What Are Trees For? Forest Ecology and Resource Conflicts

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
0% Reserved for Freshmen
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

communication
ecology, plant biology

In this program we will study forest-related conflicts from scientific, economic, cultural, and conflict management perspectives.

Forests have long been a central part of the economy in the state of Washington. They also help provide us with clean air and water, protect against erosion, and serve as wildlife habitat. Consequently, economic incentives favor harvesting forest trees, while environmental concerns argue for preservation. Similar competing interests exist in forests throughout the world.

Students will learn about the role of forest resources in complex economic and cultural systems to aid understanding of competing goals, relations of power, and politicized debates about forest policies.

We’ll study basic principles of forest ecology and the environmental consequences of harvesting forest trees. Understanding fundamental processes of tree growth will contribute to understanding the role of forests in carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. We’ll assess the possible role of forests in ameliorating climate change, and consider potential conflicts with local and indigenous land use rights.

Understanding basic principles of conflict mediation will contribute to understanding the challenges and limits of decision-making processes in forest management.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$25 fee to cover field trip entrance fees

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
0% Reserved for Freshmen
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 C1107 - Workshop

Additional details:

Every Wednesday 6-10 pm and Sat. 9am-5pm (4/6, 4/20, 5/4, 5/18, 6/1)

Located in: Olympia