2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Julia Zay
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II   Julia Zay Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Chamberlain and Gail Tremblay
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How does place affect the worldview and visions of writers, poets, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers from diverse cultures in the Americas? How can we develop an ecological and ethical identity that shapes culture and place through creative and artistic practice? As we study art history, natural history, and the natural world, we will use these questions to explore our connections to the earth and place through analysis and creation of poems, essays, and multimedia art projects. Through observations of the natural world, we will cultivate our ability to heighten sensory perceptions and gain insights that feed metaphors, images, and imagination.  As we examine the way in which our relationships to words, images, myths, cultural teachings, stories, and the arts enhance our understanding, we will reflect on the strategies we need to address environmental education, activism, and the ecological challenges and health of our planet.Readings include essays by American Transcendentalists like Thoreau, Emerson, and Fuller, and natural history writers and eco-poets such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Terry Tempest Williams, Linda Hogan, Alice Walker, Mary Austin, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Gary Snyder, David Abrahm, Pablo Neruda, Eric Chock, and other diverse writers.   Field trips and workshops include hikes, natural history observations, writing, a trip to Mt Rainier, and visits to museums, cultural, and arts events like the “Procession of the Species,” and the “Cascadia Poetry Festival.” We will work to develop practices of close observation of the natural world to fuel creativity. The quarter’s work will include the creation of art, poetry, personal essay, and a creative journal that allows us to refine our observations of local places, and to sketch and develop concepts for use in our artistic practice.   Students of different skill levels will work on improving their writing and editing abilities so they can write and work towards publication.  They will create multimedia art installations on campus and in the community, submitting proposals for one individual art project, and one group collaborative artistic project, and preparing the works for public presentation by the end of Spring quarter.Assignments:  Writing includes a personal essay about place, a series of ten poems, and a creative journal.  Art includes an individual multimedia installation and a group multimedia installation. Each student is responsible for presenting one of the projects on which they worked, in a community setting.  Note: This class was formerly called Creativity and Diversity in American Culture: Art and Narrative in Response to Place.  You can review fall and winter quarters at: Rebecca Chamberlain Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Gail Tremblay
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The fall course is designed with a focus on children of preschool age.  Courses in winter and spring will focus on the elementary years and allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The winter course is designed with a focus on children in their elementary years.  An additional course in spring will allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Hirsh Diamant
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This opportunity for student-originated studies is designed for students who have taken one or both of the courses in fall and winter quarters and wish to further pursue the topics of those courses.  In the first week of the quarter, each student will submit their project proposal and then complete that project during the quarter. This proposal will be designed with input from the faculty member.All students will also participate in readings, classes, and on-line assignments in collaboration with other students.  A weekly class meeting will include seminars, workshops, and opportunities to share learning and project work.  Weekly on-line posts will highlight students' progress and learning. Students must attend and participate in all weekly sessions. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Bob Haft
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Summerwork is an intensive, hands-on program for students of all skill levels wishing to learn the basics of the 35mm camera (or larger format), darkroom techniques, aesthetics, and a short history of photography. Expect to shoot at least 20 rolls of film for full credit. A final project involves production of a book of photographs; each student will receive a copy at quarter’s end. Emphasis is placed on learning to see as an artist does, taking risks with one’s work, and being open to new ideas. Bob Haft Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Andrew Buchman, Doreen Swetkis and Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is a tour of social forces that shape our arts communities, including cultural, organizational, managerial, financial and historical. By examining art, music and theatre worlds, we will discover structures that help foster vibrant artistic communities. We will meet business and nonprofit leaders (often artists themselves) who bring artists and art lovers together. Artistic entrepreneurs with business savvy, as we will see, often make the art world go 'round.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in making a living as an artist, musician or performer, operating in the nonprofit art world, or making a career in creative industries, and bridging the conventional gaps between creativity, business sense and social engagement. Each quarter's work will include an optional week of travel and study an art center in the United States: to New York City during the fall and Los Angeles during the winter. Students unable to travel to these cities can pursue related studies in Seattle and Portland.The program will combine studies of the arts, business and nonprofit administration and management through a rich mix of critical and creative projects, such as analyzing a local arts business or nonprofit organization. An artist who understands the principles of a well-run business and can deal effectively with contracts, grants and negotiations, we'll find, is likely to gain more artistic and professional freedom. Business people who understand and care about the arts, we'll discover, can build careers that include doing good as well as doing well. Organizations built around art forms can help support local cultures and create sustainable manufacturing ventures, too.The nonprofit arts community encompasses a broad range of artistic endeavors such as summer arts camps and festivals, art and music therapy, community theaters, arts foundations and after-school arts programs. For-profit and nonprofit organizations are different, and we want to make sure students gain knowledge of the vast range of ways they can make a living in and around the arts.By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to connect your own artistic and wage earning work, have an impact on organizations in communities you care about, acquire first-hand knowledge of a diversity of successful arts initiatives, and communicate effectively in the language of business and nonprofit administration. Andrew Buchman Doreen Swetkis Zoe Van Schyndel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I In this all levels course we will work on capturing an expression/presence with a portrait bust.  Our goal will be to make a fairly realistic bust using photographs or a mirror as a basis for the sculpture. With a variety of helpful three dimensional aides, handouts, and demos, students will learn the planes of the face, the basic anatomy of the head and neck, and will work to sculpt the features to give the bust a sense of presence. We will use a basic solid building construction method utilizing a steel pipe armature. We will consider textural, fired, and cold surface treatments to finish the pieces.  Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this class students will sharpen their observation skills by rendering the human form using a live model. Topics discussed will include the ethics of using the human form in art, determining if a figure is needed in a work, and the implications of using a partial or whole body. Skills covered include construction of armatures, sculpting around an armature with solid clay, hollowing and reconstruction, and techniques for sculpting problematic areas like heads, hands, and feet. A variety of surface options will also be covered including fired and room temperature glaze. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
David Cramton
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Session I What makes a beautiful image?  What images best tell a story?  What separates phone vids from ? We will watch films, seminar around films, and create our own moving images.  We will cover the art, technology and technique of the moving image.  We will study how lighting, composition, and camera placement all affect and reflect the story, characters and landscapes that we capture.  We will spend a significant amount of time working with cameras and watching our own creations as a group, plus a few field trips to Seattle and/or Portland to look at the tools and resources used by professional image creators. David Cramton Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Daryl Morgan
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter sequence of courses is for those interested in exploring their own creative potential through the lens of twentieth-century furniture design. We will focus our inquiry on influential designers and makers representing the Arts and Crafts movement, the International Style, Art Deco, Mid-Century Modern, the Craft Revival movement, and others. Using the work of these artisan designers as inspiration, students will construct a piece of furniture of their own design. Daryl Morgan Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Gail Tremblay and Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How does culture affect the worldviews and visions of writers, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers? How does place affect culture? We will explore these questions and connections through careful reading and analysis of literature, film, and art history which reflects a multicultural perspective. As students of diversity in American culture, we will examine the way in which place, and migration from place, shapes cultural production of texts and art, as well as how our connection to the natural world affects creativity.Over the course of the year we will study works by a diverse group of writers, artists, and filmmakers, including African American, Native American, Asian American, European American, Chicano, Latino writers, and other cultures. We will take field trips to museums and cultural events. Guest speakers from diverse communities will share their perspectives about their practice as writers, artists, and scholars.  Workshops in writing, composition, poetry, and art will provide the opportunity to develop a creative practice and create art, poetry, and various forms of narrative. All students will work on improving their academic and writing skills so by the end of the program they can write and work towards publication. Fall quarter, we will study works by a diverse group of American writers, artists, and filmmakers, beginning with Linda Hogan's novel,  A multi-day field trip to the Makah Nation in Neah Bay, on the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula will allow us to study the artifacts from Ozette, a village on the Pacific Coast buried by a mud slide during the 17th century, some of whose artifacts carbon date from the 1500s. We will meet with contemporary artists, and cultural experts, from the Makah Nation and learn about their relationship to place. We will also study works by African American, Chicano, Jewish American, Armenian American, and Arab American writers and filmmakers.  Students will explore the role of art, film, literature, storytelling, and filmmaking as they begin their own artistic practice.  They will participate in workshops on creating narrative and visual art and will write weekly synthesis essays that reflect on texts and integrate the various materials we are studying. Winter quarter, students will continue to explore creative works and anthologies by diverse writers, including texts by a variety of Asian Americans, European Americans, and other Native Nations and cultural groups.  We will also continuie our study of the works of diverse artists and filmmakers.  In addition to field trips and workshops on poetry and art, students will write two five-page expository essays and one ten-page research paper.  Students will continue to participate in creative workshops and complete two creative projects that grow out of our work over the past two quarters.  They will present their creative projects for their classmates and friends on campus. literature, education, art, and cultural studies. Gail Tremblay Rebecca Chamberlain Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Robert Esposito
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How can dance serve as a central metaphor for the holistic organization and transformation of personal life experience into aesthetic objects expressing the dynamic connectivity of self, world, and others? Using an expressive arts therapy model, movement study will be integrated with work in writing, drawing, and music in this multidimensional modern dance program exploring an integrative approach to choreography. It will involve disciplined physical and intellectual study, including weekly dance composition homework assignments.Studio activities will include progressive study in Nikolais/Louis dance technique, theory/improvisation, composition, and performance.  Readings, self-inventories, and seminars in the philosophy and psychology of the creative process, designed to broaden and enhance the student’s palette of creative choice, will explore factors such as self-image, linguistics, cultural and educational conditioning, and multiple learning styles. In solo and group collaboration, students will workshop formal craft elements of composition, such as shape, space, time, and motion. Workshops will use various media to draw and integrate content from students’ life experiences and/or past interdisciplinary study in order to create original multimedia work. Compositions will be shared in weekly performance forums that include faculty and student-centered critique and analysis.Texts will be used to explore the development of dance and movement therapy, draw distinctions between art and psychology, and explore the creative and therapeutic effects of the expressive arts. Seminar discussions will emphasize critical analysis in order to situate texts, art, film, and student work in historical and sociocultural contexts. Writing assignments will balance creative, analytical, and research styles, with a comparative overview of linguistic and communications theory. The program culminates with a Week 10 studio recital of selected student work. Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marianne Bailey, Olivier Soustelle, Shaw Osha (Flores), Bob Haft, Judith Gabriele and Stacey Davis
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring ... ...—Hölderlin, "Bread and Wine" We will study art history, literature, philosophy and music in their social and historical contexts in order to understand the Romantic avant-garde thinkers and artists, outsiders in 19th- and early 20th-century Europe, and their tenuous but fruitful dialogue with mainstream culture and the emerging popular culture of the laboring class. We will emphasize French Romanticism, but will also consider the pan-European nature of the phenomenon. This era offers a figurative battlefield where concepts of art, nature and self, order and chaos, locked swords, testing the limits of rational thought. French language study will be an important component of our weekly work; students will study French at one of four levels, from beginning to advanced.The 19th century was an era of immense political change spanning revolutions, empires and finally the establishment of democracy at home, just as European imperialism spread across Africa and Asia. We will study ways in which average women and men crafted their own identities and responded to the larger social forces of industrialization, the creation of a new working class, the solidification of gender and class roles, the rise of modern cities and the redefinition of the criminal, the socially-acceptable and the outsider.In fall, our work will begin with the paintings, poems and ideas of the early Romantics. The Romantics privileged feeling, intuition and empathy. Like adepts in an ancient mystery cult, they sought to commune with Nature. Romantic philosophers, from Schopenhauer to Nietzsche, spoke of Becoming rather than Being. Rejecting Classical order, clarity and restraint, they envisioned a pure art, beyond language and depiction, which speaks musically through color, passion, suggestion, enigmatically, as do dreams.In winter, focus will turn to the late Romantics. Decadents pushed the Romantic temperament and aesthetic to extremes through self parody and the aesthetic of fragmentation. Symbolists attempted to express the inexpressible through their art. Yet Mallarmé, Wilde and Yeats, Moreau and Gauguin, among others, helped prepare the “rites of spring” of the dawning 20th century, the arising vanguard of modernist and postmodern movements.In spring quarter, students may pursue individual research/creative projects on campus or may travel to France for 10 weeks. There they will study in a Rennes, Brittany, language school, do cultural and historical study in Paris and Lyon, as well as make side trips for research of their own.In this program, students will gain a significant grasp of key ideas in art, history and thought within their context, and will have the opportunity to specialize, creating advanced work in their choice of history, art history or writing and literature. We expect strong interest and background in humanities, and considerable self-discipline and motivation. The workload, including French language study, will be substantial and rigorous. Students will work in interdisciplinary all-program sessions and assignments, as well as choose one of three possible seminar groups. These emphasize: 1) literature and philosophy, 2) history, and 3) photography and visual arts, practice and theory. Marianne Bailey Olivier Soustelle Shaw Osha (Flores) Bob Haft Judith Gabriele Stacey Davis Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Shaw Osha (Flores)
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This intensive drawing program runs for two weeks.  Open to all levels, this immersive drawing class will address the importance of drawing as a language integral to all visual art and as a way to understand one's experience in the world. Primarily, we will study the figure as a dynamic structure in space and mark making as a process of investigation. There will be some reading and writing as well as critiques. The Drawing Marathon will push artists to a new level of working. Shaw Osha (Flores) Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course focuses on the traditional life-drawing practices of observing and drawing the human figure from live models.  Students will use a variety of media ranging from graphite to gouache as they learn to correctly anatomically render the human form.  Homework assignments will supplement in-class instruction and visual presentations.  Several readings will also be given throughout the quarter.  While previous drawing experience is not required, it is recommended. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing.  Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume, and composition.  Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand-drawn imagery.  Students will work toward the development of an informed, personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists.  Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time.  Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work.  A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Ulrike Krotscheck and Caryn Cline
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Must quotidian always be associated with humdrum? Rather, it is perhaps the quotidian—the everyday, the banal—that, in the long run, heroically ensures the survival of the individual and the group as a whole. -Michel Maffesoli, An “epic” is generally defined as a poem or narrative of considerable length, which explores grand themes such as a hero’s journey, or the origin myth of a country or peoples. As an adjective, “epic” refers to something that is larger than life and often extra-ordinary. By contrast, the “everyday” is flatly defined as ordinary and is often seen as boring, trivial, and lacking in grandeur. Yet, the “everyday” has a rich creative history and garners remarkable attention in contemporary art, spiritual practices, and other areas of study and praxis. Our lives are made up of both the epic and the everyday; both are integral components of the human experience. And the tension that exists between the two is rich territory for insight and imagination.This program interrogates how the essence of the epic enters the everyday and how the quotidian gives meaning to the epic.We will juxtapose the exploration of the “epic” as a literary form with the exploration of the “everyday” as a creative practice that engages experiments in text, sound, and image. We will conduct these explorations through readings, film screenings, analyses, lectures, workshops, seminars, and by developing discovery strategies rooted in the creative practices of writing nonfiction and of crafting video essays.During fall quarter students will read ancient Greek epic poetry, myth, and tragedy. These works tap deeply into the human condition, and they explore our most persistent and universal questions, such as the concepts of destiny, power, morality, mortality, and the (in-)evitabilty of fate. As we analyze the grand questions raised by epic texts we will also consider if or how we encounter such themes in everyday life. Conversely, we will examine how everyday life may intersect with epic-scale experiences and insights.To facilitate these considerations students will develop a daily writing practice and craft a variety of creative nonfiction essays—meditative, lyrical, personal, and hybrid forms—and we will factor into our studies exemplars that engage thematically with the everyday. Fall quarter explorations will move off the page to incorporate sound and image as tools for creative and critical inquiry. Students will take a series of electronic media workshops and gain hands-on experience with audiovisual scriptwriting, audio recording, photography, and video editing. Fall quarter will conclude with students applying their creative writing skills and electronic media competencies in collaboratively crafted video essays that blend students' literary works with audio and images to explore the realm between the epic and the everyday.During winter quarter we will deepen our investigations into the epic and the everyday through additional readings and analyses of classic Greek texts and by furthering our audiovisual inquiries. One goal of this quarter will be to advance students’ understanding of various film and adaptation theories to put into practice in their individual work. Winter quarter will conclude with rigorous individual projects that encompass a research paper on sources and methods of adaptation, and an independently made video essay.This is a full-time program emphasizing classical Greek literature and media arts, creative and critical practice, collaborative learning, and individual accountability. Expect assignments to be process-driven, highly structured, and challenging. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. If you’re eager to blend the study of Ancient Greek literature with experiments in media arts, then this program is for you. Ulrike Krotscheck Caryn Cline Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Bob Woods
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This studio course presents the opportunity for intermediate to advanced work in metal fabrication as applied to furniture, lighting, and sculptue. Modern to contemporary artists' work will be investigated. Students will do drawings, build models, and complete a final project of their own design. Bob Woods Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Devon Damonte
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In direct animation, a century-old camera-less form, artists use painting, scratching and myriad techniques not recommended by manufacturers to animate on motion picture film. It is an analog art offering experiential escape from increasingly digital visual cultures. In this intensive hands-on class students will practice numerous methods of direct animation including darkroom hand-processing, and invent their own techniques to create lots of footage in a short time, while studying genre masters like Len Lye, Norman McLaren, and Barbel Neubauer. Final culminating projects will explore analog and digital methods for publicly presenting students' work in a grand, celebratory projection performance extravaganza. Devon Damonte Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Dharshi Bopegedera and Susan Aurand
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In this program, we will explore how artistic and scientific inquiries can lead to a better understanding of ceramics, a material that has been in human use since antiquity. We will study the principles of chemistry that will enable us to understand the properties of ceramics, which is an exceptional medium for creative expression. In the studio, students will learn basic hand-building techniques and gain an introduction to slips, stains, glazes and the firing process. We will also explore the basics of the chemistry of clay bodies, glaze formation and reduction versus oxidation firing. Program activities will include lectures, workshops, seminars, studios and labs. We expect everyone to create original artworks in ceramics and participate in lab experiences that will enrich their understanding of this material that has evolved with human history. No prior ceramics or chemistry experience is necessary. arts and sciences. Dharshi Bopegedera Susan Aurand Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Robert Leverich, Gretchen Van Dusen, Robert Knapp and Anthony Tindill
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In a world full of man-made stuff, what does it mean to be a maker of things?  How does what you make, the materials you choose, and how you shape them define and speak for you, as an individual, and as part of a culture or community, or an environment?  What’s been handed to you, and what will you hand on? This is a foundational program for those who are drawn to envisioning and making things, from art and craft to architecture and environments, and who are open to thinking about that work as both creative self-expression and responsive engagement with materials, environments, and communities.  It’s a serious introduction to studio-centered creative work – each student will be part of a working studios to focus on individual and group 3D projects that address art, craft, and construction challenges at a variety of scales, with supporting work in drawing, design, and fabrication skills, materials science, environmental history and ideas, and sustainable practices. Collaboratively, we will engage this work as art, science, expression, and service, challenging such distinctions and looking for commonalities of approach and meaning.  Book possibilities include Pallasmaa: Cooper: ; Berge, Steele: Rothenburg: Engaged students will leave this program with new drawing, design, and building skills, experience with design as a multidisciplinary approach to complex problems, deeper understanding of materials and their environmental and social impacts, and fuller awareness of how the arts and architecture can shape environments and communities in ways that are ethical, beautiful, and sustainable. This program is preparatory for that follows in Winter and Spring quarters. Robert Leverich Gretchen Van Dusen Robert Knapp Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Robert Leverich and Anthony Tindill
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This program builds on ideas and skills introduced in Green Materials: Arts, Science, and Construction in the Fall.  It focuses on craft and construction at different scales, from details and furnishings to building systems and construction methods. Each student will be part of a working studio to focus on individual and group 3D projects that address design and construction challenges, with supporting work in drawing, fabrication skills, building science, environmental history and ideas, and sustainable practices. We will engage this work as art, science, expression, and service, challenging such distinctions and looking for commonalities of approach and meaning.Detail projects – furniture, hardware, built-ins, lighting, and other building details - will explore craft and sustainability through smaller scaled work with wood, metals, composites, and repurposed materials – where some of the most creative craft work is being done today.  Work at this scale is where one literally gets in touch with a building, so issues of ergonomics, comfort, usability, and equal access will come to the fore.  We’ll focus on wood and wood products in the winter quarter and metals in the spring quarter, introducing basic skills in each area.   Construction projects will address materials at the scale of sustainable building.  Energy is a primary concern: currently buildings account for 42% of U.S. energy use, larger even than transportation and industrial energy use.  New design and construction – or even better, renovating and retrofitting - can reduce that energy use in the future, even with an increase in numbers of buildings.  We will consider emerging technologies that enhance energy efficiency, design strategies that reduce the overall energy needs of a building, and the impact of current sustainable building movements.  Projects at both scales will emphasize informed use of materials – their benefits and their environmental, social, and economic impacts, and skillful use of tools and techniques, to design and build wisely.  Lectures, workshops, and seminars will address themes common to both craft and construction: the history of environmental art and design, structure principles, ethics, beauty, community and sustainability.  Likely books include: (Adamson), (Walker), (Lechner),and (Lovins). Engaged students will gain new skills in drawing, design, craft, and construction as sustainable practices, and the ability to speak for that work effectively through, graphics, writing, and public presentations. Robert Leverich Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Julianne Unsel and Artee Young
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring As currently measured by the United Nations' Human Development Index, the United States has one of the highest standards of living in the world. Average life expectancies, educational levels, and annual incomes place even poor Americans among the most privileged people on earth. Even so, there are gross inequalities inside the U.S. Factors of personal identity, including race, class, and gender, predict with uncanny precision the range of life choices available to any given individual. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Cities are rife with violence, the political system is polarized and corrupt, and personal lives of rich and poor are marked by addiction, excess, apathy, and want. This program questions how this has happened: How do the personal identities and everyday lives of a people come together to shape social, economic, and political conditions in a nation like the United States? How do such conditions, in turn, shape individual identities and lives? What institutions have framed and enforced these conditions over time? What institutions currently sustain them? How do diverse Americans understand and react to these conditions? What can we do to make things better now?  To find answers, we will focus on two institutions fundamental to personal identity and social control in the American present and past – law and commerce. We will examine how property law and the criminal justice system in particular have shaped American history, how history has shaped them, and how both have managed personal identities through social control.In fall quarter, we will study the diverse array of social, economic, and political relationships that developed in the U.S. from settlement to the end of slavery. In winter, we will examine changes in relationships from the closing of the western frontier through the present. In spring, we will place our own lives in proximate context with exploration of contemporary theories of personal identity and social control. In all quarters, we will make a visual study of "the outlaw" as a trope both romanticized and reviled in American folklore and popular culture. We will also place U.S. economic development into a general global context. Interdisciplinary readings will include legal studies, legal history, social and economic history, critical race studies, visual studies, and feminist theory. Classes will include discussion seminars, writing workshops, lectures, student panel presentations, library study periods, and occasional film screenings.Program assignments will help us grow in the art and craft of clear communication and well-supported argumentation. They will include critical reading, academic writing, research in peer-reviewed literature, and public outreach and speaking. A digital photography component will explore "the outlaw" through visual expression. In spring, internship opportunities and individualized learning plans will bring program themes to social outreach agencies and groups in our local community.This program will offer appropriate support to all students ready to do advanced work. Activities will support student peer-to-peer teaching, personal responsibility for learning and achievement, contemplative study habits, and intensive skills development. Transfer students are welcome. Julianne Unsel Artee Young Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Patricia Krafcik, Evan Blackwell and Carrie Margolin
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What is creativity? Is there a relationship between states of mind and a fertile imagination? What are the psychological mechanisms involved in the larger action of the human imagination, urging us to explore new avenues, to see what others have not seen, to create what no one has yet created? Many of the world's greatest writers, artists and thinkers have been known to struggle with conditions classified as abnormal by psychologists. We will explore these conditions and their impact on creativity, searching further for any special links between certain kinds of abnormal psychological conditions and the drive to create.Our interdisciplinary program is not intended to serve as therapy, but rather is a serious study of psychology, literature, the arts, imagination and the creative impulse. We will approach our questions through various modes of inquiry. Through an in-depth study of abnormal psychology, we will learn to identify and understand a number of conditions. We will investigate modern art history and its fascination with the art produced by individuals reputed to be cultural "outsiders," such as folk art, art of the insane, art brut and self-taught artists.  Through this study we will explore how societies form a group identity which is established in relation to some designated "other."  Our readings combine art theory with psychological case studies by writers such as Sacks and Ramachandran and with imaginative literature by Gogol, Dostoevsky, Poe, Kafka, Plath, Gilman and many others that all describe abnormal psychological conditions. We will respond to our readings by channeling the imagination with a variety of creative projects. Finally, we will also study the normal mind and how it functions in both mundane and creative ways.In both quarters of our program students will discuss assigned readings in seminars, will engage in active writing exercises and in rigorous two-dimensional and thre-dimensional visual art work in ceramics, mixed-media sculpture, collage, and drawing.  Assignments may include research papers, poster projects, creative writing, performances and visual arts projects. Weekly films and discussions of these films will enhance our examination of the uses or influence of psychological conditions in the creation of literature, art and music. Guest speakers will provide additional workshops and lectures in various artistic modalities. In fall term we will take field trips to the Tacoma Art Museum and the Museum of Glass, and our work that term will prepare students to undertake a culminating project in winter term. In all our activities, students will have ample opportunities to explore their own creativity and imagination. Patricia Krafcik Evan Blackwell Carrie Margolin Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Bob Woods
