writing

Explore a range of genres from fiction, poetry, and screenwriting to creative nonfiction and science. Cultivate your ability to tell compelling stories. Translate human experience into artful literary work. 

Art–Work

At Evergreen, you'll work in small intensive groups with peers and faculty to refine your writing skills.

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of our curriculum, you’ll have many opportunities to hone your craft, regardless of the genre in which you specialize.

Evergreen faculty members have collaborated with students to produce written projects in numerous disciplines, including the book, Defending Wild Washington: A Citizen’s Action Guide, a collection of writing and art titled Silk Roads Anthology: Identity and Travel, and the bilingual anthology, En Sus Propias Palabras/In Their Own Words, which was distributed to libraries, schools, and community organizations serving Latino populations in Western Washington.

Whether you want to become a novelist, a poet, a journalist, a copywriter, or any other type of writer, Evergreen will help you develop the techniques to become an effective communicator and artist of the written word.

Join us in an education that doesn’t just change your life — it gives you the tools to change the world.

Sample Program

Dangerous Readings 

Quality writing skills are a key asset to careers in any field, where the ability to clearly and creatively express ideas and values is in high demand.

Offered Fall 2018-Winter 2019

What does it mean to read? How does reading shape one's identity, and how does identity shape how one reads, and what one finds in those books? In this program, we'll examine the intertwined developments of poetry and history, and the implications of those histories for a theory of reading.

In the past, reading was a deadly serious business. We'll explore the relationship between illuminated manuscripts, medieval devotion, and power, and how the advent of printed reading rocked Europe and sparked 100 years of war in the 16th century. We'll study links between political cartoons, scandalous pamphlets, and the terror of the French Revolution. We'll understand the ways in which readers in the Romantic age fashioned a notion of themselves and their visions of a good life through their readings, and we'll explore how the advent of post-structuralism in the 20th century has exploded the way we think of reading today. 

View this program in the catalog.

Writing Power workshop

After Graduation

Pat Thomas

Pat Thomas ’12 published his first book while still a student.

Quality writing skills are a key asset to careers in any field requiring the ability to clearly convey information, ideas, and values. Studying writing at Evergreen prepares you for graduate studies and careers in media, publishing, business, nonprofit work, and academia. Many fields in creative writing require a college degree, including at least a bachelor’s and often an MFA in creative writing or an MA in literature, journalism, or a related field. Our alumni have an excellent record of success in graduate school. They also include numerous published authors, as well as professionals in law, education, publishing, marketing, and journalism.

Facilities & Resources

The Writing Center

As a writer, you may be able to work in our Writing Center to improve your own skills and share your knowledge and passion with others.

The Evergreen State College Press

Evergreen's newest media outlet annually publishes a small number of books showcasing exceptional student writing of high scholarly merit. Selections reflect the college’s intellectual and creative vitality and its innovative academic work. The press’s first release, Writing American Cultures: Studies of Identity, Community, and Place, which was published in 2013, features narrative nonfiction essays based on the ethnographic research of eight student authors.

Student Newspaper

Students interested in journalism, political commentary, and artistic critique produce evergreen’s student newspaper, the Cooper Point Journal.

Cross Cultural Poetics

This groundbreaking radio show, produced on campus at KAOS 89.3FM, introduces poets to listeners around the world.

Inkwell: The Student Guide to Writing at Evergreen

Produced by Writing Center tutors, Inkwell is used as a teaching tool. Its goal is to empower and inspire a wide range of audiences through the center's philosophies on writing, learning, and growth. Inkwell demonstrates a variety of styles from the traditional academic format to poetry-inducing prompts.

Vanishing Point 

An online and print publication featuring art and writing of students and faculty, Vanishing Point is dedicated to showcasing the creative endeavors of Evergreen. With a commitment to accessibility to both artists and those who enjoy their work, Vanishing Point aims to cultivate the arts community and capture the artistic spirit of Evergreen.

The Evergreen Authors Directory

Green authors, including alumni, staff, and faculty, have the opportunity to share their publications, providing awareness, knowledge, and inspiration to those who visit and explore its wide variety of works. 

 

How to Choose Your Path

You’ll choose what you study to earn a Bachelor’s degree that’s meaningful to you. Some students decide their programs as they go, while others chart their course in advance.

Aim for both breadth and depth; explore fields that may be related or that may seem very distant. You'll be surprised at what you discover.

If you're new to college, look for programs where you can gain a foundation, build key skills, and broaden your knowledge (FR only, FR-SO, or FR-SR).

If you already have a foundation in this field, look for programs with intermediate or advanced material (SO-SR, JR-SR, or FR-SR). These programs may include community-based learning and in-depth research. Some of these programs have specific prerequisites; check the description for details.

Talk to an academic advisor to get help figuring out what coursework is best for you.

