Dance as Art: Making Connections

FallWinter
Fall 2019
Winter 2020
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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REVISED

Taught by

modern dance, kinesiology

"Dance as Art" is a Modern Dance-based program linking the major principles of dance and visual art. Students will explore the artistic design potentials linking the major principles of dance and visual art. Students will explore the kinetic and visual design potentials of the body through kinesiological and anatomical study. and their connection to the visual forces of drawing and painting. How, for example do two-dimensional theories of points, lines, planes, and volumes relate to three-dimensional perspective, and our awareness of motion and time? We will examine these and other pertinent questions through texts including, but not limited to, Thomas Hanna's Somatics: Reawakening the Mind's Control of Movement, Flexibility, and Health ;, Peggy Hackneys's Making Connections: Total Body Integration Through Bartenieff Fundamentals ; and Martinez and Block's Visual Forces: An Introduction to Design . Students will explore the connection between theory and practice in the arts by making a series of drawings and color studies progressively linking visual art theory to the process of making and performing dance compositions to selected music. Compositions develop from simple to complex forms, including solo, and group collaborations. In periodic seminars that include discussion, film-screenings, and analyses of topical readings in addition to the main texts, students will analyze texts on the theories, techniques, and compositional methods of various art forms, placing them in sociocultural and historical contexts. Students will learn relaxation and visualization techniques, and apply basic methods of improvisation and composition to expand, concretize, and ratify their learning. We'll explore questions such as, "What makes a verbal statement a work of art?" and "What makes movement a work of art?" How can the language of dance help understand the language of painting, and vice-versa? 

Activities include drawing objects and energy patterns, and working with basic color theories. Two-dimensional visual theory will be applied to three-dimensional stage space, motion, time, performance, and theatricality. Students will create original dance compositions related to weekly visual art theorems outside of class, and perform them in biweekly performance forums that include peer and faculty critique. Staging will include proscenium, in-the-round, and semi-round audience perspectives.

Fall quarter will address fundamentals of visual and dance art, and establish integrated vocabularies. Winter quarter will develop and refine concepts and practices learned in the fall. 

Please note: This program involves sustained rigorous physical activity. Attendance and full mind-body participation and focus are essential. A formal dance technique (e.g., Modern, Ballet, Orissi) at the beginning/intermediate level is required. If you are unsure of your suitability for this program please contact the faculty for an interview. 

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Visual Art

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$80 each quarter for entrance fees and art supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 30, 2019 - 9:00 am
Com 209 - Dance Studio

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-04-04required fee added to catalog listing