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Bob Woods
  Course FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Bob Woods
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Steven Hendricks and Jean Mandeberg
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What makes a work of art capable of narrative expressiveness? What constitutes a narrative? How do artists invest tangible records, stories, artifacts and objects with meaning, and how do readers work to recuperate or transform those meanings for themselves?Many artists and writers have used objects, visual forms, books and text in combination to create a hybrid language that can carry narrative possibilities. How do such works exploit the possibilities of conventional and nonconventional narrative to stimulate the intellect and the imagination? Does imposing a narrative on a work of visual or sculptural art limit it, reduce it to a single interpretation? How can we navigate the space between object and idea as artists, as readers, as makers of things and makers of meaning?This program will explore such questions through intensive studio work in fine metals and book arts. Equally important will be our study of literature that tests the boundary between narrative and non-narrative and the practice of critical and creative writing. The general program structure will include alternating periods of focused writing, imaginative reading, seminar discussion and extended, deliberate work in the studio.Student projects will be direct responses to the themes and questions of the program: explorations of the nature of narrative, the various ways in which objects can participate in, contain, and create narratives. This unique opportunity to combine book arts and fine metals will persistently require competence in technical skills, unusual patience, attention to detail and materials, and articulate translations between ideas and visual forms.The second quarter of the program will in part evolve from the discoveries of the first and will involve deepening our work in both studios, with the necessary emphasis on thoughtful self-critique and aesthetic rigor. This program will be important and challenging for students in the arts and humanities who think of artists as aesthetic and conceptual problem solvers, seeking new puzzles, forms and possibilities for constructing meaning using words, the book and small-scale sculptural forms. As a first-year program, this program provides specific support for students at the beginning of their Evergreen careers. Steven Hendricks Jean Mandeberg Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Judith Baumann
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Designed for intermediate to advanced art students, this course will focus on introductory painting techniques using a variety of media. It is highly recommended that students have previous experience with college level drawing courses.  As a class, we will paint from observation using still lifes, the figure, and the landscape. Abstraction in contemporary painting will also be addressed. Class time will be devoted to studio work, presentations, demonstrations, and critiques.  Students will be expected to work outside of designated class time to complete all required assignments.  Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steve Davis
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course emphasizes beginning-level skill development in camera use, lighting, exposure, b/w film and print processing. We will also briefly explore basic color printing and digital photography techniques. The essential elements of the class will include assignments, critiques and surveys of images by other photographers. Students of this class will develop a basic understanding of the language of photography, as a communications tool and a means for personal expression. Students must invest ample time outside of class to complete assignments. Steve Davis Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Hugh Lentz
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course emphasizes beginning-level skill development in camera function, exposure, and black-and-white film development and printing as well as an introduction to digital imaging.  We will focus on photography's role in issues of the arts, cultural representation, and mass media.  Students will have assignments, critiques, collaborations, and viewing of work by other photographers.  Each student will complete a final project for the end of the quarter. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hugh Lentz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In this beginning color photography class, we'll emphasize skill development in camera function, film exposure, and working in a darkroom learning to print from color negatives.  We’ll have workshops in color darkroom mechanics and metering for ambient light and electronic flash.  Using assignments, critiques, and slide viewing of historical and contemporary artists, students will develop the tools to pursue their own projects. Students registered for 8 credits will earn the additional credit by doing independent photo projects. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Hugh Lentz
Signature Required: Winter 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this course we'll be learning to print from color negatives, work with medium format cameras, photograph with electronic flash, and work in the studio environment.  There will be assignments, critiques, and viewing the work of other photographers.  All assignments and all work for this class will be in the studio with lighting set-ups.  In addition to assignments, each student will be expected to produce a final project of their own choosing and turn in a portfolio at the end of the quarter. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Steve Davis
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course will introduce students to photographic practice through digital means.  We will explore the fundamentals of image-making through digital photographic processes.  We will work with digital cameras, software applications, and inkjet printers. Students will create work as exhibition-quality prints, and also create a photographic portfolio for the Web. Steve Davis Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Steve Davis
Signature Required: Winter 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This class will explore how photography can be effectively used as a tool for creative documentation. You may work in any photographic mediums with which you are experienced (conventional B/W, color, digital). Final projects must address a particular topic (from your perspective) and clearly communicate your message to a broad audience. Steve Davis Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Steve Davis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This class is an introduction to photographic expression using digital cameras, computers, and printers. Image-making will take the forms of digital prints and online portfolios. A brief introduction to digital video, HD panoramas, and the black-and-white darkroom will also be included. You will have full access to the Digital Imaging Studio and to our darkroom facilities. Digital cameras are available through Media Loan. Class requirements include scheduled assignments, research, and a final project consisting of new, photographically-derived, digital work. Steve Davis Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Hugh Lentz
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This is an intermediate to advanced photography class where students will be using older methods and techniques of the medium.  We’ll be spending a significant part of this class learning about and using 4x5 cameras. Additionally, we'll be working with UV printing, lith films, pinhole cameras, and more.  There will be assignments based in these processes, and each student will produce a final project.  We’ll also look at the work of contemporary and historical artists using these methods. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Julia Zay and Miranda Mellis
