests do these systems serve?

We’ll address the question of knowledge through the Western philosophical tradition, and then inflect it through concepts drawn from media theory, didactic and experimental poetics, and gender and queer theory. This trajectory will allow us to situate ourselves in relation to concepts and manifestations of knowledge, medium, and archive.

Our readings will include Plato and Kant in philosophy; Elaine Svenonius and Birger Hjørland in library and information science,and Will Alexander, Christian Bök, Vilèm Flusser, and Beatriz Preciado in experimental poetics, media theory, and gender and queer studies. With methods drawn from philosophy and library science, we’ll practice reading for both depth and breadth: close reading of particular texts and the efficient survey of potentially relevant resources. Assignments in this program will emphasize reading, writing and research practice, as well as creative experimentation with concepts and information.

This program will be repeated in winter and spring quarters. Students who take this program in fall should not register for the winter or spring quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

philosophy, gender and queer studies, media theory, library and information science, and the humanities.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 26 at 10 am (Lecture Hall Workshop 2)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-06-30Description updated.
2016-04-22New fall opportunity added.

Archives of the Present

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is a repeat of the program in fall quarter. Students who take the program in fall should not register for the winter quarter program.

What is knowledge? What is a document? What is a poem, an image, a medium, or a discipline? What does it mean to be asking these questions today, as we interface with multiple networks? In this reading- and writing-intensive program, we’ll explore real and virtual archives, emphasizing reading and research skills as well as media literacy. We’ll be centering many of our activities on the Evergreen Library.

Broadly, we’ll engage with two complementary activities: classification and critique. Through the former, we’ll explore the process of constructing structures of knowledge; through the latter, we’ll practice analyzing and criticizing them. As we synthesize these two approaches, we’ll be able to examine the social nature and construction of knowledge. With methods drawn from philosophy and library science, we’ll practice reading for both depth and breadth: close reading of particular texts and the efficient survey of potentially relevant resources. Assignments in this program will emphasize reading, writing and research practice, as well as creative experimentation with concepts and information.

We’ll critically engage with various library resources while developing research skills that will be valuable for future academic and creative projects. As we practice our skills in the use of various knowledge organization systems, we’ll also examine their conceptual underpinnings and social contexts. What defines a creative work and what are its boundaries? What does it mean for a book, a picture or a building to be ‘about’ something? What does a given knowledge structure tell us about its creators’ values, assumptions, and interests?

We’ll address the question of knowledge beginning with a study of the figure of the philosopher from Plato’s allegory of the cave to Kant and Foucault’s critiques of enlightenment. We’ll inflect our understanding of knowledge through concepts such as technical images, utopias, heterotopias, and pornotopias, drawn from media theory, narrative and experimental poetics, and gender and queer theory. This trajectory will allow us to situate ourselves personally, ethically, and politically in relation to concepts and manifestations of knowledge, medium, and archive.

In addition to the above-mentioned, our readings will include Thomas Kuhn, Vilèm Flusser, Beatriz Preciado, Jorge Luis Borges and Samuel R. Delany.

This program will be repeated in spring quarter. Students who take this program in winter should not register for the spring quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

philosophy, gender and queer studies, media theory, library and information science, and the humanities.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 36
90% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 10am (Lecture Hall 2)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-21Five sophomore seats have been reserved for first year students who have transferred in with credit.
2016-06-30Description updated.
2016-04-22New winter opportunity added.

Archives of the Present

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 36
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is a repeat of the program in fall and winter quarters.  Students who take the program in fall or winter should not register for the spring quarter program.

This introductory program in philosophy and library/information science will give students a strong foundation in reading and research skills.  We will cover a wide range of material, from scholarly articles to poetry and essays, in our explorations of gender studies and media literacy.  Students will be guided through student-initiated, college-level research and will learn to navigate library tools and research databases. We’ll explore real and virtual archives, centering many of our activities on the Evergreen Library.

Is there a difference between information and knowledge? Can an antelope be a document? What are the key differences between a cave painting and a digital photograph? Is archiving the new folk art? What does it mean to be asking these questions today, as we find ourselves interfacing with multiple networks?

To discuss these questions and many others, we’ll engage with two complementary activities: classification and critique. Through the former, we’ll explore the process of constructing structures of knowledge; through the latter, we’ll practice analyzing and criticizing them. As we synthesize these two approaches, we’ll be able to examine the social nature and construction of knowledge. With methods drawn from philosophy and library science, we’ll practice reading for both depth and breadth: close reading of particular texts and the efficient survey of potentially relevant resources. Assignments in this program will emphasize reading, writing and research practice, and creative experimentation with concepts and information.

We’ll critically engage with various library resources while developing research skills that will be valuable for future academic and creative projects. As we practice our skills in the use of various knowledge organization systems, we’ll also examine their conceptual underpinnings and social contexts. What defines a creative work and what are its boundaries? What does it mean for a book, a picture or a building to be ‘about’ something? What does a given knowledge structure tell us about its creators’ values, assumptions, and interests?

We’ll address the question of knowledge beginning with a study of the figure of the philosopher from Plato’s allegory of the cave to Kant and Foucault’s critiques of enlightenment. We’ll inflect our understanding of knowledge through concepts such as technical images, utopias, heterotopias, and pornotopias, drawn from media and gender/queer theory. This trajectory will allow us to situate ourselves personally, ethically, and politically in relation to concepts and manifestations of knowledge, information, and archive.

In addition to the above-mentioned, our readings will include Thomas Kuhn, Vilèm Flusser, Beatriz Preciado, and Jorge Luis Borges.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

philosophy, gender and queer studies, media theory, library and information science, and the humanities.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 36
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 10am (Lecture Hall 4)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-03-21This program is now open to all level
2017-02-27A small number of seats have been opened to sophomores to accommodate first year students who have transferred in credit and thus become sophomores by spring.
2017-02-22Description updated.
2016-06-30Description updated.
2016-04-22New spring opportunity added.

Art of Helping

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible.
4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Tue. First meeting Tuesday September 27, 6pm, Sem II C2105.

Located in: Olympia

Art of Mexico

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program will examine Mexican art and history through the lens of its creative practitioners.  We will take a thematic approach to our historical studies, exploring Mesoamerican art, poetry and spirituality, native paths of resistance to the conquest and the survival of native art forms and beliefs, the feminism of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the Virgin of Guadalupe, Frida Kahlo, Chicano art, and the post-revolutionary Mexican mural and printmaking traditions--considered the most radical art of the 20th century. Moving from theory to practice we will engage in studio art that is relevant to our cultural studies, which could include mask-making, performance art, collage and book arts. Students will learn how to analyze and critique art and will study the principles of design.  There will be a strong focus on reading, writing, research and seminar discussions.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Education, Museum work

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

$35 each quarter for art supplies

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/ Wed 5:30-9:00 pm

Located in: Olympia

Art Since 1500

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
46
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This class surveys world art history since 1500 from the Renaissance to the 20th century.  We will focus on paintings, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in Europe, North America, and Asia.  Credit possible in either art history or world cultures/civilizations.  This is a companion class to "Europe Since 1500."

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

art history, humanities, and teaching

46

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

This is an intensive class that will meet Mondays through Fridays, 1:30-5:30pm for two weeks, from June 26-July 7.  Students enrolled for 6 credits will then have the rest of the summer session to research and write essays, with faculty guidance.  

Located in: Olympia

Art, Mindfulness and Psychology: Racial Identity through the Lifespan

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 40
816
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program will use art, psychology, and mindfulness to explore the intersectionality of race, racial identity and societal health. The practices of mindfulness and creating art can increase our individual and collective resiliency to be able to respond to racial identity issues and structural oppression in adaptive and creative ways.  Mindfulness and the body will be a central focus of the work.  In the studio, we will focus on building skills as well as the expressive qualities of art, to explore non-verbal ways of processing our readings, writings, and discussions about race. The program will integrate mindfulness through theory, practice and its application in relation to developmental psychology, racial identity, and art practice.  Questions to be explored include: How are mindfulness and art making being integrated into working with people at various developmental and racial identity stages of life?  How do systems of racial identity live in the individual, family, and social bodies?  How can the practices of mindfulness and creating art be integral to the healing of racism?

The program offers 16 and 8 credit options.  All students will explore racial identity through the lifespan by developing skills in mindfulness, drawing and ceramics through intensive studio practice. Students taking 16 credits will also study developmental psychology and related quantitative reasoning skills for social sciences. 

In fall, the program will focus on child and adolescent developmental psychology. In the ceramics lab, students will work though the basic methods of forming in clay and learn essentials for glazing and firing.  Students will also be introduced to basic drawing skills. Constructive critique sessions on key pieces will help students to develop their ideas. In winter, students will focus on adult, geriatric and end of life developmental psychology. Building on the foundational skills and concepts in ceramics and drawing from the fall, students will develop a series of pieces that address the complexity of their own understanding of racial identity.

Students will have an opportunity to learn using diverse modalities and multiple intelligences.  The program will participate in in depth dialogue, art-making, writing assignments, theoretical tests for developmental psychology studies, and critical study of important texts. This program is designed as a two-quarter program of study preparatory for careers and further study in psychology, fine arts, art therapy, education and cultural studies.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

psychology, fine arts, art therapy, education and cultural studies

816

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend between $60-80 on personal art supplies and clay in fall and $40 in winter. These amounts will vary based on student driven projects. New students who enroll winter quarter will need to purchase some of the tools that the class used in fall as well as the new items for winter.  In addition, students who attend the NCECA conference should expect to pay approximately $170-$371, for NCECA membership and registration fees, three nights hotel at the convention site, transportation to Portland, and a one-day shuttle tour to see exhibitions in Portland.  Transportation within the city and food during the conference are additional and at the students' own expense.

