2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Public Administration (MPA)

Application and acceptance to the program is required. (Non admitted students with a bachelor’s degree and Evergreen undergraduates are eligible to take MPA electives on a space available basis: see the MPA home page for more information.)

The Master of Public Administration degree is offered in three areas of concentration: Public & Nonprofit Administration, Public Policy and Tribal Governance. Students in these three concentrations are organized into two cohorts: the General cohort (Public & Nonprofit Administration and Public Policy concentrations) and the Tribal cohort (Tribal Governance concentration).

Title   Standing Credits Schedule F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty
General Cohort
1st Year Core - General
The Context of Public Administration

Amy Gould, Steven Laubacher and Gregory Weeks

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p Thurs, 9a-5p Sat, Dec 14 F 13Fall In the first quarter we explore many of the enduring issues of U.S.public administration, increasing our understanding of important aspects of the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts of effective public administration. Through readings, class participation, and applying critical analysis, the intent is to gain an understanding of the “cannon” of public administration as a discipline and assess the current practices of public service. We will discuss and analyze what public administrators do at the federal, tribal, state, county, city and non-profit levels. Further, we will analyze and critique the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline and the “real” practice of public administration. Finally, we will be forward looking and assess the challenges and opportunities in public administration scholarship and on the ground leadership. Amy Gould Steven Laubacher Gregory Weeks
Doing Democratic Public Administration

Amy Gould, Steven Laubacher and Gregory Weeks

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p Thurs, 9a-5p Sat (March 15) W 14Winter Amy Gould Steven Laubacher Gregory Weeks
Policy, Finance & Budgeting for Public Administration

Amy Gould, Steven Laubacher and Larry Dzieza

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p Thurs, 9a-5p Sat (June 7) S 14Spring Throughout the 1st year Core we explore the fundamentals of administering for the public good. Spring quarter we plan to examine the policy, budget, and fiscal foundations of serving the public. The final class in first year core will provide an introduction to policy analysis, budgeting, and financial management. We engage in policy and budget analysis to examine public problems and critique possible solutions, craft recommendations to generate and allocate public funds, and establish plans to implement policy and budget changes.  Amy Gould Steven Laubacher Larry Dzieza
2nd Year Core - General
Analytical Techniques for Public Service I

Cheryl Simrell King, Moroni Benally and Marc Baldwin

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p, Thurs, 9a-5p Sat Oct 19 F 13Fall Analytical Techniques for Public Service is a two-quarter long Core program for second-year MPA students. Across the two quarters we seek to: understand research methodology; understand why we do research in public service; become competent in quantitative and quantitative data collection and analysis; understand analytical techniques in practice (public policy; budgeting and finance; performance measurement and management; evaluation research; etc); situate analytical techniques in management/public policy (the context); become facile with the critiques of analytical techniques; develop skills in communicating about data (displaying data; presentations) and writing research reports; and become a savvy and sophisticated consumer of research. In the Fall quarter, we focus specifically on questions of design and the application of analytical techniques in public service. Cheryl Simrell King Moroni Benally Marc Baldwin
Analytical Techniques for Public Service II

Cheryl Simrell King, Moroni Benally and Marc Baldwin

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p Thurs, 9a-5p Sat (Mar 15) W 14Winter Cheryl Simrell King Moroni Benally Marc Baldwin
Capstone

Marc Baldwin and Moroni Benally

  GRGraduate 6 6-10p Thurs, 9a-5p Sat (June 7) S 14Spring Marc Baldwin Moroni Benally
Public Policy Concentration
Foundations of Public Policy

Amy Gould

  GRGraduate 4 Oct 15, 26-27, Nov 9-10, 19, 6-10p Tues, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall Policies can be regulatory, distributive, or redistributive; material or symbolic; substantive (what government intends to do) or procedural (how something will be done and who will do it). They can provide collective goods or private goods and can be liberal or conservative. Public policies are not limited to governing public life: Our "public life" relates to how, when, and why we engage with the public sphere and this often involves our private life. For example, the materials used in your home can be regulated by public policies developed and enforced by public servants. This is known as entering into a "Ulysses contract" whereby I grant policies and government legitimacy by agreeing to allow government policies to stop me from harming myself.  Therefore, public policies can be a goal or value of one entity and not representative of an entire "public". Finally, while a policy can be driven by law or actually influence law, policy cannot do less than law requires. As noted by Schneider and Ingram, the key is for any public policy to solve problems.This course provides an overview of the concepts and issues at the heart of public administration: public policy. One of the texts you will read is by Deborah Stone who stated, “policy is the struggle over ideas and these ideas are the stuff of politics." This course is intended to provide an introduction to the study of public policy processes and the practice of public policy analysis. By comparing and contrasting various approaches, we seek to provide guidance for future policy makers and policy analysts. To accomplish this, students will become policy designers and functional critics who recognize the social constructs and subjective limitations of policy creation, implementation, and evaluation. Amy Gould
Advanced Research Methods

T. Steven Marshall

  GRGraduate 4 Jan 10-12, Feb 7-9, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter Whether you subscribe to the view that there are lies, damned lies, and statistics or not, statistics will almost certainly (invade or) influence your life.  The focus of is on learning useful analysis techniques (both in SPSS and Excel) to support meaningful research and effective decision making.  We will learn what questions to ask regarding data, how to perform statistical analyses, how to read and interpret statistical findings, and how to communicate research results.    This is a required course for the MPA's Public Policy Concentration, and is open as an elective for other MPAstudents. In order to take this course, students must have completed the MPA first year Core program and eitherbe enrolled in, or completed, the MPA second year Core program. Advanced undergraduate and other potentialstudents will be admitted, with instructor permission, on a space available basis.   T. Steven Marshall
Tribal Cohort
2nd Year Core - Tribal
Analytical Techniques for Public Service I - Tribal

Moroni Benally and Jenny Serpa

  GRGraduate 6 Oct 4-6, 18-20, Nov 1-3, 1-5p Fri, 8:30a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall Analytical Techniques for Public Service is a two-quarter long Core program for second-year MPA students. While we will focus each quarter on specific approaches to applied public service research, the intent is that the learning objectives of the program will be achieved across both quarters. The learning objectives include:  Understand research methodology; understand why we do research in public service;  Become competent in quantitative and quantitative data collection and analysis;  Understand analytical techniques in practice (public policy; budgeting and finance; performance measurement and management; evaluation research; etc);  Be able to situate analytical techniques in management/public policy (the context); understand the importance of these techniques;  Become facile with the critiques of analytical techniques not to be a cynic but to be a better user/developer of the techniques;  Develop skills in communicating about data (displaying data; presentations) and writing research reports; and  Become a savvy and sophisticated consumer of research. In the Fall quarter, we focus specifically on questions of design and the application of analytical techniques in public service. Moroni Benally Jenny Serpa
Analytical Techniques for Public Service II-Tribal

Moroni Benally and Jenny Serpa

  GRGraduate 6 Jan 10-12, 24-26, Feb 7-9, 1-5p Fri, 8:30a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter Analytical Techniques II for Tribal Governance is a yearlong core program for second year MPA students. Each quarter focuses on indigenous and traditional knowledge approaches to applied research in public administration and public policy with an emphasis on issues relevant to tribal governments. Each quarter builds on the previous one to create an integrated learning experience. This program begins with the assumption that: through reciprocal community-based research construction, using culturally appropriate methods, interpretation, and with ethical and credible analysis our world can be better understood. The intent is to gain a better understanding of how to approach, critique, use, and present research within the context of tribal governments. The emphasis in this program is to make informed decisions for implementing self-governance. Moroni Benally Jenny Serpa
Capstone - Tribal

Linda Moon Stumpff and John McCoy

  GRGraduate 6 April 11-13, April 25-26, May 30-Jun 1, 1-5p Fri, 8:30a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring Linda Moon Stumpff John McCoy
Tribal Concentration
Tribal Economics

Marc Baldwin, Alan Parker and John McCoy

  GRGraduate 4 Nov 15-17, Dec 6-8, 1-5p Fri, 8:30a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall Tribal Economics will be taught by John McCoy and a yet to be announced professor. This class will focus on the unique roles that tribal government plays in relation to economic, business and community development within Indian reservations and the surrounding areas. As the local government within reservation boundaries, tribes are responsible for determining which business enterprises may be licensed, which economic activities are to be permitted by individuals and corporations and which are to be tribally-managed. Tribal governments are responsible for regulating all land uses and to assess the environmental impacts of development proposals. In fulfilling these responsibilities, tribal governments constitute the primary authority charged with safeguarding the public good and protecting the tribal community from any harmful practices of private business. At the same time tribes strive to create an environment in which legitimate business and commerce may flourish. Tribal governments have the authority to impose taxes on economic activities and business transactions in order to generate revenue for public services. They must also fund the development of physical infrastructure such as roads, utilities, etc. Tribes take on the role of “community development” which includes construction and maintenance of public housing, schools, health care facilities, public recreation and cultural preservation. In this course, we will examine how tribal governments balance these complex and challenging roles in the context of cultural compatibility with the values and traditions of the tribal community and integration of the Tribes role within the surrounding non-tribal communities and external public land management agencies. Marc Baldwin Alan Parker John McCoy
Tribal Policy

Linda Moon Stumpff and John McCoy

  GRGraduate 4 Feb 21-23, Mar 7-9, 1-5p Fri, 8:30a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter This course explores tribal regulatory functions and policy-making from internal and external perspectives at the local, regional, national and international levels.  The context of the policy-making, and thus decision-making, processes, will be examined from the perspective of building political capacity into tribal institutions.  The course is designed to confront complex and changing alternatives through understanding policy analysis skills that build political capacity and contribute to the development of equitable and feasible policy alternatives. The focus on processes and choice among alternatives explores how to determine regulatory apparatus is needed to achieve objectives and what administrative structures are crucial for providing services and achieving policy goals. The course is designed to develop skills and abilities that support these goals, including conflict resolution, negotiation, policy design, and the analysis of alternatives and learning system strategies. Examples may be drawn from critical and current tribal issues tribes including land use planning, cultural resources, the establishment of codes, housing authorities, and implementation of programs like TANF.Tribal Policy is required for Tribal concentration students and an elective for others with instructor's permission. Linda Moon Stumpff John McCoy
Electives
Doing The Public's Business

Stephen Buxbaum

  GRGraduate 2 Nov 15-17, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall This course explores how public programs, projects and services are conceived, approved, funded and financed; using case studies about environmental, infrastructure and affordable housing projects and activities. Students will learn about how resource allocation decisions are made, how public value is determined and how levels of government work with and sometimes against each other as they take action to meet public needs. Course is intended for MPA or MES students and upper division undergraduates. Stephen Buxbaum
Government Finance Policy

Russell Lidman

  GRGraduate 2 Oct 11-13, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall There is theory and practice in government finance.  A few words about practice.  All getting and spending decisions are determined in a political context and may have little or no connection to what theory might suggest.  Why then spend time on theory?  It is important to be able to articulate the case for or against a public sector role. It is a good idea if at least one person in the room where decisions are made can anticipate the outcomes of a decision and might have some thoughts about how to accomplish a desired end more efficiently or more equitably.  Advocates, perhaps not in the room where decisions are made, need a basis to assess getting and spending proposals, and theory is a foundation of assessment.  Theory too is at the basis of regulatory frameworks.  This weekend course will include lectures, speakers, cases and readings.  Students will complete a subsequent project where they will examine a program or revenue source, implemented or proposed. Russell Lidman
Human Resources

Pamela Peters

  GRGraduate 4 Oct 11-13, Nov 8-10, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall This 2 weekend intensive is not your average HR course. Students will be introduced to management concepts affecting today’s diverse workplaces and will engage in active learning experiences designed to improve their management skills.  Concepts covered will include those that affect employment issues in the public sector as well as tribal government while gaining a better understanding of how doing HR in tribal government differs from other government employers.  Students will also learn how management impacts the way employees interact and communicate with one another to improve morale, teamwork, and productivity.  Pamela Peters
Legislative Policy

Karen Fraser

  GRGraduate 4 Oct 4-6, Nov 15-17, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall Legislative Policy, taught by Washington State Senator Karen Fraser, deepens perspectives on public policies made by legislature and the legislative policy making process. Students learn about many of the "nuts and bolts" of the state legislative policy making process, including consideration of bills and resolutions, expenditures and revenues, gubernatorial appointments, initiatives and referenda, legislative staff and other professional opportunities, scheduling and negotiating strategies.  In addition, the class examines the political context of the legislative policy making process including: state and federal constitutions, tribal treaties, interstate compacts, international treaties, federal and local governments, political parties, interest groups, media, citizens and more.  Students will explore a variety of legislative issues Karen Fraser
Nonprofit Theory and Practice

Steven Laubacher

  GRGraduate 4 6-10p, Tues F 13Fall This course will provide a thorough introduction to nonprofit theory and practice through a comprehensive examination of the major systems of a nonprofit organization.  Specifically, we will examine the systems of programming (organizational output); business (accounting, program and capital budgeting; and support services such as technology); resource development (grant writing, event management; and personal solicitation); and human resources (hiring; managing the employment process; and evaluation).  We will also examine selected topics such as board governance, strategic planning, and/or personal interests of the participants.  This course will be the first of a three course series (offered in the fall, winter, and spring terms) that will focus on nonprofit organizations.  A major emphasis will be to give participants both a theoretical sense of the selected topics but also some practical tools that will enable an individual to excel within a nonprofit agency.  Students will benefit from taking any or all of the series. Steven Laubacher
Sustainable Leadership & Decision Making

Michael Mucha

  GRGraduate 2 Nov 22-24, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall  This course will focus on ways for the manager or team leader to use sustainability as a management competency to achieve community or organizational goals in a way that empowers people, promotes healthy eco systems and creates thriving and vibrant communities.  Instead of viewing sustainability as being an abstract end goal, this course will focus more on how students can lead in a sustainable way. This course will also help students use sustainability as a decision-making platform to build trusting relationships, channel creativity and create balanced solutions that last and have fewer unintended consequences. Michael Mucha
Transportation Policy

Ryan Warner

  GRGraduate 2 Nov 1-3, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun F 13Fall No matter if you are a program manager at a non-profit, a policy analyst in a government agency, or simply a citizen trying to get to work or school your life is affected by the challenges of transportation. During this weekend intensive seminar we will analyze and discuss the wide range of transportation choices. The course will focus on understanding how transportation policy is formed at the various levels of government by examining statutory and regulatory frameworks, institutions involved in transportation policy, policymaking processes and the stakeholders who shape transportation policy and investments.  The class will look at modes of surface transportation including motor vehicles, rail, public transportation, bicycling and walking and examine the relationship between transportation policy and other critical urban and regional policy issues including economic development, public health, land use, smart growth and climate change. The weekend will be interactive with guest speakers, small group work, and out of the classroom learning Ryan Warner
Health Policy

Janette Ward Olmstead

  GRGraduate 4 6-10p Mon W 14Winter This health policy course will focus on developing healthy communities and the emerging changes in the public health system rooted in the Affordable Care Act and the National Prevention Strategy 2011. Social and environmental factors have influence on our individual health behaviors and the overall health of people in our communities. We will examine predictors of health that fall outside the health care setting.  And explore comprehensive federal, tribal, state, and local initiatives that are moving us from a health care system based on sick care to one focused on wellness and prevention.  We will explore public health evidence-based practice, developing research, and policies used to improve overall health of communities through multi-sector partnerships using a policy, environment, and systems change approach.  Janette Ward Olmstead
Leadership and Management in Cultural Organizations

Kristin Tucker

  GRGraduate 2 Jan 17-19, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter In this weekend course we will explore the dynamics of leading and managing nonprofit and public sector cultural organizations today, including two of the major challenges facing cultural organizations: participation trends and sustainability. We will examine some of the key roles of cultural leaders: building support and working with a board; strategic planning and setting priorities; fundraising and allocating resources; evaluation, accountability, and monitoring results.  The course will include required readings, video presentations, small group work, conversations with cultural leaders, and other activities. Kristin Tucker
"Lean" in the Public Sector

Larisa Benson

  GRGraduate 2 Feb 21-23, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter Larisa Benson was the front person for former Washington State Governor Gregoire's GMAP (Government Management Accountability Performance) initiative.   Larisa Benson
Local Governance

Stephen Buxbaum

  GRGraduate 2 Feb 28-Mar 2, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter Washington State's local governance system evolved out of a unique set of geographic and political circumstances leading to the creation of a web of over 50 different types of local governing bodies.  This course explores how the state's system of local governance influences the delivery of public services and helps to determine the investment of public and private capital.  We will examine how the existing governance system serves to drive public policy and consider how economic and environmental issues and interests are testing the viability of our current system.  We will use case studies and systems thinking exercises to probe the dynamic relationships between cities, counties and special purpose districts as they struggle to deliver critical programs and services.  Stephen Buxbaum
Managing Organizations

Amy Gould

  GRGraduate 4 Jan 13, Feb 1-2, 15-16, Mar 3, 6-10p Mon, 9a-5p Sat/Sun W 14Winter To manage or not to manage,...is this the question? Perhaps it is better to ask how to manage, when to manage, who to manage, where to manage, what to manage, and why manage? Just like organs in the human body, organizations do not function in isolation. Similar to most humans, public and non-profit organizations need sustenance, security, movement/change, aspirations, awareness of their internal and external environments, and... management. It is both a calling and job for managers to recognize and manage the multiple facets of any organization; especially the human components. In this course each student will have the opportunity to study organization theory/ development/ behavior, and practice their studies with hands on application of their own unique management style. Each student will learn to assess situations for a ripe "management moment," recognize strengths and weaknesses of organizations with the know how to implement recommendations for moving forward through action plans, networking connections for collaborations across organizations, maintain an organization's solvency linked to its budget and mission, and develop the skills of listening, public speaking, and professional writing. Amy Gould
Non-Profit Governance

Steven Laubacher

  GRGraduate 4 6-10p Tues W 14Winter The topic of Governance, in general, and the function of the Board of Directors, in particular, should be of interest to anyone associated with a nonprofit organization.  This would include all paid staff and those who volunteer whether they are helping out staff with programming, are on board committees, or are members of the Board of Directors.  It is important because there is perhaps no more influential component in the nonprofit.  The Board impacts virtually every aspect of the nonprofit including its programs, business practices, human resource policies, and fund raising. The purpose of this course will, therefore, be to examine the role of the Board from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.  We will examine the legal mandate of the Board, its duties, responsibilities and functions from several points of view.  However, we will also ask the practical question of how the Board should behave in the “real world.”  A major highlight of the course will be a simulation of Board Committee, Executive Committee, and Board of Directors meetings.  This will provide a learning experience for the participants that will complement our “book” learning, discussions, and experiential knowledge (i.e. what we all bring to the table). This course will expose all of its participants to differing perspectives on how the Board of Directors can best accomplish its mission.  Even more important, however, will be the opportunity for all participants to prepare themselves to either be a member of a Board or to support a Board.  In some cases, the course should enable its graduates to assist Boards in rethinking its role with an eye to improving its governance capabilities.    Steven Laubacher
Strategies for Graduate Writing

Emily Lardner

  GRGraduate 2 Jan 7, 21, Feb 4, 18, Mar 4 Tues (6-10p) W 14Winter Emily Lardner
Food Policy cancelled

Leslie Hatfield

  GRGraduate 2 April 4-6, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring Course Description -- Food Policy: Digital CultivationThe policies that govern our food systems -- influenced by a wide range of actors representing a breadth of interests -- bring serious effects to bear on other related systems, not least health care, education, taxes and the environment. Furthermore, our relationship to food is a constant topic in the media, to the extent that many of us spend more time ingesting media about food than we do preparing -- or even eating -- food in real life. As the media landscape continues to evolve, so does the conversation between industry spin doctors, nonprofit activists, citizens and government officials, as do so many other key public policies (energy, transport, etc). This class will explore best practices in "good food" advocacy and will look at the ways federal and state agencies engage – digitally and otherwise – with activists, producers and consumers. We will explore at least one each regional and national case study. Students will work individually or in small groups to create a digital campaign around a specific piece of food policy Leslie Hatfield
Local Government Finance

Stephen Buxbaum

  GRGraduate 2 April 25-27, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring This course provides students with a basic understanding of the sources and uses of revenues that are available to local governments to support public programs, services and projects. Emphasis is placed on learning about the politics of the budgetary process as well as understanding the fundamentals of the statutory framework that cities, counties and special purpose districts must work within as they strive to sustain their core services.  Stephen Buxbaum
Managing When Difference Matters

Helena Meyer-Knapp

  GRGraduate 2 April 4-6, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring This intensive course takes as an assumption that real differences in interests, needs and standpoint often create tangible and important barriers to successful management and public policy. We will make constructive uses of this particular group’s talents and agendas and pay careful attention those professional practices which are hospitable in the presence of difference. We will also study a variety of dispute resolution procedures as viable strategies for working with and through conflict. American legal, constitutional and historic traditions which impact collaborative work will also receive attention. After the class weekend each student will conduct an individual case study of a particular public conflict. Readings for those projects will be chosen by students individually, in consultation faculty, and might include materials on dialogue, on culture, on violence, on peace-making and on communication as well as on the topic itself. Helena Meyer-Knapp
Practical Strategic Planning

Steven Laubacher

  GRGraduate 4 6-10p Tues S 14Spring The act of strategic planning is one sign that a nonprofit organization has achieved a level of maturity separating it from other nonprofit organizations.  Rather than living from day to day, the leaders of a “mature” nonprofit make a conscious decision to attempt to take control of its future rather than leaving it to the vagaries of happenstance.  This course, therefore, takes strategic planning down to the practical level hence the use of the adjective “practical” which is taken from the title of the key text we will use: “Practical Strategic Planning” authored by William P. Anthony.  The use of the word refers to the goal of our process which is to produce a document that is useful rather than taking the form of an abstract document that once completed will simply stay on a desk top or bookshelf.  The course will instead produce a useful document that is specific and plans across the major systems of programming, human resource, business, and resource development.  The major course objective will be to equip its participants with the tools necessary to translate generalized program goals into reality.   Steven Laubacher
Project Management

Amy Gould

  GRGraduate 4 April 2, 16, 19, May 3-4, May 21, June 4  6-10p Wed, 9a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring What does success look like for you? In this course we will endeavor to respond to this question on both personal and professional levels. It takes integrated thinking and discipline to become a successful project manager. Tools are only tools. In addition to building an awareness of your own management style, we will use real world client based applications to explore and understand the nuances of successful project management. Students will work hands on with a pre-selected client organization to apply their learning and develop an implementable project management plan.  1) Develop an awareness of the project environment (culturally, economically, socially, and politically). This requires understanding, listening to and hearing your clients rather than believing you know what is best. 2) Recognize key project management questions: what are the client's needs (real, perceived, political)? What are the potential impacts of meeting these needs (intended or unintended)? What is the risk tolerance for the client and is the project scope reasonable?  3) Cultivate a self-awareness of your own management style when managing others, projects, and yourself.  4) Create a knowledge base of the vocabulary and processes of project management. Amy Gould
Public Administrative Law

Grace O'Connor

  GRGraduate 4 6-10p Mon S 14Spring In a modern bureaucracy, a legislative body must delegate much of its rule-making authority to the agencies that serve its constituents.  Agency regulations don’t sound very glamorous, but they dictate much of our life in civil society.    Many activities of daily life, from driving to drinking water, are regulated in some way by agency rules.  This course will explore administrative rule-making, including: how agencies get the authority to do what they do (i.e., constitutional law), how they make rules, the public’s role in the rule-making procedure, and how these rules are challenged.  This course will also touch on areas of law most salient in public administration, such as the Public Records Act and ethics laws. Grace O'Connor
Tribal Health Policy

Janette Ward Olmstead

  GRGraduate 2 May 16-18, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun S 14Spring This health policy course will focus on developing healthy Tribal and Urban Indian communities and the emerging changes in the public health system rooted in the Affordable Care Act, Indian Health Improvement Act, and the National Prevention Strategy 2011. Social and environmental factors have influence on our individual health behaviors and the overall health of people in our communities. We will examine predictors of health that fall outside the health care setting.  And explore comprehensive federal, tribal, state, and local initiatives that are moving us from a health care system based on sick care to one focused on wellness and prevention.  We will also examine the integration of western and Native epistemologies and emerging evidence-based practice to improve overall health of communities using a policy, environment, and systems change approach in Tribal and Urban Indian settings.  Janette Ward Olmstead
Energy Policy

Laurance Geri

  JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 Jun 27-29, Jul 12-13 & 25, 6-10p Fri, 8:30-4:30 Sat/Sun (Summer Session 1) Su 14Summer Cheap energy from fossil fuels has been essential to the US political economy and social system. But concern about climate change is forcing a global rethinking of energy systems and the public policies governing the energy sector.  This course will provide an introduction to the many dimensions of energy, including sources, technologies, energy markets, and the economic, social, national security and environmental implications of energy use. We will examine how public policy is crafted in the energy sector in the U.S., other countries, and at the global level, with a focus on policies that hasten the adoption of renewable energy.  Laurance Geri
Graduate Writing Seminar

Emily Lardner

  JR - GRJunior - Graduate 2 6-10p Wed (Summer Session 1) Su 14Summer Writing in professional graduate level programs requires clear, concise, and systematic ways of communicating your ideas.  The goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to add new ways of writing to their current repertoires and thereby enhance their analytic thinking skills. Specific writing tasks will come from the graduate programs. Students will develop portfolios of work, including ongoing reflective assessments about ways to manage their writing/thinking processes. Moodle will be used for practicing and sharing drafts; on campus work will focus on interactive workshops; and all students will meet individually with the instructor for customized coaching on their work. Emily Lardner
Grantwriting

Sylvie McGee

  JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 6-10p Tues (Full Summer Session) Su 14Summer Sylvie McGee
Public Speaking

Marla Elliott

  GRGraduate 2 July 18-20, 5-9p Fri, 9a-5p Sat/Sun (Summer Session 1) Su 14Summer Marla Elliott