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day and Evening S 14Spring In this interdisciplinary foundational program in visual studies, literature, cultural theory, and creative and critical writing, we will practice observing, rendering, and reflecting on the ordinary and the everyday.  We’ll study texts, objects, ideas, art and films, aspiring to Henry David Thoreau’s lifelong goal: to be surprised by what we see, in “the bloom of the present moment.”  Slowing down to observe, render, and reflect on what tends to go unnoticed will galvanize curiosity and insights about our basic experiences of embodiment and raise new questions to pursue critically, ethically, and artfully.  We’ll write, read, make images, and perform thought experiments to heighten our awareness of practices often obscured by the habitual and overly-familiar aspects of daily life (for example, calendar time, e-mail correspondence, house-cleaning, eating, and even walking to get from point A to point B – what other kinds of walks might we take?).  By activating our perceptual abilities to make visible and thinkable these quotidian structures, we will in turn consider the ways the everyday constitutes not only our private lives, but also our public and social worlds. We will study a range of philosophical, poetic, filmic, visual, and fictional texts that theorize and enact the constitution of dailiness. In all our work we will focus on cultivating practices of attention—skills essential to creative and critical engagement – while furthering our abilities to read and view closely, attend to historical and cultural context, and write – academically and creatively – with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures, screenings, workshops and seminar. Students can expect to both work individually and collaborate with peers on assignments. Finally, we'll expand our critical and creative lexicons by intersecting with two campus arts and humanities forums: the Critical and Cultural Theory lecture series on Monday evenings and the Art Lecture series on Wednesday mornings. Julia Zay Miranda Mellis Mon Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Lisa Sweet
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter It is a commonplace: ' '. In visual art, 'the rules' are the historical traditions and conventions of an artistic medium. Breaking 'the rules' means intelligently and strategically bending and breaking with those traditions and conventions in innovative ways. The history, craft and technique of intaglio printmaking provide rich arenas in which to explore tradition and innovations in 21st century image-making. The fall quarter of the program will focus intensively on seminar readings exploring the history and traditions of print and printmaking: it's early alliances with religious devotion, the Protestant Reformation, the scientific revolution. While focusing on printmaking history, students will practice traditional intaglio techniques including engraving, line etching and aquatint, through responses to weekly studio assignments. In winter quarter, students will have the opportunity to develop a series of thematically-linked images that implement and/or disrupt (break) the 'rules' of printmaking conventions. The winter quarter will emphasize research and artistic practice, image-making as a form of intellectual inquiry, and the development of professional presentation skills for articulating one's artistic work. Printmaking is a remarkably rich and flexible medium with strong political roots. It is also technically rigorous.  Students who are comfortable making detailed technical notes, following sequential processes, observing safety protocols, and withstanding the physical demands of artistic work, are encouraged to enroll. ; Students who are new to studio art, or have considerable experience with other artistic practices are welcome. Drawing skills are optional. Lisa Sweet Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This studio-based course focuses on the rich history of relief printmaking and its applied aesthetic within fine art. Using both wood and linoleum, students will experiment with a variety of printing and carving techniques including hand editioning practices, reduction relief processes, and multiple block methods. Attention to craft and professional presentation of finished prints will be stressed throughout the quarter. Students should expect to work 6 - 8 hours in the studio outside of class time. The course will conclude with a print exchange. Judith Baumann Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I Exploring all areas of the Evergreen non-toxic printmaking studio, students will learn a variety of technical skills including relief, intaglio, serigraphy, and letterpress. Students will rotate through the printmaking studio, each assignment building upon accumulated knowledge. Proper paper handling and editioning practices will be stressed. Students will be exposed to the history and contemporary applications of all techniques through presentations and lectures. At the end of the session, students will present a technical printmaking portfolio, highlighting both concept and craft. Judith Baumann Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Traditional printmaking processes and photographic techniques combine in this comprehensive overview of photo-based intaglio, serigraphy, photopolymer, cyanotypes, and photolithography. Using computer-generated, digital positives and negatives as films, students will prepare and expose light-sensitized paper, copper plates, screens, polymer, and aluminum plates to create distinctive hand-printed imagery. Throughout the course, students will also study the history and contemporary applications of the medium. While introductory, this course is highly process-based and technical in nature. Students are expected to have prior digital image editing experience. Experience in printmaking and/or photography would also be beneficial. Judith Baumann Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Judith Baumann
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this course, students will study contemporary and traditional techniques in stone lithography. Traditional stone lithography, invented in 1796, is the practice of drawing directly onto a prepared stone surface, etching, and then printing from that surface. Students will focus on learning the theory and chemistry of stone lithography through this intensive studio course. Touche washes, direct engraving methods, and color printing will also be demonstrated. Students must have previous experience in printmaking and confidence creating hand drawn imagery. Judith Baumann Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Hirsh Diamant and Cindy Beck
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program will explore how the human body was imagined by Eastern and Western cultures and how we can re-imagine the body to achieve better health and a greater sense of well-being.  In particular we will study organs and body systems, look at the ways the body was imagined in Western scientific illustration and in alchemical images, Chinese diagrams, and Tibetan paintings.  We will look at major organs and body systems from physical, physiological, and spiritual perspectives, practice medical illustration, and explore new ways of understanding and representing the interdependent work of a healthy body.  Our study will also include an introduction to energy systems and alternative medicine.Credits will be awarded in medical illustration, cultural studies, and anatomy. Hirsh Diamant Cindy Beck Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Naima Lowe
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II In a world increasingly made up of screens, it is important to know how to make and re-make images that matter. Students from all disciplines and skill levels are invited to take this course where we will learn how films and videos use editing to make meaning. In this hands on course students will be introduced to the fundamentals of digital video editing through a combination of screenings, class discussions, readings, exercises and projects. We'll look at examples of films and videos that take pre-existing footage and transform the meaning through "remixing" and transforming the original. We'll also look at some classical film and video editing techniques to better understand how these "rules of the trade" can be borrowed, transformed and broken in order to get our ideas across. Students will gain competency in a range of editing techniques appropriate for documentary, narrative and experimental video forms, and will learn to critically and formally analyze films and videos in order to better understand how editing (as well as other formal elements) come together in films to create meaning.This course welcomes students of all skill levels.  Naima Lowe Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ann Storey and Bob Woods
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring In this interdisciplinary program we will study Italian Renaissance art while we create our own bronze sculptures inspired by that tradition.  Sculpture led the way to the realization of the artistic aims of the Renaissance, as artists concentrated on two major challenges:  the freestanding figure and the representation of three-dimensional space.  We will explore the social, economic, and historical forces that led artists to revive the ideals of classical antiquity and look with fresh eyes at the natural world.  In creating our sculpture we will work systematically from ideation to realization—drawing, design, and 3D sculpture—while exploring principles, materials, and techniques.  Metal casting will be the main studio vehicle and will incorporate many sequential steps to the finished artwork.  The art history portion of the class will present an overview of the Italian Renaissance through lectures, reading, writing, and seminaring.   Ann Storey Bob Woods Tue Thu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Lucia Harrison
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This is an art-based program that combines the study of stream ecology and visual art to provide a framework and tools to examine, observe, record, and know a place. We will explore the role of art and science in helping people develop a deep and reciprocal relationship with a watershed. Designed for beginning students in art and ecology, we will study the characteristics of local streams and make drawings that are inspired by a connection to a specific stream. The Nisqually River Watershed will be the focus for our collective work while the numerous local streams will serve as individual focal points for student projects throughout the quarter.Through reading, lectures and field study, students will learn the history of the watershed, study concepts in stream ecology, learn to identify native plants in the watershed and learn about current conservation efforts. They will develop beginning drawing skills and practice techniques for keeping an illustrated field journal. Students will work in charcoal, chalk pastel, watercolor, and colored pencil. Students will explore strategies for using notes and sketches to inspire more finished artworks.   Students will study artists whose work is inspired by their deep connection to a place. Each student will visit a local stream regularly, keep a field journal, and in the second half of the quarter, students will create a series of artworks or an environmental education project that gives something back to their watershed. Lucia Harrison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Suzanne Simons and Ann Storey
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Sacred Intersections focuses on a thousand-year period of Christian and Islamic art, art history, poetry, and mysticism. As the program continues in Winter quarter, we will turn our attention to a time of, roughly, the 12 through the 14 centuries. This was a period that built on the creativity, spirituality, and change of the previous era and took the arts to new heights through creative and cultural fusion. We will study the motivating ideas and issues of the age: the mystical poetic traditions of the Persian empire (present-day Iran and central Asia) and their influence on contemporary poetry; the awe-inspiring forms of Gothic architecture, and the poetry of the Beguine mystics (of present-day Germany).  The idea that both mystic and artist were “seers”—seeing beyond the physical into the transcendent and metaphysical—impelled them into visionary realms. We will examine poets such as Rumi and Hafez and other charismatic figures.  We will study illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, sculpture, and sacred architecture of European and Byzantine Christendom and Islamic empires stretching from Spain to Central Asia.  Art workshops will enable students to move from theory to practice. Class time will be divided among the following activities: faculty lectures, art workshops, seminars, writing, films and a possible field trip to a local mosque. This program is preparatory for further study and/or careers in the visual arts, education, museum studies, religion, communication, international relations, history, and writing. Suzanne Simons Ann Storey Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Julia Zay and Amjad Faur
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This is an art foundations program invested in opening up the dense histories and meanings of photographic images in their many forms, from still to moving and back again--and the unsettled places between. We explore what it means both to know and to make an image– photographic, moving, and time-based. We will pay equal attention to the history, theory and practice of the photographic image, both still and moving, in the context of visual studies--a field that yokes a broad study of the visual arts with social and cultural history and theory--art history, film/cinema history, and philosophy. Through a critical engagement with still and moving photographic images as well as related forms of visual art, we will map a broad contextual territory and challenge received notions of the boundaries between forms, genres, and mediums.Photography can never be thought of as simply a medium, technology or practice but a convergence of material, history, culture and power. In the Fall, we will start with the unfolding of the Western enlightenment, from the 16th to the 19th century, when optical technologies radically reorganized the senses and methods of knowledge production, posing new questions about temporal, spatial and visual relationships to artists and scientists alike.  We will then move more deeply into the 19th and first half of the 20th century, when photography emerged into an art world dominated by painting, a visual culture organized around print technologies, and societies in the throes of rapid industrialization. Photography initially emerged not out of art contexts but out of the institutions of science and industry, so we will consider, in particular, the ways it was used to produce social categories, shaping dominant discourses of gender, class and criminality. For example, we’ll look at the language of portraiture so central to the emergence of both a middle class and the language of criminal and medical photography. Our materials and techniques will first be limited to those from the 19th century (proto-photography, early processes, hand-built cameras). In winter, we move from the 19th to the long 20th century and the emergence of cinema. We will look at the way early cinema was organized around a fascination with duration, spectacle, and experimentation and on the relationship between photography and cinema, stillness and movement. We will continue to work in still photography, broadening our range of techniques, and add a small amount of 16mm filmmaking to the mix as we explore the larger social and historical contexts and philosophical questions surrounding the relationship between still and moving photographic images. In our creative and intellectual work, we’ll ask many questions about the phenomenon, concept and experience of time--for example, how is a four minute exposure in a still photograph both similar to and different from a four minute continuous shot of film or video of the same subject?In all our work we will focus on building essential skills in practices of attention--learning how to slow down our modes of seeing, experiencing and working. In our photographic practice, this will mean moving away from the pursuit of “finished” images and towards experimental processes and conceptual problem solving. In our work with texts and images, this will mean developing our ability to read and view closely and write with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures/screenings, workshops, seminar, critical reading and writing, and critique. In addition to working individually, students can expect to collaborate regularly with their peers on a variety of assignments and larger projects. All along the way we will intentionally examine how our investments in collaboration animate our intellectual and creative work. We will spend significant time in critique to help each other see, describe, evaluate and improve our creative and critical work.  Julia Zay Amjad Faur Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Evan Blackwell
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is for intermediate to advanced students who are ready for intensive full-time work in theory and practice in the visual arts. Students will design their own projects, complete visual research and write papers appropriate to their topics, share their research through presentations, work intensively in the studio together, produce a significant thematic body of work, and participate in demanding weekly critiques. The program will provide opportunities for independent work while providing a learning community of students with similar interests. Beyond art making and visual research, this program will also provide opportunities for professional development for students who are thinking of graduate school, professional work in the visual arts, visual arts internships, or arts education at any level.  visual arts, museum studies, arts administration, public art, arts organizations, art education and design. Evan Blackwell Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Donald Morisato and Bob Haft