Fees:

$100 in fall and $85 in winter for art supplies.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 40
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Advertised schedule:

8 credit section meets Tue/Thu 6-10pm

First winter class meeting (16 credits): Monday, January 9th at 9am (Art Annex 1114)
First winter class meeting (8 credits) : Tuesday, January 10th at 6pm (Art Annex 1114)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-07Signature Requirement added for Winter
2016-05-10Winter fees increased.
2016-02-03New fall-winter opportunity added.

Art, Mindfulness and Psychology: Racial Identity through the Lifespan (8 credit option)

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This 8 credit program is part of the full-time, 16 credit program Art, Mindfulness and Psychology: Racial Identity through the Lifespan .  For complete program details, including schedule and CRNs, click here .

This program will use art, psychology, and mindfulness to explore the intersectionality of race, racial identity and societal health. The practices of mindfulness and creating art can increase our individual and collective resiliency to be able to respond to racial identity issues and structural oppression in adaptive and creative ways.  Mindfulness and the body will be a central focus of the work.  In the studio, we will focus on building skills as well as the expressive qualities of art, to explore non-verbal ways of processing our readings, writings, and discussions about race. The program will integrate mindfulness through theory, practice and its application in relation to developmental psychology, racial identity, and art practice.  Questions to be explored include: How are mindfulness and art making being integrated into working with people at various developmental and racial identity stages of life?  How do systems of racial identity live in the individual, family, and social bodies?  How can the practices of mindfulness and creating art be integral to the healing of racism?

The program offers 16 and 8 credit options.  All students will explore racial identity through the lifespan by developing skills in mindfulness, drawing and ceramics through intensive studio practice. Students taking 16 credits will also study developmental psychology and related quantitative reasoning skills for social sciences. 

In fall, the program will focus on child and adolescent developmental psychology. In the ceramics lab, students will work though the basic methods of forming in clay and learn essentials for glazing and firing.  Students will also be introduced to basic drawing skills. Constructive critique sessions on key pieces will help students to develop their ideas. In winter, students will focus on adult, geriatric and end of life developmental psychology. Building on the foundational skills and concepts in ceramics and drawing from the fall, students will develop a series of pieces that address the complexity of their own understanding of racial identity.

Students will have an opportunity to learn using diverse modalities and multiple intelligences.  The program will participate in in depth dialogue, art-making, writing assignments, theoretical tests for developmental psychology studies, and critical study of important texts. This program is designed as a two-quarter program of study preparatory for careers and further study in psychology, fine arts, art therapy, education and cultural studies.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

psychology, fine arts, art therapy, education and cultural studies

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend between $60-80 on personal art supplies and clay in fall and $40 in winter. These amounts will vary based on student driven projects. New students who enroll winter quarter will need to purchase some of the tools that the class used in fall as well as the new items for winter.

Fees:

$100 in fall and $65 in winter for art supplies and museum entrance fees.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

8 credit section meets Tue/Thu 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-07Winter Signature requirement added

Art/Work

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 75
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Historically, art and the work of art emerge as simultaneously debased and exalted cultural categories, treated as both epitome and critic of commodity culture, a space apart from and the ironic fulfillment of the market economy. In this sense, they come to us as historically specific practices and discourses specific to “modernity.”  Sianne Ngai suggests that 'zany,' 'interesting,' and 'cute' are the aesthetic categories best suited for grasping "how aesthetic experience has been transformed by the hypercommodified, information-saturated, performance-driven conditions of late capitalism."

In order to investigate this emergence, we will work between visual studies, philosophy, and art practice. The program will offer studies in visual and cultural studies, art and media practice, and 18 th -20 th century philosophy, writing regular critical essays in response to both theory and works of art. We will be interested in the increasing centrality of “aesthetics” in philosophy and the appearance of an aesthetic crisis within the worlds of art-making and criticism, the uneven emergence of industrial production and its representations, and transitions to the conditions understood as late-capitalism. Following our study of the early 20 th century avant-garde work and the emergence of cinema, we will look to the rise of conceptualism in art in the 1960s and 70s.  From there, we will turn to contemporary forms and institutions of art that are grappling with the question of art as labor and artists as workers under current economic pressures. We will also look at the interventions of feminist thinkers and artists in art history and film studies, as well as psychoanalytic and structuralist approaches to art criticism and theory.

We will study a range of theorists, artists, objects and practices, as well as popular and comedic forms. We'll read texts in philosophy and critical theory by Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Arendt, Adorno, Benjamin, and contemporary critic and thinker Sianne Ngai. We'll study artists associated with the Bauhaus, abstract expressionism, minimalism and post-minimalism, New Wave and Third Cinemas, feminist, conceptual, pop and contemporary practices of neo-pop and social practice, art fairs and collectives, and read related art historical and visual studies texts.

In the fall and winter our creative practice will focus on Bauhaus-style design and materials experimentation, with color experiments, paper sculpture, and drawing, as well as handmade and cameraless approaches to photography and film, supported by both foundational work in philosophy and art history and the development of those critical and creative research skills needed for spring project work. In the spring, we will turn to the contemporary art world and late 20 th century-contemporary film.  Each student will develop an individual line of research, reading, and creative production, resulting in a substantial interdisciplinary project, supported by their participation in small self-organizing groups. The program will go on at least one retreat, and one to two field trips to museums, galleries, and films each quarter. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

humanities, visual and media art, cultural studies, education and communication.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$265 in fall and winter and $235 in spring for overnight field trips, entrance fees, and art supplies.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 75
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 12pm (Sem II A1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-02-23This program will not accept new enrollment spring quarter.

Arts and the Child: Early Childhood

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing. Yet, as we grow up, this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This course will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will also examine practices of education and self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. Our study will focus on children of preschool age, 0-6 years old.

Credit will be awarded in arts and human development.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, social work

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$10 fee for art materials

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thu 5:30-9:00p.  First meeting Thur, September 29, 5:30pm, Sem II A1105

Located in: Olympia

Arts, Culture, & Ecology

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

While art is clearly influenced by culture, it can also be influenced by place. This program explores place-based arts such as basketweaving, plant arts, and nature journaling, and their eco-cultural foundations. Students gain a basic understanding in several areas including Pacific Northwest ecosystems and their dominant plant species; Coast Salish culture, history, and traditional arts; and dominant ecosystems associated with an element of one’s own cultural heritage. Students also develop the ability to critically analyze and communicate relationships between place-based arts and the places with which they are associated.  During fall quarter, students gain a foundation in cultural ecology, Northwest Coast ethnoecology, and nature journaling as well as begin to examine an aspect of their own heritage. During winter quarter, students focus more intently on Northwest Coast arts, including museum visits and traditional basketweaving workshops, as well as on heritage-based arts and identifying the dynamic relationships between art, culture, and environment. Students also strengthen their skills in nature journaling and creating representational plant arts. During spring quarter, construction of a new Indigenous Fiber Arts Studio begins. Through learning about this building as both a home for art and art itself, students learn to integrate art, culture, and ecology in a creative culminating project that advocates for eco-cultural sustainability. Throughout the year, learning activities include lectures, workshops, seminars, reading, writing, research, and field trips. Texts include Introduction to Cultural Ecology (Sutton and Anderson) and Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge (Nancy J. Turner), among others.  Students are welcome to join the program in winter or spring.  It will be helpful for new students to contact the faculty and plan to read some background materials.) 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Arts, culture, Indigenous studies, education, ecology, ethnobiology  

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$40 Fall & Spring, and $65 in Winter for Art Supplies and Museum Entrance Fees

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Weekends 9:30-5:30: Fall: Oct 1/2, 15/16, 29/30, Nov 12/13, Dec 3/4.  Winter: Jan 14 (first meeting 9:30am, Seminar 2 A1105), 21, 28, 29 (field trip) , Feb 4, 11, 18, 19 (field trip), 25(1:30-5:30), Mar 4, 11, 12 Spring: Apr 8/9, 22/23, May 6/7, 20/21, June 3/4

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-29Description, Schedule, and Student Fees for Winter updated

Astronomy and Cosmologies

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

We will learn beginning to intermediate astronomy through lectures, discussions, interactive workshops, and observations.  Using naked eye observations, reason, and simple mathematics, the ancients measured the sizes, distances, and motions of the Earth, Moon and Sun. So will we.  Making tools in class that students can take home, we will model heavenly motions, explore the nature of light and spectra, build telescopes, and more.  We will learn about the evolution and structure of our universe and celestial bodies.  We will explore our galaxy and neighboring galaxies using binoculars, telescopes, and planetarium programs. Students will explore a research topic and questions via observations and reading, and will share their learning with others.

We will read about and discuss cosmologies: how people across cultures and throughout history have understood, modeled, and ordered the universe they perceived. We will study stories, literature, and worldviews--from those of ancient peoples to modern writers and astrophysicists. Students will keep observation journals, tell star stories, make star maps, and explore the art and craft of essay writing. They will do substantial teamwork outside class, and will write essays and responses to readings. Students must be willing and able to use the internet for information and online assignments, to work in teams, and to meet after class on clear nights to participate in star-hunts. 

Astronomy is a science.  Algebra II and trigonometry are prerequisite for astronomy.  We will learn physics together, from gravity and electromagnetism to dark matter and energy.  There is no physics prerequisite. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

natural sciences, astronomy, physics, mathematics, research, environmental studies, sustainability, teaching, education, public programing, writing, literature, storytelling, mythology, cultural studies, history, and philosophy of science.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Students must have strong Algebra II and trigonometry skills.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students will need binoculars and a tripod (approximately $200-300).  Students may participate in an optional field trip (approximately $200 for entrance fees, guest speakers, camping, food, etc.).

Fees:

$80 for entrance fees and equipment to be built and kept by students, e.g. solar motion detectors, light spectra meters; small telescopes, or other observational tools; entrance fees.  

Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10pm, Wed 6-10pm, Fri 1-5pm

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 6pm (Lecture Hall 4)

Additional details:

Events Outside of Regular Schedule: Students will need to participate in star hunts outside of class.  Science Carnival/Final Presentations 9a-5p on Friday, June 2nd.  Fieldtrip (TBA)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-05-11New spring opportunity added.

Astronomy and Cosmology: Stars and Stories

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 17
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This summer, our field-based interdisciplinary study of science and humanities will focus on the solar eclipse and activities designed for amateur astronomers.  Our work will include exploring inquiry-based science education, mythology, archeo-astronomy, literature, philosophy, history, and cosmological traditions. Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories to working in a computer lab to create educational planetarium programs. We will employ qualitative and quantitative methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry-based learning and engage the imagination. Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy, and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask.

We will attend the Oregon Star Party, in Central Oregon, where we will be in the direct path of the solar eclipse on August 21st. We will camp in the high desert for a week, where we will participate in intensive field studies, develop our observation skills, learn to use binoculars, star-maps, and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, and operate 8” and 12” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

astronomy, education, public programs and interpretive work (museums, parks, observatories, outdoor education), writing, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, mythology and storytelling, scientific research

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:
Special Expenses:

Students must bring their own camping gear, supplies, food, water, etc. for camping in the high desert. Contact instructor for details.

Required Fees:

$500 for travel and field study expenses, guest lecturers, and supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 17
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Advertised schedule:

Class: 6-10 pm, Mon/Wed, July 31, Aug. 2, 7, 9, 14, 28, 30; field studies in Oregon, Aug. 16-22

 

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording I

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course starts a sequence of courses introducing the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

Fall: $60 fee for analog tape and an external storage device.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed. First meeting Wed, September 28, 5:30pm, Lib 1328.

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording II

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course continues a sequence of courses introduing the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  In Fall quarter we focused on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics included field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Winter continues this work while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb, and digital effects processing. Students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Awakening the Leader Within

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

We need a new generation of leaders and game-changers.  The notion of leadership that once resonated with greatness no longer inspires new dreams, compelling visions, and revolutionary actions.  The unethical behavior, self-indulging decisions, and ego-driven conduct of many contemporary leaders has eroded the society’s trust in corporate, public and political leaders.  There is an urgent need for conscious and principled leaders who are driven by a set of universal virtues, a strong moral compass, and a deep desire to serve a global society and a sustainable world.  This course teaches students critical concepts and skills to examine their passion and purpose, develop vision, mission, values, and a plan of action to serve their communities.  This course provides students with the opportunity to reflect, collaborate, and learn through individual and group activities including self-evaluation, cases, discussions and seminars, and team projects. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10p. First meeting is Monday, January 9, 6pm, in Seminar 2 A2109.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-07-06Course Schedule Changed- now meets Monday (was Tuesday).

Ballet Intensive

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Are you curious about the origins of dance and how they relate to classical ballet? In this program we will interrogate class, gender, and race through the philosophical and historical aspects of classical ballet. We will give much attention to the development of the individual co-learner to promote confidence and creativity emanating from the body in an atmosphere that facilitates such development. Students will be encouraged to learn through personal discovery as the most effective route to rapid technical change and unique creative expression. As a result, dancers should be sound in both mind and body with a sense of wonder about the world and the intellectual curiosity to explore the place of their art within that world.

This program offers a discursive observation of the role and function of classical ballet as the mirror, or shadow, of society. Ballet is directly tied to the world in which it is created but also transcends time and space in reverberation and relevancy. From its inception ballet has provided metaphors and symbols for cultural reflection. We will probe into the theory and history of ballet, primarily in the Western world, to familiarize ourselves with these symbolic, psychological, and cultural functions of this genre of dance. We will research and explore the historical underpinnings of dance and classical ballet to the present day to interrogate and find our places within the discipline of dance as a means to promote and facilitate one’s ultimate creative voice and expression. Students will take ballet workshops, learn French terminology, and collaborate on final projects relative to the subject matter and period of dance they choose to choreograph.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

dance, dance history, and performance.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$52 for tickets to Swan Lake.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting : Tuesday, September 27 at 10am (CRC 314)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-10-14Fee added ($52).

Basics of Scientific Illustration

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Students will learn basic techniques in scientific illustration. This is a course for anyone wishing to improve their drawing skills, from quick sketches of moving animals to detailed and accurate illustrations. This course is also for scientists interested in creating visuals to interpret their work. With access to Evergreen’s natural history collections and gardens, students have unique reference material to work from. They may also choose to illustrate local research topics or special objects from their personal collections. Discussions in the history of the practice provide students with context for their work.

Media covered include pencil, ink, colored pencil, and watercolor. We will also cover basic digital editing and design using Photoshop. Students will learn to properly scan, save, edit, and reproduce their work in print and online. Class time consists of demonstrations, practicing techniques, discussions about illustration history and applications, guest lectures on special topics, field journaling, and critiquing finished originals and printed reproductions. Students will develop a portfolio of illustrations made for a variety of applications. Selected works by each student will be displayed in a small exhibit at the end of the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

scientific illustration, art education, science communication

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$100 for art supplies, trip to zoo, and costs of installing small exhibit

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 18
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 11a-3p Lab I, rm 2046

Located in: Olympia

Be Wilder: Writing from Wilderness

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 11
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Many cultures have traditions of teachers and students spending time in wilderness. We’ll let wilderness work in us, inspire us, and help immerse us in writing. Carrying our own food and shelter will focus us, and open new outlooks on sustainability. We’ll live Leave-No-Trace ethics as we paddle to Squaxin Island and hike and backpack in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains. We’ll write daily and we'll read, seminar and critique, with ongoing in-depth faculty feedback.

This all-level program could be an orientation for incoming students, and a chance for anyone to engage deeply with writing, and/or produce a finished publishable manuscript.

Participants need to be able to carry a 40-pound pack for up to six hours on backpacking days.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$474 total for entry fees, maps, campsites, motorpool, food, and guided paddling trip. If our costs are less, the difference will be reimbursed.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 11
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Advertised schedule:

July 31-August 2, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.: on campus; August 2: day hike in Capitol State Forest

August 8-10: backpacking trip in Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Park

August 15: paddle to Hope and/or Squaxin Islands; August 16, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. on campus; August 17: day hike at Mt. Ellinor

August 22: day hike to Lena Lake; August 23, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. on campus; August 24: day hike at Mt. Rainier

August 28-31: backpacking in North Cascades National Park

 

 

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

wk 1: Capitol State Forest

wk 2: Hoh Rainforest (Olympic National Park)

wk 3: Hope and/or Squaxin Island & Olympic National Forest

wk 4: Olympic National Forest & Mt. Rainier

wk 5: North Cascades National Park

Biocultural Diversity Conservation in Peru

WinterSpring
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 15
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Peru offers a dynamic setting for students seeking a field-based program to study the opportunities and tensions in preserving biological and cultural diversity in the 21 st century. Peru is recognized for its geographic and climatic extremes, biodiversity, cultural diversity, and knowledge systems that have been shaped over thousands of years by coastal deserts, temperate valleys, glaciated mountains, subtropical cloud forests, and Amazonia. Appreciating this diversity firsthand and experiencing the theory and practice of biocultural diversity conservation is the focus of this two-quarter program.

Winter quarter will begin on the Olympia campus by studying Peruvian geography, climate, cultures, and conquests that have driven the use of biodiversity and modification of local environments. While learning how to access and review scientific literature, we will examine trends and links between Peru’s changing land cover, biodiversity, climate, cultures and languages, traditional agricultural diversity, natural resource extraction, tourism industry, glaciers, and water supplies. Ecological and ethnographic field research methods and case studies will also be introduced. Halfway through winter quarter students will travel to Peru where we will visit cultural landscapes such as Lake Titicaca, Colca Canyon, Machu Picchu, and highland communities to learn how traditional knowledge is being combined with conservation science in initiatives to preserve biocultural diversity via national parks, community conservation areas, agricultural gene banks, ecotourism, and cultural tourism projects.

Studies in Peru will continue through spring break and spring quarter, with the majority of time in the Cusco region, from the highland Quechua communities’ International Potato Park to the subtropical Machu Picchu biocultural reserve. Students will experience remnant wildlands, Incan sites that modified topography and hydrology to increase productivity of diverse domesticated species, and Quechua communities that maintain immense agricultural diversity, medicinal plants and healing practices, and dye plants, sheep and alpaca for weaving. Field research practice will be gained through activities with traditional knowledge holders and field surveys of important species and habitats. Cultural understanding and Spanish or Quechua language learning will be supported with four weeks of language study, homestays, and faculty-led outings to biocultural diversity projects in local communities. During the last five weeks faculty will assist students to complete and present independent research projects integrating scientific literature and experience with a Peruvian project focused on conservation of wild and/or domesticated biodiversity and its associated cultural knowledge. The program in Peru will conclude with students free to return home, continue studying, or travel.

Study abroad:

Total expenses beyond tuition for 16 weeks of study abroad in Peru (midwinter through spring) are approximately $6,200.  This estimate includes all travel, in-country expenses, $300 for passport/health preparation, and $500 for personal expenses.  $2500 will be paid as a student fee with winter quarter tuition to cover a portion of the overall expenses such as regional travel, community stays, language school, and lodging arranged by faculty. For additional details on study abroad, visit www.evergreen.edu/studyabroad or contact Michael Clifthorne at clifthom@evergreen.edu .

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies, conservation science, agriculture, ethnobotany, cultural studies, and tourism.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

One year of AP or college-level Spanish language study is a recommended prerequisite to optimize learning from site visits and community life in Peru. At least one quarter of Spanish language study is required for participation. Extensive hiking over uneven terrain and some camping are an integral part of the program. If you are a student with a disability and would like to request accommodations, please contact faculty or Access Services at L2153 or call (360)867-6348; TTY (360)867-6834) prior to the start of the program.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.

