2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Research

 opportunities exist with the mentorship of faculty.

Research Opportunities


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Abir Biswas
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Abir Biswas Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Alison Styring
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dylan Fischer
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring plant ecology and physiology, field ecology, restoration ecology Dylan Fischer Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Erik Thuesen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Erik Thuesen Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Shaw Osha (Flores)
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. Shaw Osha (Flores) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Douglas Schuler
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring considerable Civic intelligence attempts to understand how "smart" a society is in addressing the issues before it and to think about – and initiate – practices that improve this capacity. It is a cross-cutting area of inquiry that includes the sciences – social and otherwise – as well as the humanities. Visual art, music, and stories, are as critical to our enterprise as the ability to analyze and theorize about social and environmental issues.Although there are many ways to engage in this research, all work will directly or indirectly support the work of the Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory (CIRAL). These opportunities will generally fall under the heading of "home office" or "field" work. The home office work will generally focus on developing the capacities of the CIRAL lab, including engaging in research, media work, or tech development that will support the community partnerships. The field work component will consist of direct collaboration outside the classroom, often on an ongoing basis. Students working within this learning opportunity will generally work with one or two of the clusters of topics and activities developed by previous and current students. The first content clusters that were developed were (1) CIRAL vs. homelessness; (2) environment and energy; and (3) food. In addition to a general home office focus cluster on institutionalizing CIRAL, another focused on media and online support.We are also hoping to support students who are interested in the development of online support for civic intelligence, particularly CIRAL. This includes the development of ongoing projects such as e-Liberate, a web-based tool that supports online meetings using Roberts Rules of Order, and Activist Mirror, a civic engagement game, as well as the requirements gathering and development of new capabilities for information interchange and collaboration.Normally students taking this option will have worked with Doug Schuler previously or are otherwise familiar with CIRAL and the idea of civic intelligence. Students who are interested in type of work and have not met those informal requirements are encouraged to take the program in 2013-14. Douglas Schuler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Kathleen Eamon
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior 0, 16 0 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. Kathleen Eamon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Abir Biswas
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (geology, earth science) studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. geology and earth sciences. Abir Biswas Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Andrew Brabban
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biotechnology) studies the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotes of industrial and agricultural importance. Students who commit at least a full year to a research project, enrolling for 4 to 16 credits each quarter, will learn a broad range of microbiology (both aerobic and anaerobic techniques), molecular (DNA analysis and cloning), and biochemical techniques (chemical and pathway analysis, protein isolation). Students will also have opportunities for internships at the USDA and elsewhere, and to present data at national and international conferences. Andrew Brabban Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Brian Walter
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems relating to graphs, combinatorial games and especially combinatorial games played on graphs. He would like to work with students who have a strong background in mathematics and/or computer science and who are interested in applying their skills to open-ended problems relating to graphs and/or games. Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Clyde Barlow
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (chemistry) works with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment. Clyde Barlow Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Clarissa Dirks
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology) aims to better understand the evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence, spread and containment of infectious disease by studying the coevolution of retroviruses and their primate hosts. Studying how host characteristics and ecological changes influence virus transmission in lemurs will enable us to address the complex spatial and temporal factors that impact emerging diseases. Students with a background in biology and chemistry will gain experience in molecular biology techniques, including tissue culture and the use of viral vectors. Clarissa Dirks Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dharshi Bopegedera
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (chemistry) would like to engage students in two projects. (1) Quantitative determination of metals in the stalactites formed in aging concrete using ICP-MS. Students who are interested in learning about the ICP-MS technique and using it for quantitative analysis will find this project interesting. (2) Science and education. We will work with local teachers to develop lab activities that enhance the science curriculum in local schools. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project. Dharshi Bopegedera Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David McAvity
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. This independent learning opportunity allows advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. Students typically begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking that are valuable for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems in mathematical biology associated with population and evolutionary dynamics. Students working with him will help create computer simulations using agent-based modeling and cellular automata and analyzing non-linear models for the evolution of cooperative behavior in strategic multiplayer evolutionary games. Students should have a strong mathematics or computer science background. theoretical biology, computer science, mathematics. David McAvity Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Donald Morisato
