For Faculty

Let's work together!

Your support matters

Many of our tutors found out about the opportunity to become a tutor through a faculty member. When you notice a student who seems skilled in listening, offering valuable feedback, and working well across significant differences, please do recommend that they pursue a position as a writing tutor. Writing Center alums go on to do amazing work with the experiences and passions they cultivate at the Writing Center. Be a part of the magic!

Additionally, please recommend the Writing Center to your students as a resource for academic, personal, and professional writing. They look to you to validate the importance of our resource! Our feedback forms reflect high satisfaction from our student users. With your recommendation and their initiative to make an appointment, our users continue—or begin—a lifetime as empowered writers within and beyond academia.

Academic Statements

Looking for information about how we can support your students with their Academic Statements? Check out our Academic Statement offerings, updated 4/01/21. 
 

Connecting your Students and your Curriculum to the Writing Center 

  • Recommend one-on-one sessions up to three times a week. Students can schedule their own one-on-one appointments to work on any writing, whether it is academic, personal, or professional.
  • Recommend weekly appointments throughout the quarter. In consultation with a tutor, students can make their own recurring, weekly appointments. Recurring appointments are great for committed writers and students who are undertaking an Independent Learning Contract (ILC). 

  • Require visits. If you intend to require students from your course or program to make an appointment, please let your students know they’ll need to show you notes they took from the session to prove that they met your requirement. Seeing their notes offers you insight into their engagement and alerts you that they met your requirement. 

  • Get a list of tutors we recommend for your program's needs. Students are always encouraged to make their own appointments, but if you want to find an ideal match for one of your students, reach out to us and we can help pair a tutor to a writer's needs. 

  • Get tutoring in your class. Tutors can come to your class meetings up to once a week to rotate through your class’ peer review groups or to support you with a specific workshop that you deliver. They can be scheduled for weeks 3-10. (Depending on tutor availability.) 

  • Schedule in-class workshops led by tutors, the assistant director, or the director. For titles of workshops in our repertoire, see below. (Please give at least 2-weeks' notice when requesting an in-class workshop.)  

  • Join and recommend our open workshops and events. Keep your eyes out for emails and updates to our website about workshops we put on that are open to Evergreen students.

  • Assign Inkwell Readings. We have thirteen volumes of Inkwell: A Student Guide to Writing at Evergreen that feature peer tutors’ wisdom on writing and writing at Evergreen. Browse our collection or ask us for a recommendation based on a topic you are interested in!

  • Invite us to do our 15-Minute Intro Visit. Our tutors can visit your program to describe our services and encourage your students to make one-on-one appointments at the Writing Center.

  • Bring your class to visit the Writing Center. Your whole class can visit the Writing Center! Tutors will describe our services and help people get acquainted with the Writing Center as a resource on campus. Sometimes we also pair this with a short (20-minute) workshop on the five-stage writing process and address typical struggles that writers face in academic settings.

  • Be in conversation & collaboration with us. Come talk to the assistant director and/or director about your needs, ideas, successes, and failures. We want to grow our services to meet your needs and support you in your role as a writing mentor. We value communities of practice, even if the community is just the three of us—the assistant director, the director, and you—in an office at the Writing Center. Send us a note, and let’s put our minds together.

Workshops we can offer your course or program

All of our workshops are designed to bring student writers at all levels to a more confident place with their writing. The workshops below can be delivered by our peer tutors, the assistant director, or the director. The length can vary between 45 minutes and 90 minutes to suit your needs. If you'd like to schedule, contact all the admin at once at writingcenterstaff@evergreen.edu. For best results, we need at least 1 week's notice to arrange a facilitator for your course or program. 

If you would like to preview the slide deck for any of these presentations, please let us know! We are happy to share.

  • Brainstorming: Capturing Ideas You Can Use

    • Discusses strategies for getting started and keeping on.

  • Reading & Writing: Read to Write, Write to Understand

    • Explores strategies for using readings, research, and notes to inspire the writing process. This workshop is focused on understanding the structural elements of sources (table of contents, index, abstracts, headers, etc.), using strategies to engage with the ideas books present (asking yourself questions, pre-reading headers, etc.), and notetaking strategies (Cornell notes, outlining, etc.).

    The Paper: How to Hold an Academic Conversation

    • Based off of They Say, I Say: Moves that Matter in Academic Writing by Graff and Birkenstein, this popular workshop emphasizes the context for academic writing (audience, purpose, the importance of citing sources) and describes the main moves of claims, summaries, and analysis. Overall, it does a good job of helping people see that academic writing is simply a conversation held on the page—one that necessarily takes a stand, defends an opinion with other voices, and responds to other voices.
  • Peer Review: How to Give, Get Useful Feedback 

    • Explains and demonstrates how peer review done right can make your writing process more fun, inspired, and useful. 

  • Navigating Writing Community at Evergreen

    • Discusses how to get connected with other writers at and around Evergreen.

  • Rhetoric: Choices Writers Make to Craft and Communicate

    • Describes the many choices writers make related to their purpose, audience, tone, themes, and craft.

  • Undertaking a Big Writing Project or Thesis

    • Illuminates the many tips, tricks, and survival skills necessary for advanced and/or independent work at the undergraduate or graduate level (led by the Assistant Director).

Original workshops for your course or program

We are open to collaborating with you to create a workshop that suits your needs. Original workshops we have delivered in the past have focused on zine-making, writing as a method for processing trauma, sonnet-writing, reader-based prose, and more. Contact us at writingcenterstaff@evergreen.edu to start collaborating. We need at least 2 weeks' notice to prepare an original workshop. 

The Writing Center at Evergreen in Context

We offer peer-to-peer, nondirective tutoring that aims to center the goals of the student writer. The Writing Center and peer writing tutors are just one part of what could be considered an "ecosystem of writing support" at Evergreen. 

To get a sense of where we fit inside this ecosystem we recommend that you learn about (or reacquaint yourself with) our methodology by reading our mission & vision statements, our Preparing for Appointments page, Myths about the Writing Center page and by digging into the course readings for the 2-credit class that tutors take as training on our Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutors' Craft page. 

To learn more about what else may be living in this "ecosystem of writing" we recommend getting involved with Summer Institutes on writing, holding dialogues about writing and/or Writing Across the Curriculum with your teaching partners or other colleagues, and visiting The Washington Center for Undergraduate Education and Evergreen's Faculty Development page as well as becoming a part of the conversation with the First-Year Experience group, the Mentor Council, and many other areas on campus. You might even peruse the student groups for this year—oftentimes there are clubs that are focused on writing.