Evening & Weekend Studies

2008-09 Courses: Spring

2008 Fall Courses: A-C 2009 Winter Courses: A-C 2009 Spring Courses: A-C
2008 Fall Courses: D-M 2009 Winter Courses: D-M 2009 Spring Courses: D-M
2008 Fall Courses: N-Z 2009 Winter Courses: N-Z 2009 Spring Courses: N-Z

Discovering the Unknown Russia through Media and an Open Mind

Credits: 4

CRN: 30523

Faculty: Elena Sonina, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 5-9p Mon

Location: Sem II A1107

Enrollment: 25

This course provides an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the Russian people and Russian history, art, technology, and culture.  Via film, music, literature, and current events you will discover the cultural values, traditions, and customs of Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks.  You will be introduced to some dramatic events in Russian history that shaped the Russian character and which, in turn, have impacted the whole world.  Besides academic class activities, you will have hands-on experience of Russian national cuisine, song, and dance.  With an open mind and the teaching of a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive and learn to appreciate the similarities of American and Russian cultures.

Drawing and Painting the Figure

Credits: 4

CRN: 30253

Faculty: Mike Moran, 867-6988

Days & Times: 4-6:30p Tue & Thu

Location: ArtAnx 2109

Prerequisites: Faculty signature. Two quarters college level drawing including figure drawing.

Special Expenses: $50-$75 for art materials and supplies

Enrollment: 24

This is an intermediate to advanced course in figure drawing. Study will include academic drawing and an introduction to figure painting in water-based medium, color theory and composition.

Essentials of Energy: Economics, Politics, Ethics

Credits: 4

CRN: 30270

Faculty: Howard Schwartz, 360-725-3114

Days & Times: 6-10p Thu

Location: Sem II A3109

Prerequisites: Some college level work in history, politics, economics or environmental studies

Enrollment: 25

The solutions to our energy problems are global, but energy resources are distributed unequally around the globe and political decisions are made on a national and sub-national basis. As a result, energy issues seem intractable and insoluble. It is easy to state obvious goals - consume fewer fossil fuels and more clean ones — but difficult to implement them. This course will examine the economic, environmental and ethical consequences of our resource choices and see whether there are political pathways to better decisions. We will evaluate many renewable technologies to see whether they can supplant fossil fuels while trying to decode the role of government ownership of oil around the world. We will use the rise of Africa as a major supplier of oil as a case study of how the politics of oil can support corrupt regimes and what can be done to move to a more just and environmentally-friendly energy system.

Evenings with Dostoevsky

Credits: 4

CRN: 30223

Faculty: Thomas Rainey, 867-6750

Days & Times: 6-10p Wed

Location: Sem II A3109

Enrollment: 25

This course will explore the life, times, and major literary works of Feodor Dostoevsky, one of Russia’s preeminent novelists. We will read, analyze, and thoroughly discuss at least three major novels as works of art, as philosophical and religious statements, as psychological studies, and as social documents. We will study this remarkable Russian writer against the tumultuous social, intellectual, political, cultural, and literary background of his times. Special study will also be made of Dostoevsky’s enduring contribution to world historical literature.

The Evergreen Singers

Credits: 2

CRN: 30254

Faculty: Marla Beth Elliott, 867-6096

Days & Times: 6-8p Tue

Location: COM 117

Required Fees: $25 for accompanist, copy music, and recital expenses

Enrollment: 50

Web Site: http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/tescsingers/

The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.

Experiments in Text: Moving Off The Page

Credits: 4

CRN: 30224

Faculty: David Michael Wolach, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 6-8p Wed & 4-6p Sat

Location: Sem II B1107

Enrollment: 25

An author who teaches writers nothing, teaches no one. What matters therefore is the exemplary character of production, which is able first to induce other producers to produce, and second to put an improved apparatus at their disposal. And this apparatus is better the more consumers it is able to turn into producers, that is, readers or spectators into collaborators. (Walter Benjamin, The Author as Producer)

Our challenge: to unwrite what has been written, to create what has yet been named, and to ask: What does it mean to perform a text, absent terms such as "poetry," "theater," "author," "audience?" When is "interpretation" squashed by the triviality of its vocabulary? Can a work of passion and intention resist such trivialization, and if so, how? And now? In this course we will build textual experiments in small groups, document these experiments, perform them, and in so doing, necessarily redefine the terms of "performance." This creative writing course will, at times, collaborate with the daytime program Threads and Tears and Finnegans (end) Wake (begin) Experiments and Music in Dance. Aside from writing experiments, students will read excerpts from Brecht, Thalia Field, Tracie Morris, David Buuck, John Cage, Rodrigo Toscano, Antonin Artaud, and Guy Debord.