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology) is interested in the developmental biology of the embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process. biology, health sciences. Donald Morisato Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
EJ Zita
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (physics) studies the Sun and the Earth. What are the mechanisms of global warming? What can we expect in the future? What can we do about it right now? How do solar changes affect Earth over decades (e.g., Solar Max) to millennia? Why does the Sun shine a bit more brightly when it is more magnetically active, even though sunspots are dark? Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip every 11 years? Why is the temperature of the Sun’s outer atmosphere millions of degrees higher than that of its surface? Students can do research related to global warming in Zita's academic programs and in contracts, and have investigated the Sun by analyzing data from solar observatories and using theory and computer modeling. Serious students are encouraged to form research contracts and may thereafter be invited to join our research team. astronomy, physics, climate studies. EJ Zita Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Judith Cushing
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science, ecology informatics) studies how scientists might better use information technology and visualization in their research, particularly in ecology and environmental studies. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or one of the sciences (e.g., ecology, biology, chemistry or physics), and who are motivated to explore how new computing paradigms can be harnessed to improve the individual and collaborative work of scientists. Such technologies include visualizations, plugins, object-oriented systems, new database technologies and "newer" languages that scientists themselves use such as python or R. Judith Cushing Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
James Neitzel
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biochemistry) uses methods from organic and analytical chemistry to study biologically interesting molecules. A major focus of his current work is on fatty acids; in particular, finding spectroscopic and chromatographic methods to identify fatty acids in complex mixtures and to detect changes that occur in fats during processing or storage. This has relevance both for foods and in biodiesel production. The other major area of interest is in plant natural products, such as salicylates. Work is in process screening local plants for the presence of these molecules, which are important plant defense signals. Work is also supported in determining the nutritional value of indigenous plants. Students with a background and interest in organic, analytical or biochemistry could contribute to this work. biochemistry, alternative energy, health sciences. James Neitzel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lydia McKinstry
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (organic chemistry) is interested in organic synthesis research, including asymmetric synthesis methodology, chemical reaction dynamics and small molecule synthesis. One specific study involves the design and synthesis of enzyme inhibitor molecules to be used as effective laboratory tools with which to study the mechanistic steps of programmed cell death (e.g., in cancer cells). Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience with the laboratory techniques of organic synthesis as well as the techniques of spectroscopy. chemistry, health sciences. Lydia McKinstry Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology, veterinary medicine) is interested in animal health and diseases that affect the animal agriculture industry. Currently funded research includes the development of bacteriophage therapy for dairy cattle uterine infections, calf salmonellosis and mastitis. A number of hands-on laboratory projects are available to students interested in pursuing careers in science. biology and veterinary medicine. Michael Paros Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Neal Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. His areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing and hardware modeling languages. Neal Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Neil Switz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior 6 06 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. Laboratory experience is especially important – and useful – for students planning to pursue graduate studies or enter the technical job market. (physics) develops optical instruments for use in biophysical and biomedical applications, including low-cost diagnostics. Projects in the lab are suitable for motivated students with quantitative backgrounds in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics or computer science. Neil Switz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Paula Schofield
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (organic, polymer, materials chemistry) is interested in the interdisciplinary fields of biodegradable plastics and biomedical polymers. Research in the field of biodegradable plastics is becoming increasingly important to replace current petroleum-derived materials and to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Modification of starch through copolymerization and use of bacterial polyesters show promise in this endeavor. Specific projects within biomedical polymers involve the synthesis of poly (lactic acid) copolymers that have potential for use in tissue engineering. Students with a background in chemistry and biology will gain experience in the synthesis and characterization of these novel polymer materials. Students will present their work at American Chemical Society (ACS) conferences. Paula Schofield Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Rebecca Sunderman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (inorganic/materials chemistry, physical chemistry) is interested in the synthesis and property characterization of new bismuth-containing materials. These compounds have been characterized as electronic conductors, attractive activators for luminescent materials, second harmonic generators and oxidation catalysts for several organic compounds. Traditional solid-state synthesis methods will be utilized to prepare new complex bismuth oxides. Once synthesized, powder x-ray diffraction patterns will be obtained and material properties such as conductivity, melting point, biocidal tendency, coherent light production and magnetic behavior will be examined when appropriate. Rebecca Sunderman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. Richard Weiss Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Her areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing, and hardware modeling languages. Sheryl Shulman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Emily Lardner
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students who are interested in understanding the relationship between teaching and learning, including students who are interested in pursuing a career in education (at any level--from preschool through college, and in any role--from counselor to teacher to administrator) as well as students who would like to examine the principles and practices embodied in education at Evergreen, are welcome to apply to join this research group. Students will develop their abilities to identify, analyze and synthesize studies related to the research questions. Students will also have opportunities to design individual or collaborative research projects related to the group’s research questions. We will function as a collaborative research group, and our focus will be on understanding how students develop as writers at an interdisciplinary liberal arts college with no required writing classes. We will examine early studies of student writing at Evergreen and current studies of students’ development as writers at colleges across the U.S. We will also review literature on the nature of disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding. Based on our collective review, we will develop research questions and design research studies that will allow us to probe a variety of topics including the following: Students who participate in this group for the whole year will have opportunities to develop their own research projects related to teaching and learning. Students may choose to organize their work so that it culminates in submissions to peer-reviewed national journals like Y Emily Lardner Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Greg Mullins
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students of the humanities who are nearing the end of their Evergreen education may wish to pursue a major research project, senior thesis or capstone project in their particular field of interest. Often, the goal is to contruct an original argument around a particular body of literature, set of ideas or historical events. These kinds of projects develop advanced research skills in the humanities, including the ability to read deeply and critically in a particular field, and to discover and engage with important theoretical writings in that field. Students will also gain valuable skills in reading, analyzing, synthesizing, writing and editing long pieces of complex prose. The best kinds of this work will be invaluable for graduate school applications, and will be an asset to those entering the job market directly following graduation. (American literature, queer theory) specializes in twentieth-century and contemporary literature and comparative American Studies (U.S./Brazil). His broad interests include the crossroads of aesthetics and politics, national versus transnational formations of literary studies, queer gender and sexuality, memory studies and poststructuralist theory. Most of the capstone projects he has supervised in the past have been centrally concerned with literary and cultural theory, including visual culture and queer theory. Students are enthusiastically welcome to work with Greg on his research on cultures of human rights and representations of human rights in literature and film. Greg Mullins Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Stacey Davis
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students of the humanities who are nearing the end of their Evergreen education may wish to pursue a major research project, senior thesis or capstone project in their particular field of interest. Often, the goal is to contruct an original argument around a particular body of literature, set of ideas or historical events. These kinds of projects develop advanced research skills in the humanities, including the ability to read deeply and critically in a particular field, and to discover and engage with important theoretical writings in that field. Students will also gain valuable skills in reading, analyzing, synthesizing, writing and editing long pieces of complex prose. The best kinds of this work will be invaluable for graduate school applications, and will be an asset to those entering the job market directly following graduation. (European history) specializes in French history from the 18th century to the present, as well as the history of French colonies in North and West Africa. Students who wish to study European social, cultural, political, intellectual or religious history from the Middle Ages to the present, including topics in the history of gender and sociocultural aspects of the history of art, are welcome to propose research projects. Students are welcome to work with Dr. Davis on her ongoing research projects on 19th-century political prisoners, notions of citizenship and democracy in modern Europe, memory and the history of aging. Stacey Davis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Trevor Speller
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students of the humanities who are nearing the end of their Evergreen education may wish to pursue a major research project, senior thesis or capstone project in their particular field of interest. Often, the goal is to contruct an original argument around a particular body of literature, set of ideas or historical events. These kinds of projects develop advanced research skills in the humanities, including the ability to read deeply and critically in a particular field, and to discover and engage with important theoretical writings in that field. Students will also gain valuable skills in reading, analyzing, synthesizing, writing and editing long pieces of complex prose. The best kinds of this work will be invaluable for graduate school applications, and will be an asset to those entering the job market directly following graduation. (British/anglophone literature) specializes in the long eighteenth century (1650-1830), including the Restoration, the Enlightenment, and Romanticism. Students who wish to study the literature and political philosophy of these periods are welcome to propose research projects, including capstone projects and senior theses. Particular interests include the rise of the novel, the conception of reason and rationality and representations of space and place. Previous projects have included studies of Romantic women writers and travel writing. Students are also welcome to work with the faculty member to develop his ongoing research projects on such authors as Daniel Defoe, John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Bishop Berkeley, Jonathan Swift and John Milton. Trevor Speller Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring