Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions


Fall 2015, Winter 2016 and Spring 2016 quarters

Taught by

physical and inorganic chemistry
(F)
physics
(W,S)
physics, biomedical engineering, optical imaging and microscopy

Prerequisites

one year of college-level general chemistry, at least one quarter of college-level physics, as well as the comfort and ability to work problems in integral and differential calculus.  One year of college-level calculus is recommended.

This is a year-long, upper-division science program in physical chemistry. In this program we will go from introductory chemistry concepts of the shapes of atomic and molecular orbitals, and explore how these shapes are known mathematically and measured experimentally. Similarly, we will move from stating that some materials are conductors to examining the solid-state structural characteristics that indicate a material is a potential conductor or semiconductor. This program is devoted to exploring the "But why?" of physical chemistry by examining topics in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, kinetics, advanced inorganic chemistry, and materials chemistry. During Winter and Spring quarters statistical mechanics – the discipline that most unites physics and chemistry – will enable us to derive from first principles such “chemistry” topics as the law of mass action, the ideal gas law, the heat capacity of solids, and the Gibbs free energy, and such “physics” topics as the behavior of semiconductors, the Planck blackbody law, Bose-Einstein condensation, and the Chandrasekhar limit for stellar collapse. Many of the topics in this program require a strong mathematical foundation and comfort with application of calculus. Elements of upper-division linear algebra, differential equations, and probability will be taught in conjunction with the chemistry and physics content of this program.

The program will encompass lectures, workshops, labs, group projects, seminars, homework, essays, field trips, and community interaction events. Primary topics of study will include: thermodynamics (enthalpy, entropy, Maxwell relations), statistical mechanics (equipartition, the Boltzmann factor, chemical potential, Bose and Fermi statistics), quantum mechanics (Schrodinger equation, atomic and molecular energy levels, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, spectroscopy), kinetics (unimolecular and biomolecular kinetics, reaction spontaneity, current kinetic theories), and properties of materials (phase diagrams, solid-state structure, bonding theories, applications of symmetry and point groups, electronic and magnetic properties of materials), as well as the chemistry of transition metal complexes and materials synthesis. Each quarter will involve significant advanced laboratory work focusing on instrumentation, experimental design and research, and structured experimentation. Additional focus on scientific writing, scientific ethics, and societal issues connected to science will be incorporated throughout the year.

Program Details

Fields of Study

Preparatory for studies or careers in

chemistry, chemical engineering, engineering, chemical physics, physics, medicine, biochemistry, and teaching.

Location and Schedule

Campus location

Olympia

Schedule

Offered during: Day

Final Schedule and Room Assignment

Books

Buy books for this program through The Greener Store.

Online Learning

Enhanced Online Learning

More information about online learning.

Required Fees

$50 in fall, $40 in winter, and $30 in spring for symposium registration and entrance fees.

Upper Division Science Credit

All 16 credits each quarter represent upper division science credits.

May be offered again in

2017-2018

Registration Information

Credits: 16 (Fall); 16 (Winter); 16 (Spring)

Variable Credit Options

Fall quarter can be taken for 16 credits; 8 credits (Thermodynamics & Experimental Design or Advanced Inorganic & Experimental Design); or 4 credits (Quantum Mechanics & Experimental Design). Winter quarter can be taken for 16 credits; 8 credits (Statistical Mechanics & Experimental Design or Quantum Mechanics & Experimental Design); or 4 credits (Thermodynamics & Experimental Design).  Spring quarter options are 16 credits; 12 credits (Statistical Mechanics & Solid State); 10 credits (Statistical Mechanics & Kinetics or Solid State & Kinetics); 6 credits (Statistical Mechanics or Solid State); or 4 credits (Kinetics).

Class standing: Sophomore–Senior

Maximum enrollment: 35

Fall

Course Reference Number

So - Sr (16 credits): 10040

Go to my.evergreen.edu to register for this program.

Winter

Accepting New Students

Signature Required

In addition to meeting the prerequisites for the general AMR program, students joining in the winter must meet with Rebecca Sunderman to determine if they are prepared to join a continuing program as content from fall will continue to be utilized.  For example, in order to succeed in the winter quantum mechanics portion of AMR, students must have previously taken fall quantum mechanics content in AMR or the equivalent.

Course Reference Number

So - Sr (16 credits): 20016

Go to my.evergreen.edu to register for this program.

Spring

Accepting New Students

Signature Required

In addition to meeting the prerequisites for the general AMR program, students joining in the spring must meet with Rebecca Sunderman to determine if they are prepared to join a continuing program as content from fall and winter will continue to be utilized. For example, in order to succeed in the spring statistical mechanics portion of AMR, students must have previously taken winter statistical mechanics content in AMR or the equivalent.

Course Reference Number

So - Sr (16 credits): 30014

Go to my.evergreen.edu to register for this program.

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