Fabrication for Sculpture

Credits: 4

CRN: 30255

Faculty: Bob Woods, 867-6228

Days & Times: 5:30-9:30p Thu

Location: ArtAnx 0100

Prerequisites: Previous metalworking/welding experience (Introduction to Metalworking or equivalent) is required.

Required Fees: $100

Enrollment: 12

This studio course presents more advanced work in metal fabrication as applied to various forms of modern design and sculpture. Contemporary artists, ideas, materials, and methods, will be investigated. Metalworking processes of forming, fitting, and welding with oxy-acetylene, MIG and TIG, will be utilized. Students will do drawings, create process samples, build models, and complete a final project of their own design.

French, Beginning III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30225

Faculty: Judith Gabriele

Days & Times: 7:15-9p Tue & Thu

Location: Sem II B3107

Prerequisites: 1 quarter college level French or 2-3 years high school French or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

This course continues from winter quarter with class work emphasizing grammar acquisition using a textbook and workbook. Students will practice listening comprehension skills, conversation, vocabulary building and accurate pronunciation through reading short legends and tales from Francophone countries, and view corresponding films with basic discussions of their themes. They will engage in situational role-plays and short skits from the legends. Class is conducted entirely in French and includes a multi-dimensional approach to learning styles.

French, Intermediate III: French Studies Through the Lens of Film and Culture

Credits: 4

CRN: 30226

Faculty: Judith Gabriele

Days & Times: 5-6:45p Tue & Thu

Location: Sem II B3107

Prerequisites: 4 quarters college level French or 3-4 years high school French or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

Note: This course description has been revised as of March 2, 2009.

What makes French cinema unique? Movies reveal cultural values and different ways to see the world. While not aiming to be a comprehensive survey, students will view a series of selected French / Francophone films and read a short novel that is the basis for one of the films. They will learn to analyze, compare and appreciate aspects of film art, its form and style, language, gestures, identity and socio-political commentary. This class will continue to refine all language skills, particularly conversational speech at intermediate to high levels. Students will expand vocabulary acquisition, sharpen listening comprehension skills, review particular structural forms and make connections to previous learning. All classes will be conducted entirely in French.

French and Japanese Media: Ancient and Modern

Credits: 4

CRN: 30227

Faculty: Judith Gabriele and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer, 867-5494

Days & Times: 5-9p Mon

Location: Sem II B1107

Enrollment: 50

How do modern and traditional elements coexist in centuries-old countries? What kind of cultural and social similarities exist between the French and the Japanese? How would you compare Paris and Tokyo, two of the most fashionable and historic cities in the world? Join us as we examine films and other media to explore these questions from an insider’s viewpoint. Students will be introduced to both languages as we look at their roles in the expression of culture.

German, Beginning III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30228

Faculty: Marianne Hoepli, 867-6532

Days & Times: 6-8p Mon & Wed

Location: Sem II C2109

Prerequisites: 2 quarters of college German or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

This is the third quarter of a year long beginning German course. New students who want to review their basic skills are also encouraged to take this class. We will continue to use "Wie geht's", text- and workbooks, and expand all four basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students will improve their oral skills by discussing short films and modern short stories . They will also improve their writing skills by learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé or a job application. This course will use a communicative method and will be conducted primarily in German.

GIS: Theory and Practice

Credits: 4

CRN: 30271

Faculty: Peter Impara, 867-6543

Days & Times: 6-10p Tue & Thu (weeks 1-5)

Location: CAL

Prerequisites: File management in Windows.

Enrollment: 25

In this course we will explore the capabilities of GIS to analyze spatial information. The course will focus on understanding the fundamentals of GIS and the distinctive nature of spatial data through lecture and labs using ArcGIS 9. In addition students will access spatial data to conduct a specific spatial analysis. Results from this analysis, as well as a description of the analysis technique(s), will be presented to the class.

Grantwriting and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 30280; Sec B: 30281

Faculty: Don Chalmers, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: Sec A: 6-8p Tue & Thu ( Mar. 31, Apr. 2, 14, 16, 28, 30, May 12, 14, 26, 28 ); Sec B: 10a-2:30p Sat ( Apr. 4, 18, May 2, 16, 30 )

Location: Sem II A3107

Enrollment: 25 each section

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fundraising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based on either guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application.

Health vs Wealth

Credits: 4

CRN: 30282

Faculty: Mary Dean, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 6-10p Tue

Location: Sem II C3109

Enrollment: 25

We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access and treatment will be reviewed. Reports from the Institute of Medicine will aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine" and "Sick Around the World". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need.

Hybrid Music III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30256

Faculty: Peter Randlette, 867-6279

Days & Times: 6-10p Tue

Location: COM 346/347

Prerequisites: Faculty signature; sophomore standing or above; Hybrid Music I and II or equivalent

Enrollment: 18

This continuing course will focus on building projects in the studio and continuing to learn advanced digital production techniques. Members will develop pieces based on design problems using combinations of computer-based and analog resources covered in prior quarters. New material will include acoustic/synthesic integration, mastering techniques using Waves plugins and multiband compression, object-oriented voice construction and advanced production methods. Students will complete two projects, one incorporating live elements, attend weekly seminar/lecture/critique sessions, use weekly studio times and maintain production journals.

Japanese, Advanced Beginning III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30229

Faculty: Tomoko Hirai Ulmer, 867-5494

Days & Times: 7-9p Tue & Thu

Location: Sem II B3109

Prerequisites: Five quarters of college-level Japanese or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

This is a continuing intensive course from winter quarter. Students will learn new sentence structures and vocabulary so they can function in Japanese in a variety of situations. Classroom activities include oral presentations, learning kanji characters and reading short stories. Practicing with CDs on a daily basis is required. Japanese culture and life are discussed throughout the course.

Japanese, Beginning III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30230

Faculty: Tomoko Hirai Ulmer, 867-5494

Days & Times: 5-7p Tue & Thu

Location: Sem II B3109

Enrollment: 22

This is a continuing intensive course from winter quarter. Students will learn more sentence structures and kanji characters as they build their overall communicative skills. Practicing with CDs on a daily basis is required. Japanese culture and life are discussed throughout the course.

Leadership - Are You Prepared?

Credits: 4

CRN: 30283

Faculty: Steve Johnson, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 9a-4p Sat (April 4, 18, May 2, 16, 30, Jun 6)

Location: Sem II B2109

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or faculty approval

Enrollment: 25

This course is designed to develop and prepare students to recognize and assume leadership roles. The class will explore contemporary leadership theories with an emphasis on accountability-driven leadership, ethical leadership through servant leadership, and the significance of embracing diversity. Major areas of study will include human resource management and business. Credits will be awarded in business management.

Marketing Communications: Integration and Synergy

Credits: 4

CRN: 30284

Faculty: Karen Champagnie Alman, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 5-9p Tue

Location: Sem II A2109

Enrollment: 25

Marketing Communications examines the machinery behind the message, the sophisticated ways in which marketers appeal to consumers. Students will learn to view marketing from a holistic perspective, based on the premise that the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. All the various consumer touch points are explored—advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations & publicity, direct marketing, and Internet/interactive media. By the end of the course, students will have acquired skills in research, critical analysis, and marketing strategy.

Metalworking

Credits: 4

CRN: Sec A: 30257 (freshmen and soph); Sec B: 30258 (junior or above)

Faculty: Bob Woods, 867-6228

Days & Times: 5:30-9:30p Tue

Location: ArtAnx 0100

Required Fees: $100 for materials and supplies

Enrollment: 6 each section

This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication. Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design.