2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Olympia


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Hirsh Diamant and Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students in this interdisciplinary program, which continues from Fall quarter, will learn how to cultivate a “sense of wonder” while building skills as writers, activists, artists, and interdisciplinary scholars.  Our work will combine theory and practice as we delve into the rich areas of literature, cultural studies, writing, creative arts, contemplative practice, natural history, and environmental/outdoor education.  We will explore how we develop roots to the natural world and explore themes related to natural history literature, the Pacific Northwest, and global multicultural traditions that have intimate connections to place, family, education, and artistic practice. At the core of our inquiry will be the questions:  What enlivens culture?  What motivates change?  Working from a rich, interdisciplinary perspective, we will study what it means to be rooted to place and how place connects us to a deep sense of purpose and meaning through word and image, language and tradition, stories and activism, and education and scholarship. Highlights of Winter quarter will include a three day Lunar New Year and Tai Ji celebration and Community Service work in areas of students’ interests.  Hirsh Diamant Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Evergreen students are expected to demonstrate integrative, independent, and critical thinking—that's one of the six expectations for graduates. Most often, students demonstrate their thinking in writing. The purpose of this course is to help you develop skills as a writer and thinker in academic programs across the curriculum. We will focus on critical components of academic writing, including skills related to working with ideas found in other writers' texts, whether those texts are books or articles or take some other form. We will explore preconceptions you have about what good writers do, investigate conventions for writing across academic fields, and practice a lot of writing. All levels welcome. Emily Lardner Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Andrea Gullickson and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Humans are unique products of adaptive evolution. Our most remarkable evolutionary features are associated with our overwhelmingly cultural brains, far more flexible and dynamic than the brains of any other creature on earth. But this level of uniqueness creates a problem in the quest to understand ourselves. How are we to comprehend human characteristics that have no parallel, and little precedent, elsewhere in the biota?Of all the unique cultural attributes of humans, music is uniquely perplexing. It exists in every culture, is a significant feature of nearly every human life. Music is produced by both males and females. It can be made with tools as elaborate as a piano, or as sparingly as with a single human voice. It is both collaborative and solitary. It can be enjoyed as a participant or spectator. And music is powerful—reaching into our deepest emotional core where it has the capacity to trigger profound responses, often with zero associated narrative content.This program will confront this deepest evolutionary mystery full force, and on its own terms. We will cultivate an appreciation and comprehension of the structure, meaning and effect of music as we address the evolutionary mechanisms that must have produced it. We will strive as a learning community to experience music’s full glory and mystery, while we grapple rigorously with it as an evolutionary phenomenon. Weekly program activities will include reading, focused listening, workshops, lectures and seminars. Together we will approach program content in a manner that is accessible to students with little background in these areas, while still challenging those with prior experience.  Andrea Gullickson Bret Weinstein Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Terry Ford
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Full While children's literature meets the developmental needs of children grades K-6, adolescent literature  meets the developmental needs of middle and high school ages (grades 6-12).  Participants will learn about adolescent literature in an historical perspective, young adult development in reading, and genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique a variety of genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts. Terry Ford Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Terry Setter
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a year-long long sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording and producing music. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history, and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students’ ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio. In fall, students will train to pass the related proficiency test and develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic history of audio production. Topics and activities will include basic acoustics; microphone design and placement; the use of compressors, limiters, and console block diagrams; and the theory of digital audio recording, with a strong emphasis on Digidesign’s Pro Tools software.  In winter, students will be provided with increasingly advanced instruction and exercises in the use of recording technologies with an emphasis on Pro Tools software, a number of plug-ins, and the creation of mixes, including those for inclusion in the Evergreen Student CD Project. Topics and activities will include techniques for recording a rock band, mixing techniques, and applications of various signal processors.  In spring, students will work to create well-balanced, innovative tracking and mixing. There will be an emphasis on mastering techniques and a field trip to four of Seattle’s most active recording studios.  The courses do not cover music production from electronic sources. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sheryl Shulman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full This class will focus on developing programming techniques in a variety of programming languages. Possible languages include C, C++, Java, Haskell, ML, and OCAML. This is an opportunity to explore languages in more depth, increase you expertise in programming, prepare for more advanced work, and increase the depth and breadth of your programming background. In connection with the practical programming component we will also read papers on programming language design, emphasizing recent language innovations such as generics, multi-paradigm languages, the introduction of lambda terms and their role, and higher-order programming. Computer Science Sheryl Shulman Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Dylan Fischer, Abir Biswas, Lin Nelson, Erik Thuesen, Alison Styring and Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market. studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords. studies plant ecology and physiology in the Intermountain West and southwest Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, genes to ecosystems approaches, plant physiology, carbon balance, species interactions, community analysis and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (academic.evergreen.edu/projects/EEON). See more about his lab's work at: academic.evergreen.edu/f/fischerd/E3.htm. studies and is involved with advocacy efforts on the linkages between environment, health, community and social justice. Students can become involved in researching environmental health in Northwest communities and Washington policy on phasing out persistent, bio-accumulative toxins. One major project students can work on is the impact of the Asarco smelter in Tacoma, examining public policy and regional health. studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics, natural history collections and bird research in the EEON. Bioacoustic research includes editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from Bornean rainforests. Work with the natural history collections includes bird specimen preparation and specimen-based research, including specimens from Evergreen's Natural History Collections and other collections in the region. Work with EEON includes observational and acoustic surveys of permanent ecological monitoring plots in The Evergreen State College campus forest. conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology. Dylan Fischer Abir Biswas Lin Nelson Erik Thuesen Alison Styring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Abir Biswas
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Abir Biswas Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Alison Styring
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dylan Fischer
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring plant ecology and physiology, field ecology, restoration ecology Dylan Fischer Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Erik Thuesen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Erik Thuesen Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This 12-credit program, Advanced Writer's Workshop, is designed for 15 students who already have a foundation in writing fiction and/or creative non-fiction.  Through our writing, reading and review of film as a medium, we will examine and practice the craft of creating rich characters, vibrant scenes, and crisp dialogue.  During spring quarter, students will produce one memoir-based piece, a short story or novel chapter, and a “student choice” writing block.  We will concentrate on the craft of revision with each section of writing.  Students should also expect to spend significant additional time critiquing peer work outside the classroom. Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Amadou Ba
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II Wolof is a language spoken in Senegal, West Africa. This class is an introduction to the Wolof language, culture and tradition. The class will put an emphasis on oral expression giving ample opportunities for student interaction through drills, exercises and role plays. Students will learn greetings, family relationships, and expressions for basic needs, as well as how to get by linguistically and culturally in various situations. Students will study the basic grammatical structure of the Wolof language and vocabulary.This class is appropriate for students who are interested in studying linguistics, learning a new language or traveling to West Africa.  Amadou Ba Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 13 Fall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 14Winter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 13 Fall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 14Winter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary times. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history, media and popular culture to investigate the lives of these men and women lives, their historical, cultural and spiritual contexts and legacies.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills and insights about the mis-education/re-education process through a quarter -long reflective journal project , a mid -quarter contextual research project;  and an end-of-the-quarter final paper and a collaborative performance about the journey from mis-education to education and those factors that allow one to retain their humanity in spite of horrific dehumanizing attempts. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Rik Smoody
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Computers are a driving force of our modern world and increasingly influence our lives. Mathematics and mathematical models lay at the foundation of modern computers; furthermore, we increasingly rely on mathematics as a language for understanding the natural world, such as complex climate models that predict major changes in weather patterns world wide over the next 50 years. Mathematics and computational thinking enable people as citizens to make good decisions on a wide range of issues from interpreting the evidence for climate change to understanding the potential impacts of technology; as such, they are an integral part of a liberal arts education. In this program, we will explore connections between mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences and graphic arts.We will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills to express, analyze and solve simple problems in the sciences and the arts and explore how to program interesting visual shapes using simple geometry. Class sessions include seminars, lectures, problem-solving workshops, programming labs, problem sets and seminars with writing assignments. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical and statistical thinking and expression along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, algorithms, programming and problem solving, with seminar readings about the role of mathematics in education, the sciences and society.This program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or before pursuing further work in the sciences or the arts. Rik Smoody Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall Algebraic Thinking develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and data analysis.  Collaborative learning is emphasized. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Julia Zay
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II   Julia Zay Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Steven Niva and Peter Bohmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter It is easier to criticize contemporary capitalism for its failures than to develop feasible alternatives and a strategy to get there. We will explore and critically analyze diverse social movements and visions that seek to create more just global and national societies. International institutions such as the WTO, IMF and World Bank promote “free market” and “free trade” capitalist globalization which open up countries to multinational corporations and impose Western development models. In the past few decades, many alternative visions have developed within the global justice movement and have been renewed through more recent “occupy” and anti-austerity movements in Europe (Greece and Spain), the United States and the Global South. They draw upon historical precedents and alternatives to capitalism, from anti-colonial and socialist movements to the new left, situationist and anarchist movements after 1968.We will analyze existing capitalist globalization and current U.S. capitalism and then look at how diverse social movements and thinkers have formulated alternative visions for creating just, liberatory, democratic and sustainable societies. We will explore different and sometimes clashing alternatives to national and global capitalism that have developed around the world. These will include those influenced by socialist, Marxist, anarchist, anti-authoritarian, ecological, feminist and perspectives emanating from the Global South. We will research and evaluate case studies of existing and possible alternatives from Cuba, Venezuela, Argentina, Bolivia, and those derived from cooperatives, intentional communities, participatory socialism and eco-feminist alternatives in the U.S. and elsewhere. We will analyze alternatives to NAFTA and other “free trade” agreements such as ALBA, and global visions of equity and justice, including climate justice. We will also look at strategies, ideologies and visions of alternative societies in the “occupy” and other current movements.The program will include a focus on theoretical debates over strategies and goals of movements, including debates about the role of states, the limitations of reforms, insurrectionist visions and the role of pre-figurative strategies and of creating alternative communities that bypass political institutions. We will pay special attention to the conditions facing women in their changing roles in the global system of production and consumption, ecological concerns and the struggles of indigenous peoples for survival and self-determination.Students will engage these topics and case studies through lectures, seminar discussion, group projects, films and guest speakers. Our activities will include theoretical reading, analytic and critical thinking about the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches, and imagining and formulating fresh views of the facts and possible futures of capitalist globalization. Steven Niva Peter Bohmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Stephanie Coontz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring This program explores changes in the social construction and cultural expectations of family life and intimate relations, from colonial times to the present. We begin by delving into the very different values and behaviors of colonial families and then trace changes in love, marriage, parenting, and family arrangements under the influence of the American Revolution and the spread of wage labor. We study the gender and sexual norms of the 19th century, including variation by race and class, then examine the changes pioneered in the early 20th century. We discuss the rise of the 1950s male breadwinner family and then follow its demise from the 1960s through the 1980s. We end the quarter by discussing new patterns of partnering and parenting in the past 30 years,Readings will be challenging, and there will be frequent writing assignments. All students are expected to complete all assignments and participate in workshops and seminar discussions. Credit depends upon consistent attendance and preparation and a demonstrated mastery of the subject matter.This class is excellent preparation for graduate work or professional employment in history, sociology, law, American studies, social work, and psychology. It provides needed context and background for people working in the social services or education. sociology, history, family studies, research, social work, teaching, family law and counseling. Stephanie Coontz Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Beth Schoenberg
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2, 4 02 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full This summer course offers continued study of American Sign Language for students who have completed two or three quarters.  Emphasis is on conversational skills, presentation of narratives, and receptive skills.  Non-manuals, use of space and directionality, depicting verbs, and narrative structure will be covered.  Students will work somewhat independently at their current level, and in small groups with others at their level.Students registering for ASL 3 should use CRNs 40007 (full session), 40008 (first session), or 40009 (second session).Students registering for ASL 4 should use CRNs 40010 (full session), 40011 (first session), or 40012 (second session). Beth Schoenberg Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Beth Schoenberg
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In winter quarter we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In spring quarter we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events. Beth Schoenberg Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Beth Schoenberg
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In winter quarter we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In spring quarter we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events. Beth Schoenberg Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Rachel Hastings and Steven Scheuerell
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a yearlong interdisciplinary program that incorporates sociolinguistics, geography, history, cultural ecology, global change, biocultural diversity conservation, food systems and sustainable development studies to explore how societies evolve and survive in relation to their environment and a globalizing world. Our studies are based on the belief that many cultures have developed rich linguistic and ecological traditions that have provided the means for communication, food, clothing and shelter based on a sustainable relationship with the land. More recently, cultural and economic globalization are increasingly impacting local knowledge systems worldwide, in particular when measured by changes to language, land-use and food systems. These changes, together with such factors as increasing human population, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and climate change, compel us to explore the ways in which knowledge systems are preserved or lost. In particular, we recognize the urgent need to preserve cultural knowledge that allows a society to be rooted in place, recognize ecological limits and provide for its needs. The Andean region of South America is an ideal region to study these issues.The academic program consists of two phases. The first phase over fall quarter will focus on program themes using texts, lectures, workshops, film, writing and local field trips. Fall quarter the program will be offered for 12 credits to provide students with the option to separately register for an appropriate Spanish language course. Selection for the second phase over winter and spring quarters will be based upon criteria including successful completion of fall quarter work, demonstrated readiness for study abroad and Spanish language ability. In winter and spring, students will be full time in the program, which will be offered for 16 credits per quarter. Winter quarter will begin with 5 weeks of travel preparations and intensive study on Peru, followed by a 15-week study abroad experience in the Cusco region of the Peruvian Andes that incorporates intensive Spanish or Quechua language study, regional travel, seminars, urban and rural home stays and independent research or service learning with local organizations. At the end of the independent project period, we will reconvene for final student presentations and evaluation conferences in the Sacred Valley near Cusco.As the former Incan capital, and home to vibrant cultures and immense biodiversity, the Cusco region of Peru offers immersion in the study of biocultural diversity and how the preservation of linguistic diversity is related to the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge, biodiversity and local food systems. While in Peru, we will continue language and cultural studies while experiencing regional initiatives to preserve cultural landscapes and indigenous knowledge systems in the midst of development pressure. Given the region's rich history, knowledge systems, architecture, agriculture, weaving, ceramics and music, we will ask how is knowledge transferred across generations and between communities, and how can traditional knowledge be maximized in sustainable development projects?  As we address these academic questions, our own experiences will also lead us on to consider on a more individual level how learning another language and traveling abroad can increase our understanding of culture and what it means to fit into place. Rachel Hastings Steven Scheuerell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Heather Heying
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring What do animals do, how do they do it and why? In this two-quarter-long investigation of animal behavior, a continuation of Genes and Evolution in fall quarter, students will answer these questions through extensive use of the scientific literature, in-depth discussions of the evolutionary and ecological theories fundamental to the study of behavior, independent research projects and several weeks in the field, including a multi-week trip to tropical ecosystems in Ecuador.Animals hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young and so much more. They do so with the tools of their physiology, anatomy, and, in some cases, culture, for reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. In this program, we will begin with a review of animal diversity, and continue our studies of behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex and often contradictory scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field through lectures, workshops and take-home exams, as well as undertake their own, intensive field research. Some topics covered in this program will include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, game theory, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution. Several readings will focus on one group of animals in particular: the primates, including  Continuing the focus on theory and statistics begun in Genes and Evolution, we will travel to Ecuador to study the differences and similarities between the neotropics and the Pacific Northwest, focusing on the animals and their behavior. Particular attention will be paid to the herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) that live in lowland rainforests. In spring quarter, having studied the methods, statistics and literature frequently used in behavioral research, students will generate their own hypotheses and go into the field to test them through extensive, independent field research. This work might be in Ecuador or the Pacific Northwest. Students will return to campus for the last two weeks of spring quarter to complete their data analysis and present their research.  Heather Heying Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Why do humans keep pets and at the same time raise animals for food? What are the psychological and moral complexities that characterize our relationships with animals? What is the impact of human–animal interactions on the health and well-being of people and animals? How do we assess the relative welfare of animals under a variety of circumstances? Anthrozoology is the interdisciplinary study of human (anthro) and animal (zoo) interaction. This topic of inquiry will be used to study general biology, zoology, anthropology and philosophy. Through field trips, guest speakers, reading, writing and discussion, students will become familiar with the multiple and often paradoxical ways we relate to companion animals, animals for sport, zoo animals, wildlife, research animals and food animals. We will use our collective experiences, along with science-based and value-based approaches, to critically examine the ever-changing role of animals in society.We will begin the quarter by focusing on the process of animal domestication in different cultures from an evolutionary and historical perspective. Through the formal study of animal ethics, students will also become familiar with different philosophical positions on the use of animals. Physiology and neuroscience will be used to investigate the physical and mental lives of animals while simultaneously exploring domestic animal behavior. Students will explore the biological basis and psychological aspects of the human-animal bond. Students will then study the science of animal welfare and complete a final project in which they will apply their scientific and ethical knowledge to a controversial and contemporary animal welfare question.Students will be expected to read primary literature in such diverse fields as animal science, ethology, neurobiology, sociobiology, anthropology and philosophy. Student success in this program will depend on commitment to in-depth understanding of complex topics and an ability to combine empirical knowledge and philosophical reflection. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Paula Schofield and Andrew Brabban
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring The aim of this program is to apply fundamental knowledge and theories of biology and chemistry to practical, real world situations. The application of biology and chemistry has huge impacts on our society, particularly influencing our economy and quality of life. Cutting edge techniques and processes are continually being developed by biologists and chemists to produce the medicines, chemicals and materials we use daily. Products include pharmaceuticals—from synthetic drugs to gene therapies—used to prevent disease and cure illness; biocompatible materials for use in the medical field; fossil-fuel derived synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, rubbers, etc.); and modern "green" or "sustainable" materials that include biodegradable polymers. These products are widely used by the general public, as well as in a wide array of industries and professions: agriculture, sports, health-care, law enforcement, the military, automotive, food, etc.We will focus on the practical applications of modern biology and chemistry, studying both small and large molecules, natural and synthetic. Based significantly in the laboratory, students will learn the theoretical principles and relevant lab and instrumentation techniques needed to synthesize, isolate and analyze small molecules and macromolecules. We will examine small biological molecules as well as organic molecules, moving to important biological macromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, biodegradable polymers, green materials). Theory and techniques of molecular cloning, protein biochemistry, biocatalysis and transgenics will be emphasized, as well as synthesis and characterization of relevant organic molecules, polymers and green materials. Seminars on technical literature and student presentations will be significant components of the program. We will also discuss the professional biologist's and chemist's relationship with industry, government and universities, and examine employment opportunities for biologists and chemists. Students will be evaluated based on their laboratory techniques, laboratory reports, class presentations and homework assignments. Paula Schofield Andrew Brabban Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Rob Cole
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Sustainability - what does it mean? Sustainability for whom? Consumption, social stratification, increased indebtedness, and environmental destruction are existing hallmarks of ‘civilization.’ Many of our current cultural, social and economic systems are unsustainable. This program will explore different visions of sustainability that offer alternatives to the dominant industrial/corporate model. We will examine approaches taken by different groups of people, in differing circumstances, to forge a more just, equitable and sustainable future that doesn’t outstrip the regenerative capacity of our ecosystem.In particular, we will compare and contrast two major approaches to sustainability; that of The Natural Step, and that of ‘transition communities.’ We will explore how these visions address equity and justice in the face of climate change, social stratification and ecosystem degradation. We will examine metrics and indicators of sustainability, and various measures of the regenerative capacity of the planet. We will survey a wide array of actions individuals and groups can take to foster a future that is more sustainable and more equitable and just for both human and other species.Through workshops, readings, films, personal audits and seminar discussions, students will engage a variety of sustainability concepts and approaches. They will learn skills useful in assessing actions that foster sustainability, and they will explore the habits of mind so essential to taking action in the twenty-first century.  Rob Cole Mon Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In this year-long sequence, students will learn to read and write in both classical and modern Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries.  (All Muslims are instructed to pray in Arabic.)  By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level.  The objectives are to continually increase vocabulary; to learn suffixes, pronouns, and verbs for personalization; to learn to conjugate verbs; and to recognize proper and inverted sentences as well as those starting with infinitive verbs and indefinite nouns.  Students are required to master verbs tenses, superlatives, sentence analyzing, and subject-verb agreement as well as all other areas of grammar.  Students will also learn some songs, short poems, and stories while studying Arabic culture and learning some conversational Arabic.  Yasmin Khattab Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Steven Niva
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This five week intensive summer program introduces students to both written Arabic and basic conversational Arabic in order to provide the foundations for further study in the Arabic language.   Students will learn basic phrases, vocabulary and grammar used in conversational Arabic and learned how to use it in informal situations.  Students will also learn to read and write modern standard Arabic used in written publications and materials, with an emphasis on learning the alphabet, reading and writing words and basic grammar.  In the final week of the program, students will bring together their learning from both colloquial and written Arabic learning for review and final projects.  The program is organized around a series of texts, exercises and assignments, including several class presentations and a final presentation. Steven Niva Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Anthony Tindill
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full Architectural Design Studio will introduce students to intensive architectural design practices and principles.  This program will be studio based and students will investigate and apply their ideas about buildings and architecture through comprehensive design projects.  Students will participate in conceiving, designing and presenting their projects in an open class forum.  They will learn best design practices and develop their own design process.  Students in this program will gain experience in idea generation, application of architectural theory and principles, design development, design drawing and presentation practices.  Other topics explored may include concepts of structural design, architectural history, and interior design theory. Key Texts may be Norbert Lechner, Andrea Oppenheimer Dean and Francis Ching, Anthony Tindill Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Chamberlain and Gail Tremblay
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How does place affect the worldview and visions of writers, poets, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers from diverse cultures in the Americas? How can we develop an ecological and ethical identity that shapes culture and place through creative and artistic practice? As we study art history, natural history, and the natural world, we will use these questions to explore our connections to the earth and place through analysis and creation of poems, essays, and multimedia art projects. Through observations of the natural world, we will cultivate our ability to heighten sensory perceptions and gain insights that feed metaphors, images, and imagination.  As we examine the way in which our relationships to words, images, myths, cultural teachings, stories, and the arts enhance our understanding, we will reflect on the strategies we need to address environmental education, activism, and the ecological challenges and health of our planet.Readings include essays by American Transcendentalists like Thoreau, Emerson, and Fuller, and natural history writers and eco-poets such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Terry Tempest Williams, Linda Hogan, Alice Walker, Mary Austin, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Gary Snyder, David Abrahm, Pablo Neruda, Eric Chock, and other diverse writers.   Field trips and workshops include hikes, natural history observations, writing, a trip to Mt Rainier, and visits to museums, cultural, and arts events like the “Procession of the Species,” and the “Cascadia Poetry Festival.” We will work to develop practices of close observation of the natural world to fuel creativity. The quarter’s work will include the creation of art, poetry, personal essay, and a creative journal that allows us to refine our observations of local places, and to sketch and develop concepts for use in our artistic practice.   Students of different skill levels will work on improving their writing and editing abilities so they can write and work towards publication.  They will create multimedia art installations on campus and in the community, submitting proposals for one individual art project, and one group collaborative artistic project, and preparing the works for public presentation by the end of Spring quarter.Assignments:  Writing includes a personal essay about place, a series of ten poems, and a creative journal.  Art includes an individual multimedia installation and a group multimedia installation. Each student is responsible for presenting one of the projects on which they worked, in a community setting.  Note: This class was formerly called Creativity and Diversity in American Culture: Art and Narrative in Response to Place.  You can review fall and winter quarters at: Rebecca Chamberlain Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Emilie Bess
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II From parasites to pollinators, insects have shaped human society from the beginning. explores our intimate relationships with the bugs that we rely on and the bugs that we fear, the central role that insects play in our biosphere, and the unique adaptations that have led to their unparalleled diversity. This class introduces students to insect diversity and ecology, field techniques, and specimen preservation. Each full-day session includes outdoor field work. We learn to draw insects, emphasizing the importance of careful observation of morphology and behavior as learning tools. We also discuss the influence of insects on pop culture and modern society. Graphic arts, such as graphic story telling (e.g. comics), design of insect costumes, and other visual learning tools are integrated into student projects. Emilie Bess Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Gail Tremblay
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Mary Dean
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Olivier Soustelle
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6 04 06 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class surveys world art history since 1500 from the Renaissance to the 20th century.  We will focus on paintings, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in Europe, North America, and Asia.  Credit possible in either art history or world cultures/civilizations. Students earn 4 credits during two weeks of intensive class meetings, June 23 to July 3, 2014. Students enrolled for 6 credits will then have the remainder of the summer session to research and write essays, with faculty guidance.  This is a companion class to "Europe Since 1500." Olivier Soustelle Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The fall course is designed with a focus on children of preschool age.  Courses in winter and spring will focus on the elementary years and allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The winter course is designed with a focus on children in their elementary years.  An additional course in spring will allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Hirsh Diamant
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This opportunity for student-originated studies is designed for students who have taken one or both of the courses in fall and winter quarters and wish to further pursue the topics of those courses.  In the first week of the quarter, each student will submit their project proposal and then complete that project during the quarter. This proposal will be designed with input from the faculty member.All students will also participate in readings, classes, and on-line assignments in collaboration with other students.  A weekly class meeting will include seminars, workshops, and opportunities to share learning and project work.  Weekly on-line posts will highlight students' progress and learning. Students must attend and participate in all weekly sessions. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Chico Herbison and Frances V. Rains
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall “The rain feels heavy/on the gray sidewalks of America.” —James Masao Mitsui, Japanese American poet of the Pacific Northwest Embedded among the bricks of the Japanese American Historical Plaza—part of a picturesque waterfront park in Portland, Oregon—are thirteen granite and basalt stones. Engraved on those “story stones” are poems that, in harmony with the overall design of the plaza itself, help illuminate the tragedies and triumphs of Japanese in Oregon. Along with their counterparts in Washington State, communities of Oregon Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants, including “war brides” and a “mixed-race” population) have helped define—historically, culturally, and in other ways—the Pacific Northwest. Yet, their story is not well known, either nationally or here in this place of “rain and gray sidewalks.”This program will explore the rich, but still frequently overlooked, history and culture of Nikkei, from their first arrival in this country, through the traumatic events of the World War II period, and beyond. Although we will examine the overall experience of Nikkei in the United States, our particular focus will be on those in the Pacific Northwest. Accompanying us on our interdisciplinary journey will be historical studies, oral testimony, fiction and poetry, photographs and film, and music, among other texts and tools. We will immerse ourselves in topics such as the earliest Japanese immigration; the 19th- and 20th-century struggles against discrimination and exclusion; the World War II internment experience (including an examination of the resistance movement in the internment camps, and the legendary exploits of Nikkei soldiers in both theaters of the war); the post-war efforts by Nikkei to reassemble their lives and, for some, to seek redress and reparations; the saga of Japanese “war brides” (women who married U.S. servicemen in Occupied Japan and eventually migrated stateside); and the world of “mixed-race” Nikkei.Each student will read a series of seminar books and articles related to program topics and themes; participate in weekly seminars and write weekly seminar papers; participate in workshops; and screen and critically analyze films. In addition, there will be field trips to Pacific Northwest locations with Nikkei historical and cultural connections. Finally, students will complete substantial, individual research projects and make summative presentations of their work. This program was formerly entitled Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: "We carry strength, dignity and soul." Chico Herbison Frances V. Rains Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Chico Herbison
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter —Blue Scholars, Seattle hip-hop duo (from “Evening Chai”) From Bruce Lee to Harold & Kumar, henna to hip-hop, bulgogi to pho, manga to , Asians and Asian Americans have left an indelible imprint on U.S. popular culture. As eloquently noted by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, “[f]ew of us are immune to popular culture’s intimate address or to its pleasures and affirmations, frustrations and denials” ( ). It is, indeed, that lack of immunity and a restless hunger to understand those “pleasures, affirmations, frustrations, and denials” that will sustain us on our 10-week journey. We will begin the quarter with two fundamental questions—“What is an Asian American?” and “What is popular culture?"—that will lead us to (1) an exploration of the major historical, cultural, social, and political contours of the Asian American experience, and (2) an immersion in critical theoretical perspectives on culture in general, and popular culture in particular. We will devote the remainder of the quarter to an examination of the complex, and frequently vexed, ways in which Asians and Asian Americans have been represented in U.S. popular culture and, more importantly, how members of those communities have become active of popular culture. Our approach, throughout the quarter, will be interdisciplinary, multilayered, and transgressive in its insistence on an intertextuality that moves beyond the commonly interrogated categories of race, gender, and class. Students will read selected fiction, poetry, comics and graphic novels, scholarly articles, and other written texts. There will be weekly screenings and analysis of documentaries and a range of fiction films, such as martial arts films and anime. We will also explore Asian American popular culture in music, photography and other visual art, bodies, and cuisine. Students will participate in weekly seminars and workshops, submit short weekly writing assignments, and produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. Field trips may include visits to Pacific Northwest locations with Asian/Pacific Islander historical and cultural connections, and to off-campus film, music, and other venues.   Chico Herbison Tue Tue Thu Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I To understand literacy assessment, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses and workshops that will address formal and informal literacy assessment. Topics include diagnostic reading tests, informal reading inventories, cueing systems and miscue analysis, nonfiction text features and formats, qualitative and quantitative readability assessment, content area reading assessment, and scripted curricula assessments. : For members of the class who are licensed teachers or who intend to become licensed teachers, The Evergreen State College offers this course as one of five courses that leads to a Washington State reading endorsement. The other courses are Instructional Methods in Literacy (offered in summer 2014), Foundations of Literacy and Research in Literacy (offered in summer 2015), and Children’s Literature or Adolescent Literature (offered every summer). Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This class is focused on fieldwork and activities designed for amateur astronomers and those interested in inquiry-based science education, as well as those interested in exploring mythology, archeo-astronomy, literature, philosophy, history, and cosmological traditions.   Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories under the night sky to working in a computer lab to create educational planetarium programs. We will employ qualitative and quantitative methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry based learning and engage the imagination. Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. We will participate in field studies at the Oregon Star Party as we develop our observation skills, learn to use binoculars, star-maps, and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, and operate 8” and 10” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects. We will camp in the desert and do fieldwork for a week. Rebecca Chamberlain Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Sunderman
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In previous chemistry work, you learned what the atomic orbital shapes were. In this program, you will explore how we know their shape. In previous chemistry work, you learned what a conductor was. In this program, you will examine the solid-state structural characteristics that indicate a material is a potential conductor. You will explore the "But why?" of chemistry by examining topics in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, kinetics and materials chemistry. Many of the topics require a strong mathematical foundation and comfort with calculus applications.In the lecture component, faculty will present the laws of thermodynamics, enthalpy, entropy, chemical potential, phase diagrams, Gibbs free energy, reaction spontaneity, solid-state structure, solid-state bonding theories, point group symmetry, applications of symmetry, transition metal complexes, materials synthesis, Maxwell relations, the Schrodinger equation, atomic and molecular energy levels, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, unimolecular kinetics, biomolecular kinetics and current kinetic theories.During fall quarter, students will participate in physical chemistry and materials chemistry laboratory experiments. The laboratory component in the winter will train students to use and to explain the theory of several instruments for chemical analysis. In the spring, students will focus on enhancing skills in experimental design and research methods with the incorporation of team research projects surrounding a historical experiment in chemistry. In addition, emphasis will be placed on the development of technical writing skills and on interpretation and integration of issues pertaining to chemistry and society. Rebecca Sunderman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Zenaida Vergara
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses introduces the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Winter continues this work while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb, and digital effects processing.  In spring, additional topics will include sound design for film with sync sound production for dialogue, Foley, sound effects, and music composition. There will also be an interview-style production meant for radio broadcast.  In each quarter, students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Steve Blakeslee
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring "Could a greater miracle take place," writes Henry David Thoreau, "than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant?" This two-quarter program will approach autobiography (literally, "self-life-writing") as a powerful way to make sense of human experience, particularly in times, places, and social and political settings that differ from our own. In seminars, students will delve into the rich and intricate issues of memory, authority, persona, and truth that face every self-portraying writer. In "writing marathons," they will learn to write freely and fearlessly about their memories, thoughts, and emotions. Finally, students will develop substantial memoir-essays of their own. humanities and education. Steve Blakeslee Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Alison Styring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Birds are considered important indicators of habitat quality and are often the focus of conservation-oriented research, restoration, and monitoring.  A variety of field and analytical methods commonly used in bird monitoring and avian research will be covered.  Theory will be applied to practice in the field and lab where students will develop skills in fieldwork, data management, and statistical analysis.  Students will demonstrate their learning through active participation in all class activities; a detailed field journal; in-class, take-home, and field assignments; and a final project. An understanding of avian natural history is important to any successful project, and students without a working knowledge of the common birds in the South Puget Sound region are expected to improve their identification skills to a level that will allow them to effectively contribute to class efforts both in the field and in class. Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II  Great leadership begins with self-transformation and awakening the leader within.  Our world is fragile and can no longer sustain poor and unethical leadership.  Remaining a bystander is not an option for us anymore.  There is an urgent need for conscious and principled leaders who are driven by a set of universal values, a strong moral compass, and a deep desire to build a global society and a sustainable world.  This course provides students with a chance to examine their passion for change, formulate their vision and mission, and build leadership capacity to enable others to take action. Students in this course will have the opportunity to reflect, collaborate, and learn through individual and group activities including self-evaluation, cases, seminars, and team projects.  Dariush Khaleghi Fri Fri Sat Sat Sun Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 14Winter In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 13 Fall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 14Spring In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day F 13 Fall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day S 14Spring In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring The Basque Country is an ancient country the size of the Puget Sound region that sits between France and Spain. In this class we will explore Basque history, culture, and socio political movements including the Basque conflict. We will immerse ourselves in the prehistoric Basque language (Euskera) and learn about Mondragon, the largest worker owned industrial cooperative system in the world. Music, literature, art and gastronomy will be experienced and discussed in the class led by a native Basque from Mondragon. Amaia Martiartu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
John Schaub
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Session II Many cultures have a tradition of teachers and students spending time in wilderness. We’ll let wilderness work in us, inspire us and help immerse us in writing. Carrying our own food and shelter brings focus, and opens new viewpoints on sustainability. We’ll study and live Leave-No-Trace ethics as we paddle to Squaxin Island and backpack at Mts. Rainier, St. Helens and the Olympics. We’ll seminar, write and engage in peer review, with ongoing faculty feedback.This all-level program could be orientation for incoming students, and a chance for anyone to engage deeply with writing, and/or produce a finished publishable manuscript.Students who wish to extend work into the other session for additional credit may do so through individual learning contracts. John Schaub Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Yvonne Peterson, Michelle Aguilar-Wells and Gary Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How does a group of indigenous people from different countries: (1) create an activity to reclaim ancient knowledge? (2) develop communication strategies in the 21 century to build a foundation to support gatherings numbering in the thousands? (3) relate tribal governance/rights to state agreements and understandings? (4) appraise economic impacts on local/regional economies when a Tribe hosts a canoe journey destination? and, (5) how does one move to allyship with indigenous people and begin preparation for the historic journey from coastal villages of Northwest Washington to Bella Bella in British Columbia, Canada? Evergreen has a history of providing community service coordinated with the Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to Tribes during the canoe journeys. This program expands the venture by researching the canoe journey movement, understanding Treaty rights and sovereignty, economic justice, cultural preservation, and the social economic, political and cultural issues for present day Tribes participating in the 2014 canoe journey to Bella Bella. As a learning community, we’ll pose essential questions and research the contemporary phenomenon of the tribal canoe journeys to get acquainted with Tribes and Canoe Families and the historic cultural protocol to understand Native cultural revitalization in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia.Upper-division students will have the option to engage in service learning volunteer projects and program internships during winter and spring quarters. All students will participate in orientation(s) to the program theme and issues, historic and political frameworks, and work respectfully with communities and organizations. Participation in this program means practicing accountability to the learning community and to other communities, interacting as a respectful guest with other cultures, and engaging in constant communication with co-learners. Yvonne Peterson Michelle Aguilar-Wells Gary Peterson Mon Tue Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Bob Haft
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Summerwork is an intensive, hands-on program for students of all skill levels wishing to learn the basics of the 35mm camera (or larger format), darkroom techniques, aesthetics, and a short history of photography. Expect to shoot at least 20 rolls of film for full credit. A final project involves production of a book of photographs; each student will receive a copy at quarter’s end. Emphasis is placed on learning to see as an artist does, taking risks with one’s work, and being open to new ideas. Bob Haft Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Andrea Gullickson and Robert Esposito
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do our experiences in the performing arts impact our understanding of and relationship to our environment?  How can music and dance be used to transform lives?  This two-quarter, core program will focus on the study of music and dance as powerful methods for both exploring and expressing our experiences in the world.  Throughout the program we will examine fundamental concepts of music and dance and consider cultural and historical environments that influence the development of and give meaning to the arts. Our work with progressive skill development will require physical immersion into the practices of listening, moving, dancing and making music.  Theory and literature studies will require the development of a common working vocabulary, writing skills, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking skills.Weekly activities will include readings, lectures, seminars and interactive workshops, which will provide the basis for focused consideration of the ways in which our relationship with sound and motion impact our daily lives. Weekly in-program performance workshops will provide opportunities to gain first-hand understanding of fundamental skills and concepts as well as the transformative possibilities that exist through honest confrontation of challenging experiences. Weekly writing workshops and assignments will encourage thoughtful consideration of a broad range of program topics with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the power and importance of bringing one’s own voice into the conversation.This balanced approach to the development of physical craft, artistry and intellectual engagement is expected to culminate in a significant written and performance work each quarter. Andrea Gullickson Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Frederica Bowcutt
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program allows students to learn introductory and advanced plant science material in an interdisciplinary format. The program is suitable for both advanced and first year students who are looking for an opportunity to expand their understanding of plants and challenge themselves. Students will learn about plant anatomy, morphology and systematics. Lectures based on textbook readings will be supplemented with laboratory work. The learning community will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of major groups of plants such as mosses, ferns, conifers and flowering plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and in the field. To support their work in the field and lab, students will learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal. Instruction will be given in the history and practice of botanical illustration.A central focus of the program is people's relationships with plants for food, fiber, medicine and aesthetics. Economic botany will be studied through seminar texts, films, and lectures that examine agriculture, forestry, herbology and horticulture. Students will examine political economic factors that shape our relations with plants. Through economic and historical lenses, the learning community will inquire about why people have favored some plants and not others or radically changed their preferences, for example considering a former cash crop to be a weed. Readings will examine the significant roles botany has played in colonialism, imperialism and globalization. Students will also investigate the gender politics of botany. For example, botany was used to inculcate "appropriate" middle and upper class values among American women in the 19th century. Initiatives to foster more socially just and environmentally sustainable relations with plants will be investigated.In winter, students will write a major research paper on a plant of their choosing. Through a series of workshops, they will learn to search the scientific literature, manage bibliographic data and interpret and synthesize information, including primary sources. Through their research paper, students will synthesize scientific and cultural information about their plant. Frederica Bowcutt Mon Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Yvonne Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Johnson Charles, Jr., Lower Elwha Klallam This program is intended for students wishing to analyze a modern day dilemma: American Indians have standing in their land, cultural protocols, and legal relationships with the U.S. Government; the State of Washington wants/needs to repair a bridge and provide jobs; and local community people plan to develop a waterfront. Students will use the text , related print/non-print documents, the case study and interview WSDOT employees and Lower Elwha Klallam tribal members to formulate cross-cultural communication models. Students will build an academic foundation in law and public policy as they move from theory to praxis using the following texts: , , and . We are interested in providing an environment of collaboration in which faculty and learners will ask essential questions, identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics. Learners will be exposed to research methods, the politics of ethnographic research, interview techniques, writing workshops, and educational technology. Students will effectively use Bloom’s Taxonomy, develop essential questions, and commit to Paul’s 35 Elements of Critical Thinking. Students will also use the expectations of an Evergreen graduate and the five foci as a guide to their development.  Students will have the opportunity to improve their skills in self- and group-motivation as well as communication (including dialogue, email, resources on the Web and our moodle site).Students (in groups) will propose, undertake and evaluate a three-week ethnographic interview project to understand how student groups have formed on campus and the politics of their existence. Students will present their academic project during week ten. Yvonne Peterson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Joli Sandoz and Gillies Malnarich
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Placing yourself in the changing world is a worldchanging act," writes Edward C. Wolff, researcher and specialist in the natural history of global change.  In Building Resilient Communities we will learn the integrative skills needed to influence and adapt to change as we consider selected social and ecological paradoxes facing us and future generations. Program participants will have multiple opportunities to develop the habits of mind of analytic, creative, and resilient thinkers who take the time to formulate problems before seeking solutions and who work with others to create life-affirming choices.  Clear and thoughtful writing and opportunities to develop personal perspectives on cultivating a culture of resilience and community-building across significant differences will be essential components of our work together. Throughout the program, we will place ourselves in the swirl and mix of complex problems. Program participants will discover hidden dimensions of the "familiar" as we rely on close observation and current qualitative and quantitative research to help us first envision and then move toward communities in which all people thrive. Research in winter quarter will deepen our understanding of the challenges facing local communities and how government, non-profit organizations, and the "public" engage with them. Spring work will focus on dynamic community-building, including planning, decision-making, and collaborative action. Students in spring will also work through a complex problem of their choice, integrating theory and practice. In all program efforts, we will be especially attentive to the following lines of inquiry and their implications: how best to address inequities and complexity within community-building efforts, how to gather and use public information to serve the common good, and how to steer present change into a sustainable future. Joli Sandoz Gillies Malnarich Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Theresa Aragon and Lee Lyttle
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long, weekend-intensive, business and management program will assess business, management, and leadership in both the public and private sectors.  We will explore these in the context of contemporary technological advances and globalization and will examine organizations and governmental agencies within their economic, political, and social environment.  Organizational development and management strategies will be analyzed in terms of current and future utility and the delivery of the public good.  Traditional elements of management such as decision making, strategic planning, organizational behavior, human resources, and conflict management are incorporated throughout the program.  Application of theory and enhancement of critical thinking will occur through problem solving and case study analyses.  Assignments will place a heavy emphasis on developing analytical, verbal, written, and electronic communication skills through dialogue, seminars, critical essays, training modules, research papers, and formal presentations.  Managerial skills will be developed through scenario building, scripting, role-play, and case development among other techniques.Winter quarter will focus on strategic management theory, policy analysis, and developing the ability to plan and execute a strategic plan. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of basic finance, economic, and strategic management concepts.  Skill development objectives will include the ability to utilize analytical tools to assess a company’s or agency’s performance and to develop recommendations to ensure continued success in either sector. Spring quarter will focus on applying managerial skills and strategic management concepts and analytical tools in the workplace through internships.  Selected concepts in change management and managing people will be analyzed in terms of their utility in the workplace. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of change management and of managing people.  Skill development objectives will include the ability to critique and apply people and change management concepts in the public or private sector workplace.Students will be accepted in the program for winter quarter with signature approval of the faculty. Theresa Aragon Lee Lyttle Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Success in international business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in international trade, globalization, and intercultural communication. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of international business, communications, and finance. This course focuses on the international and community development aspect of business management, namely international trade, marketing, intercultural communication, globalization, and international organizations.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in economics, finance, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of government public policies, business cycles, and community development. This course focuses on the macro aspect of business economics and management, namely macroeconomics, fiscal and monetary policies, national accounting, money and banking systems, and business organizational development.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in finance, economics, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of business management, economics, and finance.  This course focuses on the micro aspect of business management, namely business planning, microeconomics, business finance, fund raising, and human resource management.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Would you like to better understand the business world?  This program will provide the analysis and reasoning for the conduct and understanding of business and finance in today’s world. We will focus on contemporary business issues, as well as offer an introduction to strategy, personal finance and investing. We will examine the financial challenges faced by smaller businesses, entrepreneurs and individuals, and what it takes to be effective in our current economic environment. There will be workshops, lectures, films, guest speakers and student-led sessions. Readings from daily newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal, magazines such as the Economist and Kiplinger’s, and texts such as by Thomas Friedman and by Jim Collins will increase student familiarity with current business topics and help students develop the skills to organize and analyze business, economic and financial information. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will also be covered. Students will compete in an advanced business simulation in teams. The simulation will require substantial student research, including analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Students will emerge from the simulation with improved teamwork skills, as well as a greater understanding of financial statement analysis, competitive strategy, marketing, operations, and business economics.  Glenn Landram Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Allen Jenkins