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring Both science and art take things apart. In some instances—the evisceration of a frog or an overly analytical critique of a poem—the process can result in the loss of the vital force. In the best scenario, carefully isolating and understanding individual parts actually reconstitutes the original object of study, bringing appreciation for a whole greater than its parts. Sometimes taking things apart results in a paradigm shift: suddenly, the ordinary becomes extraordinary.In one program strand, we use a biologist's tool kit to explore how living organisms function. We learn how biology takes apart and studies life in different ways. In winter, we focus on visual perception, beginning with anatomy, proceeding onto the logic of visual processing, and concluding with an examination of the specialized neurons and molecules involved in phototransduction. In spring quarter, we play with the idea of mutation, exploring how genetics is used to dissect complex processes and provide an entry point for the molecular understanding of inheritance at the level of DNA.Another strand takes visual art as its point of departure. Here, we combine what we learn about the anatomy and physiology of the eye with a study of using sight to apprehend and appreciate the world around us. We will work with different tools—charcoal pencils and cameras—both to take apart and to construct new things. During winter quarter, we will learn the basics of drawing. In spring, we use black-and-white photography to study life at a more macroscopic level than in the biology lab. Ultimately, our goal here is the same as that of the scientist: to reconstitute and reanimate the world around us.There are ideas for which literature provides a more sophisticated and satisfying approach than either science or the visual arts. Thus, in a third strand, we examine how literature depicts and dissects the emotional and behavioral interactions that we call "love." Authors we read will include Shakespeare, Stendhal, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, John Berger, Haruki Murakami and Louise Gluck.Our goal is to weave these strands together to produce an understanding about the world informed by both cognition and intuition. Throughout our inquiry, we will be investigating the philosophical issue of objectivity. This is a rigorous program involving lectures, workshops, seminars, studio art and laboratory science work. Student learning will be assessed by weekly seminar writing assignments, lab reports, art portfolios and exams. Donald Morisato Bob Haft Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Gilda Sheppard and Carl Waluconis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full This program will explore the role that movement, visual art, music, and media can play in problem solving and in the resolution of internalized fear, conflicts, or blocks.  Through a variety of hands-on activities, field trips, readings, films/video, and guest speakers, students will discover sources of imagery, sound, and movement as tools to awaken their creative problem solving from two perspectives—as creator and viewer.  Students interested in human services, social sciences, media, humanities and education will find this course engaging. This course does not require any prerequisite art classes or training. Gilda Sheppard Carl Waluconis Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Daryl Morgan
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Full "The life so short, the craft so long to learn."                                                 Hippocrates   The rise of the great medieval artisan craft guilds of Europe and Japan began a transformation not only of the ways in which things were made and of the ways in which craftsmen were trained to make them, but of the fundamental relationship between capital and labor.  This course will investigate the world of the guilds and of the men, methods, tools, and materials they employed.  We will focus on the history of two guilds in particular, (of which the instructor's grandfather was a member) and (of which the instructor is a member) and their effect on the cultures they inhabited.  During the program students will experience learning in much the same way as an 18th century apprentice might have, engaging both the work of the mind and of the hand as they make and learn to use a classic English bowsaw and a traditional handplane called a "coffin smoother."     Daryl Morgan Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Shaw Osha (Flores)
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. Shaw Osha (Flores) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Arlen Speights and Richard Weiss
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Arlen Speights Richard Weiss Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Joseph Tougas and unassigned
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Evergreen Faculty Joe Tougas and Makah master carver Alex McCarty will lead this first in a two course series on wooden mask carving, focusing on the local cultural perspectives of mask making.  Students will explore regional Northwest Native styles and form-line design, and masks from other world traditions as inspiration to their own mask concepts and designs. Students will carve their own masks, each one unique to the individual's identity, culture and/or personal creative expression, using both contemporary and traditional Northwest coast carving tools. This first course in the series will include developing original designs and basic mask carving skills. Joseph Tougas unassigned Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Joseph Tougas and unassigned
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II Evergreen Faculty Joe Tougas and Makah master carver Alex McCarty will lead this second in a two course series on wooden mask carving, focusing on the local cultural perspectives of mask making.  Students will explore regional Northwest Native styles and form-line design, and masks from other world traditions as inspiration to their own mask concepts and designs. Students will carve their own masks, each one unique to the individual's identity, culture and/or personal creative expression, using both contemporary and traditional Northwest coast carving tools. This second course in the series will focus on more advanced carving and finishing skills. It is expected that people who enroll for this second course will either have taken the first course or have some background in woodcarving.  Students who have questions about the preparation needed to be successful in this second course are encouraged to contact the faculty before enrolling.   Joseph Tougas unassigned Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Daryl Morgan
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter There is a sense of personal satisfaction and creative accomplishment to be gained from working with wood. The aim of this course is to provide a way to realize that intention through an understanding of the basic principles of designing in wood, the physical properties of the material, and the fundamental skills necessary to shape timber to a purpose. Daryl Morgan Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Daryl Morgan
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring There is a sense of personal satisfaction and creative accomplishment to be gained from working with wood. The aim of this course is to provide a way to realize that intention through an understanding of the basic principles of designing in wood, the physical properties of the material, and the fundamental skills necessary to shape timber to a purpose. Daryl Morgan Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Daryl Morgan
  Course FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall There is a sense of personal satisfaction and creative accomplishment to be gained from working with wood. The aim of this course is to provide a way to realize that intention through an understanding of the basic principles of designing in wood, the physical properties of the material, and the fundamental skills necessary to shape timber to a purpose. Daryl Morgan Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Daryl Morgan
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall There is a sense of personal satisfaction and creative accomplishment to be gained from working with wood. The aim of this course is to provide a way to realize that intention through an understanding of the basic principles of designing in wood, the physical properties of the material, and the fundamental skills necessary to shape timber to a purpose. Daryl Morgan Tue Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall