Institutional Research and Assessment

End-of-Program Review History

The End-of-Program Review (EPR) was created by Evergreen's Assessment Study Group to improve cross-curricular general education and to help the college recognize and articulate curricular offerings. In Academic Year 2001-02, the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment began surveying faculty at the end of each program. Faculty were asked how they integrated four divisions of the Liberal Arts and about other emphases and practices in their programs.

EPRs for Academic Years 2001-02 through 2005-06

View the original EPR survey instrument to see questions associated with the first five years of this assessment.

The following documents show trends in the presence of various learning areas in Evergreen programs as reflected in the End-of-Program Review results from Academic Year 2001-02 through AY 2005-06. The charts show the percentage of programs reporting an emphasis in each area over time.

Trends for each learning area 2001-06:Faculty conversing at an End-of-Program Social.

Individual Program Responses
Interested in finding the responses of a particular program? See Individual Program Responses to the EPR (2001-02 to 2005-06)

End-of-Program Review Workshop Summer 2006

By design, the 2001 Assessment Study Group developed the initial End-of-Program Review with many open-ended narrative responses and very few definitions.  The idea was to avoid pre-determining on behalf of the faculty as a whole what was meant by concepts such as Art, minor emphasis, critical thinking, or advanced work.  As part of the institutional assessment of teaching and learning, data would be collected for five years, and then the College would stop, consider the results, assess the effectiveness of the assessment, and make changes.  By planning for five-year administration cycles before major revisions to the EPR, a substantial body of data could be compiled from which to understand how faculty from different planning unit and programs thought about the questions, and it allowed time to have trend data collected in a similar format for several years for purposes of internal reflection on the curriculum and external reporting.

In August 2006, a group of faculty, staff, and students came together in an End-of-Program Review Workshop to review and synthesize the first five years' results from the EPR. Workshop Participants worked in teams to compose summaries (listed below) of EPR responses (listed below the synthesis documents). In the course of their work, they reflected on the ways in which their colleagues interpreted various concepts, and then they used this experience to substantially redesign the survey for the subsequent five-year cycle.  The group sought to clarify definitions and reframe questions in the hope of yielding more useful and consistent results, while potentially easing the time-burden of completing the instrument.

Workshop synthesis documents:

Following are the EPR data sets analyzed by Workshop participants in preparing the above-listed summaries: