Evening & Weekend Studies

2009-10 Courses: Winter

2009 Fall Courses: A-G 2010 Winter Courses: A-G 2010 Spring Courses: A-G
2009 Fall Courses: H-P 2010 Winter Courses: H-P 2010 Spring Courses: H-P
2009 Fall Courses: Q-Z 2010 Winter Courses: Q-Z 2010 Spring Courses: Q-Z

Academic Writing: Exploring Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Approaches

Credits: 4

CRN: 20189

Faculty: Emily Lardner, 867-6637

Days & Times: 6-9:30p Mon

Location: SEM 2 E2107

Enrollment: 25

Note: This description was significantly altered on Nov. 20, 2009.

Evergreen grads are expected to be able to apply qualitative, quantitative, and creative modes of inquiry to practical and theoretical problems—but what does this actually look like? To that end, what can we learn by studying the approaches taken by expert writers to contemporary problems, particularly as they draw upon a range of disciplines and modes of inquiry? Expect to do strategic reading about current topics—climate change, social justice and the global economy, and quality education, plus another topic of your choosing. Each student will do a series of short exercises and drafts, building towards a longer inquiry-based project. The focus of that project will be based on your strengths, interests, and/or work you are doing in another program.

Students enrolling in this class are encouraged to co-register for Class in the U.S. or Public Thinking and Public Health. See www.evergreen.edu/eveningandweekend/integratedstudies for details.

Afro-Brazilian Dance

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 20138; Sec B: 20139

Faculty: Janelle Keane Campoverde, 867-6605 (message)

Days & Times: Sec A: 10:30a-12:30p Sat; Sec B: 1-3p Sat

Location: CRC 314

Enrollment: 25 each section

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.

After the Ice the World Changed

Credits: 4, upper-division science

CRN: 20298

Faculty: Dennis Hibbert, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 9a-1p Sat

Location: SEM 2 E2109

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above. One year of English composition.

Enrollment: 25

There are so many people — and environmental problems — because we control our food supply. Population growth accelerated as the last ice age waned and agriculture emerged separately in the Middle East, East Asia, southern Mexico, and the Amazon basin. We will study the world at that time and the evidence for agriculture's beginnings, drawing on archaeology, geology, palaeobotany, geochemistry, and climatology. We will then watch the project we began come to be today's world.

American Sign Language I

Credits: 4

CRN: 20106

Faculty: Anne Ellsworth

Days & Times: 3-5p Tue & Thu

Location: LAB 2 2207

Enrollment: 30

In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign and ASL grammar. Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader, and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and attend the Deaf Club.

American Sign Language II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20107

Faculty: Anne Ellsworth

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Tue & Thu

Location: LAB 2 2207

Prerequisites: ASL I or equivalent

Enrollment: 30

Students will focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There is a continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area.

Arabic, Beginning II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20108

Faculty: Joe Fahoum

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Mon & Wed

Location: SEM 2 C3109

Prerequisites: Beginning Arabic I or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

In this year-long course, students will learn the Arabic alphabet and to read and write in modern standard and classical Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries (all Muslims have to pray in Arabic). By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level. Students will also learn some short poems and stories, as well as Arabic culture and some conversational Arabic.

Art History I: Temples and Tombs

Credits: 4

CRN: 20359

Faculty: Nancy Bishop, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 9a-1p Sat

Location: SEM 2 D3107

Enrollment: 25

If you have always wanted to know what a ziggurat is for you should take this class.  Art History I is an exploration of the surviving art and artifacts of the most ancient Western civilizations: the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome.  The European middle ages will also be covered.  In addition to a text students will critically read primary source documents to facilitate their understanding of the cultures, religions, and the role of visual art.

The text for this course will not be available in the bookstore. Students should purchase it online: Gardner's Art through the Ages: The Western Perspective, Volume I, 12th Edition, by Fred S. Kleiner and Christin J. Mamiya, ISBN-10:0495004790.

Audio Recording II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20136

Faculty: Zenaida Vergara, 867-5277, and Aaron Kruse, 867-6842

Days & Times: 6-10p Wed

Location: LIB 1540

Prerequisites: Faculty signature. Sophomore standing or above. Audio Recording I or equivalent.

Enrollment: 22

The second quarter of this two-quarter sequence will continue the study of audio production. Students will continue their work with analog recorders and mixing consoles while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb and digital effects processing. Class time will be spent on lectures and recording exercises. There will be weekly lab assignments outside of class.

Ballet

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 20141; Sec B: 20142

Faculty: Jehrin Alexandria, 867-6605 (message)

Days & Times: Sec A: 12:15-2:15p Wed; Sec B: 3-5p Wed

Location: CRC 116

Required Fees: $5 for materials

Special Expenses: Ballet slippers required

Enrollment: 25 each section

Students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.

Calculus I

Credits: 4

CRN: 20166

Faculty: Vauhn Foster-Grahler, 867-5630

Days & Times: 1-3p Mon & Thu

Location: Mon Sem 2 D1107, Thu Sem 2 B1107

Prerequisites: A strong foundation in functions and algebraic procedures or college-level precalculus.

Special Expenses: A graphing calculator is required

Enrollment: 25

This course will provide a rigorous treatment of differential calculus appropriate for students who are planning to teach mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. In particular we will cover concepts, techniques, and applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization. We will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized.

Ceramics: Vessels

Credits: 4

CRN: 20173 (freshmen and sophomores); 20174 (junior standing or above)

Faculty: Mike Moran, 867-6988

Days & Times: 1-3p Tue & Thu

Location: ArtAnx 1100

Special Expenses: $50 to $100 for clay and tools

Enrollment: 24

This is an introductory studio course in making functional ceramics. Study will include handbuilding and throwing approaches to forming utilitarian vessels from stoneware and porcelain clays.

Chemistry for Everyone

Credits: 2

CRN: 20299

Faculty: Peter Pessiki, 867-6892

Days & Times: 6-10p five Mondays (Jan. 4, 11, 25, Feb. 8, 22)

Location: LAB 2 3216/3220

Enrollment: 24

Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. Learning experiences will focus on the states of matter, ionic bonding and energy. Each learning experience will consist of lectures, workshops, presentations, labs and discussions. All students will be given the opportunity to make physical measurements, handle chemicals and glassware, perform chemical reactions and learn how to put a calculator to use.

Chinese, Beginning I

Credits: 4

CRN: 20358

Faculty: Lin Crowley, 867-6239

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Tue & Thu

Location: SEM 2 E3107

Enrollment: 25

This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with little or no prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

Chinese, Intermediate II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20248

Faculty: Wenhong Wang

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Tue & Thu

Location: SEM 2 E3109

Prerequisites: 1 year college Chinese or 2 years high school Chinese or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

This class is designed to reinforce and build upon previous skills through rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese. Students will work to improve pronunciation while expanding understanding of vocabulary and grammatical constructions. Students will also be exposed to a variety of cultural topics through readings and other interactive activities.

Class and Education: Reading, Writing, and Rising Up

Credits: 4

CRN: 20190

Faculty: Gillies Malnarich

Days & Times: 6-9:30p Tue

Location: SEM 2 E2109

Enrollment: 25

How have educators, committed to educational equity and social justice, worked outside and within the public education system to provide an education of quality for all? We will explore the principles and practice of progressive and popular education over time with a special emphasis on contemporary practices and curriculum. Our collective inquiry will be informed by key ideas in sociology, your aspirations, and an overriding objective—you learning how to make the most of your studies at Evergreen.

Students enrolling in this class are encouraged to co-register for Class in the U.S. or Public Thinking and Public Health. See www.evergreen.edu/eveningandweekend/integratedstudies for details.

Cornerstone Seminar

Credits: 4

CRN: 20179

Faculty: Hirsh Diamant, 867-6736

Days & Times: 5:30-9p Thu

Location: SEM 2 B1105

Enrollment: 25

For beginning, continuing and returning students, this class will reawaken the joy, adventure and wonder of learning. Students will learn about human development, identify their educational goals and create an academic plan of study. Students will explore the five foci of the Evergreen curriculum: personal engagement in learning, interdisciplinary study, collaboration with faculty and peers, bridging theory and practice, learning across significant differences.

Drawing, Figure

Credits: 4

CRN: 20175

Faculty: Mike Moran, 867-6988

Days & Times: 4-6p Tue & Thu

Location: ArtAnx 2109

Prerequisites: Faculty signature. Beginning Drawing or portfolio review.

Special Expenses: $30 for art materials and supplies

Enrollment: 24

This is a course in basic figure drawing. Study will include structure and anatomy, gesture and proportion, and a variety of approaches to drawing from life.

Drawing Practices: Foundations

Credits: 4

CRN: 20178

Faculty: Judith Baumann, 867-6003

Days & Times: 6-8p Mon & Wed

Location: ArtAnx 2109

Enrollment: 24

This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques in drawing. Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume and composition. Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand drawn imagery. Students will work toward the development of an informed personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time. Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work. A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter.

East-West Psychology: Constructive Cognition/Emotion

Credits: 4

CRN: 20180

Faculty: Jamyang Tsultrim, 867-6758

Days & Times: 9a-4:30p on five Saturdays (Jan. 9, 23, Feb. 6, 20, and Mar. 6)

Location: SEM 2 C3109

Enrollment: 25

In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies.

Economics, Principles of

Credits: 4

CRN: 20285

Faculty: Tomas Mosquera

Days & Times: 7-9p Tue & Thu

Location: SEM 2 B2107

Enrollment: 25

Presented in a non-technical and logical manner, this introductory course will introduce you to the essentials of economic theory and policy. We will explore the fundamentals of economic theory and practice, and extend these concepts to real-world applications. This course will help you acquire an understanding of micro- and macro-economic terminology, concepts and principles. Furthermore, this course will help you realize the important role that economics plays in our lives, and will help you gain a greater understanding of economic policy, as well as how decisions influence the success or failure of a business.