Upper division science credit:

Up to 16 upper-division science credits may be awarded in conservation science and field research to students with prior introductory science coursework and who successfully complete the assigned program work and an independent research project in Peru that integrates primary literature and field studies.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 15
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 9am (Sem II A3107)

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Peru

DateRevision
2016-11-16Study abroad fee updated ($6200).

Bodies Speaking Out: Public Health and Community through the Lenses of Science, Ethnography, and Media

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program builds interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in public health, ethnography, documentary media production, history, cultural studies, and community-based research as a basis for collaborative work with community partners in the Pacific Northwest, particularly at the intersections of health, labor, and migration. How have people and communities come to understand and represent the complexity of their embodied experiences of health, including individual and collective well-being, sickness, disability, and healing? What conditions of inequity can jeopardize health, including jobs, schooling, housing and industrial exposures? What social networks, educational resources and medical practices have communities created to address their concerns? How can we—as students and practitioners of documentary media, ethnography, history, and public health—contribute to their ongoing efforts? At the core of these questions lies an ethics of engagement that places us in the role of listeners, collaborators, and facilitators, recasting more conventional relationships between researchers and subjects, adults and youth, health workers and patients, academics and community members.

Drawing from a range of cases in the U.S. and abroad, we will learn foundations of global health, occupational health, epidemiology, and critical medical anthropology. We will study archival research, oral history, and ethnography as techniques for understanding and documenting people’s everyday lives, exploring experimental and collaborative methods that give voice to stories of illness and healing. We will learn practices of documentary photography and possibly video and activist art to document community efforts, and support communities to create their own narratives of struggle. We’ll explore community-based research projects that have the potential to change the relationship between higher education and local community. We’ll explore the politics and ethics of representation in visual images, and investigate how our own images, produced collaboratively with community members, can challenge relations of power and privilege that have traditionally existed in mainstream media.

Central to these studies will be consideration of the economic and social conditions that contribute to community health and well-being. We’ll learn how structural inequalities of race, class, and gender (among others) shape exposure to harm and access to remediation. We’ll learn how struggles over housing, schooling, jobs and other social and economic conditions affect individual health and the collective health of communities. We will consider how infectious diseases, once easily treatable such as tuberculosis, have resurged in virulent drug-resistant forms under conditions of incarceration, substandard housing, and biomedical abandonment. We’ll learn how economies of production and exposure to carcinogens and other industrial toxics affect poor communities and communities of color disproportionately, mapping onto patterns of social, economic, and political marginalization. We’ll learn how immigrant laborers, including those in Washington State, face particular occupational hazards and limits to care, and follow what they are doing or hope to do to address these challenges. Finally, we will learn how struggling communities develop strategies of resistance, including alternative health care programs and schools, and documentary media campaigns. We will explore these critical facets of environmental justice and health inequities both locally and in Southeast Asia and Latin America. A key focus will be studying and engaging with efforts in our region—through field trips, ethnographies, public health research, films, historical and contemporary studies—and projects that explore research and collaboration with nearby communities.

Fall quarter will emphasize in-class studies and beginning community dialogues to create a foundation for our collaborative work winter quarter. We will explore case studies and models of community collaboration to inform our efforts, taking a two-night field trip to Mt. Vernon farming communities. While the fall quarter media component will focus on archives and documentary photography, in winter we might widen our studies of art and media practices to incorporate video documentary, activist art and recorded oral histories. We will also conduct urban studies in Portland centered on housing instability. We’ll embark on collaborative projects with community organizations to document, support, and augment their work. Possible projects include facilitating community photography (Photovoice), video documentary, collaborative ethnographic studies, performance, public health communications, and health policy advocacy. Spring quarter we will focus on writing, revision, photo/video editing, presentations, and completion of our collaborative projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

public health, anthropology, history, media arts, biology, medicine, and community-based work.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$210 in fall and $190 in winter for overnight field trips and CPR and First Aid certification.

Internship Opportunities:

Winter and spring internship possibilities with community-based organizations. Students must complete an in-program Internship Learning Contract in consultation with the faculty and Academic Advising. Please go to Individual Study for more information.

Research Opportunities:

collaborative community-based research winter quarter.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First spring class meeting: Tuesday, April 4th at 10am (Sem II C2105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-05-16Title and description updated (formerly Bodies Speaking Out: Documenting Health, Healing, and Community).

Book Arts

Summer
Summer 2017 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
12Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

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Taught by

Book Arts is a program for artists, writers, and craftspersons—and anyone who loves books. Students will get to approach the book arts from different angles: as writers, digital designers, fine-printers, bookbinders, and artists.

FIRST SESSION:First, students will learn the basic skills of the fine craft of letterpress printing. Steeped in lore, letterpress printing is a fantastic skill for poets, writers, graphic designers, lovers of typography, book artists, artists, and printmakers. Drawing on Evergreen's huge collection of mid-century metal type, you will learn to design, hand-set, and print your own projects on Evergreen's Vandercook printing presses.  

At the same time, you will learn how to complete small scale or personal self-publishing projects (of book-length work). Working with professional design tools (Adobe InDesign and Photoshop), you'll design and submit for printing your own version of a copyright-free classic, your own work, or a class anthology. Opportunities for peer critique and discussion of the writing practice will nurture the writer in you. 

SECOND SESSION: Students enrolled in both sessions can continue to develop projects using the letterpress and/or digital design practices and integrate hand bookbinding and experimental book-arts techniques. Those entering in second session will combine writing or art practices with book arts to create conventional and experimental book projects. Everyone will learn the basics of the ancient and modern craft of hand bookbinding, including the adhesive-free methods of coptic and cord-binding and the more modern case-binding approach—along with a variety of creative techniques and creative exercises.

Readings will familiarize students with the history of books and the contemporary poetics of the book form; according to student interest, other readings will emphasize creative writing practice, graphic design, craft, and/or the arts—according to student interest.

12Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Students may enroll for both sessions or just one of them. One session = 6 credits.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Expect to spend up to $75 on tools, materials, misc. project expenses

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tue/Wed/Thu 10a-3p

Located in: Olympia

Bookmaking: Visual Artbooks, Photobooks and Zines

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The book puts the artwork into hands rather than onto screens. In the digital age, artists use handmade books and zines to extend the reach of their work to brick and mortar locations like bookstores, collections, art fairs, and library shelves across the globe.  This course frames the artist's book in a critical, professional, and practical context. Students interested in attending should have a series or collection of images and/or text for creating a book. Students will acquire the technical skills to design and lay out their own artist books, whether printing those books themselves or working with a commercial printer. Through in-class demonstrations on designing, printing and binding processes, students will gain a solid foundation in book production. Independent channels of distribution as a way to reach larger and more diverse audiences will also be covered. By the end of the course, students will have developed a handmade book, a commercially printed book or collection of zines and an artist’s statement. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Books arts, art book publishing, and editing

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend $25-$50 on paper supplies.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-9:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Borders

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Nowadays, the word border conjures images of the U.S.-Mexico border, patrol agents, walls and barbed wire. Yet there are many kinds of borders: between racial, ethnic, and cultural groups; between social classes; between genders and sexualities; and even between belief systems, languages, and different ways of knowing. They are real and they are metaphorical.  Depending on who you are, you may barely notice some borders, while others may seem impossible to cross. What forces construct—and deconstruct—these various types of borders?  

Economic systems involve many borders. Businesses and policy makers determine how fruits of economic labor are distributed between profits and wages, white collar and blue collar, and between Wall Street and Main Street. Behaviors of real estate agents and bank policies create barriers for people of color buying homes in predominantly white neighborhoods. Immigration status delineates who has the right to work and fully participate in society. What determines which residents, workers, and groups are protected? Who is, and is not, allowed to move freely and why? 

Borders also play out in our identities, in sometimes conflicting ways. Society defines simplistic, often binary boxes—black-white, female-male, gay-straight, young-old, among others—that do not capture a range of experiences along a continuum. The intersections between different aspects of our selves create tensions between generations, within cultural groups, among political activists, within classrooms, or among friends.  

We will combine literature, history, economics, and political economy to examine the role borders play in identities, economic welfare, and community self-determination. While we will be cognizant of all types of borders during both quarters, we will begin fall quarter with the impacts of the international borders dividing the United States from Latin America. In winter we will shift our primary focus to the peoples living within the United States. Students will gain an in-depth ability to critically analyze a range of texts in social context and to use political economic models. We will work systematically on critical reading, writing, and collaboration skills. Quantitative study will focus on international economics and personal finance. We will also cross the campus border to surrounding communities though field trips and some community-based learning with local organizations. 

By the end of the program we will be better able to understand both the forces that create and enforce borders, and the forces that may modify or erase them, sometimes reinforcing patterns of domination, but other times enabling liberatory social change. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

literature, community studies, economics, political economy, cultural studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$150 per quarter for overnight field trips.

Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 9am (Sem II A1105)

Located in: Olympia

Botany: Plants, Fungi, and People

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program serves beginning to intermediate science students who are looking for an opportunity to expand their understanding of botany and challenge themselves. This one-quarter program allows students to learn introductory plant biology and mycology in an interdisciplinary format. Students will learn about plant and fungal anatomy, morphology, systematics, and ecological relationships. Lectures based on textbook readings supplement laboratory work. The learning community will explore how present form and function informs us about the ecology and evolution of major groups of plants and fungi. Students will get hands-on experience studying these organisms under microscopes and in the field. Students will also learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal to develop basic plant identification skills of common Pacific Northwest vascular plant and fungal species.

In addition to laboratory and field work, this program investigates people's current and historical relationships with plants and fungi.  Through seminar texts, films, and lectures, students will examine plants through the lens of agriculture, forestry, herbology, and horticulture and will learn how fungal plant diseases have shaped history.  Weekly workshops will help students improve their ability to write thesis-driven essays defended with evidence from assigned texts.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

conservation, ecological agriculture, ecological restoration, forestry, natural resource management, plant ecology, and plant taxonomy.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 26 at 10am (Sem II E4115)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-04-07Fee removed.
2016-04-04Description updated to reflect fall-only plans.
2016-03-16Noelle Machnicki joins the teaching team. This program will be fall only.

Bridging Cultures

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program is a unique experiment in intercultural learning. Students from Daejeon University in Korea will join students at The Evergreen State College for a rich exploration of culture and communication. What do we need to know about other people, other cultures, and other places in order to be competent intercultural communicators? What do we need to know about the cultural forces and cognitive patterns that limit our ability to communicate across significant differences? How can we help other people learn the language we speak when we don’t yet speak their language? How do the stories we tell about ourselves and our communities challenge and enrich cross-cultural learning? How is meaning shaped by both national culture and international media? These are just a few of the questions students will explore in this program.

Program activities will highlight themes of communication, narrative, language, and context. Students will learn about foundational concepts in intercultural communication theory, and work to expand their intercultural competence through research, practice and reflection. Students will explore the power of storytelling as a means of sharing experiences and engaging with the lived experiences of others. Students will work collaboratively as language learners and language mentors, supported by introductory study of ESL instruction techniques. Together we will investigate the cultural intersections of story, communication, language, and context through academic reading, small group projects, films, field trips, food, and fiction novels. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

communication, international studies, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$300 for entrance fees and an overnight field trip.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 9:30am (Sem II C4107)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-03-08This program now accepts all class levels.
2016-12-29New spring opportunity added. This replaces the program Culture Matters, originally developed by Lori Blewett and Laura Citrin.

Bruce and Jimi

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course will explore the lives, art, and impact on popular culture of Bruce Lee and Jimi Hendrix. Course materials will include written texts (biographical works, scholarly studies, fiction, and poetry), films (fiction and documentary), and music. We will visit a number of Seattle sites associated with the lives and legacies of these legends, including Garfield High School, Seattle's International District, their gravesites, and the final installment of an acclaimed multiyear Bruce Lee exhibit at Seattle’s Wing Luke Museum. Students will have the option of producing a traditional research paper, a creative writing project, or a multimedia portfolio.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, humanities, and cultural studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Thur/Fri 9 am - 1 pm

Located in: Olympia

Business and Ethics

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program is designed for students with an interest in business studies. While this is primarily a business strategy program, we will be reading discussions of ethics from ancient philosophy to contemporary theater. These will shed light on the role that honesty and ethics play in the sometimes cut-throat world of business. We will view socially responsible business as an integral part of building a healthy society.

Starting with basic work on spreadsheet skills and understanding balance sheets we will move into the business strategy realm as we compete against each other in small teams using an in-depth on-line simulation that puts you in charge of a sneaker company with global sales. You will choose customer segments, set prices, respond to changes in taxation and global events, and be ready to pivot when your ‘friends’ get ahead of you in sales. We will also conduct in-class negotiations.

We will consider the ethics of global markets that use inexpensive foreign labor to keep low prices for our consumer goods. Theater and philosophy help us focus on the impact that economic decisions have on the quality of our lives. We will read about Nike’s rise in the footwear industry and essays by Socrates, Kant and Bok, and plays by the likes of Arthur Miller, Shakespeare, Suzan-Lori Parks and August Wilson. There will be guest speakers.

Whether you are a hard-core capitalist, a seller of Cheetos dust, an artist (or an aspiring con-artist), this program could be for you. You can expect to gain knowledge of business terminology, a grasp of the fundamentals of business plans, experience with business strategy and negotiations, public speaking and strong basic writing skills, useful for business or anywhere else.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business and management.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$10 for theater tickets

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 9am (Sem II E3107)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-03$10 student fee added

Business Economics and Accounting Fundamentals for Entrepreneurs and Managers

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Success in management for both non-profit and small business enterprises requires a basic level of knowledge and proficiency in economics, finance and accounting. This course provides a foundational knowledge and skill training in the areas of management, economics and finance for small businesses. This two-credit course will focus on the financial aspects of business, specifically: business accounting, finance, money and banking.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the issues, challenges and opportunities which arise from working in the area of small business and non-profit enterprises, and to investigate several key aspects of the international business environment such as trade and globalization.

This course is intended for students interested in the fields of entrepreneurship, accounting for small business, and economics.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Business, economics, non-profit management, entrepreneurship.

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon, 5:30-9:30pm

Located in: Olympia

Calculus 2 and 3

Summer
Summer 2017 (Second Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The program is divided into two major topics: integral calculus and multivariable calculus. The integral is developed as the area under a curve and approximated using various numerical methods. The Riemann Integral is introduced rigorously. The connection between anti-differentiation and the definite integral is made via the FTC. A standard variety of integration techniques are used to solve applied problems in geometry and the physical sciences. Differential equations are introduced. Multivariable calculus including gradients and multiple integrals are formally developed and used to strongly reinforce the idea of the derivative and the integral. Taylor polynomials are briefly introduced.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Computer Science, Physical Sciences, Economics, Education

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Calculus 1

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Mon-Thu, 9am - 1pm

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus I, II, and III is a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long (Winter, Spring, Summer) sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  During winter quarter, we will engage in a rigorous study of derivatives and their applications through multiple modes of inquiry.   If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.  A graphing calculator is required for the course.

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, science, engineering, economics, and education.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Successful completion, or a strong understanding, of college-level precalculus and trigonometry.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 7:30a-9:00a. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 7:30a, in Seminar 2 A1107.

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus II is the second of a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  Spring quarter will focus on procedures and applications of integration.  There will be an emphasis on context-based problem solving and collaborative learning. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.   A graphing calculator is required for the course.

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, science, engineering, economics, and education.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

 Differential calculus for Spring.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 7:30a-9:00a

First class meeting: Tuesday, April 4 at 7:30 am (Sem II A1107)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-05-04Course shifted from Winter to Spring

Calculus and Analytical Geometry III

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus III completes the year-long sequence of courses that provides a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This three-quarter-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. Summer quarter topics include introduction to multi-dimensional space, introduction to differential equations, and sequences and series.  There will be an emphasis on context-based problem solving and collaborative learning. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.   A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, science, engineering, economics, and education.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

 Differential and integral calculus for Summer.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Monday-Thursday, 8:00 am - 10:00 am

Located in: Olympia

Calculus I

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus is the mathematical study of change. This course is designed for students interested in further studies in science, mathematics, engineering, technology and economics.

In the first quarter of this thematically-integrated course, students will cover  calculus through small-group discussions, interactive lectures, and hands-on laboratory investigations. We will learn about limits, rate of change, differentiation and its rules, optimization, integration and its applications (area under the curve, volumes of revolution, arc length and surfaces), methods of integration, differential equations and multi-variable calculus. We will take a numerical, algebraic and graphical approach to the main concepts of calculus.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Economics, Education

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Solid background in college algebra and trigonometry.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10. First meeting Tuesday September 27, 6pm, Sem II D3109.

Located in: Olympia

Calculus II

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus is the mathematical study of change. This course is designed for students interested in further studies in science, mathematics, engineering, technology and economics.

In the second quarter of this thematically-integrated course, students will cover calculus through small-group discussions, interactive lectures, and hands-on laboratory investigations. We will learn about limits, rate of change, differentiation and its rules, optimization, integration and its applications (area under the curve, volumes of revolution, arc length and surfaces), methods of integration, differential equations and multi-variable calculus. We will take a numerical, algebraic and graphical approach to the main concepts of calculus. This class will cover many of the traditional topics of a first-year calculus sequence.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Economics, Education

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Calculus I

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 6p, in Seminar 2 D1105

Located in: Olympia

Calculus III

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Calculus is the mathematical study of change. This course is designed for students interested in further studies in science, mathematics, engineering, technology and economics.

In the third quarter of this thematically-integrated course, students will cover a full year of calculus through small-group discussions, interactive lectures, and hands-on laboratory investigations. We will learn about limits, rate of change, differentiation and its rules, optimization, integration and its applications (area under the curve, volumes of revolution, arc length and surfaces), methods of integration, differential equations and multi-variable calculus. We will take a numerical, algebraic and graphical approach to the main concepts of calculus. This class will cover many of the traditional topics of a first-year calculus sequence.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Physical sciences, mathematics, education, computer science, economics

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Calculus I and II

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Capstone Project Preparation: A Research and Writing Seminar in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

A capstone project is a powerful representation and consolidation of one main focus of your undergraduate work. Such a project can become a representation of your work for graduate school, job applications, and/or prepare you for additional advanced work in your chosen field of study. It may also help you apply for grants and fellowships, and attune you to the kind of work you are likely to encounter if you pursue a Master’s degree or Ph.D. 

If you are planning to pursue a significant research project in the humanities and related social sciences, including history, classics, literature, cultural studies, or anthropology, this program will help you begin this work. You will learn how to review relevant literature in your field, design a central argument, organize and present data effectively, and how to adapt your writing for a specific audience. Students will work in thematically organized groups on each other's work as well as collect faculty feedback. Peer review is an important part of scholarly work, and will be emphasized throughout the process. We will also share a set of common readings that explore how academic knowledge is produced, disseminated, and evaluated.

During the course of the quarter you will write weekly reading summaries and read commonly assigned seminar texts, some of which will be chosen by students. We will also take day trips to the UW library for their more comprehensive journal holdings. In addition, students will be expected to attend at least two academic lectures at Evergreen or a neighbor institution and write brief reports on them. We may also search for professional conferences or publication outlets. Finally, in occasional guest lectures, you will meet Evergreen faculty actively pursuing their own research, who may be future ILC sponsors. By the end of the quarter, you will have developed a research plan, prospectus, and bibliography that you can then execute in a subsequent quarter as an ILC, or save for graduate school.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

the humanities and social sciences.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$50 for conference registration.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 1pm (Sem II E2019)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-29New winter opportunity added.

Catastrophe: Community Resilience in the Face of Disaster

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program will explore the role of natural and human-made disasters—including earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, floods, droughts, volcanic activity, landslides, wildfires, pandemics, wars, attacks, uprisings, and radioactive and toxic leaks—in shaping human society and consciousness. A central focus will be on how many of these place-based upheavals are becoming more common or intense in the climate crisis, and how communities can plan, respond, and adapt under new conditions. The program will apply the lessons from elsewhere in the world to locally in the Pacific Northwest.

On one hand, many so-called “natural” disasters have their roots in exploitation of the Earth and human beings, and social inequalities put the greatest burden of recovery on the poor (such as in earthquakes in Haiti and Nepal). “Disaster capitalism” is often used to centralize political and economic control in the aftermath of mass catastrophes, as Naomi Klein describes in The Shock Doctrine . These inequalities will be worsened as climate change generates more intense storms, sea-level rise, droughts, and flooding.

On the other hand, responses to disasters (such as hurricanes Katrina and Sandy) have become opportunities to build better relationships to each other and our ecosystems, as Rebecca Solnit describes in A Paradise Built in Hell . Planning for “disaster cooperativism” strengthens the ability of local communities and cultures to sustain shocks (such as climate change), unite communities across racial and cultural barriers, and promote greater social and ecological equality.

Our inquiry will draw insights from communities that have survived disasters and are recovering from historical trauma, including Indigenous and other colonized peoples, war refugees, and military veterans. It will learn from Indigenous epics that describe disasters through oral tradition, and methods of resilience that Native societies have used to persevere over the centuries. These insights will be explored through texts, lectures, workshops, field trips, films, art, and literature.

The program will explore how communities and nations can democratically prepare and practice for disasters, as Elaine Scarry describes in Thinking in an Emergency . Planners and activists can use emergency planning and response to increase awareness of ecological ways to prevent future disasters, the need to share resources among neighbors, and deepen lasting cooperation. In particular, climate change adaptation can be effectively used a reason to quickly make necessary changes for a healthier future that otherwise may take many more years to implement.

Our inquiry will be conducted at the intersections of climate justice studies, Native studies, and geography. It will use varied research methodologies as tools of inquiry, including ethnographic interviews that establish narratives (storytelling), community mapping, film analysis, government document research, and case studies of disasters. Students will have the opportunity to participate in community emergency response training.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

disaster preparedness, hazards and risk assessment, community development, and climate change adaptation and resilience.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students have may choose to register for 3-day Thurston County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training ($95).

Fees:

$170 for 3-day field trip to Olympic Peninsula (Grays Harbor, and Quinault, Quileute, Makah nations).

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, April 4 at 9:30am (Sem II B1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-10-03Kristina Ackely joined the teaching team.
2016-02-03New spring opportunity added.

Ceramics: An Introduction

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
25% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course is intended as an overview of ceramic studio practices.  Students will learn a variety of wheel-thrown and hand-built ceramic techniques including slip-casting and sprig mold making.  Thematic projects are designed to aide students toward the development of an informed and personal style while gaining solid foundation skills in both functional and sculptural work. Critical analysis of resulting work will be scheduled through written observations and through group discussions.  Demonstrations will introduce students to clay types, kiln firing methods, glazing and related surfacing techniques.   Presentations on the history and contemporary application of ceramic arts will contextualize studio work. 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 5:30-9:30p. First meeting, Mon September 26, 5:30pm, Arts Annex 1100.

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Expressive Portraits

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this all-level course, we will work to capture an expression/presence with a portrait bust. Our goal will be to make a full sized, fairly realistic bust using photographs in the round. Students will build observational skills as well as learn how to translate two dimensions into three. With a variety of helpful visual aides, handouts, and demos, students will learn the planes of the face, the basic anatomy of the head and neck, and will work to sculpt the features to give the bust a sense of presence. We will use a basic solid building construction method with a steel pipe armature. Students will be introduced to a variety of surface techniques to finish their pieces including textural, fired, and cold surface treatments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts, art therapy

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend $25 for clay, and $20 for basic tools and armature.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue/Thu 6- 10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Form and Function

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

$50 or more for initial clay allotment and additional materials.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 6-8:30p

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Wheel-throwing

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
10% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to concentrate on advanced wheel throwing techniques.  It is highly encouraged that students have previously taken a ceramics course and have the ability to center clay on a pottery wheel.  Students will learn to develop better control over their cylinders, create forms with walls of uniform thickness, improve handles, spouts, lids and trimming techniques.  Weekly demonstrations will include surface techniques, lidded forms, plates, large vases, double wall cylinders and teapots.  Students will work toward the development of a personal style while drawing from a library of historically celebrated ceramic design.

 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
10% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 5:30-9:30p. First meeting is Monday, January 9, 5:30p, in Art Annex 1100.

Located in: Olympia

Children's Literature

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

To understand more about children’s literature, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, workshops, and lesson planning that will address literary and informational texts for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature in a variety of genres, non-fiction texts across a range of subjects, and censorship. Fulfills teacher certification prerequisite and endorsement requirements.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Early childhood education, elementary and middle school education, and child psychology. Fulfills teacher certification prerequisite and endorsement requirements.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Mon-Thu, 1:00 to 5:00 pm, June 26-29, July 3-6, July 10-13

Located in: Olympia

China and Japan: Traditional and Contemporary "Silk Roads"

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program will introduce the history, culture and philosophy of China and Japan. We will use the theme of the Silk Road in our examination of China as the heart of Asian civilization and Japan as a constant presence at the eastern end of the route.

Our inquiry into Chinese and Japanese history will focus on periods in which foreign contacts were most influential, for example when Buddhism, along with tea, traveled the Silk Road to reach Japan. Japan embraced Chinese culture while modifying it to fit Japan’s political and cultural needs. Japanese language, literature and art cannot be discussed without Chinese influences. Japan is also a repository of both tangible and intangible Chinese culture, which has disappeared from China itself. For example, treasures from the Silk Road, as well as Tang Dynasty dance and music from the 8th century, still survive in Japan. Such a heritage has, in turn, helped produce a present day cultural renaissance in China. We will examine contemporary “Silk Roads” that incorporate new trends, technologies and aspirations.

The program will also include discussions on Asian philosophies, including Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Shintoism and their distinct time/space concepts. We will study the Chinese and Japanese ideographic languages and their embedded worldviews and sensitivities as expressed in poetry and literature, both classic and contemporary.

In the Fall quarter we will study Chinese and Japanese history, along with important cultural concepts for understanding these two countries. In winter we shift our focus to a more thorough examination of both cultures. Students will take part in a three-day Lunar New Year celebration in early February. There will be an optional three-week study abroad trip to both China and Japan starting in Week 9 and extending into the spring break at an estimated cost of $3,500. During Spring quarter students will continue their focused studies through independent or group projects and will have an opportunity to connect their learning with the community. Other program activities include field trips to the Chinese and Japanese gardens in Portland, Oregon; calligraphy demonstrations and workshops, and studying Chinese tea culture and the Japanese tea ceremony.

Students are strongly encouraged to take a Japanese or Chinese language course for four credits in addition to this program.

Study abroad:

Optional study abroad trip to both China and Japan starting in Week 9 of Winter quarter and extending into the spring break at an estimated cost of $3,500.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Optional study abroad at the end of Winter quarter in Japan and China - approximately $3500.00 for three weeks of study

Fees:

Fall: $125 for field trips, entrance fees, and calligraphy and tea supplies. Winter: $30 for a tea ceremony presentation. Spring: $50 for field trips, entrance fees, and calligraphy and tea supplies.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays, 9am-5pm. First Winter meeting Saturday January 14, 9am, Sem II B1105. There will be an optional three-week trip to China and Japan during  Winter quarter week 10, evaluation week, and spring break week.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-12-06Winter fee increased (from $15 to $30).

Chinese, Beginning I

Fall
Fall 2016
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with no or little prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through interactive practice and continuous small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

 

Study abroad:

Travel and study in China will be offered as a study abroad program in the summer.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm. First meeting Tuesday September 27, 5:30pm, Library 2619.

Located in: Olympia

Chinese, Beginning II

Winter
Winter 2017
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with no or little prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through interactive practice and continuous small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

 

Study abroad:

Travel and study in China will be offered as a study abroad program in the summer.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 5:30p, in Library 2619.

Located in: Olympia

Chinese, Beginning III

Spring
Spring 2017
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This third course in the introductory Chinese series will emphasize the standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with beginning Chinese experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through interactive practice and continuous small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

 

Study abroad:

Travel and study in China will be offered as a study abroad program in the summer.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Coming to Our Senses: Blessing the Space Between Us

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Bless thou to me mine eye
May mine eye bless all that it sees
I will bless my neighbor
May my neighbor bless me.

-a Celtic prayer trans. A Carmichael

Often we feel we are individuals and the space between us and other individuals is empty, barren. But sometimes we say others give off a “vibe,” or that we have a “hunch” or an “intuition” about someone. We sense … something, something between us. Often though, we don’t trust our sensibilities and dismiss them as unreasonable or fanciful. In this program we will try to become sensible again — sensible to trust our senses, including our common sense, and approach them as a kind of knowledge not to be shrugged off as "just a feeling." We’ll enlist some bright people to help us understand how our sensibilities transcend our bodies and apprehend the spaces between us: Aristotle on the senses and on true friendship, monastics on community, philosophers Martha Nussbaum and Harry Frankfurt on love, theologian Karen Armstrong who offers us a distinction between two kinds of knowing — logos (what we apprehend empirically) and mythos (what we perceive through our senses), anthropologists Kathryn Geurts and Rebecca Lester on the cultural origins of our sensibilities and the meaning we make of them, Irish poet John O’Donohue on anam ċara , a peculiarly Celtic form of friendship, Martin Buber on education and the change in sensibility that happens when we think not in terms of separate I and It but in terms of the unitary I-You. In what ways would we live our lives differently if we recognize and bless the space between us?

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, April 4 at 12pm (Library 1001)

Located in: Olympia

Commodities, Conflict, and Cooperation

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program examines how the capitalist drive to extract commodities stokes divisions among cultural communities and deepens their differences and conflicts, as well as how those communities can and have come together to defend common ground. In our inquiry we will use multiple disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses, including political economy, geography, ethnic and racial studies, political science, sociology, political ecology, feminist economics, literature, and cultural studies.

The program will explore the creative tension between particularism (which emphasizes the autonomy of different identities such as race, ethnicity, or religion) and universalism (which emphasizes unity around similar identities such as social class or the environment). The class will also examine the related interaction between corporate globalization from above (involving cultural homogenization and dividing communities) and grassroots globalization from below (stitching together place-based social movements and cultural communities).

The program will review case studies where the quest to control commodities such as crops, minerals, energy, and labor contributes to ethnic, racial, or religious conflicts as well as cooperation. Fall quarter we will focus on North American cases, such as the origins of racial slavery and the white race in relation to early colonial tobacco plantations; treaty rights struggles of indigenous nations over access to fish and water; and the use of migrant labor from Latin America in fruit fields and orchards. We will review examples of conflicts that led to unlikely alliances between former enemies and redefined the meanings of commodities beyond mere economic purpose. Winter quarter we will compare and contrast North American case studies in other parts of the colonized world, such as the ethnic and sectarian conflicts that divide the oil-rich Middle East, the forested tribal territories of South Asia, and the heartland of corn and chocolate in Mexico. We will draw parallels between domestic and overseas resource wars generated by the same global capitalist systems and link processes of decolonization at home and abroad. We we examine how changing labor markets have shifted gender roles and relations. In general the program will stress community-based learning both within and outside the walls of academia through group work and the use of field trips, field work, guest speakers, and visual depictions of people and places. Students will also participate in workshops on social movement tactics, community engagement, humor, cultural respect, counter-mapping, and social media.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

non-governmental organizations, community-based advocacy, public policy, law and legal rights, education, public health, alternative justice systems, graduate school in social science, history, law, cultural studies, feminist economics, geography, and political economy.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$200 per quarter for overnight field trips.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 9:30am (L4300)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-11-30This program will accept new winter enrollment with faculty signature.
2016-11-17Sarah Williams leaves the teaching team winter quarter. She will teach SOS: Commodification and Its Alternatives. Commodities, Conflict, and Cooperation will end after winter quarter.
2016-04-26Fees added ($200 per quarter)

Communication and Security

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

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Taught by

In this program, students will hone their written and oral communication skills as they learn about different areas of Information and Computer Science.  Students will develop a deeper understanding of Information Security issues and important Computer Science concepts, including algorithm complexity and dynamic programming. The individual threads comprising the program are Communication, Information Security seminar, and Topics in Computer Algorithms.

Communication fuses oral and written communication. The students will learn the basics of creating a powerful presentation. The students will also get training in creating written documents such as reports, formal written communications and program documentation. In Information Security seminars, students will give presentations, view related movies, hear talks by outside experts and participate in vigorous discussion of relevant concepts and facts. The Topics inComputer Algorithms thread covers important algorithms and relevant data structures. The students will study important algorithms, design and analysis approaches, and how to choose the most appropriate algorithm for a given problem.  Students successfully mastering these topics will be better prepared for upper-level courses in Computer Science and future employment in computing-related fields.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science.

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

variable credit options available.  Contact faculty for more information.

Prerequisites:

At least two quarters college-level computer science.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Upper division science credit can be earned upon successful completion of the program objectives; contact the faculty prior to the beginning of the program.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 10am (Sem II E2105)

Located in: Olympia

Community Connections - What Makes Communities Work (at Grays Harbor)

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017
Grays Harbor
Grays Harbor
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The purpose of this three-quarter program is to help students develop the skills needed to assess their communities, capture their observations, and articulate them in a useful form. Students will work to improve their skills in critical thinking, research methods, analytical reading and writing, and understanding across differences of socio-economic class, race and ethnicity. This program will support students pursuing advanced degrees or careers in the field of education, government and non-profit service organizations.

Students will work in teams as they learn research skills, participate in field activities, and keep a record of their progress through a variety of assignments, such as mapping, journaling, oral histories, and data analysis. One of the primary objectives of this program will be to give back to the communities we are studying by adding to historical internet archives, creating photo journals, stories, poems and published articles.

Our contextual focus will be the formation of communities in the “Harbor” – generally speaking the geographic region that is connected to the communities of Aberdeen, Cosmopolis and Hoquiam. Special emphasis will be given to how communities met their need for housing – from the settlement period through to current day challenges of creating affordable housing and meeting the needs of seniors, special needs populations and the homeless.

The communities of the Harbor will be our learning laboratory for our investigation into what makes communities work. We will use a multidisciplinary approach in the examination of how these communities evolved and the role that the private, public and non-profit sectors played in the development of housing as the region grew and developed.

Our examination of the history of the region will seek out answers to how past events inform the current issues in housing and community development policy that the Grays Harbor region is facing now and in the future. Students will learn how to work with primary source material and conduct research as a means of learning skills that are transferable to a broad range of social science disciplines.

Fall quarter will focus on settlement years through WWI. Students will learn primary source research skills as they collect information about the early development of the Harbor Region with a focus on natural resources based industries and meeting the needs of a growing labor force and diverse immigrant populations.

Winter quarter will focus on growth of federal and state housing programs during the boom and bust years of 1920s through 1980. Students will explore how housing programs were created as part of the welfare state of this period and examine their success and shortcomings based on research of how programs, projects and services were implemented in the Harbor Region.

Spring quarter will look at current housing challenges in the Harbor Region including an examination of issues related to affordability, homelessness and innovative approaches to meeting the needs of communities that are gripped by change influenced by local, state, national and international forces.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Education, social services, non-profit management.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat 9a-5p. Classes held on the Grays Harbor College campus, Manspeaker Building, Room 2250.

Grays Harbor

Located in: Grays Harbor

Community Resilience: Science and Society

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 48
12
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

What can people do to foster the health of ecological systems and of human communities? Interplays of stress and resilience shape living systems, human and environmental. We can think of resilience as a system’s capacity to absorb or adapt to disturbance while holding to its original function and purpose. Stress broadly defined is anything that makes a system’s development more difficult, as the system acquires and transforms energy and material. 

We will investigate the dynamic connections in living systems between stress (also referred to as change, or disturbance) and resilience (response or adaptation). Key questions include: What is resilience in ecological and human communities? How do ecological systems, and the human mind and aptitudes for action, draw resilience from stressful experience? And how can we build social capital (human relationships) and promote collective action, while supporting ecological and social capacities to respond positively to change? 

Our second class meeting will be a one-day Saturday field trip to an old-growth forest and to Mt. St. Helens. There we will begin to examine relevant scientific and social concepts. During the rest of the quarter, Olympia’s Capitol Lake and the community of Olympia will focus our investigations of social and ecological capacities that support resilience before, during, and after stressful disturbance.

Program learning activities will include field work, labs and interactive workshops, discussions, readings, and research and writing assignments. Program participants will explore scientific perspectives, and work together to develop analytic habits of mind and performance as thoughtful observers and writers. Credit will be awarded in biology, ecology, and resilience and community studies.

Community Resilience:  Science and Society  can be taken as a one-quarter program. It is also linked to  Community Resilience  programs in Winter and Spring. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental science, education, community organizing, non-profit/associational sector, government

12

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 48
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays, 6-10 pm and Saturdays, 9 am- 5 pm. First meeting Wednesday, September 28, 6pm, Sem II C1107.

Located in: Olympia

Community Resilience: Social Equity and Environmental Issues

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Community Resilience: Social Equity and Environmental Issues is a program about thriving in the midst of potentially catastrophic shifts. We will be thinking and talking from the perspectives of sociology and community studies along several lines of inquiry:

  • the ways in which environment and nature are socially constructed in history, and how various social forces contribute to the identification, emergence, and community responses to environmental issues.
  • the effects of inequality – how social aspects of environmental realities in the U.S. are manifested along the lines of race, income and wealth.
  • the promise of equity, especially transformative community responses to climate crisis. Here we will focus on innovative ways of reorganizing communal life, already underway around the world.

Several of our program “texts” will be serious games, learning activities through which we can explore issues and develop abilities necessary to effectively engage “wicked” problems (complex problems without an endpoint, which evolve and take new directions over time). Game-based learning fosters skills in collaboration, analytical thinking, decision making, and strategic innovation – capacities vital to community resilience. 

 

Please note that our work will address equity aspects of community organization, environmental issues, and social transformation. This program is not a science-based investigation into global warming, or an investigation of environmental science.

 

Community Resilience: Social Equity and Environmental Issues is the third of three programs in the Community Resilience series. Junior and senior students new to the series are welcome. (First- and second-year students who began the series in Fall or Winter are welcome to continue through Spring quarter.)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

government and public service, education, social work, non-profit management, community development and organizing

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays, 6-9:45 pm and Saturdays 9:30 am - 4:45 pm Apr 8, 22, May 6, 20, June 3

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-03-15This program is now all-level
2017-02-05Saturday meetings now begin at 9:30 am

Community Resilience: Women Making Change

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Resilient communities depend on relationships of trust and respect between their members. Our attention in Community Resilience: Women Making Change will focus on women’s experiences of organizing and acting for racial and gender equity. We will celebrate the public accomplishments of successful advocates, and consider how best to continue to work for change. An introduction to public policy and its role in shaping lives will provide context for our considerations.