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Business Foundations program provides a functional overview of all phases of business, including ownership, marketing, personnel, accounting, finance, managerial controls, leadership, and the relationship of business to the ethical, economic, and social environment in which it operates.  Business Foundations provides students a window on global business: how the global marketplace operates and how a country’s customs, politics, and ethnicity affect business. The program is designed for business and non-business degree seeking students, current and future entrepreneurs, or anyone who wants a practical foundation in business. Winter’s studies will focus on Financial and Managerial Accounting Fundamentals. As the program continues in the spring quarter, students will continue to study finance, do independent study, and learn through a four-credit internship.Each quarter's specific topics are designed as foundations for students with no prior academic business background. The instructor will strive to teach the program in an engaging manner, using a mix of uncluttered reading materials, conversational language, and humor to introduce students to the essentials of business and management without sacrificing rigor or content.  We will use a real-world focus to illustrate fundamental concepts and employ case studies of companies whose products and services are familiar.The intent of the program is to provide a theoretical framework for the realities of starting, managing, and growing a small to medium size business.  Our goal is for students to gain insight into the operational, legal, financial, ethical, and practical challenges associated with running a business.  We will explore how organizations are legally and financially defined, what is unique about them, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type.  The program uses seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions, assignments, self-study, and an internship to integrate classroom knowledge with current best practices, protocols, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's global, diverse economies. Allen Jenkins Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Natividad Valdez
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Students will learn about the legal system including sources of law, the framework of the U.S. court system, and legal considerations with the current economy. The class will explore intellectual property (trade secrets/patents) in business, the employer-employee relationship, contracts, and how to apply current law to popular conflicts. The course will also review antitrust laws/considerations and retirement plans. Natividad Valdez Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Andrew Buchman, Doreen Swetkis and Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is a tour of social forces that shape our arts communities, including cultural, organizational, managerial, financial and historical. By examining art, music and theatre worlds, we will discover structures that help foster vibrant artistic communities. We will meet business and nonprofit leaders (often artists themselves) who bring artists and art lovers together. Artistic entrepreneurs with business savvy, as we will see, often make the art world go 'round.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in making a living as an artist, musician or performer, operating in the nonprofit art world, or making a career in creative industries, and bridging the conventional gaps between creativity, business sense and social engagement. Each quarter's work will include an optional week of travel and study an art center in the United States: to New York City during the fall and Los Angeles during the winter. Students unable to travel to these cities can pursue related studies in Seattle and Portland.The program will combine studies of the arts, business and nonprofit administration and management through a rich mix of critical and creative projects, such as analyzing a local arts business or nonprofit organization. An artist who understands the principles of a well-run business and can deal effectively with contracts, grants and negotiations, we'll find, is likely to gain more artistic and professional freedom. Business people who understand and care about the arts, we'll discover, can build careers that include doing good as well as doing well. Organizations built around art forms can help support local cultures and create sustainable manufacturing ventures, too.The nonprofit arts community encompasses a broad range of artistic endeavors such as summer arts camps and festivals, art and music therapy, community theaters, arts foundations and after-school arts programs. For-profit and nonprofit organizations are different, and we want to make sure students gain knowledge of the vast range of ways they can make a living in and around the arts.By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to connect your own artistic and wage earning work, have an impact on organizations in communities you care about, acquire first-hand knowledge of a diversity of successful arts initiatives, and communicate effectively in the language of business and nonprofit administration. Andrew Buchman Doreen Swetkis Zoe Van Schyndel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This program focuses on integral and multi-variable calculus. The definite integral will be motivated by calculating areas and defined in terms of limits. The connection between differential and integral calculus will be made via the FTC. All basic techniques of integration will be studied with emphasis on using definite integrals to answer questions from geometry and physics. Polar and parametric functions and series will be briefly covered. Vectors, gradients, and multiple integrals will be the focus of the second half of the class. There is a significant online component to the class. Calc 1 is required. Allen Mauney Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  In particular we will cover applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization and of integration including area, arc length, volume, and distribution functions. We will gain a deep understanding of the analytical geometry of lines, surfaces, and vectors in multi-dimensional space and engage in a rigorous treatment of sequences and series.  Throughout the year, we will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Allen Mauney
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This class continues the calculus sequence after Calculus I. The main focus of the class will be on applications of the integral, especially on problems from the physical sciences. The definite integral will be defined intuitively as the area under a curve and rigorously as the limit of partial sums. Techniques of anti-differentiation including u-substitution, parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, and partial fraction decompostition will be thoroughly covered. Additional topics will include polar coordinates and parametric functions. Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This class will apply the derivative and integral to phenomena best modeled by vector and multi-variable functions. The derivative will be used to determine motion in space, and the partial derivative will be used to calculate gradients. Vector-valued and parametrically defined functions will be used to approach problems in a way very well suited to questions in the physical sciences. Some geometry will be covered using the dot and cross products. Taylor series will be used to approximate and represent functions. Students will do online work, solve problems collaboratively, and write exams.  Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Bill Arney and Michael Paros
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Most of you are in school because you want to live a better life; many of you probably think about what it might mean to live a good life. Is a good life one full of pleasure and devoid of suffering? A moral life? A long and healthy life? Of course, it is possible that the good life cannot be defined at all and simply has to be lived and attended to. Let's start with the premise that most of our reliable, useful knowledge comes from science. Scientists work according to philosophically sound methodologies, which include commitments to impersonal inquiry and trying, always, to find the data most likely to defeat their favorite hypotheses; they work in open communities of other scientists, all of whom are obligated to be vigilantly critical of their colleagues' work; they generally qualify their claims to knowledge based on the limitations of their methodologies and their understandings of the probabilities of their claims being incorrect. But can science help us to be , to live a good life? Some think that science can help us recognize, even define, our values, and we will explore this possibility from the perspectives of neuroscience, brain evolution, psychology, social science and philosophy. Some say that science can never answer questions of morality or what it means to live a good life, or even a better life; something more is necessary, they say. Reading and written assignments, faculty presentations and deliberate discussions with vigilantly critical colleagues will assist students in an independent inquiry about how science can help a person live better with regard to some question of critical concern to the investigator(s). This program explores the power and limitations of scientific inquiry. Students should be able to imagine themselves discussing neurotransmitters and the moral life in the same sentence, but they should know that any education aims, finally, to help them know themselves. Bill Arney Michael Paros Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Tom Womeldorff and Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In the late 1700s, Europeans saw the Caribbean as one vast sugar plantation controlled by French, English, Spanish and Dutch colonial powers. The insatiable need for labor decimated local populations who were replaced by millions of African slaves and, after emancipation, indentured labor from East India and China. Historically, this represents the largest forced mixing of cultures in the world; the result was a host of new Caribbean identities, all developing in the context of the political, economic and ideological structures imposed by Europeans. Today, the identities and cultural expressions of all Caribbean peoples continue to be shaped by the colonial legacy and the rise of post-colonial consciousness. Thinkers like José Martí (" América"), Aimé Césaire ( ), and Frantz Fanon ( ) exposed the negative effects of colonial subjugation and envisioned liberatory processes of social change. Despite the region's shared colonial and post-colonial legacies, a sense of a common Caribbean identity should not be exaggerated. As Jean Casimir writes, the Caribbean is simultaneously united and divided. A Guadeloupian may be more connected psychologically and physically to Dakar, or even Paris, than she is to Puerto Rico. Out of this intense forced mixing of cultures, what forms of identity emerged and continue to emerge? Is there such a thing as a Caribbean culture, or are identities complex amalgams that defy easy categorizations such as Caribbean, Dominican American, creole Martinican, Afro-Cuban, East-Indian Trinidadian? What are the factors that make the identities of each island's peoples similar and in what ways do they defy categorization--even on a single island? How have cultural movements such as and the "New World baroque" contributed to the construction of Caribbean identities and post-colonial consciousness? These will be the questions at the center of this program. We will begin with an exploration of the colonial legacy with close attention to the political and economic forms central to extracting sugar profits from land and laborers. We will explore the impact of diverse political statuses such as independence (e.g., Jamaica), complete incorporation with the motherland (Martinique) and more nebulous forms in between (Puerto Rico). We will explore the symbioses and tensions between these political and economic issues and cultural movements. Finally, we will investigate how migration and globalization continue to play a major role in shaping local realities. Throughout the quarter, we will examine our own positionality with relation to these questions, asking: How can we study about, learn from, and engage across cultural differences in non-dominating ways? Readings will range from fiction and poetry to history and political-economic analysis. In addition to shared readings, lectures and films, each student will engage in synthesis work and a small project. The latter will be on a topic of the student's choosing, such as cultural expression through music and art, political status, religious syncretism, post-colonial literature, globalization, or migrant identities abroad. Tom Womeldorff Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I In this all levels course we will work on capturing an expression/presence with a portrait bust.  Our goal will be to make a fairly realistic bust using photographs or a mirror as a basis for the sculpture. With a variety of helpful three dimensional aides, handouts, and demos, students will learn the planes of the face, the basic anatomy of the head and neck, and will work to sculpt the features to give the bust a sense of presence. We will use a basic solid building construction method utilizing a steel pipe armature. We will consider textural, fired, and cold surface treatments to finish the pieces.  Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this class students will sharpen their observation skills by rendering the human form using a live model. Topics discussed will include the ethics of using the human form in art, determining if a figure is needed in a work, and the implications of using a partial or whole body. Skills covered include construction of armatures, sculpting around an armature with solid clay, hollowing and reconstruction, and techniques for sculpting problematic areas like heads, hands, and feet. A variety of surface options will also be covered including fired and room temperature glaze. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II To understand the field of children’s literature, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that will address literary and informational texts for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature in a variety of genres, non-fiction texts across a range of subjects, introducing literature into elementary classrooms, and censorship. : For members of the class who are licensed teachers or who intend to become licensed teachers, The Evergreen State College offers this course as one of five courses that leads to a Washington State reading endorsement. The other courses are Instructional Methods in Literacy and Assessment in Literacy (offered in summer 2014) and Foundations of Literacy and Research in Literacy (offered in summer 2015).  Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rose Jang and David Shaw
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In the fall of 2012, China’s 18th Communist Party Congress selected the current generation of Chinese political leaders, moving China into the next chapter of its 3,000-plus years of political history.Today, China’s economic power continues to grow, and its rise globally has drawn increasing attention. Many developing countries are viewing the China model as an alternative to the Western experience of economic growth and middle class prosperity. However, China is faced with many internal and external challenges. Challenges like these have repeatedly threatened China’s social stability in the past. In the extreme case, they might alter its current ideological foundations, potentially undercutting the premises of the China “success story.”This introductory China studies program will focus on China's present situation as a modern state and global power evolved from a lengthy and complicated cultural development over centuries. Within the time constraint of a quarter, we will examine China from selective angles and subject matters suggesting recurrent cultural patterns and distinct national characteristics. In the social sciences, we will touch on China’s geography, political structure and economic and business systems, including sustainability and environmental issues. From the humanities perspective, we will look at prominent examples of China’s religion, philosophy, arts and literature. All these issues are potentially interrelated, leading to a more coherent set of inquiries into the myth or reality of China’s current image of success.Students will be exposed to multiple topics and issues through weekly readings, lectures, discussions and workshops. They will also conduct a research project on a China-related topic of their own choice. This research project will provide them with opportunities to develop skills in research methods and academic writing. The program will introduce the fundamentals of Chinese language and linguistics through program studies but does not contain an independent Chinese language study component. Rose Jang David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
David Shaw
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This China studies program will take an in-depth look at modern China through the perspective of the social sciences, building on readings and issues discussed in the fall program However, any student with an interest in China or East Asian studies should be able to join the program in winter or spring quarter and succeed in their studies. Our overriding goals are to understand today's China as a vital global power, while critically exploring the lingering influence of its rich yet strife-torn cultural past on behavior and decisions made at the national, institutional and individual levels. Building on our shared texts and themes, students will do independent research individually or in small groups, becoming experts in a particular facet of Chinese business, economy. society and/or sustainability. Our work will also extend beyond uniquely Chinese experiences into topics on which the future of Asia, the global economy and our small planet depend, including the natural environment, paths to ecological, social and economic sustainability and strategies to redress economic inequalities and social dislocations. China's environmental history, its rural-urban dynamic and its economic development will also serve as core threads through both quarters of study. During winter quarter, we will study ancient Chinese texts (in translation), as well as popular and academic articles, books, films and documentaries on China, particularly those exploring and reinterpreting ancient themes. Chinese philosophy, comprised of the primary "Three Teachings" of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, will inform our study of Chinese culture. Sun Tzu's will introduce us to one of the world's oldest sources of strategic thought and Chinese concepts of leadership. Other topics likely to be covered include China’s trade and travel with the outside world, the Chinese diaspora, China's contact and interactions with foreign powers and its industrialization and political transformations from an imperial dynasty to a republic to a Communist state. Spring quarter we will focus on present-day China. We will examine China's current image as a dynamic economic powerhouse and “global factory” and as an enigmatic political player internationally. We will also look at its internal, problematic quests for domestic harmony, a well-functioning legal system and a truly civil society.In both quarters, we will meet in seminar, workshop and lecture settings. Weekly readings from books, popular media (newspapers, magazines) and academic journal articles should be expected for seminar and workshop. A peer-review approach will be taken in a Writing and Research Workshop to complement individual or small-group efforts on their research projects. Regular film and documentary viewings will build a closer familiarity with Chinese culture and society. Finally, in spring quarter, students will make an individual presentation on a book they have read and critically reviewed on their own. Another student completing the same reading will provide feedback on the presentation based on their reading of the book. This should expand the range of perspectives covered beyond the readings assigned to the entire class.Separate enrollment in Chinese language courses is strongly encouraged as a complement to this program. This program would also serve as good preparation for students who plan to travel to China via independent learning contracts or subsequent study abroad programs. David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Lin Crowley
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course is designed for students who have some prior experience in Chinese language and know the use of Chinese pinyin system. The course will begin with a review and assessment from which the starting points for new learning will be determined. The emphasis is placed on continued introduction of standard Mandarin Chinese listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with special attention to the building of useful vocabularies through interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. The course is highly recommended for those who want to take part in the summer Chinese travel study program. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Lin Crowley
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is designed for students who have some prior experience in Chinese language and know the use of Chinese pinyin system. The course will emphasize on continued introduction of standard Mandarin Chinese listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with special attention to the building of useful vocabularies through interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. The course is highly recommended for those who want to take part in the summer Chinese travel study program. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
David Cramton
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Session I What makes a beautiful image?  What images best tell a story?  What separates phone vids from ? We will watch films, seminar around films, and create our own moving images.  We will cover the art, technology and technique of the moving image.  We will study how lighting, composition, and camera placement all affect and reflect the story, characters and landscapes that we capture.  We will spend a significant amount of time working with cameras and watching our own creations as a group, plus a few field trips to Seattle and/or Portland to look at the tools and resources used by professional image creators. David Cramton Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jennifer Gerend and Steven Niva
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Does the way we live—in suburbs, malls and automobiles—shape the foreign policy conducted in our name? Can we change our foreign policy by living differently?Our program will explore these questions through the prism of American foreign policy in the Middle East. The program will examine how the suburbanized and automobile dependent culture of the United States after World War II was made possible by American involvement in the Middle East to secure access to cheap and plentiful oil, particularly through our close alliances with oil-rich regimes. This ongoing involvement has been central to the rise of anti-American sentiment and the resultant wars in the Middle East during the past decade. While some have called for a new foreign policy which supports democracy, this program will also explore the question of whether a new domestic policy—one focused on shifting our way of living from suburbia to more walkable, dense and sustainable ways of urban living--may also be a necessary element of a new foreign policy. How do we create ways to live that reduce our dependency on access to non-renewable resources and support for repressive regional governments? What do sustainable and walkable cities look like? Should urban planning be a key element of foreign policy? Where do these decisions get made, and how can residents help shape their communities?Students will be introduced to the history and practice of U.S. foreign in the Middle East as well as central issues in the history and theory of U.S. urban planning and development. We will read texts, watch films and hear guest speakers who will address these issues, as well as write papers and engage in discussion and debates. Jennifer Gerend Steven Niva Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Brittany Gallagher
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 2, 4 02 04 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II The Republic of Fiji is a collection of 322 islands in the South Pacific Ocean, home to about 858,000 people.  Although Fijians have done little to exacerbate the problem of global climate change, they and their neighbors in the South Pacific are among the first people on the planet to experience its effects.  Issues Islanders currently face include coral bleaching, threats to mangroves and other nearshore ecosystems, rising sea levels, and declining terrestrial biodiversity, including the loss of important endemic species.MES students traveling to Fiji will observe firsthand how the Fijian government, NGOs, and everyday people address the effects of climate change; from adaptation activities at a local level to lobbying the international community through regional partnerships with other Small Island Developing States (SIDS).The social, cultural, and political dimensions of these complex environmental issues will be explored through visits to coastal and inland villages, government offices, NGOs, and the University of the South Pacific (USP).  Students will visit major environmental sites on Viti Levu, Fiji’s largest island, including two national parks and other private reserves.  Guest speakers from USP and various governmental and non-governmental organizations will visit or host our group in their offices to speak about island biodiversity, geography, political economy, and community development. Religion in Fiji is an important and complex beast: students will have the opportunity to visit the most famous Hindu temple in the country, attend village church services, and learn about Islam in Fiji.  We will spend several days at an “eco-resort” in the Mamanuca islands, snorkeling on healthy and degraded reefs and engaging in mangrove conservation activities.  Students will also spend several nights in rural villages for an immersive experience alongside Fijians and expatriates working on community development initiatives. Academic credit will be awarded in Pacific Island Sustainability for either two or four credits. Four credits will be awarded for those participating in the trip, keeping a detailed field journal, writing a summary of the experience, and researching and writing a paper on a topic of island sustainability. Two credits will be awarded for participating in the field trip, maintaining a field journal, and writing a summary of the experience. All students are required to write a self-evaluation for the instructor. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor by emailing well prior to May 1 to express interest in the course, arrange travel, and indicate topic areas of interest to be explored during the trip. More practical information will be shared during three pre-trip on-campus meetings, to be arranged at the convenience of the student cohort. , has a background in international development and sustainability. She is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and former Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar.  She lived in Suva, Fiji while earning a graduate certificate at the University of the South Pacific, where she studied geography and biodiversity protection.  Her research at USP focused on the intersections of religion and ecology in the region and the associated mix of social and environmental policy and local and national levels. At Evergreen, where she earned her MES degree, she was a graduate research associate who coordinated education programs for the Sustainability in Prisons Project and she focused her thesis research on the effects of science and sustainability education on prison inmates. Brittany Gallagher Summer Summer
George Freeman and Terry Ford
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist-practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the fields of education and human services. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. Students will be required to begin a two-quarter long, 15 hour/week internship winter quarter in the fields of education and social services. Constructing a research project may be an option if students prefer research to the internship. Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology and its application to clinical settings and schooling, quantitative and qualitative research methods, multicultural studies and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology and applied settings such as educational settings. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism and humanistic psychology. Students will also begin their self-identified internships for winter and spring quarters in an area of the social services or an educational setting. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Students may opt for independent literature-based reviews with faculty approval.Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of theory to practice through communication skills practicum and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their internships started winter quarter through spring quarter.Variable credit options are available to students participating in internships. George Freeman Terry Ford Mon Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Krishna Chowdary
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This algebra-based physics course introduces fundamental topics in physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, and conservation laws. We will focus on conceptual understanding, problem solving, and lab work. The course will provide a solid foundation for those working toward careers in medicine, engineering, the life sciences, or the physical sciences. We will cover material traditionally associated with the first half of a year-long introductory physics course. Krishna Chowdary Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lin Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This program is an exploration of how to do Community-Based Research (CBR) and develop meaningful documentation in relation to community needs and challenges. Our focus will be on the social and environmental justice issues that are part of community life and that become the focus of the work of community-based organizations and social movements. A key feature of this two-quarter program will be grounded approaches with community groups. We’ll be working actively with Evergreen’s Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to learn about the pressing needs in our region and to shape and sharpen our research skills and approaches. Some of the groups we will likely connect with include Parents Organized for Welfare and Economic Rights (POWER), People for Puget Sound (on environment and sustainability), Fertile Ground (community sustainability), Garden-Raised Bounty (community agriculture and food justice), Stonewall Youth (on the rights of youth and the LGBTQ community) and Teen Council of Planned Parenthood, among others.Central to our work, especially in winter quarter, will be an examination of the history, philosophy, debates and strategic modes of CBR—which is also called “participatory research,” “popular education” and “action research.” Readings and resources will draw from academics who work with communities in initiating or supporting research; at the same time, we’ll learn from community organizations about research they launch and how they work with faculty, staff and students in colleges and universities. CBR as a social movement in the U.S. and internationally will be the grounding for our efforts. Our reading will be drawn from the growing literature on CBR: key ideas and frameworks, cross-cultural and cross-national approaches, methods and skills, and vivid case material. We will sustain a persistent examination of ethics, community rights and co-learning and collaboration. Winter quarter will focus on exploring the literature and resources, learning with area organizations, posing and launching projects. Spring quarter will shift to more of a community base, with substantial fieldwork, community documentation and participation, project review and planning for future applications.Some important skills that will be developed include project design and development, interviewing and questionnaire design, researching public/government documents, participant-observation and creative approaches to documentation and presentation. We’ll be working to link our projects with compelling social, political and ecological issues and to place our work in regional to international contexts. There will be a strong focus on “give back” to the community and working with and contributing to the resource base of the CCBLA. Students will come away from the program with ideas, experiences and skills that should be helpful to them if they’re interested in future work in social justice, community organizing, environmental protection and environmental justice, public health, fieldwork, social analysis and documentation. Lin Nelson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Neal Nelson, Paul Pham, Sheryl Shulman and Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The goal of this program is for students to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work in support of other disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in the context of the liberal arts and compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.The program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture supporting high level languages and operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A technology and society theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology.We will explore these themes throughout the year through lectures, programming labs, workshops, and seminars.  computer science, education and mathematics. Neal Nelson Paul Pham Sheryl Shulman Richard Weiss Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ab Van Etten
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence. Ab Van Etten Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Lori Blewett
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This course will introduce students to core concepts and theoretical frameworks that enhance our ability to analyze and successfully manage conflict.  It will include skill building and communication practice aimed at expanding our conflict negotiation repertoire and our capacity for collaborative problem-solving. Lori Blewett Mon Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Thomas Rainey and John Baldridge
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program offers comparative study of the Russian conquest of northern Eurasia (Siberia) and the Euro-American conquest of North America.  It will explore the impact of what environmental historian Alfred Crosby calls "ecological imperialism" on native populations, economic development of the nations based on the exploitation of natural and agricultural resources, the ecological consequences of this exploitation, and the successes and failures of conservation efforts in Russia east of the Urals and in the United States west of the Mississippi.  It will also consider the religious, economic, and social motivations and apologias for the ecological conquests.  During the winter quarter, the program will examine these two world historical examples of ecological expansion and its consequences from 1600-1900; during the spring quarter, the program will explore the course and legacy of these conquests in the twentieth century as well as the current ecological state of these two continent-wide environments. Students can expect to read and write about bio-geographical, environmental-historical, ethnographic, natural historical, demographic, and political economic texts focusing on the western United States and on northern Eurasia. Personal and fictional accounts as well as films will also be used to enhance understanding of the environmental, economic, and social consequences of conquest. During the spring quarter, students can also expect to research and write short environmental histories of local areas in Western Washington.  Credit will largely be in environmental history, bio-geography, and political economy. Thomas Rainey John Baldridge Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Despite access to all sorts of information, people continue to be conned, swindled and cheated out of their hard-earned money. Is it really true anyone can be conned? How can we protect ourselves and our communities against cons who by their very nature make situations seem reasonable and socially compelling.This program is an overview of various schemes and trickery that fraudsters employ in the financial world and elsewhere. From the original Charles Ponzi and his schemes in the early 1900’s to the current day massive affinity fraud perpetrated by Bernie Madoff, we will look at the schemers and their victims. If an investment sounds too good to be true, it probably is—but the success of real-life swindlers shows how often this simple advice is ignored. We will explore what makes investors and others reach for the fool’s gold of seemingly foolproof and lucrative investment opportunities. We will also look at the psychology of fraudsters and try to determine what makes them operate outside the normal laws of society.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in finance and investments or those interested in what drives the most basic of human instincts, greed. Spotting a con requires us to think critically about situations and to find a balance between trusting and self-preservation. By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to protect yourself and society from fraudsters. Zoe Van Schyndel Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Karen Gaul, Rita Pougiales and Julie Russo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In , the historian William Leach writes, “Whoever has the power to project a vision of the good life and make it prevail has the most decisive power of all.” Since the early 20th century, the pleasures of consumption have dominated prevailing visions of the good life in the United States. Innovations in mass production and mass media went hand in hand to link pleasure and prosperity with acquiring the latest commodities. Leisure has also been central to those pleasures, often in the form of tourism, fashion and entertainment, as people consume not only goods but experiences and ideas about what it means to be successful and happy. This program is an inquiry into these features of American consumer culture, particularly the values of convenience and authenticity that characterize the objects and desires it produces and exchanges.Students in this program will study the history and logic of U.S. consumer culture. We will consider the forces that have shaped each of us into consumers in this capitalist society, from representation and ideology to material and technological development. Sustainability will be a critical lens for our inquiry, as we consider the raw materials, labor and waste streams inherent in goods and in cultural experiences. Life cycle analysis of objects—from their origins in nature to their presence on retail shelves, personal spaces, garbage bins and landfills—will help us build a broader context for understanding the materiality with which we all engage every day.Our historical arc will be sweeping: from hunter-gatherers nearly two million years ago, to the origins of animal and plant domestication, to the formation of colonial settlements which created unprecedented challenges and opportunities, to the modern era. We will explore the patterns of resource use, social inequality and relative sustainability. We will examine how habits of conservation, thrift and re-use that were endemic to pre-modern societies transformed in tandem with the unprecedented energies of industrialization. We will investigate the theory and economics of post-industrial capitalism to better understand the impact of new media and technologies on the ways we produce and consume in the present day. We will also examine how curiosity about foreign and mysterious cultures in the context of globalization paved the way for tourism in which cultural authenticity is a central attraction. We will study the relationship between consumption and sustainability, pursuit of the good life through self-help and imported cultural practices such as yoga and meditation, between entertainment industries and communication networks, advertising and buying habits, spending money and self-worth. These contexts will enable us to destabilize and interrogate notions of what feels "normal" in the ways we engage as consumers today, including as consumers of knowledge in increasingly digitized institutions of higher education.Students will have the opportunity to examine ingrained routines of daily life, become conscious of the origins and meanings of their own habits and desires, and thereby become critical thinkers and actors in consumer culture. Our activities will include reading, writing papers and participating in seminar discussions on program topics, learning ethnographic research methods, experimenting with multimodal and collaborative work, viewing relevant films and participating in field trips. In fall quarter, we will build foundational skills and introduce key concepts and themes; winter quarter students will begin to develop their own research agenda; and in spring quarter, they can apply theory to practice in research and/or community-based projects. Spring quarter readings emphasize responses to consumer culture through alternative practices and collectives. Texts on on intentional communities include by Juliet Schor, by Karen Litfin, , and . Texts on virtual communities include by Fred Turner, by Lawrence Lessig, and selections from the anthology Digital Labor. These and related topics comprise an 8 credit academic block taught on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Students enrolling for 16 credits should be prepared to engage in substantial independent learning or work in the community (faculty can structure or guide this piece for new students). One option is a media production intensive that includes a series of technical workshops and a collaborative project. Program learning activities include: seminar responses and essay assignments, field trips, digital media workshops, yoga and awareness practices. Field trips may include Procession of the Species, visits to Fertile Ground, NW Ecobuilders Guild, the Arbutus School, and intentional communities in the PNW, and/or a tour of tiny homes. Karen Gaul Rita Pougiales Julie Russo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Daryl Morgan
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter sequence of courses is for those interested in exploring their own creative potential through the lens of twentieth-century furniture design. We will focus our inquiry on influential designers and makers representing the Arts and Crafts movement, the International Style, Art Deco, Mid-Century Modern, the Craft Revival movement, and others. Using the work of these artisan designers as inspiration, students will construct a piece of furniture of their own design. Daryl Morgan Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I modern dance. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Frances V. Rains
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen your skills of critical thinking and learning across significant differences.  Through readings, seminar discussions, lectures, workshops and student leadership, students will enhance personal engagement with learning, launch their own Academic Statement, and hone skills of self evaluation, as well as experience different types of written assignments.   Frances V. Rains Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Frances V. Rains
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen your skills of critical thinking and learning across significant differences.  Through readings, seminar discussions, lectures, workshops and student leadership, students will enhance personal engagement with learning, launch their own Academic Statement, and hone skills of self evaluation, as well as experience different types of written assignments.   Frances V. Rains Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In this 8-credit summer program, we will explore ways in which various types of gardens can contribute to community and health. We will spend much of our time outdoors, visiting medicinal, ethnobotanical, reservation-based, and urban food forest gardens, and engaging in hands-on and community-service learning experiences.  We will also consider themes related to sustainability, identify plants, learn herbal, and horticultural techniques, and develop nature drawing, and journaling skills. We will deepen our understanding through readings, lecture/discussions, and seminars as well as projects and research. This program is suitable for students interested in environmental education, community development, health studies, plant studies, sustainability, ethnobotany, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Therese Saliba and Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Dangerous creations" emerge out of adverse political conditions and embody new creative strategies and possibilities. This program will explore how writers, media makers, artists and community activists use experimental modes of address to challenge dominant narratives and formal structures, and to confound notions of "the real." With an emphasis on multiculturalism, identity and especially African and Arab Diasporas, this program will examine the histories of slavery, colonialism and Empire and how art, media and literature have been used as tools of both conquest and resistance. We will draw on theoretical tools  to analyze the "politics of representation" in popular media, including critiques of Orientalism, the Africanist presence and the gaze. And we will explore how diasporic communities, particularly feminists of color, "talk back" to these representations—by creating dangerously. That is, how do these artists use experimental forms to challenge fixed notions of individual and communal identity, as well as the consumerist system of media and literary production?Through the study of diasporic cultural production, African and Arab American literature and film, Third World Cinema and queer and feminist film theory, we intend to foster critical thinking about race, class and gender identities, and how they are negotiated. We will also explore how certain models of cultural-mixing, hybridity, and border-crossing have created a dispersal of identities and strategic possibilities for solidarities and connections across community struggles.In fall and winter quarters, students will learn to read cultural texts, including film, visual art and literature, to understand the relationships of people and communities, their sense of identity and possibilities for solidarity across differences. Students will develop skills in visual and media literacy, creative and expository writing, analytical reading and viewing, literary analysis, and the terminologies and methodologies of cultural and gender studies, film history and theory. Through workshops, students will also learn a range of community documentation skills, including photography, video, interviewing and oral history. In spring, students will have the opportunity to work on in-depth independent projects in autobiographical representations either through moving image or narrative writing. With faculty guidance and small group workshops, students will write proposals, conduct research and engage in critique groups to produce a major individual or colloborative creation.  visual studies, film studies, cultural studies, literary studies, African-American studies, Arab/Middle East studies, gender studies, community organizing and advocacy, and education. Therese Saliba Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe and Therese Saliba
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of Junior-Senior students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: visual art, art history, literature, creative writing, media theory, cultural studies, critical race studies, or feminist studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of , but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a large-scale project that will be developed over the course of the year. These students will also act as peer mentors for the Freshman-Sophomore students in the class, and will have opportunities for ongoing critique on projects with program faculty. In addition, advanced students will be required to take a year-long, 2-credit sequence in Critical and Cultural Theory offered one evening a week by Greg Mullins. Naima Lowe Therese Saliba Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Gail Tremblay and Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How does culture affect the worldviews and visions of writers, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers? How does place affect culture? We will explore these questions and connections through careful reading and analysis of literature, film, and art history which reflects a multicultural perspective. As students of diversity in American culture, we will examine the way in which place, and migration from place, shapes cultural production of texts and art, as well as how our connection to the natural world affects creativity.Over the course of the year we will study works by a diverse group of writers, artists, and filmmakers, including African American, Native American, Asian American, European American, Chicano, Latino writers, and other cultures. We will take field trips to museums and cultural events. Guest speakers from diverse communities will share their perspectives about their practice as writers, artists, and scholars.  Workshops in writing, composition, poetry, and art will provide the opportunity to develop a creative practice and create art, poetry, and various forms of narrative. All students will work on improving their academic and writing skills so by the end of the program they can write and work towards publication. Fall quarter, we will study works by a diverse group of American writers, artists, and filmmakers, beginning with Linda Hogan's novel,  A multi-day field trip to the Makah Nation in Neah Bay, on the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula will allow us to study the artifacts from Ozette, a village on the Pacific Coast buried by a mud slide during the 17th century, some of whose artifacts carbon date from the 1500s. We will meet with contemporary artists, and cultural experts, from the Makah Nation and learn about their relationship to place. We will also study works by African American, Chicano, Jewish American, Armenian American, and Arab American writers and filmmakers.  Students will explore the role of art, film, literature, storytelling, and filmmaking as they begin their own artistic practice.  They will participate in workshops on creating narrative and visual art and will write weekly synthesis essays that reflect on texts and integrate the various materials we are studying. Winter quarter, students will continue to explore creative works and anthologies by diverse writers, including texts by a variety of Asian Americans, European Americans, and other Native Nations and cultural groups.  We will also continuie our study of the works of diverse artists and filmmakers.  In addition to field trips and workshops on poetry and art, students will write two five-page expository essays and one ten-page research paper.  Students will continue to participate in creative workshops and complete two creative projects that grow out of our work over the past two quarters.  They will present their creative projects for their classmates and friends on campus. literature, education, art, and cultural studies. Gail Tremblay Rebecca Chamberlain Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jose Gomez
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Full This program will take a critical look at controversial issues in the criminal justice system, including police misconduct and interrogation, mandatory minimum sentencing, decriminalization of marijuana and prostitution, needle exchange programs, the insanity defense, children tried as adults, privatization of prisons, and physician-assisted suicide. It will be taught via the Internet through a virtual learning environment (Moodle or Canvas), a chat room for live webinars, and e-mail. A one-time face-to-face orientation will take place 7:00 to 9:30 pm on Monday, June 23. Contact instructor for alternate arrangements for the orientation. Jose Gomez Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rita Pougiales
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I The processes of economic and political globalization reshape and undermine the lives of people and communities throughout the world. Some anthropologists have turned their attention to the effects of globalization on traditional and modern societies, attempting to bring to light the full complexities and consequences of these transnational practices. For example, Joao Biehl develops an argument linking global economic activity in Brazil to what he calls the development of "zones of social abandonment" in most urban settings. Anthropologists conduct their studies through research, which involves gathering data, over long periods of time, as both "participant" and "observer" of those they are studying. Doing ethnographic research is simultaneously analytical and deeply embodied. This program includes an examination of ethnographic research methods and methodologies, a study of varied theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists today to interpret and find meaning in data, and an opportunity to design an ethnographic project of interest. Students will read and explore a range of ethnographic studies that reveal what an anthropologist—whom Ruth Behar calls a "vulnerable observer"—can uncover about the lives of people today, and advocate on their behalf. Rita Pougiales Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michelle Aguilar-Wells
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring -Laura Bickford, Oscar nominated producer of "Traffic" Film can revolve around complex issues found in society and offer different perspectives on human and societal behavior.  Students in the all level class will view and analyze a minimum of 20 films from the big screen, small screen, and documentary categories.  The class will be divided into four topical areas: race relations, corporate influence and impacts, LGBT community issues, and a miscellaneous category.  Examples of films that may be included are: Crash, Milk, American History X, Wall Street, Grand Torino, 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days, Traffic, Two Spirits, and How to Survive a Plague.  Students will review critiques of the films, participate in seminars, use organizing techniques to identify concepts, and review competing and historical perspectives.  In addition, students will analyze each film’s individual perspectives, techniques, and impacts.  Students will produce reflections and/or film analysis, a final term paper that is a comparative analysis within one of the categories, deep reflective questions for each film, and research work associated with each film category. They will learn to apply critical modes of questioning to issues in their own communities.  They will understand the meaning of social consciousness and the value of significant dialogue. Students should be prepared to enter into difficult discussions with civility and respect. Students can expect to examine their own beliefs in light of differing perspectives.  Students can expect to receive credit in film analysis, critical thought, and social consciousness or justice.   : students in this program must be prepared to view films that offer controversial subject matter and perspectives and may be rated R.  Michelle Aguilar-Wells Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sandra Yannone
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day S 14Spring This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course. Sandra Yannone Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Susan Preciso and Mark Harrison
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring What is culture and how does it inform our understanding and interpretation of history?  As we explore this question, students will study works of fiction, film, visual art and history to determine how our culture shapes our ideas about past and present realities.  Each quarter students will incorporate quantitative methods to enrich and explain aspects of American culture.  We’ll look at cultural products, from high art to popular culture with a particular focus on film and literature, to see how they reflect and shape our ideas about who and what we are. Our study will be organized around three turbulent decades in American history.During Fall Quarter, we considered the post-Civil War years, including Reconstruction and western expansion.  From dime novels to Hollywood westerns, we examined how deeply we are shaped by 19 and 20 century frontier ideology.  Money and technology—capitalism and the railroads—also drove westward migration.  We analyzed the tensions around race and class as they figure in film, novels, and popular culture.Winter quarter, we will move to the 1930s.  How did the Great Depression and the policy created to deal with that crisis change the way we see government?  What was the impact of two great migrations—from the dust bowl states to the West, and from the agricultural South to the industrial north—on American society?  In such a time of hardship and deprivation, how did the Golden Age of Hollywood reflect our cultural realities through genre films, such as the screwball comedy, the musical, and the gangster film?In the spring, we’ll focus on the 1950s and ‘60s and how upward—and outward—mobility informed who and where we are today.  The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War transformed the country.  Cars, freeways, and the rise of the suburbs re-shaped the cultural landscape, and television expanded the scope of mass media and popular culture.Our work will include critical reading of books and films. Students will be expected to learn about schools of cultural criticism, using different approaches to enrich their analyses. They will be expected to participate in seminar, lectures, workshops, and library research and to attend field trips to local museums and live theater performances.The thread of mathematics runs through the tapestry of everything we’ll study in Culture as History.  Often times, in a non-math/science interdisciplinary program, even though the threads are there, they are never seen but lay hidden.  In Culture as History, we’ll work to pull some of these threads forward – to brighten the image and sharpen the focus of the topics we’ll study.  The mathematical threads that we choose to pull forward will be carefully chosen to gently enhance the image. Through collaborative learning, the mathematical topics we’ll engage with include quantitative literacy (reading and interpreting information), graph theory (How far is it to New York?), and other topics as appropriate.  Susan Preciso Mark Harrison Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Peter Bohmer
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring The outcome of current social and economic problems will shape the future for us all. This program focuses on analyzing these problems and developing skills to contribute to debates and effective action in the public sphere. We will address major contemporary issues such as national and global poverty and economic inequality, immigration, incarceration, climate change, and war. U.S. economic and social problems will be placed in a global context. We will draw on sociology, political science, economics and political economy for our analysis, with particular attention to dimensions of class, race, gender, and global inequalities.We will analyze the mainstream and alternative media coverage of current issues and of the social movements dealing with them. We will build our analyses using data-driven descriptions, narratives of those directly affected, and theories that place issues in larger social and historical contexts. Students will be introduced to competing theoretical frameworks for explaining the causes of social problems and their potential solutions (frameworks such as neoclassical economics, liberalism, Marxism, feminism, and anarchism). We will study how social movements have actively addressed the problems and investigate their short- and long-term proposals and solutions as well as how they would be addressed in alternative economic and social systems.We will choose the specific issues to be investigated in the program as spring 2014 approaches, so that our study will be as relevant as possible. For each topic examined, we will combine readings with lectures, films, and workshops, along with guest speakers and possible field trips as appropriate to observe problems and responses first hand.Students will write short papers on each of the social problems we analyze. In addition, you will study in more depth and report on one of the economic or social issues we are studying. Peter Bohmer Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Robert Esposito
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How can dance serve as a central metaphor for the holistic organization and transformation of personal life experience into aesthetic objects expressing the dynamic connectivity of self, world, and others? Using an expressive arts therapy model, movement study will be integrated with work in writing, drawing, and music in this multidimensional modern dance program exploring an integrative approach to choreography. It will involve disciplined physical and intellectual study, including weekly dance composition homework assignments.Studio activities will include progressive study in Nikolais/Louis dance technique, theory/improvisation, composition, and performance.  Readings, self-inventories, and seminars in the philosophy and psychology of the creative process, designed to broaden and enhance the student’s palette of creative choice, will explore factors such as self-image, linguistics, cultural and educational conditioning, and multiple learning styles. In solo and group collaboration, students will workshop formal craft elements of composition, such as shape, space, time, and motion. Workshops will use various media to draw and integrate content from students’ life experiences and/or past interdisciplinary study in order to create original multimedia work. Compositions will be shared in weekly performance forums that include faculty and student-centered critique and analysis.Texts will be used to explore the development of dance and movement therapy, draw distinctions between art and psychology, and explore the creative and therapeutic effects of the expressive arts. Seminar discussions will emphasize critical analysis in order to situate texts, art, film, and student work in historical and sociocultural contexts. Writing assignments will balance creative, analytical, and research styles, with a comparative overview of linguistic and communications theory. The program culminates with a Week 10 studio recital of selected student work. Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marianne Bailey, Olivier Soustelle, Shaw Osha (Flores), Bob Haft, Judith Gabriele and Stacey Davis
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring ... ...—Hölderlin, "Bread and Wine" We will study art history, literature, philosophy and music in their social and historical contexts in order to understand the Romantic avant-garde thinkers and artists, outsiders in 19th- and early 20th-century Europe, and their tenuous but fruitful dialogue with mainstream culture and the emerging popular culture of the laboring class. We will emphasize French Romanticism, but will also consider the pan-European nature of the phenomenon. This era offers a figurative battlefield where concepts of art, nature and self, order and chaos, locked swords, testing the limits of rational thought. French language study will be an important component of our weekly work; students will study French at one of four levels, from beginning to advanced.The 19th century was an era of immense political change spanning revolutions, empires and finally the establishment of democracy at home, just as European imperialism spread across Africa and Asia. We will study ways in which average women and men crafted their own identities and responded to the larger social forces of industrialization, the creation of a new working class, the solidification of gender and class roles, the rise of modern cities and the redefinition of the criminal, the socially-acceptable and the outsider.In fall, our work will begin with the paintings, poems and ideas of the early Romantics. The Romantics privileged feeling, intuition and empathy. Like adepts in an ancient mystery cult, they sought to commune with Nature. Romantic philosophers, from Schopenhauer to Nietzsche, spoke of Becoming rather than Being. Rejecting Classical order, clarity and restraint, they envisioned a pure art, beyond language and depiction, which speaks musically through color, passion, suggestion, enigmatically, as do dreams.In winter, focus will turn to the late Romantics. Decadents pushed the Romantic temperament and aesthetic to extremes through self parody and the aesthetic of fragmentation. Symbolists attempted to express the inexpressible through their art. Yet Mallarmé, Wilde and Yeats, Moreau and Gauguin, among others, helped prepare the “rites of spring” of the dawning 20th century, the arising vanguard of modernist and postmodern movements.In spring quarter, students may pursue individual research/creative projects on campus or may travel to France for 10 weeks. There they will study in a Rennes, Brittany, language school, do cultural and historical study in Paris and Lyon, as well as make side trips for research of their own.In this program, students will gain a significant grasp of key ideas in art, history and thought within their context, and will have the opportunity to specialize, creating advanced work in their choice of history, art history or writing and literature. We expect strong interest and background in humanities, and considerable self-discipline and motivation. The workload, including French language study, will be substantial and rigorous. Students will work in interdisciplinary all-program sessions and assignments, as well as choose one of three possible seminar groups. These emphasize: 1) literature and philosophy, 2) history, and 3) photography and visual arts, practice and theory. Marianne Bailey Olivier Soustelle Shaw Osha (Flores) Bob Haft Judith Gabriele Stacey Davis Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Paul Pham
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day S 14Spring What is computer science, who is it for, and can it combine with art, design, and engineering to help us be more free? What is the relationship of computation to human socialization, physical embodiment, psychology, play, intelligence, or gender? This program addresses these questions through four interrelated threads: (1) Massively Multi-language Computer Programming (MMCP), (2) Software Anthropology, (3) Arduino Robotics, and (4) Seminar and Speaker Series. Each thread has a concrete but open-ended goal, which students will pursue in small groups documented with an online journal.In MMCP, students will learn a programming language of their own choice in a self-directed way and help jointly develop software for an interactive online storybook to teach computer science. Each week, a student group will help prepare a lesson to teach the rest of the class. In Software Anthropology, students will study communities centered around technology including makerspaces, software companies, and schools. They will actively provoke social interaction with other Evergreen programs. The end goal of this thread will be organizing a sustainable Evergreen computer club. In Arduino Robotics, students will learn the basics of computer architecture and system design by using the Arduino electronics platform to control small robots. In the Seminar and Speaker Series, students will hear from a variety of Evergreen alums with careers in technology. In addition, they will help organize the logistics of the speakers' visit.One or more of the above threads will be shared with the programs "Computer Science Foundations" and "Student-Originated Software." Students wishing to prepare for "Computability and Language Theory" in 2014-2015 may take a 12-credit version of this program and the Discrete Math thread from "Computer Science Foundations." The final goal of the overall program is a single creative work to which all students will contribute. It will be part ethnography and part how-to manual to recreate a future program in a similar spirit.The program is designed to be self-bootstrapping, vastly exploratory, and evolving, with all students actively participating in ongoing activity planning. It is perfect for responsible, self-motivated students who can tolerate confusion, excitement, boredom, joy, and the gradual formation of new insights. No previous computer science background is required, only a strong desire to improve and not give up.Activities will include field studies, long hikes, movable feasts, guest lectures, studio time, seminar discussions, student presentations, lively group discussions, silent reading parties, watching films and TED talks, giving peer feedback and critiques, and meetings with the instructor.Possible texts include "Design Patterns" by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, and Vlissides; "The Design of Everyday Things" by Donald Norman; "Anathem" by Neal Stephenson; "Logicomix" by Apostolos Doxiadis, Christos H. Papadimitriou, Alecos Papadatos; "Thinking with Type" by Ellen Lupton; and "Artificial Knowing: Gender and the Thinking Machine" by Alison Adam. Paul Pham Mon Mon Tue Tue Tue Wed Thu Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Cynthia Kennedy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I This weekend-intensive program is designed for students who either are, or plan to be, in the position of managing their own work groups, heading up large companies, starting businesses that change society, managing the world's most important non-profits, or serving in government. The program will introduce basic language, concepts, tools, and problem-framing methodologies that are needed to develop management skills. We will focus on a variety of themes from motivating others, team-building, developing self-awareness, and communicating supportively to leadership, decision-making, understanding power and influence, and solving problems creatively. Cynthia Kennedy Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate digitally generated waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, additive synthesis, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis algorithms.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of this class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, and contemporary research in music composition. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Elena Smith
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I This course attempts to inspire a better understanding of today's Russia and the people of Russia through a study of their history, literature, arts, and culture.  Everyone who has an interest in exploring Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks is welcome.  The students will be introduced to certain dramatic events of Russian history through film, literature, and personal experiences of the Russian people. Besides the traditional academic activities, the students will have hands-on experiences of Russian cuisine, song, and dance.  Armed with an open mind and lead by a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive, and learn to appreciate the similarities of Russian and American cultures. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Brian Walter
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I In this course, we'll study standard topics in discrete mathematics, including: logic and proof; sets, relations, and functions; combinatorics; basic probability; and graph theory.  Along the way, we'll focus on skills and techniques for problem-solving.  This is an excellent course for teachers and future teachers, people wanting to broaden their mathematical experience beyond algebra, and students considering advanced study in mathematics and/or computer science. Brian Walter Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Emily Lardner and Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring The skills to design and conduct effective research—defined as systematic inquiry-- are essential components of a liberal arts education and professional work. In this program, students will develop strong writing, critical reading, and statistical reasoning skills applicable to a variety of fields. The program is organized around two core assumptions: first, that research is more about thinking than doing, and second, that good research uses appropriate methods to support claims and communicate results effectively. In winter quarter, we will use the broad topic of climate change—understanding it, preparing for it, and adapting to it—as a shared focus for developing research skills. Students will focus on aspects of climate change that connect with their previous and future studies, or their current interests. Students will build skills through active-learning workshops, hands-on data collection and analysis, and critical analysis of online and print media reports. We will discuss research articles from a variety of fields, noting what makes some articles effective and others less so. In the second quarter of the program, students will be invited to identify their own topics for investigation, and continue to develop research tools and methods.The goal of the program is to help students become good researchers—good at asking and answering questions about complex topics in systematic ways. We expect that students will come to the program with a variety of backgrounds—from little or no experience with quantitative reasoning and statistics to some background, and from limited writing experience to lots of it. Successful students in this program will be intellectually curious and keen to become better at asking and answering good questions.   Emily Lardner Allen Mauney Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Eddy Brown
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring In what situations, milieus, and other kinds of settings do characters find or put themselves? How and why did they get there? How do they then behave? What habits, values, self-identity paradigms, world views, conscious and unconscious needs, goals and fears drive them and affect or determine their actions and decisions? The answers to these key questions help authors to create compelling, rounded characters in realistic settings, dramatized through vivid, engaging scenes with meaningful subtexts, in stories that are surprising yet convincing. With that in mind, this class will explore these and other narrative design elements in service of students constructing their own short fiction prose narratives.Students will also be given the guidance and tools for analyzing existing literary texts. Along with reading, discussing and writing about selected published materials, students will consider and practice spontaneous and experimental modes of story development, as well as apply some established cinematic and classical dramatic paradigms for story structure and development.Typical program activities will include writing exercises, story drafting, self-editing, small- and large-group peer activities including writing critiques, and weekly seminars on assigned readings. The major project will be a short story that has undergone revision through several drafts.In general, students will explore and practice story crafting, writing as a process, fiction genres, and literary analysis, and are expected to be active, consistently engaged members of a learning community. Eddy Brown Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Shaw Osha (Flores)
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This intensive drawing program runs for two weeks.  Open to all levels, this immersive drawing class will address the importance of drawing as a language integral to all visual art and as a way to understand one's experience in the world. Primarily, we will study the figure as a dynamic structure in space and mark making as a process of investigation. There will be some reading and writing as well as critiques. The Drawing Marathon will push artists to a new level of working. Shaw Osha (Flores) Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course focuses on the traditional life-drawing practices of observing and drawing the human figure from live models.  Students will use a variety of media ranging from graphite to gouache as they learn to correctly anatomically render the human form.  Homework assignments will supplement in-class instruction and visual presentations.  Several readings will also be given throughout the quarter.  While previous drawing experience is not required, it is recommended. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing.  Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume, and composition.  Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand-drawn imagery.  Students will work toward the development of an informed, personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists.  Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time.  Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work.  A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Dharshi Bopegedera and Abir Biswas
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This interdisciplinary, introductory-level program will explore topics in physical geology and general chemistry. It is designed for students with a desire to have a broader and deeper understanding of the Earth, the structure of matter that makes up the Earth, and their interconnectedness. The study of lab and field sciences through rigorous, quantitative, and interdisciplinary investigations will be emphasized throughout the program. We expect students to finish the program with a strong understanding of the scientific and mathematical concepts that help us investigate the world around us.In the fall quarter we will study fundamental concepts in Earth science such as geologic time, plate tectonics, and earth materials supported by explorations into the atomic structure and bonding. We will focus on skill building in the laboratory with the goal of doing meaningful field and lab work later in the year. Winter quarter will focus on Earth processes such as nutrient cycling and climate change supported by the study of stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, and kinetics. Quantitative reasoning and statistical analysis of data will be emphasized throughout the program and students will participate in weekly geology and chemistry content-based workshops focusing on improving mathematical skills. Opportunities will be available for field work and to explore topics of interest through individual and group projects. Dharshi Bopegedera Abir Biswas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Are destructive emotions innately embedded in human nature?  Can they be eradicated?  A growing body of Western research has examined these and other questions through the perspectives of Eastern psychology and philosophy which view destructive emotions, perceptions, and behaviors as the primary source of human suffering.  To alleviate this suffering, Eastern psychology has developed a rich and varied methodology for recognizing, reducing, transforming, and preventing these destructive forms of mind and emotion.  After examining the nature and function of the afflictive mind/emotions, students will choose one emotion to study in-depth and develop effective East/West interventions to transform this emotion/state of mind. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend W 14Winter In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Martha Rosemeyer, Sarah Williams and Thomas Johnson
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Spring emphasis: We will study agroecology, traditional agriculture and permaculture in a tropical context. Seminar will focus on international “sustainable development” and its contradictions, successes and challenges. As a final project, students will apply their knowledge of tropical crops and soils to create a farm plan in a geographic area of their choice. This would be excellent preparation for an internship abroad and/or Peace Corps. Martha Rosemeyer Sarah Williams Thomas Johnson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ralph Murphy
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This upper division social science program examines the methods and applications of ecological and environmental economics for environmental problem solving. The major goal of the program is to make students familiar and comfortable with the methodologies, language, concepts, models, and applications of ecological and environmental economic analysis. The program does not assume an extensive background in economics; therefore it begins by quickly reviewing selected micro economic principles.  We will study the models used in natural resource management, pollution control approaches , and sustainability as an empirical criterion in policy development. We will explore externalities, market failure and inter-generational equity in depth. Examples of case studies we will evaluate include: natural resources in the Pacific Northwest; management and restoration of the Pacific Salmon stocks and other marine resources; energy issues including traditional, alternative, and emerging impacts from hydraulic fracturing (fracking), coal trains and climate change; selected issues of environmental law; wetland and critical areas protection and mitigation; and emerging threats such as ocean acidification and low oxygen zones. We also will develop a detailed consideration of the theory and practice of benefit cost analysis. The program concludes by critically evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of using ecological and environmental economics to develop solutions to environmental problems.Program activities include lectures, seminars, research and methods workshops, possible field trips, quizzes, exams, and a research paper assignment. Attendance and thorough preparation for class is a critical requirement for success in this program. Ralph Murphy Tue Wed Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Alison Styring
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Flight is one of the most fascinating phenomena in nature.  It has evolved independently numerous times across several groups of animals.  This program will investigate the evolution of flight and its ecological consequences.  We will gain experience with standard methods for studying flying animals as we conduct biodiversity surveys at several field sites in the Olympia area.  During the course of this program, we will learn key biological, ecological, and conservation concepts relating to flying organisms as well as field, analytical, and laboratory methods associated with the study of biodiversity.  As a group, we will produce comprehensive inventories for key taxa (birds, dragonflies, and butterflies) at ecologically  important field sites.  Alison Styring Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This field-based program will provide students with the fundamental tools to manage livestock and grasslands by exploring the ecological relationships between ruminants and the land. We will begin the quarter learning about the physiology of grasses and their response to grazing and fire. Practical forage identification, morphology and production will be taught. Ruminant nutrition, foraging behavior, and digestive physiology will be covered as a precursor to learning about the practical aspects of establishing, assessing and managing livestock rotational grazing operations. We will divide our time equally between intensive grazing and extensive rangeland systems. Classroom lectures, workshops and guest speakers will be paired with weekly field trips to dairy, beef, sheep and goat grazing farms. There will be overnight trips to Willammette Valley where we will study managed intensive grazing dairy operations and forage production, and Eastern Washington/Oregon where students can practice their skills in rangeland monitoring and grazing plan development. Other special topics that will be covered in the program include: co-evolutionary relationships between ruminants and grasses, targeted and multi-species grazing, prairie ecology and restoration, riparian ecosystems, controversies in public land grazing, interactions between wildlife and domestic ruminants, and perennial grain development. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Susan Cummings
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Su 14Summer Session II Mind and nature are inseparable. The natural world is not outside of us or separate from us, but it us. Ecopsychology is an exciting emerging perspective that explores the connection between psychological and ecological health. Many of our psychological ills and our addictions are directly related to our lack of awareness and our perceived disconnection from our natural origins. The very destruction of our habitat is an expression of this lack of connection to the ground of our being. There are many emerging approaches to deal with this, such as the greening of playgrounds, nature-based therapy, architecture that aims to connect us with a healthy habitat, and the exploration of our assumptions.  We will explore the historical and cultural influences underlying and leading up to this perceived separation from nature, cultural differences in perspectives, assumptions in psychology, the connections between pathology and this perceived separateness from nature, and the role of connectedness with nature in child development. We will also explore the role of innovation, creativity and Active Hope in ecopsychological healing. Students will review the literature, engage in experiential activities and projects, and brainstorm solutions. Depending on the weather, we may spend sometime outdoors. Susan Cummings Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
David Phillips
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This interdisciplinary 16-credit program focuses on ecotourism, culture-based tourism and adventure travel. Ecotourism offers wildlife and nature experiences in protected habitats and pristine areas. Participative tourism is based on visits to traditional rural communities where travelers share in the daily lives of unique host cultures. Adventure travel involves endurance sports and high-skill challenges in natural settings. Ecotourism is often touted as a contributor to the conservation of ecosystems and wildlife habitats, and to economic development in rural communities. We explore the history, outcomes and future potential of ecotourism in different parts of the world.We study historic travel accounts and the literature of travel, changing modes of tourism, including solo travel and the global trend toward leisure travel. Creative writing and storytelling allow students to share their own travel experiences and goals. Travel media and journalism, books, films and the internet provide sources for discussion and writing, and topics for research.We study current theory of ecotourism, including policy and case studies, and acquire tools for critical analysis. Students study the ecotourism market, including planning, management, operations, and project outcomes. Sustainability criteria for ecotourism is a key topic. We study impacts of culturally-focused “participative” travel in developing countries, and the relationship of tourism to environmental changes. Students’ weekly essays, journals and narratives serve to elaborate on diverse topics and the learning process.The program includes a Spanish language component.  Students are encouraged to study the language for the full 16 credits (or to take another foreign language or elective course, as a 12-credit option).Students collaborate in groups or work individually to design and present models for ecotourism and adventure travel. Term projects can focus on business development, operations, outdoor safety and environmental education, travel writing, eco-lodge design, photography, travel films, internet and other media, applied research in tourism, or other related areas of interest.Guest speakers relate their experiences in the adventure travel and ecotourism businesses. Day-long outdoor experiences and multi-day class trips add an experiential component to the program, and films and videos round out our learning about ecotourism and adventure travel. David Phillips Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Bill Arney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter —T. S. Eliot, “Two Choruses from the Rock” Education is not schooling. Schooling is for fish and maybe for getting a job. Life is not living. Living is what you have to make or, to some, everything that happens between birthing and dying. What could “Education for Life” mean? We’ll read some sages, all of them our contemporaries, who seem to have wisdom enough to offer an answer. Annie Dillard muses on God that, “Sometimes, en route, dazzlingly or dimly, he shows an edge of himself to souls who seek him, and the people who bear those souls, marveling, know it, and see the skies carousing around them, and watch cells stream and multiply in green leaves.”  We’ll see where comes from and where it leads.  Alain de Botton says it is possible to build new institutions to “generate feelings of community,” “promote kindness,” to help us “surrender some of our counterproductive optimism,” to “achieve perspective through the sublime and the transcendent,” and to do it without ethical codes, religions, morality and all the other trump cards that, while they might help us live, distract us from life. We’ll see. Wendell Berry believes that we can disentangle ourselves from a science that tells us everything worth knowing about a world that is one grand mechanism or, more recently, a total system, and from an economy where value means only price. He thinks we can recover the old virtues of living together not on the Earth but on the land and must do so “motivated by affection, by such love for a place and life that [we] want to preserve it and remain in it.” We’ll see. Charles Bowden asks, “How can a person live a moral life in a culture of death?,” and answers, by saying Yes to all of life.  There are other sages who might help us claw our way back up T. S. Eliot’s slippery slope to our future. We’ll find some. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Laurance Geri
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Cheap energy from fossil fuels has been essential to the US political economy and social system. But concern about climate change is forcing a global rethinking of energy systems and the public policies governing the energy sector.  This course will provide an introduction to the many dimensions of energy, including sources, technologies, energy markets, and the economic, social, national security and environmental implications of energy use. We will examine how public policy is crafted in the energy sector in the U.S., other countries, and at the global level, with a focus on policies that hasten the adoption of renewable energy.  Laurance Geri Fri Sat Sun Summer Summer
EJ Zita
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program will study how energy is harvested and transformed, used or abused by humans. We will explore interactions between natural systems and human systems to understand global changes currently affecting the Earth System. What is the evidence, what are the consequences, and what can be done about global warming? How can we find our personal roles in addressing challenges facing Earth and its inhabitants?We will study solutions ranging from renewable energy to sustainable farming and (insert your idea here). Our approach is based in natural science, with an emphasis on critical thinking. This challenging and rewarding two-quarter program will include lectures and workshops by faculty and guest lecturers; seminars on books and articles; inquiry-based writing and peer feedback; qualitative and quantitative reasoning and problem solving; and hands-on research projects in spring, to engage our inquiry and learning together.In winter, our plans include research planning for students interested in more advanced studies in Spring. Every student will write several short inquiry-based essays, and will respond to peers' writing, in addition to face-to-face seminars. Small teams of your choice will meet at least twice weekly to discuss readings and prepare for class together. Students will make presentations in class on current topics of interest, and teams will facilitate discussions. No mathematical or technical design texts or prerequisites are required in winter quarter. Our efforts in spring will include more challenging quantitative work, including research projects. Every student will write several short inquiry-based essays, and will respond to peers' writing, in addition to face-to-face seminars. Students will build on quantitative problem solving begun together in the classroom. Small teams of your choice will meet weekly to discuss readings and prepare for class together. Students will do research projects, make presentations in class and at regional meetings, and write research reports. Research projects typically range from greenhouse gas reduction projects to sustainable energy, agriculture, building, or urban planning. Upper division credit will be available in spring quarter only. EJ Zita Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ted Whitesell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 14Summer Full  –  ecological restoration, sustainable agriculture, conservation, resource management, environmental health, climate impacts analysis, environmental justice, environmental advocacy, environmental education, and much more! Ted Whitesell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jean MacGregor
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I It is widely agreed that an environmentally literate and concerned citizenry is crucial to environmental quality and long-term sustainability—but how and where is environmental and sustainability literacy fostered? And where environmental education occurs, is it effective? This class will explore the history, philosophical underpinnings, and current trends in environmental and sustainability education for both youth and adults, in both formal sectors (schools and colleges) and non-formal ones. This class will provide a theoretical and practical introduction to the field of environmental education and interpretation. It will be useful to those of you who are interested in environmental teaching as a career, or to those whose environmental work might involve education or outreach components. There will be an all-day field trip on Saturday, July 12. Students should expect to pay a $15 entrance fee. is a Senior Scholar at the Washington Center for Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education at The Evergreen State College. She directs the Curriculum for the Bioregion Initiative, a faculty and curriculum development initiative, whose mission is to prepare undergraduates to live in a world where the complex issues of environmental quality, community health and wellbeing, environmental justice, and sustainability are paramount.  The Curriculum for the Bioregion initiative involves hundreds of faculty members at colleges and universities throughout Washington State. Prior to work at Evergreen, she helped develop the environmental studies program at Warren Wilson College near Asheville, North Carolina.  Earlier in her career, she developed and/or evaluated environmental education programs for both youth and adults at nature centers and science museums, and in various outdoor and wilderness learning settings. Jean MacGregor Summer Summer
Ulrike Krotscheck and Caryn Cline
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Must quotidian always be associated with humdrum? Rather, it is perhaps the quotidian—the everyday, the banal—that, in the long run, heroically ensures the survival of the individual and the group as a whole. -Michel Maffesoli, An “epic” is generally defined as a poem or narrative of considerable length, which explores grand themes such as a hero’s journey, or the origin myth of a country or peoples. As an adjective, “epic” refers to something that is larger than life and often extra-ordinary. By contrast, the “everyday” is flatly defined as ordinary and is often seen as boring, trivial, and lacking in grandeur. Yet, the “everyday” has a rich creative history and garners remarkable attention in contemporary art, spiritual practices, and other areas of study and praxis. Our lives are made up of both the epic and the everyday; both are integral components of the human experience. And the tension that exists between the two is rich territory for insight and imagination.This program interrogates how the essence of the epic enters the everyday and how the quotidian gives meaning to the epic.We will juxtapose the exploration of the “epic” as a literary form with the exploration of the “everyday” as a creative practice that engages experiments in text, sound, and image. We will conduct these explorations through readings, film screenings, analyses, lectures, workshops, seminars, and by developing discovery strategies rooted in the creative practices of writing nonfiction and of crafting video essays.During fall quarter students will read ancient Greek epic poetry, myth, and tragedy. These works tap deeply into the human condition, and they explore our most persistent and universal questions, such as the concepts of destiny, power, morality, mortality, and the (in-)evitabilty of fate. As we analyze the grand questions raised by epic texts we will also consider if or how we encounter such themes in everyday life. Conversely, we will examine how everyday life may intersect with epic-scale experiences and insights.To facilitate these considerations students will develop a daily writing practice and craft a variety of creative nonfiction essays—meditative, lyrical, personal, and hybrid forms—and we will factor into our studies exemplars that engage thematically with the everyday. Fall quarter explorations will move off the page to incorporate sound and image as tools for creative and critical inquiry. Students will take a series of electronic media workshops and gain hands-on experience with audiovisual scriptwriting, audio recording, photography, and video editing. Fall quarter will conclude with students applying their creative writing skills and electronic media competencies in collaboratively crafted video essays that blend students' literary works with audio and images to explore the realm between the epic and the everyday.During winter quarter we will deepen our investigations into the epic and the everyday through additional readings and analyses of classic Greek texts and by furthering our audiovisual inquiries. One goal of this quarter will be to advance students’ understanding of various film and adaptation theories to put into practice in their individual work. Winter quarter will conclude with rigorous individual projects that encompass a research paper on sources and methods of adaptation, and an independently made video essay.This is a full-time program emphasizing classical Greek literature and media arts, creative and critical practice, collaborative learning, and individual accountability. Expect assignments to be process-driven, highly structured, and challenging. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. If you’re eager to blend the study of Ancient Greek literature with experiments in media arts, then this program is for you. Ulrike Krotscheck Caryn Cline Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Howard Schwartz
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Our interest in Essentials of Energy is learning about what it means to make the "right" energy choices. The first part of the course will cover the energy resources that are currently available. These include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and many kinds of renewable energy. We will study the availability of each (How much is there? How is it obtained? What does it cost?), their advantages and disadvantages, and their environmental consequences. We will then be in position to study policy: what mix of energy resources should we have? While we will look at the policies of other countries and the international politics of energy, our focus will be on current US policies and how to evaluate options for change. Since policy is created and implemented through politics we will then spend much of the class looking at how political and governmental institutions (and the cultures they are embedded in) produce energy policies. For the United States, we will focus on climate change, conservation and renewable energy. Internationally, we will look at how the international oil trade affects different countries in different ways.  For some countries oil enables modernizations and a rising standard of living while for other it is a "resource curse" which stifles development and enhances corruption.   Howard Schwartz Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II During this weeklong intensive, students will spend time in the Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden at Evergreen learning to identify, care for, and use native, edible, and medicinal plants in late summer. Students will participate in workshops, carry out projects, and engage in daily nature journaling, reading, and writing. Plan to spend much of your time outdoors.  Marja Eloheimo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Stacey Davis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 04 06 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class surveys the social, cultural, political, intellectual, and religious history of Europe since 1500, including the Reformation, the Dutch Republic, 18th-century Enlightenment and absolutism, the French Revolution, 19th-century imperialism and industrialization, the Russian Revolution, the two World Wars, and decolonization. Social, gender, and intellectual topics will be stressed. Students earn 4 credits during two weeks of intensive class meetings, June 23 to July 3, 2014. Students enrolled for 6 or 8 credits will then have the remainder of the summer session to research and write essays, with faculty guidance.  This is a companion class to "Art Since 1500." Stacey Davis Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 13 Fall The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 14Spring The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 14Winter The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Stephen Beck and Karen Hogan
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program will investigate the relationship between philosophical ethics and evolutionary biology. In winter quarter we will further develop our understanding of evolutionary theory and of ethics. Central questions for winter quarter will include: Is the imperative of evolutionary fitness, defined as individual reproductive success, consistent with ethical behavior? Has our evolutionary history as social animals given us an intrinsic sense of moral concern for others? What, if any, are our ethical obligations to near and distant others, to family and to strangers, to other species, and to ecosystems and global ecology? In that context, we’ll develop an understanding of the ways in which ethics can be consistent with a naturalistic conception of the world and an understanding of the fundamental biological processes of life and of the evolution, diversity, and relationships among different forms of life on Earth. Stephen Beck Karen Hogan Tue Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Experience Japan is an intensive, in-country program that gives students first-hand experience of contemporary Japanese culture, society and language. During the three-week program you will live and take classes at Tamagawa Universty in Tokyo, engage in activities with Tamagawa students, meet local residents, conduct research on a topic of your choice and go on field trips in the Tokyo area. Classes at Tamagawa University are regular bilingual classes on Japanese culture and society. Extra-curricular activities and field trips will be arranged according to your research topic and interests, and will include visits to Tokyo's historically and culturally significant sites and nearby towns such as Kamakura. Admission is open to all students regardless of language ability. Interested students should contact faculty via email at ulmert@evergreen.edu and attend an explanatory meeting either on Wednesday, April 2 or Friday, April 4. The past participants will be there to answer your questions as well.   Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Bob Woods
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This studio course presents the opportunity for intermediate to advanced work in metal fabrication as applied to furniture, lighting, and sculptue. Modern to contemporary artists' work will be investigated. Students will do drawings, build models, and complete a final project of their own design. Bob Woods Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Steven Hendricks
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In this introductory literary arts program, we’ll investigate the tradition of experimental literature by treating literary experiments—our own included—as creative research into the possibilities of language and narrative. The alphabet, the language, the myriad tropes and formulae for literary expression and the archetypal patterns that haunt our stories: we will view these as a vast table of elements that can be combined and synthesized into new substances: new genres, prose forms, syntax, strategies for reading and making meaning...new reasons to write. Our own creative work will provide a rigorous testing ground for literary ideas. Student writing will be examined by faculty and peers on a regular basis with half a mind toward developing one's craft, and the other half toward investigating, for its own sake, the complex relationship between reader, text and writer. Program seminars will emphasize a lineage of exceptional exceptions: novels and short fiction of the last half century by writers who have taken careful stock of shifts in literary and cultural theory. Lectures will introduce students to analytic reading practices, literary criticism and theory. Throughout the program, we'll practice rich and extended reading of just six book-length works (along with short ancillary texts). Thus, just three pairs of authors will shape our studies: (Pair 1) Virginia Woolf and Samuel Becket;(2) Italo Calvino and Harry Mathews; and (3) Thalia Field and Ben Marcus. Each pair will comprise the focal point for a three week unit; each unit will include an in-class exam. Students enrolled in the program should be prepared to read the range of challenging texts, practice the art of writing in the spirit of experimentation and play, conduct independent research into complex questions relevant to program texts and themes, and participate actively in program seminars, workshops and critiques. Interested students should study the program schedule carefully, as there will be extensive in-class work, as with a studio-based program; in our case, studio practice means writing, reading and critique. Steven Hendricks Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Steven Hendricks
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for advanced students of writing and literature to participate in a small, focused group of like-minded students while also contributing actively to the learning of peers who are beginning their study of writing and literature.  Steven Hendricks Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Leonard Schwartz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter In this two-quarter program we will read contemporary fiction, poetry, and essays as well as several theoretical texts that pertain to our central inquiries: What kind of knowledge do we encounter in fiction and poetry? What is the relation between the artifice of form and the experience of truth? In what way is the factual (that which we take to be given) also artefactual (that which has been made)? By what powers and strategies do poetry and fiction convey truths?Fall quarter will develop the coordinates of the inquiry via reading, writing, and visitors; winter extends the inquiry into our own writings. Required texts include poetry by modernists such as Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and Gertrude Stein; and poetry and prose by Robert Duncan (from whom we take our course title) much of which was written in response to the generation of modernists who preceded him. The required texts are extremely diverse formally, but share overlapping preoccupations with memory and amnesia; metaphysics and transformation; realism and perception; and ethics and poetics.Fall quarter will be reading-intensive and comprised of seminars on the required texts; a range of writing exercises aimed towards generating material; and opportunities to hear and dialogue with visiting writers. In this quarter students will learn literary critical vocabulary and close reading skills. Winter quarter will involve an extended writing project and intensive writing workshops in small groups in which we will utilize the skills learned in the first quarter towards critiquing and revising student writing. Leonard Schwartz Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Dylan Fischer and Alison Styring
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is designed to provide a premier hands-on experience on learning how to conduct field science in ecology at the advanced undergraduate level. We will focus on group and individual field research to address patterns in ecological composition, structure and function in natural environments. Students will participate in field trips to local and remote field sites and they will be expected to develop multiple independent and group research projects. During the second week of the quarter, the program will be divided into two smaller groups: a Northwest Science group and a Grand Canyon Plants group. A small group of 20 students will participate in a two-week trip to the Grand Canyon, which will include a four-day backpacking excursion and several day trips where we will conduct individual and group research related to plant ecology. Students will be selected for the Grand Canyon experience based on their application and interest.  Students in the Northwest Science group will focus on research in ornithology and Northwest ecosystems with associated workshops in research methods.We will work as a community to develop and implement field projects based on: 1) workshops that will train students in rapid observation and field data collection; 2) participation in large multi-year studies in collaboration with other universities and agencies; and 3) student originated short- and long-term studies. Students will focus on field sampling, natural history and library research to develop workable field data collection protocols. Students will implement observation- and hypothesis-driven field projects. We will then learn to analyze ecological data through a series of workshops on understanding and using statistics. Students will demonstrate their research and analytical skills via writing and presentation of group and individual research projects. Student manuscripts will be "crystallized" through a series of intensive, multi-day paper-writing workshops at the end of the quarter. Students will also give public presentations of their research work in a final research symposium.Specific topics of study will include community and ecosystem ecology, plant physiology, forest structure, ecological restoration, riparian ecology, fire disturbance effects, bird abundance and monitoring, insect-plant interactions, disturbance ecology and the broad fields of bio-complexity and ecological interactions. We will emphasize identification of original field research problems in diverse habitats, experimentation, data analysis, oral presentation of findings and writing in journal format.  Dylan Fischer Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Frederica Bowcutt
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program fosters the skills needed for field work in the fields of floristics and plant ecology particularly vegetation studies. Students will learn how to use Hitchcock and Cronquist's , a technical key for identifying unknown plants. We will spend time in the field and laboratory discussing diagnostic characters of plant families. Seminar readings will be focused on floristics, biogeography and vegetation ecology. Students will learn how to collect and prepare herbarium specimens and apply this knowledge to a collaborative research project. Students will also learn about herbarium curation.A multi-day field trip to the Columbia River Gorge will give students an opportunity to learn about Pacific Northwest plant communities in the field, including prairies, oak woodlands and coniferous forests. Students will be expected to maintain a detailed field journal and will be taught basic botanical illustration skills to support this work. Through the field trip, students will learn qualitative vegetation sampling methods and how to analyze their observations. The field trip is required.Students who successfully complete the course will earn 16 units of upper-division science credit in field plant taxonomy, vegetation ecology of the Pacific Northwest, and floristic research. Frederica Bowcutt Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Zoe Van Schyndel and Jennifer Gerend
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Weekend Su 14Summer Full   Zoe Van Schyndel Jennifer Gerend Thu Fri Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Devon Damonte
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In direct animation, a century-old camera-less form, artists use painting, scratching and myriad techniques not recommended by manufacturers to animate on motion picture film. It is an analog art offering experiential escape from increasingly digital visual cultures. In this intensive hands-on class students will practice numerous methods of direct animation including darkroom hand-processing, and invent their own techniques to create lots of footage in a short time, while studying genre masters like Len Lye, Norman McLaren, and Barbel Neubauer. Final culminating projects will explore analog and digital methods for publicly presenting students' work in a grand, celebratory projection performance extravaganza. Devon Damonte Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Gerardo Chin-Leo and EJ Zita
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall The Earth’s atmosphere and oceans are affected by human activities, by the Sun and by geologic activity. Over many millions of years, the Earth has experienced wide fluctuations in climate, from ice ages to very warm periods. Earth is currently experiencing an unusually rapid warming trend, due to anthropogenic (human-caused) changes in atmospheric composition. Historically, a major factor determining global climate has been the intensity of the Sun's energy reaching the Earth. However, climate changes cannot be explained by variations in solar radiation alone. This program will examine some of the major interactions between the Earth and Sun, atmosphere and oceans.Interactions between oceans and atmosphere affect the composition of both, and oceans impact global climate by redistributing the Sun's energy. Changes in ocean circulation help explain climatic changes over geologic time, and marine microorganisms play a major role in the cycling of gases that affect climate (e.g., CO2 and dimethylsulfide). What is the evidence for causes of contemporary global warming? What are expected consequences? What can be done? What about proposed schemes to engineer solutions to global warming, such as the sequestration of anthropogenic carbon into the deep sea? We will study diverse and interconnected physical, chemical, geological and biological processes. This requires a basic understanding of biology and chemistry as well as facility with algebra and ability to learn precalculus.Students will learn through lectures, workshops, laboratories and seminars, often using primary scientific literature. Students will do significant teamwork and may research questions that they are particularly interested in. We will have weekly online assignments, so students should be comfortable using computers and the Internet. Gerardo Chin-Leo EJ Zita Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Terry Ford
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I Given the increasing number of students for whom English is not their first language and the impact of language acquisition on the ability of students to benefit from classroom learning opportunities, potential teachers need a solid understanding of language acquisition and its impact on learning. This class will focus on the processes, principles, and factors, as well as the similarities and differences of first and second language acquisition.  Focus will also be contextualized to classroom teaching and specific teaching practices that accommodate differing stages of language acquisition. Terry Ford Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jeanne Hahn
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This program will examine the movement of the North American colonies in their separation from Britain to the emergence of the United States through the election of 1800. It will investigate the conflict, including social, racial and class divisions, and the distinctly different visions of the proper social, economic, and political system that should predominate in the new nation. Much conflict surrounded the separation of the settler colonies from Britain, including a transatlantic revolutionary movement, development of slave-based plantations and the birth of capitalism. Capitalism was not a foregone conclusion. We will study this process and pay close attention to the Articles of Confederation and the framing of the Constitution; in addition, we will investigate the federalist and anti-federalist debates surrounding the new framework, its ratification, and the political-economic relations accompanying the move from one governing structure to the other. This program will require close and careful reading, engaged seminar participation and considered, well-grounded writing. Enrolling students are expected to have completed some college-level work in the social sciences and history. Jeanne Hahn Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students work on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Classes use immersion style learning and are conducted primarily in French. Students develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn to develop conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun, creative activities with music, poetry, videos, role play, and use of Internet sites.  Winter quarter themes focus on poetry and fables, regional French traditions, cuisine, and contemporary issues in France.  Spring quarter focuses on themes from the Francophone world along with continued grammatical study.  Students learn from viewing films from Francophone countries and reading a small book of legends and tales from these countries.  Through oral reading and discussions in French, students expand skills in vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and situational role-plays based on the legends.  Throughout the year, students use the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marianne Bailey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This course is appropriate for beginners and for low and high intermediate students who wish to improve oral proficiency.  All instruction is in French. The summer is the perfect time to concentrate on French language.  This course offers basic communicative skills, both structures and vocabulary, which allow you to function comfortably in French speaking areas.  It is also excellent for past students of French who want to gain oral fluency.  Be prepared to work hard both in class and outside class and to learn more French than you might imagine possible in a short five weeks. Marianne Bailey Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French is designed to reinforce, practice, and build upon previous skills. All classes are conducted in French. They are fast paced, interactive, and focus on continued review of grammatical structures, conversational skills with native speakers, discussion of short videos, music, poetry, Francophone themes, and Internet news clips. Students are expected to use French in discussions, increase their reading and writing skills through study of selected literary excerpts. Winter quarter focuses on theater, reading plays and performances of short scenes from them. In spring, students work with a selection of films and a short novel. Through focus on in-depth discussions of French identity, history, and culture, students learn to analyze, compare, and write about aspects of film increasing their acquaintance with media vocabulary. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dharshi Bopegedera and Susan Aurand
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In this program, we will explore how artistic and scientific inquiries can lead to a better understanding of ceramics, a material that has been in human use since antiquity. We will study the principles of chemistry that will enable us to understand the properties of ceramics, which is an exceptional medium for creative expression. In the studio, students will learn basic hand-building techniques and gain an introduction to slips, stains, glazes and the firing process. We will also explore the basics of the chemistry of clay bodies, glaze formation and reduction versus oxidation firing. Program activities will include lectures, workshops, seminars, studios and labs. We expect everyone to create original artworks in ceramics and participate in lab experiences that will enrich their understanding of this material that has evolved with human history. No prior ceramics or chemistry experience is necessary. arts and sciences. Dharshi Bopegedera Susan Aurand Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Noelle Machnicki
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Fungi. What are they? Where are they and what roles do they play in terrestrial ecosystems? How do they get their energy? How do they grow? What do they taste like? How do they interact with other organisms? During this two-quarter long program we will answer these and other questions about fungi. Fall quarter will cover the fundamentals of fungal biology, ecology, diversity and systematics, with an emphasis on the musrhoom-forming fungi of the Pacific Northwest. Students will learn to describe and identify fungi using morphological and microscopic techniques and utilize a variety of taxonomic keys. Students will participate in a quarter-long project to curate their own collections of herbarium-quality mushroom specimens and learn to identify local mushroom species on sight. Several multi-day field trips and day trips will provide students with an opportunity for collecting specimens and studying the natural history of western Washington. During winter quarter, we will explore the diversity other groups of fungi and and study fungi through the lens of forest ecology. Forest ecosystems rest on a foundation of fungi, and students will read the primiary scientific literature to learn about the pivotal roles fungi play as mutualists to plants and animals, as nutrient cyclers, disease-causing agents, and indicators of environmental change. Lab work will focus on advanced methods and examining taxonomically-challenging groups of fungi. Students will also learn about museum curation by organizing and accessioning the class mushroom collection for submission into the Evergreen herbarium. Students will engage in a two-quarter-long group research project relating to fungi. Research topics may include ecology or taxonomy-focused lab and field studies, cultivation or herbarium research. During fall quarter, students will participate in research and writing seminars and quantitative skills workshops to inform their research.  Each group will prepare a concise research proposal including a thorough literature review and a pilot study exploring the most appropriate data collection and analysis methods for answering their research questions. During winter quarter, students will conduct research experiments in the field and/or lab, analyze their data and write a research paper outlining their results. Noelle Machnicki Mon Mon Tue Thu Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Elizabeth Williamson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program offers Evergreen students the opportunity to co-learn with individuals incarcerated in a maximum-security institution for juvenile males. It is high stakes work that demands consistent engagement—approximately 10-12 hours a week in class and 4-6 hours a week at the institution (including travel time). The learning of students enrolled in this program fuels and is fueled by the learning of the incarcerated students.A fundamental principle of the Gateways program is that every person has talents given to them at birth and valuable experiences that can contribute to our shared learning. It is our job as human creatures to encourage each other to search out and develop our passions and gifts. These values are manifested in the practices of popular education, which will serve as both the process and the content of our work. Our goal is to create an environment in which each person becomes empowered to share their knowledge, creativity, values and goals by connecting respectfully with people from other cultural and class backgrounds. All students will wrestle with topics in diversity and social justice alongside other subjects chosen by the incarcerated students—the main feature of popular education is that it empowers those seeking education to be the local experts in shaping their own course of study.Popular education works through conscientization, the ongoing process of joining with others to give a name to socioeconomic conditions, to reflect critically on those conditions, and thereby to imagine new possibilities for living. In order to do this work successfully, students will practice learning how to meet other learners "where they are at" (literally, in order to better understand the conditions that put some of us in prisons and others in colleges). Students will also develop or hone their skills in contextualizing and analyzing socioeconomic phenomena. Most importantly, students will learn that solidarity does not mean "saving" other people or solving their problems—it means creating conditions that allow them to articulate those problems through genuine dialogue and supporting them as they work toward their own solutions.   Program participants will have the opportunity to reflect on how different individuals access and manifest their learning as they gain experience in facilitating discussions and workshops. In the process of collectively shaping the Gateways seminar, they will also learn how to organize productive meetings and work through conflict. Each quarter, students will take increasing responsibility for designing, implementing and assessing the program workshops and seminars. Throughout the year we will seek to expand our collective knowledge about various kinds of relative advantage or privilege while continually working to create a space that is welcoming and generative for all learners.High stakes community-based work requires trust, and trust requires sustained commitment. This program requires that all participants be ready to commit themselves to the program for the entire academic year. Elizabeth Williamson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 16 04 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Clarissa Dirks
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, biomolecules, cell structure and function, genetics, gene expression and regulation, evolutionary biology, biodiversity, introduction to ecology, plant and animal physiology, and the scientific method. The lab component will reinforce concepts and ideas explored in lectures, readings, and workshops. Some components of our work will take us outside to do field surveys and learn about the ecosystem and habitats around us. This biology course is excellent preparation for students interested in taking more advanced life science courses or for future work in environmental science. Clarissa Dirks Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Sunderman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I We will begin the study of general chemistry by exploring the structure of the atom and the nature of the chemical bond and then proceed towards an understanding of molecular geometry. This will lead us to discussions of the periodic table, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, and properties of gases.  Issues of chemistry and society will also be discussed and incorporated.  In the laboratory we will work to develop the skills needed to be successful in a chemistry lab. In particular we will focus on measurements, solutions, and possibly some spectroscopy.  This is part one of a two course sequence, that together cover one year of general chemistry with lab. Rebecca Sunderman Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Trisha Vickrey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This course is designed to offer the equivalent of the second half of a year-long course in general chemistry. The topics to be presented will include thermochemistry, properties and physical changes of matter, solution chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and aqueous equilibria. Additional topics in electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry may be presented if time permits. Course activities will include lectures, small-group problem-solving workshops, and laboratories. Laboratory work will build upon the skills learned in General Chemistry I, and provide hands-on experience with additional methods relevant to the topics presented in lecture. This is part two of a two course sequence, that together cover one year of general chemistry with lab. Trisha Vickrey Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Tapas Das
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Chemistry is the foundation for everything around us and relates to everything we do. These courses provide the fundamental principles of general chemistry. They also provide the  prerequisites for advanced chemistry offerings as well as various studies: science, liberal arts, health, agriculture, engineering, and medicine. These courses include a mandatory laboratory component as an integral part of the course. This is the first course in a year-long general chemistry sequence. Topics covered in fall quarter include unit conversions, electron structures, and chemical bonding. Laboratory experiments will be carried out to complement the course materials. General Chemistry II builds upon material covered in General Chemistry I. Topics covered in winter quarter include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, and acid-base equilibria. Course has a mandatory laboratory component.   Tapas Das Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Donald Morisato and Heather Heying
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall The theory of evolution is the cornerstone of modern biology, unifying disciplines as diverse as molecular genetics and behavioral ecology. Evolution provides an explanation for the extraordinary biological diversity on this planet. What is the best way to study this process—by focusing on the mechanisms producing genetic variation, by looking at modern organisms for evidence of past evolutionary forces or by generating theory that fits with what we already know? At what level does natural selection act—on genes, on organisms, or on groups of organisms? This program will present and discuss some of the big ideas in evolution and at the same time, examine how we, as scientists, with distinct processes and cultures, approach these questions. We will study several aspects of microevolution—the change that occurs within populations, over time spans that are directly observable by humans—and spend time in the field early in the quarter as a class. Our microevolutionary focus will be animal behavior and students will work in pairs on field-based projects throughout the quarter, while regular workshops in statistics will allow students to conduct their own analyses on their data. On a parallel track, we will consider some of the genetic processes underlying this evolutionary change. We will begin with classical Mendelian genetics and move on to a formal treatment of population genetics and analysis of complex traits. We will be undertaking a laboratory project using . This upper-division science program will have an intensive workload, including reading the primary literature and carrying out experimental work in the laboratory and in the field. Student learning will be assessed by problems sets, writing assignments, statistics workshops and exams. Donald Morisato Heather Heying Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Neal Nelson
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. The course is suitable for middle and secondary math endorsements. Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Marianne Hoepli
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Komm und lern Deutsch! This year-long sequence of courses for beginning German students will cover basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and conversation.  Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating, and writing standard high German.  Students will also learn about culture, traditions, and customs of the German people, new and old.  Through involvement in children’s stories, music, and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions.  By the end of the year, students will improve their oral skills to the point of discussing short films and modern short stories and learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé, or a job application. Classes will use a communicative method and will move quickly toward being conducted primarily in German. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Paul Pickett
  Course FR–GRFreshmen - Graduate 2, 4 02 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I The United Nations has declared the access to affordable, clean water to be a human right. Yet around the world billions of people cannot exercise this right. In addition, people in the developing world often face challenges of drought, floods, and degradation of aquatic ecosystem services. This class explores the challenges of water in developing countries, emerging issues, and potential solutions. Issues to be explored include Integrated Water Resource Management, governance, privatization, gender equality, social justice, climate change, water security, and appropriate technology.Graduate students (4 credits) and undergraduate students (2 credits) will explore these topics during the first session. Undergraduate and graduate students will participate in the weekly classroom sessions, read from weekly assignments, and do a research project which will include a final paper and presentation. Graduate students will also write weekly assignments on the readings, and will do a more in-depth, graduate-level research topic with a more extensive final paper. , has worked in water resources engineering for over three decades. His career focus has been on water quality, hydrology, water supply, watershed functions, and climate change. He received a Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources from the University of California at Davis in 1984, and a Masters of Engineering in Environmental Civil Engineering from U.C. Davis in 1989. Since 1988 he’s worked for the Washington Department of Ecology as an environmental engineer. From 2001 through 2012 he served as an elected Commissioner for the Thurston Public Utility District, a water utility with about 3,000 customers in five counties. He has taught at Evergreen since 2009, and also occasionally writes feature articles for local publications. He lives with his wife on acreage in rural Thurston County, along with cats, chickens, blueberries, fruit trees, noxious weeds, and mud. Paul Pickett Summer Summer
Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 14Summer Full The goal of this program is to equip  students with knowledge and understanding of national and state governmental institutions  and how they function in order to serve the people . The objective is achieved through extensive exploration into  theoretical and pragmatic knowledge about how democratic systems work. This program offers an opportunity to engage in an intense collaborative exercise in  participatory governance in order to know  how the multiple layers of government in our state and nation continue to evolve as the nation expands.   To this end, we will delve deeply to learn how government  has worked from its inception to the present.   Participatory governance is based not only on knowledge about how government works, but also on voting patterns and vote-counts; thus, this program seeks to interrogate issues, legislation and proposed laws that obstruct citizens’ access to the right to vote.  We will also investigate the causes and effects of declining citizen interest  in voting, a factor that critically erodes the ideal of government of, by and for the people.   We will also examine the roles of “the people” in this evolving democracy  through texts, journal articles, governmental websites, significant court cases,  films, lecture, guest speakers and student oral presentations.  The approach to this body of information focuses on the content and processes by which the people acquire information and engage officials in national and state branches of government.  Themes include, but are not limited to, federalism, states' rights, and citizens' participatory governance and rights.  Students will also visit the Washington State Capitol and legislative offices,  the Washington State Archives  as well as the Temple of Justice  Artee Young Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Emily Lardner
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 2 02 Evening Su 14Summer Writing in professional graduate level programs requires clear, concise, and systematic ways of communicating your ideas.  The goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to add new ways of writing to their current repertoires and thereby enhance their analytic thinking skills. Specific writing tasks will come from the graduate programs. Students will develop portfolios of work, including ongoing reflective assessments about ways to manage their writing/thinking processes. Moodle will be used for practicing and sharing drafts; on campus work will focus on interactive workshops; and all students will meet individually with the instructor for customized coaching on their work. Emily Lardner Wed Summer Summer
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I Emily Lardner Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend S 14Spring This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 13 Fall This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 14Winter This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Sylvie McGee
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full Sylvie McGee Tue Summer Summer
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring With the aging of the post-war baby boom generation, the United States population aged 65 years and older is increasing rapidly. Between 2010 and 2030 this age group is expected to double in size, from 35 million to 72 million individuals and, by 2030, will represent nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population. Relative to earlier generations, today's seniors tend to be more affluent, better educated and in better health. But the aging of the population will present challenges to institutions and individuals. This program will examine the impacts of growth of the senior population on U.S. society.The central focus of our study will be on the social and economic impacts of an aging population. We will try to sort out the effects on Social Security, Medicare the Affordable Care Act and other programs, and consider alternative public policy responses to these impacts. We will also study the economic impacts on individuals and families. What economic and financial decisions do we face as we grow older? How can we make choices that will secure a reasonable quality of life in our senior years?Young people should not assume that this is a program for old people.  It is intended for students of any age who want to learn how an aging population will affect the next generations.  This younger generation can expect looming demographic changes to impact their job choices and prospects, their income and wealth expectations and their responsibilities toward their aging parents and grandparents.  We will develop concepts from economics and political science within the program; no prior study in these fields is necessary. Bill Bruner Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring
Robert Leverich, Gretchen Van Dusen, Robert Knapp and Anthony Tindill
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In a world full of man-made stuff, what does it mean to be a maker of things?  How does what you make, the materials you choose, and how you shape them define and speak for you, as an individual, and as part of a culture or community, or an environment?  What’s been handed to you, and what will you hand on? This is a foundational program for those who are drawn to envisioning and making things, from art and craft to architecture and environments, and who are open to thinking about that work as both creative self-expression and responsive engagement with materials, environments, and communities.  It’s a serious introduction to studio-centered creative work – each student will be part of a working studios to focus on individual and group 3D projects that address art, craft, and construction challenges at a variety of scales, with supporting work in drawing, design, and fabrication skills, materials science, environmental history and ideas, and sustainable practices. Collaboratively, we will engage this work as art, science, expression, and service, challenging such distinctions and looking for commonalities of approach and meaning.  Book possibilities include Pallasmaa: Cooper: ; Berge, Steele: Rothenburg: Engaged students will leave this program with new drawing, design, and building skills, experience with design as a multidisciplinary approach to complex problems, deeper understanding of materials and their environmental and social impacts, and fuller awareness of how the arts and architecture can shape environments and communities in ways that are ethical, beautiful, and sustainable. This program is preparatory for that follows in Winter and Spring quarters. Robert Leverich Gretchen Van Dusen Robert Knapp Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Robert Leverich and Anthony Tindill
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This program builds on ideas and skills introduced in Green Materials: Arts, Science, and Construction in the Fall.  It focuses on craft and construction at different scales, from details and furnishings to building systems and construction methods. Each student will be part of a working studio to focus on individual and group 3D projects that address design and construction challenges, with supporting work in drawing, fabrication skills, building science, environmental history and ideas, and sustainable practices. We will engage this work as art, science, expression, and service, challenging such distinctions and looking for commonalities of approach and meaning.Detail projects – furniture, hardware, built-ins, lighting, and other building details - will explore craft and sustainability through smaller scaled work with wood, metals, composites, and repurposed materials – where some of the most creative craft work is being done today.  Work at this scale is where one literally gets in touch with a building, so issues of ergonomics, comfort, usability, and equal access will come to the fore.  We’ll focus on wood and wood products in the winter quarter and metals in the spring quarter, introducing basic skills in each area.   Construction projects will address materials at the scale of sustainable building.  Energy is a primary concern: currently buildings account for 42% of U.S. energy use, larger even than transportation and industrial energy use.  New design and construction – or even better, renovating and retrofitting - can reduce that energy use in the future, even with an increase in numbers of buildings.  We will consider emerging technologies that enhance energy efficiency, design strategies that reduce the overall energy needs of a building, and the impact of current sustainable building movements.  Projects at both scales will emphasize informed use of materials – their benefits and their environmental, social, and economic impacts, and skillful use of tools and techniques, to design and build wisely.  Lectures, workshops, and seminars will address themes common to both craft and construction: the history of environmental art and design, structure principles, ethics, beauty, community and sustainability.  Likely books include: (Adamson), (Walker), (Lechner),and (Lovins). Engaged students will gain new skills in drawing, design, craft, and construction as sustainable practices, and the ability to speak for that work effectively through, graphics, writing, and public presentations. Robert Leverich Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Kathy Kelly
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Systems theory offers a holistic approach to group development, along with a framework for identifying leverage points for improving group performance. Whether for senior managers in large businesses or agencies or for members of volunteer community organizations, systems thinking provides a vantage point to better understand group dynamics and useful tools to develop a group's capacity to work together effectively. Following an introduction to systems theory, students will explore key concepts when applied to cases in their own experiences and in cases presented in class. Resources include Peter Senge, Margaret Wheatley, Otto Scharmer, Linda Booth Sweeney, Ron Heifetz, and others. Kathy Kelly Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Mary Dean
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access, and treatment will be reviewed. The books and  aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine", "Sick Around the World," and "Sick Around America". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Eirik Steinhoff
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This intensive introductory critical and creative writing program will investigate the relation between and , between making in language and taking action . We will do this by studying the ways in which the arrangements of our words influence the shapes of our thought and vice versa. The objective is to better comprehend the material consequences and political upshots of the choices we make with the language we use both on and off the page. We will read (and sometimes write) poetry and fiction and drama, in order to sharpen our alertness to the operation of a variety of verbal tactics and strategies. But the primary form in which we conduct our experiments, both as readers and as writers, will be that old stand-by, the essay. Our effort shall be to re-animate this form, prying it free from any knee-jerk reflexes, worn-out proficiencies, and straight-up allergies we might have by reconnecting ourselves to the form’s roots in the French word for “attempt,” , as one of the essay’s progenitors, Michel de Montaigne, will so helpfully remind us. The wager here is that the essay itself is a kind of laboratory, a space in which experiments in language can be composed, where new forms of thought may be invented, and new actions and practices persuasively proposed. Our reading will be organized around a handful of case studies designed to expose us to various ways of doing things with words in relation to particular subject matter. These will allow us to build our toolkit together as readers and writers, and they will prepare us to branch out into areas of research we will conduct on our own as the program proceeds. Authors to be consulted range from philosophers to poets to scientists to fiction writers, such as Hannah Arendt, Anne Carson, Charles Darwin, and Franz Kafka. Case studies to be considered are likely to include: metamorphosis, metaphor, tricksters, slogans chanted in Tahrir Square, the commodity form, pencils, cargo containers, the placebo effect, LCD screens, and how to think in an emergency. The short of it is this: we’ll be reading and writing (and re-writing) a lot, both in class and out of it, on the page and on the screen. No experience necessary, some assembly required, all students welcome. But whoever you are, be sure to bring a notebook and a good pen to our first class. The only way to do this right is by writing. Eirik Steinhoff Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Michael Vavrus
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full             Human Geography focuses on geography as a cultural encounter.  We will study patterns and processes that have shaped human interaction with various environments. The course encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of geography.  Central guiding questions we will be addressing in this course:This survey of human geography introduces broad concepts that are the focus of contemporary studies in geography.  These concepts includeGraduate students are welcome to attend this course for undergraduate credit.     Michael Vavrus Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Greg Mullins
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Human rights law is encoded in the spare language of treaties, but human rights practice comes alive in the materiality of daily life. After a quick tour of human rights law, we will devote our energies in this program toward understanding how human rights accrue force and meaning insofar as they are embedded in cultural practice and specifically, in cultural practices of representation. Our inquiry will be guided by these questions: How do human rights frameworks prevent or redress human wrongs (including atrocities such as torture and genocide)? What leads some people to abuse human rights and other people to respect them? How are human rights struggles pursued using modes of visual and textual representation? What role do cultural forms such as film, literature and public memorials play in either fostering or hindering respect for human rights?The program is designed for students who wish to advance their skills in literary criticism and visual analysis; both literature and film are at the center of the work. The first five weeks of fall quarter will be devoted to legal and philosophical definitions of human rights. We will study critiques of rights from the major ideological camps and students will establish their own assessment of the viability of rights approaches to atrocity and injustice. The second five weeks of fall quarter and six weeks of winter quarter will be devoted to studying works of fiction, films (both feature and documentary), photographs and public memorials that all, in their own ways, attempt to tell human rights stories or open fresh critiques of human rights work. The balance of the winter quarter work will be research projects that result in either a traditional research essay or a more practical implementation of the theory students have learned.Field study will take us, in one day, to memorial parks in Tacoma and Bainbridge Island. A typical week's work will include a film screening, a short lecture followed by discussion and seminars. Students will write weekly one-page papers, two six-page essays in each quarter, an academic statement, a research prospectus fall quarter and a 15- to 20-page research paper (or its equivalent) winter quarter. Students joining fall quarter need not have prior knowledge of human rights, but substantive prior work in literary criticism and/or film criticism and theory will be helpful. Students who wish to join in winter quarter, please note the signature requirement. Greg Mullins Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Peter Randlette
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long series of courses is intended for the musician interested in exploring compositional experimentation with analog and digital synthesis technology and computer applications.  In fall, the course will focus on analog synthesis techniques, studio production, and the creation of musical pieces with a focus on new options presented by this compositional environment.  Winter will focus on building pieces from techniques of synthesis introduced in fall quarter and learning new digital synthesis techniques, different controllers and sequencers, signal processing, and surround 5.1 production skills.  Techniques will include use of percussion controllers, synthesizer voice editing, sample based applications, and plug-in signal processing.  In spring, students will develop pieces based on design problems using combinations of computer-based and analog resources covered in prior quarters.  New material will include acoustic/electronic sound source integration, mastering techniques, object-oriented voice construction, and advanced production methods.  Each quarter, students will complete projects, attend weekly seminar/lecture/critique sessions, use weekly studio times, and maintain production journals. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Arleen Sandifer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I In its first words on the subject of citizenship, Congress in 1790 restricted naturalization to ‘white persons.’   [T]his racial prerequisite to citizenship endured for over a century and a half, remaining in force until 1952.   From the earliest years of this country until just a generation ago, being a "white person" was a condition for acquiring citizenship.” -- Ian Haney Lopez, , 1. Most people do not realize that the notion of the United States as a “white” majority nation is largely a construction of law. In this course, we examine how our understanding of immigration history and law changes if we shift our view from Ellis Island in New York’s harbor to the U.S. southern border.  We’ll examine the current landscape of immigration law and policy and restrictionist and immigrant-rights movements.  We’ll critically analyze how concepts of race are embedded in immigration law and policy and how those embedded concepts drive the current debates on immigration reform. Students will build some basic legal skills through reading and researching important cases and laws. We’ll look at the historical context within which immigration issues relating to the southern U.S. border have arisen and continue to be defined.  We will examine current controversies about immigration, immigrant workers, labor movements, and the varied ways communities respond to the most recent immigration boom.Major areas of study include: U.S. history, immigration history, immigration law, politics, American studies, and critical race theory. This course is preparatory for careers and future studies in history, law, labor organizing, government and politics.               Arleen Sandifer Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jon Davies and Zahid Shariff
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter By the time the First World War broke out in 1914, the imperial powers of modern Europe had radically transformed the vast majority of the societies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Religious, scientific and discursive practices that legitimized colonial aspirations facilitated colonial rule imposed through military conquests, political subjugation and the exploitation of human and natural resources. How did the experiences of imperialism affect colonized societies? What effects did imperialism have on the imperialists themselves? What lasting effects of imperial subjugation continue to impact relations between the former colonial powers and postcolonial states in the 21st century?We are interested in unpacking the discursive practices of both the colonial past and the neo-colonial present. Through our study of history, literature and political economy, we will examine the ways in which European ideologies, traditions and scientific knowledge legitimized the formation of empire and continue to re-inscribe asymmetrical relations of power today under the guise of modernity, progress and global economic development.We will explore these issues through readings, lectures, films, as well as weekly papers, a well-developed research paper, and a presentation of that paper's findings to the class. Jon Davies Zahid Shariff Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Stacey Davis
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 04 06 08 Day Su 14Summer Full Students will work independently, studying the social, political, gender, and intellectual trajectories of the French Revolution from 1789 through the Terror and the Napoleonic Empire.  To understand the origins of the Revolution, students will read philosophy and political theory from Enlightenment authors like Voltaire, Rousseau, and Montesquieu.  Students will share a reading list in common and have the option to meet periodically for book discussions as a group and with the faculty member.  Since this is an independent readings course, students enrolled at different credit levels will read different texts and write different numbers of essays.  Students enrolled for more than 4 credits will complete a library research paper on one aspect of the Enlightenment or the French Revolution. Stacey Davis Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jeanne Hahn
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Invividual studies and Insternships offer opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. I will sponsor student research and reading in political economy, U.S. history, various topics in globalization, historical capitalism, and contemporary India. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small cluster groups must consult with Jeanne about their proposed projects or course of study. The project/study is then described in an Independent Learning Contract.  Jeanne Hahn Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Bill Arney
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Individual Study offers opportunities for students to pursue their own courses of study and research through individual learning contracts or internships. Bill Arney sponsors individual learning contracts in the humanities and social sciences. All students, including first-year students and transfers, ready to do good work are welcome to make a proposal to Bill Arney. 12-16 variable credit options are available. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Harumi Moruzzi
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This Individual Study offers two options for students: (1) to continue their studies of Japanese literature, culture and society, in the form of Individual Learning Contracts, and (2) to continue their Japanese language and culture studies by studying abroad in Japan. This Individual Study also offers opportunities for students who are interested in creating their own courses of study and research, including study abroad. Possible areas of study are Japanese studies, cultural studies, literature, art and film. Interested students should first contact the faculty via email ( at least 2 weeks before the Academic Fair for spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Lawrence Mosqueda
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This Individual Learning Contract can be a specific in-depth topic or an internship that the student has already researched and begun to get approval from an outside agency. A group of students can also work together and develop a reading list and timetable for completion of a group project. Students can also contact Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action for projects that may fit into the parameters of this description. Students should contact the faculty before the fall of 2013. The best time to contact the faculty is at the Academic Fair in spring 2013. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in political economy or political science should contact the faculty by email at . Lawrence Mosqueda Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
John Filmer
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring There is no classroom! Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their own learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicable skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter program explores the fascinating world of languages. What do you know when you know a language? How do you get that knowledge? Are there properties that all languages share? How do languages change over time? Why are half of the world's languages now under threat of extinction? How are communities held together or torn apart by the languages they speak?We will consider these questions and others through the lens of linguistics. Topics to be examined for winter include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, language change, the history of English and English dialects, key issues facing multilingual communities and language planning. In spring, topics will include: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, first language acquisition, language and gender and linguistic politeness. We will look at well-known languages and lesser-known languages and discover why they matter in our lives today. Through the course of the program students will learn a variety of conceptual and empirical techniques, from analyzing speech sounds to interpreting the rationale behind current language policy.This program will be an intensive examination of topics requiring a significant amount of reading as well as regular problem sets and essays.Students interested in taking a language course alongside this program can arrange to take this program for 12 credits.  Diego de Acosta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I To understand literacy instructional methods, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address research-based instructional practices. Topics address reading, writing and oral language strategies to support K-12 students, including English language learners and students with learning disabilities. : For members of the class who are licensed teachers or who intend to become licensed teachers, The Evergreen State College offers this course as one of five courses that leads to a Washington State reading endorsement. The other courses are Assessment in Literacy (offered in summer 2014), Foundations of Literacy and Research in Literacy (offered in summer 2015), and Children’s Literature or Adolescent Literature (offered every summer).  Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Laura Citrin and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What are emotions, sentiments, and feelings? What functions do they serve, both for the individual and for society? In this full-time, two-quarter program, we will use social pyschology, scientific research, creative writing, and literary and film analysis as methods of inquiry into the ways that emotions are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions. We will study the ways emotions are expressed, avoided, embraced, and rejected according to complex display rules that vary across and within cultures based on gendered, raced, and classed social norms. Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions: our emotions. If we read between the lines, what is the subtext of our cultural narratives about fear, love, guilt, anger…? We will look to literature and film for examples of dominant and alternative narratives, and we will experiment with creative writing—fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid forms—as both a mode of expression and a method of inquiry: a way of looking under the surface of our habitual reactions and cultural norms.Fall QuarterWe'll survey the "big six" emotions: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride. We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions (e.g., joy, hope, interest, love) and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life."  We will consider published psychology research and literature from the field of social psychology, and students will design, propose and lay the groundwork for Winter Quarter research projects. Through analysis of films and literary and critical texts, students will consider how stories convey, evoke, and manipulate our emotions. They will develop fluency with critical terminology and concepts related to narrative, literary and cinematic theories. Through creative writing assignments and workshops, students will cultivate facility with elements of narrative discourse such as scene, summary, description, exposition, and dialogue.Winter QuarterOur interrogation of emotions will continue winter quarter with greater focus on independent, in-depth, and finely-crafted work. In addition to continued reading, screening and discussion of literary, critical and research-based texts, students will conduct the primary research projects approved during Fall Quarter, and will work to develop a portfolio of creative work representative of their inquiry. Winter quarter is an opportunity to participate first-hand in knowledge production within the interdisciplinary domain of affect studies, and to engage directly in the contemporary critical/creative discourse as art-makers.The interrogation of emotions in this program will occur via readings, screenings, lectures, research and creative writing workshops, and student-led seminars. Designed as a two-quarter program, the Fall Quarter will lay the foundation for more in-depth work in Winter. We strongly encourage students to enroll who are interested in sustained inquiry. Laura Citrin Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In this year long sequence, students will explore the creative use of the music technology labs.  Original compositions will be the primary goal of the course work, with clear technical learning objectives for each assignment.  Reading and listening will provide a historical and theoretical context for the creative work.  Fall quarter will focus on the operation of mixers, tape machines, and analog synthesizers, looking to the work of early electroacoustic composers for inspiration.  In the winter, students will begin working with the computer as a compositional tool, creating sound collages and compositions using MIDI to control hardware and software instruments. The spring quarter will focus on electronic music in performance and the development of independent projects.   Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Amy Cook and Ralph Murphy
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is designed to serve as a foundation for advanced programs in Environmental Studies. It will survey a range of disciplines and skills essential for environmental problem solving from both a scientific and social science perspective. Specifically, we will study ecological principles and methods, aquatic ecology, methods of analysis in environmental studies, the political and economic history of environmental policy making in the United States, micro-economics and political science. This information will be used to analyze current issues and topics in environmental studies.In fall quarter, we will study ecology with a focus on aquatic systems. We will examine the major physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic environments, the organisms that live in these environments and the factors controlling the species diversity, distribution and growth of aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These scientific issues will be grounded in the context of politics, economics and public policy. During fall quarter we will examine, from the founding era to the present, how the values of democracy and capitalism influence resource management, the scope and limitations of governmental policymaking, regulatory agencies and environmental law. Understanding the different levels (federal, state, local) of governmental responsibility for environmental protection will be explored in depth. Field trips and case studies will offer opportunities to see how science and policy interact in environmental issues. During fall quarter, we will develop an introduction to research design, quantitative reasoning and statistics.In winter, the focus will shift to a more global scale. We will examine in depth several major challenges for the early 21st century; forest and fish resources, global warming and marine pollution. These are three related topics that require an understanding of the science, politics and economics of each issue and how they interact with one another. Globalism, political and economic development and political unrest and uncertainty will be discussed within each topic as well as how these macro-level problems overlap one another. During winter quarter, micro-economics will be studied as a problem solving tool for environmental issues as well as an introduction to environmental economic analysis.The material will be presented through lectures, seminars, labs, field trips/field work and quantitative methods (statistics) and economics workshops. Labs and field trips will examine the organisms that live in aquatic systems, measure water quality and study local terrestrial habitats. Quantitative methods workshops will present the use of computers to organize and analyze data. Microeconomic principles and methods will provide the foundation for environmental economic analysis. Amy Cook Ralph Murphy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
James Neitzel, Mario Gadea and Kristopher Waynant
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This introductory-level program is designed for students who are prepared to take their first year of college-level science using an interdisciplinary framework. This program offers an integrated study of biology, chemistry, and physics that serves as an introduction to the concepts, theories and structures which underlie all the natural sciences. Our goal is to equip students with the conceptual, methodological and quantitative tools that they will need to ask and answer questions that arise in a variety of disciplines using the models and tools of chemistry, biology, and physics. . Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological and physical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problemProgram activities will include lectures and small-group problem-solving workshops, where conceptual and technical skills will be developed. There will be a significant laboratory component--students can expect to spend at least a full day in lab each week, maintain laboratory notebooks, write formal laboratory reports and give formal presentations of their work. Biology laboratories in this program will include participation in the SEA-PHAGE program coordinated by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the use of bioinformatics tools on a bacteriophage genome. We will make extensive use of mathematical modeling in all program activities.Seminar will enable us to apply our growing understanding of scientific principles and methodology to societal issues such as genetic testing and engineering or the causes and effects of climate change. In addition to studying current scientific theories, we will consider the historical, societal and personal factors that influence our thinking about the natural world. Students will be exposed to the primary literature of these sciences and develop skill in writing for diverse audiences. During spring quarter, students will have the opportunity to design and carry out their own laboratory investigations, the results of which they will present in talks and papers at the end of the quarter.All laboratory work and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem-solving groups. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a solid working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, and with the ability to reason critically and solve problems.Students completing this program will have covered material equivalent to one year of general biology and general chemistry, with a significant amount of physics. James Neitzel Mario Gadea Kristopher Waynant Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Nancy Anderson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I The program will provide an introduction to the scope and tools of public health.  Students will work individually and in groups to understand milestones in the history of public health, the basic tools of public health research, and the challenges to successful health promotion projects. The learning community will work in small groups to identify a significant public health problem, develop a health promotion/ intervention, and consider methodology for evaluation of impact.  The program will focus on public health issues in the United States but will also draw on international examples of successful interventions. Nancy Anderson Tue Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Bruce Thompson
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II Bruce Thompson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This program introduces students to the theories, research and pedagogies specific to teaching English language learners (ELLs) in adult and K-12 classroom settings. We will explore the role of family and community in the language acquisition process and identity formation among ELLs. Also, we will analyze how history, political climate, and educational policies impact the quality of schooling of ELLs receive. By using Washington state’s K-12 English Language Development standards and the TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Language) standards for adult ELLs, we will engage in curriculum planning, teaching and assessment strategies. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sean Williams
Signature Required: Fall 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This yearlong program explores Ireland and Irish America through the lenses of history, literature, politics, spirituality, language, film and the arts. In fall quarter, we begin with Irish ways of understanding the world, focusing on the roots of pre-Christian spirituality and traditional culture. We will examine the blend of pre-Christian and Christian cultures in the first millennium C.E., and move forward to the layered impact of the Vikings, Normans and English. We end fall quarter with the Celtic Revival (Yeats, Joyce and others) at the turn of the 20th century. In winter quarter, we shift to Irish America for four weeks, then return to Ireland for the 20th century and into the present.Most weeks will include lectures, seminars, small group work, songs, play reading out loud, instrumental music practice, poetry, and a film. Short pre-seminar papers will be required to focus your attention on each week's texts. In fall quarter, three papers are required (on ancient Ireland, the English conquest, and the Celtic Revival). In winter, two large papers are required (on Irish America and contemporary Ireland). At least one work of visual art will be required in each quarter. The last week of fall and winter quarters will focus on collaborative student productions. Students will learn to cook Irish food for a food-and-music gathering once each quarter.Every student is expected to work intensively with the Irish-Gaelic language all year; no exceptions. Our work will include frequent lessons and short exams in grammar and pronunciation, as well as the application of those lessons to Gaelic-language songs and poetry. If you cannot handle Gaelic study or do not take it seriously, do not sign up for this program. Similarly, you will be expected to learn to sing and play Irish music on a musical instrument if you cannot already play one. We will practice this music each week, and we will be bringing musical instruments to Ireland.Early spring quarter, we will travel to the small village of Gleann Cholm Cille in Donegal, the northernmost county of the Republic. Students will spend four weeks improving their language skills, learning traditional skills (singing, dancing, poetry writing, drumming, tin whistle playing, weaving, knitting) and exploring the region, which is rich in archaeological features like standing stones and dolmens. Students will also have the opportunity to spend two weeks doing individual learning in Ireland; that project will become part of their final work. Upon their return at the end of May 2014, students will write a significant integrative essay, combining the theory of Irish Studies with what they have learned in the practice of living and studying in Ireland. Sean Williams Mon Tue Wed Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Sean Williams
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I Sean Williams Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
George Freeman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This program explores the central personality theories from a traditional perspective as well as a nontraditional perspective. We examine the relationship of personality theories to abnormal behavior and develop an understanding of the DSM classification system and other diagnostic methods. We use an on-line Canvas site to facilitate discussions of the texts and other pertinent issues. We use  films to reinforce the theoretical and practical concepts we’re learning.Although the program is structured for a combined 8 credits, students wanting to complete only the abnormal psychology credits or the personality theory credits separately may register for only 4 credits. George Freeman Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Trevor Speller
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I It seems that contemporary audiences cannot get enough Jane Austen. Some two hundred years after her novels were written, they continue to be filmed, adapted, and discussed. Why do we keep rewriting Austen’s work? How should we understand what Austen had to say about mating, marriage, and material success? How should we understand what she had to say about women and writing? How do we maintain those values in our society – and what might that mean for us?   To answer these questions, we will read Austen’s novels alongside contemporary interpretations of her work. For example, students will compare with  or  with  , or  with  , all the while considering the impact of Jane Austen on our contemporary culture.   Trevor Speller Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Harumi Moruzzi and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Japan is a vital, energetic and dynamic country which has been constantly reinventing and revitalizing itself even in the midst of gargantuan natural disasters, while struggling to maintain a sense of cultural and social continuity from the long lost past. Meanwhile, the conception and image of Japan, both in Japan and throughout the West, has varied widely over time, mostly due to Japan’s changing political and economic situation in the world. In the late 19th century, when Japan re-emerged into Western consciousness, Lafcadio Hearn, the Greek-Irish-American writer who later became Japanese, thought of Japanese society and its people as quaintly charming and adorable. In contrast, Americans in the 1940s viewed Japan as frighteningly militaristic and irrational. The French philosopher/semiotician Roland Barthes was bewitched and liberated by Japan’s charmingly mystifying otherness during his visit in 1966, when Japan began to show its first sign of recovery from the devastation of the WWII. The Dutch journalist Karel Van Wolferen was disturbed by the intractable and irresponsible system of Japanese power in 1989, when the Japanese economy was viewed as threatening to existing international power relations. These examples show how Japan has been viewed by Westerners in the past. The idea and image of Japan is highly dependent on the point of view that an observer assumes and that history makes possible.This full-time interdisciplinary program is devoted to understanding contemporary Japan, its culture and its people, from a historical point of view. We will study Japanese history, literature, cinema, culture and society through lectures, books, films, seminars and workshops, including study of Japanese language embedded in the program. Three levels of language study (1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-year Japanese) will be offered for 4 credits each during the fall and winter quarters.In the fall quarter, we will explore the cultural roots of Japan in its history. In the winter quarter, we will examine Japan after 1952, when the Allied occupation ended. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination of contemporary Japanese popular culture and its position in economic and cultural globalization. Students who are interested in experiencing Japan in person can take Japanese language classes in Tokyo through Harumi Moruzzi’s Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society, and Study Abroad in spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence covers the second year of Japanese language studies.  Students must be familiar with basic verb forms and elementary kanji letters.  Students will build on previous skills and learn new grammar and vocabulary so they can function in a variety of situations.  Classroom activities include presentations, watching film and TV clips, and discussion. Students will continue their kanji studies at their own levels in small groups.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course.  The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence covers the first year of Japanese language studies.  Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations by learning useful expressions and basic sentence structures.  Both hiragana and katakana letters as well as elementary kanji characters will be introduced.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This is an introductory course on Japanese history and culture. We will focus on a popular visual art form, and the way of tea), a centuries-old composite art. These two art forms draw from the same wellspring of Japanese culture and are both present in contemporary Japan. We will examine Japanese history, worldviews, folklore, aesthetic sensitivity, performing arts and hero/heroine archetypes through readings, lectures, seminar discussion and student presentations. This course will help you appreciate ’s stories and artistic expressions that you might otherwise overlook or misinterpret. You can start as an expert, fan or complete novice of and tea but you will deepen your understanding of these two artistic genres through your participation in this class. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter This course is for students who have taken two years of college-level Japanese.  Students will review important grammar, increase their vocabulary and strengthen their reading and writing skills.  The class is ideal for students who are preparing for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.  Students will improve their overall proficiency through a variety of activities such as watching film/TV clips, discussion, and presentations. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomas Mosquera
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Tomas Mosquera Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Richard Weiss and Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This program links together computer science and linguistics through the written forms and grammars of languages. First, we’ll consider writing: what do the world’s alphabets, syllabaries and pictographic writing systems tell us about the structure of human languages? Are some writing systems particularly appropriate for some languages, or is it possible to represent any language with any writing system? Ciphers deliberately conceal information without removing it. What does cryptography tell us about the nature of information?Second, we’ll look at the grammars of human and computer languages. The syntax of a computer language can be described precisely, while human languages have exceptions. Yet there have been many attempts to model human language with computers, and to create ways for computers to “read” and “listen” to human languages. To what extent have automatic translation programs and Internet search engines been successful? Why is it that humans can handle ambiguity, but computers have such a difficult time?Major topics of the programStudents will participate in lectures, seminar, labs and workshops on linguistics, programming and computation. They will be evaluated on quizzes, exams, papers and programs.  Richard Weiss Diego de Acosta Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In recent decades, Latin America has become well known beyond its borders for compelling, politically urgent and aesthetically vibrant literary works. Contemporary writings by Latin American women, increasingly available in English translation, challenge preconceptions about gender and sexuality in the region, while also addressing critical issues of politically motivated violence, collective memory, intersecting oppressions, language, spirituality, democratization and social change. This program seeks to foster greater understanding of the region and its diverse peoples and perspectives. Writers will include Gloria Anzaldúa (U.S.), Rosario Castellanos (Mexico), Ana Lydia Vega (Puerto Rico), Rigoberta Menchú (Guatemala), Daisy Zamora (Nicaragua), Conceição Evaristo (Brazil), Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay), Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina) and Pía Barros (Chile), among many others.We will read novels, poetry, short stories and testimonials by Latin American (indigenous, mestiza, Afro-Latina) women writers, focusing on legacies of colonialism, authoritarianism and neoliberalism, as well as projects for contesting recent histories. We will situate our literary analysis within the historical and political events that shape Latin American women’s texts, and examine their critique of masculinist narratives that justify domination and exclude women’s voices. We will also view films by and about women, and examine women's and feminist movements in the region. Students will write literary analyses and some creative work, and will conduct research on a writer of their choice. Through this study, students will consider the impact of political, economic and cultural forces on Latin American women's lives and literary production, while also examining literary and film representations as sites of resistance. Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Alice Nelson
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of advanced students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: Latin American or postcolonial studies, feminist or gender studies, literature, creative writing, film studies, or critical race studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of the program, but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a larger-scale project developed over the course of the quarter.  Alice Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ulrike Krotscheck
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Are you interested in learning the language of Virgil, Caesar, and Cicero? Are you a scientist or incipient medical professional who needs more experience with the etymology of your field's vocabulary? Would you like an introduction to the vocabulary and grammatical structure of Romance languages? Or do you struggle with English grammar? If any of these apply to you, you should take this introduction to Latin! This course provides an introduction to the Classical Latin language, that is, the language of the later Roman Republic and the earlier Roman Empire—the language of authors like Cicero, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, and Tacitus.  It also prepares one to read Medieval, Renaissance, or Ecclesiastical Latin texts. The principle objective of the course is the development of your ability to read ancient Latin texts as well as you can, as soon as you can. Another considerable benefit is a greater understanding of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of related languages, including the prominent spoken languages in the United States, English and Spanish, as well as French and Italian. You will also improve your grasp of the specialized languages of the sciences, law, and philosophy; as such, Latin is a great way to prepare for law school or medical school. Last, but not least, you will acquire the unmistakable sophistication, ,and seductive wit that distinguish the student of the Classics. This intensive summer course constitutes roughly 1/2 of a traditional 3-quarter or two-semester first – year Latin course.  At its completion students should have a solid grounding in basic Latin vocabulary, forms, and syntax, and with some additional study, they will soon be able to read texts of moderate difficulty with the help of a dictionary and grammar. Ulrike Krotscheck Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Julianne Unsel and Artee Young
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring As currently measured by the United Nations' Human Development Index, the United States has one of the highest standards of living in the world. Average life expectancies, educational levels, and annual incomes place even poor Americans among the most privileged people on earth. Even so, there are gross inequalities inside the U.S. Factors of personal identity, including race, class, and gender, predict with uncanny precision the range of life choices available to any given individual. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Cities are rife with violence, the political system is polarized and corrupt, and personal lives of rich and poor are marked by addiction, excess, apathy, and want. This program questions how this has happened: How do the personal identities and everyday lives of a people come together to shape social, economic, and political conditions in a nation like the United States? How do such conditions, in turn, shape individual identities and lives? What institutions have framed and enforced these conditions over time? What institutions currently sustain them? How do diverse Americans understand and react to these conditions? What can we do to make things better now?  To find answers, we will focus on two institutions fundamental to personal identity and social control in the American present and past – law and commerce. We will examine how property law and the criminal justice system in particular have shaped American history, how history has shaped them, and how both have managed personal identities through social control.In fall quarter, we will study the diverse array of social, economic, and political relationships that developed in the U.S. from settlement to the end of slavery. In winter, we will examine changes in relationships from the closing of the western frontier through the present. In spring, we will place our own lives in proximate context with exploration of contemporary theories of personal identity and social control. In all quarters, we will make a visual study of "the outlaw" as a trope both romanticized and reviled in American folklore and popular culture. We will also place U.S. economic development into a general global context. Interdisciplinary readings will include legal studies, legal history, social and economic history, critical race studies, visual studies, and feminist theory. Classes will include discussion seminars, writing workshops, lectures, student panel presentations, library study periods, and occasional film screenings.Program assignments will help us grow in the art and craft of clear communication and well-supported argumentation. They will include critical reading, academic writing, research in peer-reviewed literature, and public outreach and speaking. A digital photography component will explore "the outlaw" through visual expression. In spring, internship opportunities and individualized learning plans will bring program themes to social outreach agencies and groups in our local community.This program will offer appropriate support to all students ready to do advanced work. Activities will support student peer-to-peer teaching, personal responsibility for learning and achievement, contemplative study habits, and intensive skills development. Transfer students are welcome. Julianne Unsel Artee Young Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Steven Johnson
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter It's been said, "The only thing constant is change." In this course, students will be exposed to different theories on how to develop and implement processes and procedures to successfully lead through that change while continuing to support both organizational goals and the people around you. Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Stephen Beck
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring Individual liberty and equality among all people are the ideals that drive nearly all modern political philosophy. These ideals raise for us the problem: By what right does any government have power over people? What could constitute legitimate political authority ? In this program, we will read classics of modern political pihlosophy, including works by Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Mill, as well as some contemporary sources that extend as well as challenge the views of earlier thinkers. Students will also engage in research into contemporary political issues in connection with a political theory we study. Credit will be awarded in political philosophy. Stephen Beck Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Carrie Margolin
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This course will focus on milestones of human development from conception through death. We will consider the nature of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development throughout the lifespan, addressing major theories and current research that explain how and why developmental change occurs. Some practical topics to be explored will include child rearing, learning disorders, adolescent rebellion, adult midlife crisis, and care giving for elderly parents. This course serves as a prerequisite for upper-division work and graduate school admission in psychology, education, and health care.    psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Karen Gaul
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II What can we learn from past and current cultures about how to best live on this planet?  How have people throughout time met their basic needs, and what systems appear to be more sustainable?  What are your own goals for sustainable living today? From foraging cultures of the past, to off-the-grid communities or urban neighborhoods of today, we will explore cultural approaches to life that demonstrate prudent use resources while maintaining thriving, healthy communities.  Readings will include ethnographic studies of various cultural groups, as well as how-to guides for contemporary sustainable living. The program will include field trips to local communities where students can interact with people building intentional sustainable communities.  Student work will include careful reading, reflection and critical analysis based on program materials.  Students will design and craft their own ethnographic studies focusing on topics of their choice. Additionally, a service component will enable us to connect to local initiatives, and help build community partnerships.  We will spend some portion of each week in a community partnership setting.Students will build vocabularies, analyses, and hands-on skills in the fields of both anthropology and sustainability. Karen Gaul Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Patricia Krafcik, Evan Blackwell and Carrie Margolin
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What is creativity? Is there a relationship between states of mind and a fertile imagination? What are the psychological mechanisms involved in the larger action of the human imagination, urging us to explore new avenues, to see what others have not seen, to create what no one has yet created? Many of the world's greatest writers, artists and thinkers have been known to struggle with conditions classified as abnormal by psychologists. We will explore these conditions and their impact on creativity, searching further for any special links between certain kinds of abnormal psychological conditions and the drive to create.Our interdisciplinary program is not intended to serve as therapy, but rather is a serious study of psychology, literature, the arts, imagination and the creative impulse. We will approach our questions through various modes of inquiry. Through an in-depth study of abnormal psychology, we will learn to identify and understand a number of conditions. We will investigate modern art history and its fascination with the art produced by individuals reputed to be cultural "outsiders," such as folk art, art of the insane, art brut and self-taught artists.  Through this study we will explore how societies form a group identity which is established in relation to some designated "other."  Our readings combine art theory with psychological case studies by writers such as Sacks and Ramachandran and with imaginative literature by Gogol, Dostoevsky, Poe, Kafka, Plath, Gilman and many others that all describe abnormal psychological conditions. We will respond to our readings by channeling the imagination with a variety of creative projects. Finally, we will also study the normal mind and how it functions in both mundane and creative ways.In both quarters of our program students will discuss assigned readings in seminars, will engage in active writing exercises and in rigorous two-dimensional and thre-dimensional visual art work in ceramics, mixed-media sculpture, collage, and drawing.  Assignments may include research papers, poster projects, creative writing, performances and visual arts projects. Weekly films and discussions of these films will enhance our examination of the uses or influence of psychological conditions in the creation of literature, art and music. Guest speakers will provide additional workshops and lectures in various artistic modalities. In fall term we will take field trips to the Tacoma Art Museum and the Museum of Glass, and our work that term will prepare students to undertake a culminating project in winter term. In all our activities, students will have ample opportunities to explore their own creativity and imagination. Patricia Krafcik Evan Blackwell Carrie Margolin