Evening & Weekend Studies

2008-09 Courses: Spring

2008 Fall Courses: A-C 2009 Winter Courses: A-C 2009 Spring Courses: A-C
2008 Fall Courses: D-M 2009 Winter Courses: D-M 2009 Spring Courses: D-M
2008 Fall Courses: N-Z 2009 Winter Courses: N-Z 2009 Spring Courses: N-Z

Abnormal Psychology

Credits: 4

CRN: 30278

Faculty: Susan Cummings

Days & Times: 6-10p Mon

Location: Sem II A2109

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology

Enrollment: 25

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined as well and the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology will be studied.

Academic Writing: The Role of Stories

Credits: 4

CRN: 30217

Faculty: Emily Lardner, 867-6637

Days & Times: 6-9:30p Mon

Location: Sem II E3109

Enrollment: 25

In this course, our focus is on stories, and how writers use them to organize various kinds of arguments. We will continue our practice of studying the texts that other writers have created in order to build a richer set of patterns for our own writing possibilities. We will investigate the role of stories in our lives and in academic texts. Through writing and rewriting drafts, we will work on harnessing the power of narrative and the excitement of good analytical thinking, inviting readers to take our ideas seriously.

Afro-Brazilian Dance

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 30243; Sec B: 30244

Faculty: Janelle Keane Campoverde, 867-6605

Days & Times: Sec A: 10:30a-12:30p Sat; Sec. B: 1-3p Sat

Location: CRC 116

Required Fees: $40 for music

Enrollment: 25 each section

With live drumming we will learn dances that originated in Africa and migrated to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addiiton, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.

American Sign Language II

Credits: 4

CRN: 30218

Faculty: Anne Ellsworth

Days & Times: 3-5p Tue & Thu

Location: Lab II 2207

Prerequisites: ASL I or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

Students will focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There is a continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area.

American Sign Language III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30219

Faculty: Anne Ellsworth

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Tue & Thu

Location: Lab II 2207

Prerequisites: ASL II or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

Students will continue to focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area.

The Americas, 15,000 BC to 1500 AD

Credits: 4

CRN: 30267

Faculty: Dennis Hibbert, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 9a-1p Sat

Location: Sem II A2109

Prerequisites: 1 year college composition

Enrollment: 25

We will study the whole span of time for which we have good evidence that people lived in the Americas before European contact. We want to know about when people reached the Americas & where they came from, where they traveled and settled, the societies that developed, the responses of these societies to ongoing environmental changes, and human impacts on the landscape. We will draw on genetic studies, archaeology, palaeobotany, geology, palaeoclimatology, and liguistics. Emphasis throughout will be on learning what kinds of evidence tell us about our past and how that evidence is obtained and interpreted.

Arabic, Beginning III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30220

Faculty: Joe Fahoum, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Tue & Thu

Location: Sem II C2107

Prerequisites: Beginning Arabic I or equivalent

Enrollment: 25

In Beginning Arabic III, the objectives are to increase vocabulary, and learn suffixes, pronouns and verbs for personalization. Other objectives are to conjugate verbs, improve grammar and sentence structure, learn definite, root and pattern verb forms, proper and inverted sentences as well as those starting with infinitive verbs and indefinite nouns. Students are required to master all forms of verbs (present, past, future tense on command), superlatives, sentence analyzing, and subject-verb agreement as well as all other areas of grammar. Songs and culture studies will be covered. By the end of the quarter, students should be reading and translating paragraphs.

Arabic, Conversational III

Credits: 2

CRN: 30221

Faculty: Joe Fahoum, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 5:30-7:30p Mon

Location: Sem II C2107

Enrollment: 25

In Conversational Arabic we will practice and learn the everyday spoken language used in daily life, which is more informal than the formal written language covered in Beginning Arabic. Each quarter will build on the previous quarter's learning. We will use the book Spoken Arabic for Foreigners, An Introduction to the Palestinian Dialect by Dr. Moin Halloun.

Art: Process and Theory

Credits: 4

CRN: 30246

Faculty: Marc Dombrosky, 867-6588 (message)

Days & Times: 9a-1p Sat

Location: ArtAnx 2109

Special Expenses: $75 to $100 for art materials

Enrollment: 25

This studio-based course will explore a range of contemporary process-oriented work through projects, readings and discussions. We’ll experiment with different ways to make paintings, sculptural objects, installations, and drawings. Studio works will be complemented with relevant texts. How do we map our actions, and what do they suggest for the viewer? How do you twist, crumple, layer, crease, open, mix, rotate, stack, support, collect, store, bend, shorten, tear, split, cut, drop, splash, arrange or simplify?