The Evergreen Singers

Credits: 2

CRN: 20137

Faculty: Marla Beth Elliott, 867-6096

Days & Times: 6-8p Thu

Location: COM 117

Required Fees: $15 for copy music and recital expenses

Enrollment: 50

Web Site: http://blogs.evergreen.edu/evergreensingers/

The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.

Experiments in Text: Radical Poetry, Politics, and Pedagogy

Credits: 4

CRN: 20311

Faculty: David Wolach

Days & Times: 6-8p Wed, 4-6p Sat

Location: SEM 2 E3109

Enrollment: 25

"Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity or it becomes the practice of freedom, the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world." - Paulo Freire (Pedagogy of the Oppressed)

"as the eyes / near wreck / to create / when they see"

-- Louis Zukovsky (4 Other Countries)

If we think that language arts and radical politics are somehow related, how might poetry, for example, model new ways of forming social relationships? How might experiments in text re-imagine or apprehend social structures, and in so doing, help to either undermine or recapitulate dominant forms of acculturation? And how might roles in often predetermined environments, such as the university, inform or constrain our creative experiments? In contemporary text arts, there is new found interest in what, as Rodrigo Toscano has put it, "the poem can do." Throughout the quarter, students will work on their own creative manuscripts but they will also work in groups (alternative learning labs) on developing new models for radical education. In the first half of the quarter, students will look at a handful of radical poetic-pedagogical models, and based on these and their own creative writing, will develop their own text arts courses. In the second half of the quarter, student groups will test these models out by taking each others' courses. Students need not have any prior experience with poetry or political economy to take this course, though it will be helpful to their classmates if they do. Students will be encouraged to write and think dynamically, and, where appropriate, to move outside the classroom and the campus into the larger Olympia community.

Financial Accounting

Credits: 6

CRN: 20265

Faculty: Allen StandingBear Jenkins, 867-5501

Days & Times: 5-7p Tue & Thu with weekly lab from 7-9p on either Tue or Thu

Location: LIB 1540

Enrollment: 35

Business decisions and allocating resources rely heavily on concise, credible, and timely financial information. This course will provide students with a general introduction and overview of the field of accounting. Understanding financial accounting processes is important for accountants and other professionals in all areas of business, finance, marketing, personnel and general management, but it is also useful for general citizens whose careers are not directly related to business. This course will use case studies of familiar companies to illustrate fundamental accounting concepts. Weekly lab sessions will give students hands-on experience with QuickBooks accounting software.

French, Beginning II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20109

Faculty: Judith Gabriele

Days & Times: 7:15-9p Tue & Thu

Location: SEM 2 B3107

Prerequisites: 1 quarter college French or 2-3 years high school French or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

This is a continuing course from fall quarter. It emphasizes mastery of basic skills through interactive learning. Classes are lively and conducted primarily in French. Students practice all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Within this context there will be emphasis on accurate pronunciation, useful vocabulary, videos and situational role-play. Winter quarter will focus on oral skills through the use of poetry, short legends and fables. Additionally, students will become acquainted with French traditions, cuisine and contemporary issues in France and the Francophone world.

French, Intermediate II

Credits: 4

CRN: 20110

Faculty: Judith Gabriele

Days & Times: 5-6:45p Tue & Thu

Location: SEM 2 B3107

Prerequisites: 4 quarters college French or 3-4 years high school French or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

This is a continuing course from fall quarter for students who have already studied French. It will continue to emphasize grammar review and development of conversational skills through discussions of literature. During the quarter we will focus particularly on theater, film, music, and art, discussing themes that include both cultural and historical context in France. Additionally, students will read, analyze and act out scenes from various plays. Classes are interactive and conducted entirely in French.

Global Health and Ethics I

Credits: 4

CRN: 20355

Faculty: Carolyn Prouty

Days & Times: 6-10p Tue

Location: SEM 2 A3109

Prerequisites: Successful completion of college biology preferred but not required.

Enrollment: 25

This is the first of a two-quarter exploration of the major health issues encountered in chronically impoverished areas of the world, and the ethical issues encountered by health care providers and researchers working in resource-poor environments. How do Western ideas of justice and autonomy apply in developing countries? Over two quarters, we will examine the physiology and pathology of specific diseases and conditions including HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and nutritional deficiencies. These case studies will form the basis for our inquiries into the medical, ethical, and cultural landscape surrounding health care for those on the lowest rungs of our economic ladder.

Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 20181; Sec B: 20264

Faculty: Don Chalmers, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: Sec A: 6-10p on five Thursdays (Jan. 7, 21, Feb. 4, 18, and Mar. 4); Sec B: 10a-2:30p on five Saturdays (Jan. 9, 23, Feb. 6, 20, and Mar. 6)

Location: Both sections: SEM 2 D3109

Enrollment: 25 each section

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fundraising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based on either guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application.