Planned offerings for 2018–19
Class Standing Quarters Offered Credits
Asian/American: Pop Culture Crosscurrents FR-SR
  • Spring
16
Botany: Plants and People FR-SR
  • Fall
16
Cities and Suburbs: Advocacy and Writing for Social and Ecological Justice SO-SR
  • Fall
8, 12
Combinatory Play: Creative Writing, Mathematics, and Improv FR-SO
  • Winter
  • Spring
12, 16
Communicating Science in the Disinformation Era FR
  • Winter
16
Cornerstone: Foundations for Success FR-JR
  • Fall
4
Cornerstone: Foundations for Success FR-JR
  • Winter
4
Cornerstone: Foundations for Success FR-JR
  • Spring
4
Critical Indigenous Studies I FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Critical Reasoning FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Dangerous Readings FR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
Designing for Social Good: Two-Dimensional Design and Board Games SO-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
12
Environmental and Social Justice Successes: How to Grow Hope in the Dark FR-SR
  • Winter
12
European Ethnobotany in Historical Context FR-SO
  • Spring
16
Experiments in Text FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Future History: Indigenous Speculative Fiction FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Gardens as Creative Non-Fiction FR-SR
  • Spring
12
Gateways for Incarcerated Youth: Critical Literacy and Critical Numeracy SO-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
Genes and Poems: Creating Form and Meaning FR-SO
  • Spring
16
Global/Local Realities and Alternative Visions JR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
Inscribing the Body: Embodiment and the Performance of Identity in Creative Writing FR-SR
  • Winter
4
Languages of Unsaying: Islam, Secularism, and American Poetry JR-SR
  • Spring
16
Literary Arts Foundations SO-SR
  • Fall
16
On Reading Well FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Plants in Art, Word, and Healing SO-SR
  • Winter
8
PLE Document Writing FR-SR
  • Winter
4, 6, 8
PLE Document Writing FR-SR
  • Fall
4, 6, 8
PLE Document Writing FR-SR
  • Spring
4, 6, 8
Senior Seminar SR
  • Spring
4
Shifting the Margins: Revolutionary Writing in Times of Crisis FR-SR
  • Spring
4
Social Entrepreneurship and Development: Management, Sustainability and Finance FR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
8
Student-Originated Studies: Literature, Philosophy, Myth/Religion and Writing SO-SR
  • Spring
16
Student-Originated Studies: Science and Environmental Writing for the General Public JR-SR
  • Spring
16
Student-Originated Studies: Science Writing in the Public Forum SO-SR
  • Fall
16
Teaching through Performance FR-SO
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
Teachings of the Tree People: Culture Matters FR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
The Practice of Writing FR-SR
  • Winter
4
Topics in Science FR-SR
  • Fall
12
Unmasking the Material World: Discovering Objects as Stories FR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
Utopian Dreams, Dystopian Nightmares SO-SR
  • Winter
8
Veterans' Next Mission: Crossing the Bridge Between Military and Academic Life FR-SR
  • Winter
2
Veterans' Next Mission: Crossing the Bridge Between Military and Academic Life FR-SR
  • Fall
2
Veterans' Next Mission: Crossing the Bridge Between Military and Academic Life FR-SR
  • Spring
2
Writing and Speaking in the Workplace and Beyond FR-SR
  • Fall
8
Writing for Your Life FR-SR
  • Fall
16
Writing from Life FR-SR
  • Fall
4
Writing from Life FR-SR
  • Winter
4
Writing from Life FR-SR
  • Spring
4
Writing Out Loud: Journalism and Personal Essay Writing SO-SR
  • Spring
12
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (A) JR-SR
  • Spring
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (A) JR-SR
  • Winter
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (B) JR-SR
  • Spring
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (B) JR-SR
  • Winter
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (C) JR-SR
  • Spring
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (C) JR-SR
  • Winter
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (D) JR-SR
  • Spring
2, 4, 6
Writing Well: Making Your Statement (D) JR-SR
  • Winter
2, 4, 6
Planned offerings for 2019–20
Class Standing Quarters Offered Credits
Arts of Urgency: Latin American Film and Literature FR-SO
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
Gateways for Incarcerated Youth JR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
Highway 101 Revisited: History, Literature, Music, and Ecology JR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
Illustrations of Character: Faith, Reason, and Ethics FR-SO
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Inquiry: Experience and Experiment FR
  • Fall
16
Literary Arts Foundations: Texts and Contexts SO-SR
  • Winter
  • Spring
12, 16
Public Health, Human Biology, and Community Resilience FR-SO
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring
16
Temporality, Word and Image JR-SR
  • Fall
  • Winter
16
The Feminine Imaginary and Ancient Greece: Sappho, Medea, and Cassandra SO-SR
  • Spring
16