Athletics as a Model for Leadership

Credits: 2

CRN: 30286

Faculty: Mychael Heuer, 867-6189

Days & Times: 6-10p Thu, Apr 2, 16, 30, May 14, 28

Location: Sem II A2109

Enrollment: 25

This course will introduce students to servant and situational leadership models used in athletics. Students will explore the “Character of Champions” and “CHAMPS” life skills programs that will give them training, guidelines and behavior models to create positive environments that promote personal growth and develop leadership skills. Students will create a campus/community outreach project in order to develop an understanding of the importance of the role of athletics within the campus and greater community. This class is open and welcome to all students.

Audio Recording III

Credits: 4

CRN: 30247

Faculty: Zenaida Vergara, 867-5277

Days & Times: 6-10p Wed

Location: L1540

Prerequisites: Faculty signature; Audio Recording I or II or equivalent

Enrollment: 22

This is the third of a three-quarter sequence in which students are introduced to the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media. Students will continue to work with analog and digital recording while expanding on their production techniques. Additional topics will include sound design and surround sound mixing for video, music business and copyright. Class time will be spent on lectures and recording exercises. There will be weekly lab assignments outside of class.

Ballet

Credits: 2

CRN: Sec A: 30248; Sec B: 30249

Faculty: Jehrin Alexandria, 867-6605 (message)

Days & Times: Sec A: 12:30-2:30p Wed; Sec B: 3-5p Wed

Location: CRC 116

Required Fees: $25 for pianist

Special Expenses: Ballet slippers required

Enrollment: 25 each section

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Ballet slippers are required. Wednesday 12pm class is a faster class.

Business: Quantitative Methods

Credits: 4

CRN: 30279

Faculty: Allen StandingBear Jenkins

Days & Times: 5-9p Wed

Location: L2708

Enrollment: 25

Quantitative Methods is an interdisciplinary field of study concerned with issues that arise in business. This course will center on students acquiring quantitative reasoning using everyday business situations/problems as a way to uncover what is real, to “look through” nicely ordered financial statements for clues to potential problems, understand and present persuasive arguments, and convey data clearly, concisely, and accurately. Excel will be used for assignments. In so doing, the complexities of calculation should not be an impediment to learning and will allow students to concentrate on analytical thinking. Data analysis is pervasive in business as a way of limiting risk and forecasting in an uncertain world.

Ceramics: Studio Projects

Credits: 4

CRN: 30251

Faculty: Mike Moran, 867-6988

Days & Times: 1-3p Tue & Thu

Location: ArtAnx 1100

Prerequisites: Faculty signature. Minimum 1 quarter college level ceramics or equivalent.

Special Expenses: $50 to $100 for clay and tools

Enrollment: 24

This is an intermediate to advanced course. Emphasis is on independent work in sculpture, pottery and/or related areas. Course work will include a study of glaze chemistry.

Chemistry, General III

Credits: 6

CRN: 30268

Faculty: Peter Pessiki, 867-6892

Days & Times: 6-8p Tue & 6-10p Thu

Location: Lab II 3216/3220

Required Fees: $15 lab fee

Enrollment: 24

This course will begin with an in-depth investigation of equilibrium and pH. We then will cover entropy and free energy, followed by an introduction of electrochemistry. Our final topic will be transition metals and the crystal field model. The lab will include pH titrations, absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. New students should be aware that this course is a continuation from the fall and winter quarters.

Contemporary Furniture Design II

Credits: 4

CRN: 30252

Faculty: Daryl Morgan, 867-6228

Days & Times: 5:30-9:30p Tue

Location: ArtAnx 0111

Prerequisites: Faculty signature.

Required Fees: $75 for materials

Enrollment: 25

Fundamentally, furniture can be understood as made objects designed to satisfy needs of utility, convenience, and physical and emotional comfort inside our living and working environments. Recognizing need is, after all, the primary condition of design. Beginning from this simple premise and drawing on a rich tradition that bridges disciplines and movements, this two-quarter sequence will explore the wide and evolving spectrum of need, concept, and aesthetic perspective that constitutes furniture design and construction. Winter quarter focused primarily on conceptual design with spring quarter devoted to constructing those designs.

Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutor's Craft

Credits: 2

CRN: 30222

Faculty: Sandra Yannone, 867-6382

Days & Times: 3-5p Mon

Location: Writing Center

Prerequisites: Faculty signature

Enrollment: 20

This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors in the Writing Center. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course.