Resilience can be thought of as capacity for learning and for response to change. Writings arising from advocacy work for women’s equity form one record of U.S. society’s social resilience. Program texts will be drawn from U.S. women’s, feminist, and womanist writings from the 1840s, 1970s, and the 1990s and 2000s. These texts encompass four types of writing: history, poetry, the prose of public policies, and creative nonfiction. (Creative nonfiction is factual writing combining accounts of personal experience with more abstract or theoretical thinking.) Women working for change have long relied on crafting and reading poetry and creative nonfiction, in particular, as ways to acknowledge where women stand in the world and where and how they might move forward. History and public policy are important centers of work for social justice and equity – history as a record of human effort, and public policy as one guide for, and path of, action.   

Participants in this program will have opportunities to develop the habits of mind of analytic, creative, and resilient thinkers who work with others to create life-affirming choices. Our work to develop skills in research, in clear and thoughtful speaking, in idea-based creative nonfiction writing, and in cultivating a culture of resilience and relationship-building across the significant human differences apparent in any community will be essential components of our work together.

Credit will be awarded in writing and women's studies.

Community Resilience: Women Making Change can be taken as a one-quarter program. It is also linked to the Spring quarter program Community Resilience: Social Equity and Environmental Issues.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

government and public service, education, social work, community development and organizing

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6-10p and Sat 9:15a-4:45p Jan 14, 28, Feb 11, 25, Mar 11. First meeting is Wednesday, January 11, 6p, in Seminar 2 C2105.

Located in: Olympia

Computability and Language Theory

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 46
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program will explore what computers can do, how we get them to do it, and what they can't do. It is designed for advanced computer science students and students with an interest in both mathematics and computer science. The program covers topics in formal computer languages, computability theory, artificial intelligence, and programming language design and implementation. Students will also study a functional programming language, Haskell, learn the theoretical basis of programming languages, and do an in-depth comparison of properties and capabilities of languages in the four primary programming paradigms: functional, logic, imperative, and object-oriented.

These topics are offered in four distinct threads. The Formal Languages thread will cover the theoretical basis of language definitions, concluding with a study of what is computable. The Artificial Intelligence thread will cover machine learning and techniques for building intelligent programs. The Functional Language thread covers advanced programming techniques using the programming language Haskell. The Programming Language thread covers both the theoretical basis and practical implementation of programming languages. Students will have a project opportunity to implement an interpreter for a small programming language.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computability theory, computer science, education, formal language theory, mathematical logic, mathematics, and programming language design.

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

On a space-available basis 4-, 8-, or 12-credit enrollment options are possible for students planning to focus on only one, two or three threads of the program, such as students with a strong mathematical background but little programming experience or students with little mathematical background but strong programming experience. As with the 16-credit option, students joining the program in winter must have course work or experience equivalent to prior fall quarter work for each appropriate thread of study.

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Computer Science Foundations program or a strong mathematical background with two quarters of computer programming. Students with a strong mathematical background but little programming experience will be accepted in variable credit options.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.

Upper division science credit:

All parts of the program cover upper-division material. Upper-division credit will be awarded for successful completion of upper-division work.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 46
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 10am (Lib 2612)

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2018-19

Computer Science Foundations

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this program students will have the opportunity to learn intellectual concepts and skills essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work supporting other disciplines. Students will achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem-solving, and the organization, and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics, and programming in the context of the liberal arts and compatible with model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.

Program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture supporting high-level languages and operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code computer programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions, and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A technology and society theme explores social, historical, or philosophical topics related to science and technology.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science, mathematics, and computing support for other sciences.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

High School Algebra II or its equivalent.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Monday, January 9th at 10am (Lecture Hall 3)

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2017-18

DateRevision
2016-08-03Irene Gassko has joined the teaching team; Adam King has left.

Computers and Cognition

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs. human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon & Wed 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Computing Practice and Theory: Consumer Behavior

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This project-oriented program for intermediate and advanced computer science and business students will weave together the theory and practice of cross-cutting topics in computer science, data mining, and data analytics in the context of Big Data. The overriding question of the program is how do we organize and analyze large amounts of data to discover or confirm patterns.

The program will meet for lectures, seminar, workshops, and labs. Particularly in seminar, students will share responsibility for presenting and discussing concepts from the readings and lectures. In addition to seminar and lecture, the program will have two disciplinary components and a project. The disciplinary components will focus on: 1) data mining, machine learning, and pattern recognition and 2) statistics, modeling, and visualization.

Students will also be expected to apply the computing sub-discipline of their choice to a research paper, or a programming or statistics project, and present their work orally and in written reports. To facilitate projects, faculty will organize small affinity groups that meet twice weekly (once with a faculty adviser) to discuss progress and questions. Projects will begin with a proposal and bibliography, and should be either small enough in scope to be completed in one quarter or a self-contained part of a larger project. While faculty will encourage project work in areas related to program themes (data mining, machine learning, database systems, data visualization—especially visual analytics—networking, security, algorithmic complexity), they will approve other well-defined and promising projects that have a significant computer science or programming component. Projects can be either individual or small group.

This program aims to give students from Computability and Computer Science Foundations opportunities to continue work begun in those programs. Students who have taken Computability will be expected to complete more advanced work to earn upper-division credit.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science and mathematics.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Computer Science Foundations (including discrete mathematics) or equivalent experience.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Students seeking to earn upper-division credit must complete the "Seeking Upper Division" form during the first week of the quarter. This form will ask questions that allow students to describe the area of their proposed project work and their competency to complete work at the upper-division level (e.g., completion of two quarters of Computability). The form will be posted on the program website about mid-March.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 3 at 10am (Sem II C1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-02-16Description updated.
2016-02-08Jon Baumunk will teach this program with Richard Weiss.

Consciousness, Dreams, and Beliefs: The Nature of Personal Reality

FallWinter
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this interdisciplinary program, we will focus on advanced topics in consciousness studies and the psychology of dreams. We’ll explore consciousness by examining dreams and personal belief systems using both scientific research and first-person experience. We’ll explore dynamics of the psyche by examining the following questions.  What is the psyche, what is consciousness, and what are their properties and dynamics? Are there different types of consciousness?  What is the relationship between unconscious and conscious mental processes? What is the relationship among the conscious, unconscious, and personal beliefs in constructing our sense of self and our experience individually and en masse? 

Fall quarter we’ll consider consciousness and dreams from a variety of viewpoints. In addition to the third-person approach of our texts and lectures, students will explore the topics by keeping structured journals of their first-person experiences and dreams. Winter quarter we’ll continue with a more in-depth analysis of these topics and the role of beliefs in perception and experience. There will be a substantial individual research component winter quarter culminating in a presentation to the class.

The work will be challenging intellectually and personally. Students will be expected to keep a detailed log of their work and expect to document working efficiently for a minimum of 48 hours each week, including class time. Students should be willing to study details of empirical research of conscious and unconscious processes as well as be willing to explore their personal beliefs in a variety of areas and in both personal and group activities.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

consciousness studies, psychology, social work, and government.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Be prepared to explore challenging and unfamiliar ideas! This program is for junior or senior level students, but the only prerequisites are to have learned how to work hard, read actively, identify authors’ evidence for main points, and be willing to work on both third-person texts and first-person introspective activities.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$30 in winter for entrance fees and supplies.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Tuesday, January 10th at 11am (Com 323)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2016-09-21Fall fee removed.
2016-03-15A visitor will join the teaching team; enrollment has been increased.

Consciousness: Eastern Philosophy of Mind and Contemplative Practices

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Can consciousness be studied through trained subjective experience? In the recent decade, methodologies utilizing first person inquiry have evolved as a crucial tool in investigating the nature of consciousness. Exploring and comprehending the nature and function of human consciousness can help us to discover our innate potential at the deepest levels of advanced consciousness. Students in this program will integrate the findings of Western science with Eastern (Buddhist) philosophies of mind, and will engage in contemplative techniques such as systematic training in universal ethics, refined attention, classical/contemporary mindfulness, analytical skills, and direct experience. Main areas of inquiry include the nature of mind and its functions, store-house consciousness, grosser and subtler mind, conceptual thought and non-conceptual awareness, attention, emotions and perceptions. 

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Mon, Wed, 6-10 pm; Sat 9 am - 4:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet

Summer
Summer 2017 (First Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this course, students will be learning the basic steps and terminology of Classical Ballet.  In addition they will learn a series of exercises that help strengthen and develop their core muscular system. This course is excellent for those who want to increase their flexibility and overall coordination as well as work on their ability to focus and experience a greater self awareness via movement.  Basic dance attire is required.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Theater, Personal Trainer

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 fee for required exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue/Thu 5:30-7:30p

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet A

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$35 for an exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 10a-noon

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet A

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises. We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Students will need ballet slippers.
2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for an exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 10a-noon. First meeting is Saturday, January 14, 10a, in CRC 116.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-01-20Student fee decreased to $31 (was $35)

Core Ballet A

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students will need ballet slippers.
2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for an exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 10a-noon.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-01-20Student Fee decreased to $31 (was $35)

Core Ballet B

Fall
Fall 2016
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Description

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  Students will learn to apply these techniques to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.

 

 
2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$35 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-8p

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet B

Winter
Winter 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises. Students will learn to apply these techniques to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.
2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-8p. First meeting is Tuesday, January 10, 6p, in CRC 116.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-01-20Student fee decreased to $31 (was $35)

Core Ballet B

Spring
Spring 2017
Olympia
Olympia