2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Psychology [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Why do humans keep pets and at the same time raise animals for food? What are the psychological and moral complexities that characterize our relationships with animals? What is the impact of human–animal interactions on the health and well-being of people and animals? How do we assess the relative welfare of animals under a variety of circumstances? Anthrozoology is the interdisciplinary study of human (anthro) and animal (zoo) interaction. This topic of inquiry will be used to study general biology, zoology, anthropology and philosophy. Through field trips, guest speakers, reading, writing and discussion, students will become familiar with the multiple and often paradoxical ways we relate to companion animals, animals for sport, zoo animals, wildlife, research animals and food animals. We will use our collective experiences, along with science-based and value-based approaches, to critically examine the ever-changing role of animals in society.We will begin the quarter by focusing on the process of animal domestication in different cultures from an evolutionary and historical perspective. Through the formal study of animal ethics, students will also become familiar with different philosophical positions on the use of animals. Physiology and neuroscience will be used to investigate the physical and mental lives of animals while simultaneously exploring domestic animal behavior. Students will explore the biological basis and psychological aspects of the human-animal bond. Students will then study the science of animal welfare and complete a final project in which they will apply their scientific and ethical knowledge to a controversial and contemporary animal welfare question.Students will be expected to read primary literature in such diverse fields as animal science, ethology, neurobiology, sociobiology, anthropology and philosophy. Student success in this program will depend on commitment to in-depth understanding of complex topics and an ability to combine empirical knowledge and philosophical reflection. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Gail Tremblay
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Bill Arney and Michael Paros
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Most of you are in school because you want to live a better life; many of you probably think about what it might mean to live a good life. Is a good life one full of pleasure and devoid of suffering? A moral life? A long and healthy life? Of course, it is possible that the good life cannot be defined at all and simply has to be lived and attended to. Let's start with the premise that most of our reliable, useful knowledge comes from science. Scientists work according to philosophically sound methodologies, which include commitments to impersonal inquiry and trying, always, to find the data most likely to defeat their favorite hypotheses; they work in open communities of other scientists, all of whom are obligated to be vigilantly critical of their colleagues' work; they generally qualify their claims to knowledge based on the limitations of their methodologies and their understandings of the probabilities of their claims being incorrect. But can science help us to be , to live a good life? Some think that science can help us recognize, even define, our values, and we will explore this possibility from the perspectives of neuroscience, brain evolution, psychology, social science and philosophy. Some say that science can never answer questions of morality or what it means to live a good life, or even a better life; something more is necessary, they say. Reading and written assignments, faculty presentations and deliberate discussions with vigilantly critical colleagues will assist students in an independent inquiry about how science can help a person live better with regard to some question of critical concern to the investigator(s). This program explores the power and limitations of scientific inquiry. Students should be able to imagine themselves discussing neurotransmitters and the moral life in the same sentence, but they should know that any education aims, finally, to help them know themselves. Bill Arney Michael Paros Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
George Freeman and Terry Ford
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist-practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the fields of education and human services. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. Students will be required to begin a two-quarter long, 15 hour/week internship winter quarter in the fields of education and social services. Constructing a research project may be an option if students prefer research to the internship. Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology and its application to clinical settings and schooling, quantitative and qualitative research methods, multicultural studies and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology and applied settings such as educational settings. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism and humanistic psychology. Students will also begin their self-identified internships for winter and spring quarters in an area of the social services or an educational setting. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Students may opt for independent literature-based reviews with faculty approval.Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of theory to practice through communication skills practicum and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their internships started winter quarter through spring quarter.Variable credit options are available to students participating in internships. George Freeman Terry Ford Mon Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Are destructive emotions innately embedded in human nature?  Can they be eradicated?  A growing body of Western research has examined these and other questions through the perspectives of Eastern psychology and philosophy which view destructive emotions, perceptions, and behaviors as the primary source of human suffering.  To alleviate this suffering, Eastern psychology has developed a rich and varied methodology for recognizing, reducing, transforming, and preventing these destructive forms of mind and emotion.  After examining the nature and function of the afflictive mind/emotions, students will choose one emotion to study in-depth and develop effective East/West interventions to transform this emotion/state of mind. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend W 14Winter In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Susan Cummings
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Su 14Summer Session II Mind and nature are inseparable. The natural world is not outside of us or separate from us, but it us. Ecopsychology is an exciting emerging perspective that explores the connection between psychological and ecological health. Many of our psychological ills and our addictions are directly related to our lack of awareness and our perceived disconnection from our natural origins. The very destruction of our habitat is an expression of this lack of connection to the ground of our being. There are many emerging approaches to deal with this, such as the greening of playgrounds, nature-based therapy, architecture that aims to connect us with a healthy habitat, and the exploration of our assumptions.  We will explore the historical and cultural influences underlying and leading up to this perceived separation from nature, cultural differences in perspectives, assumptions in psychology, the connections between pathology and this perceived separateness from nature, and the role of connectedness with nature in child development. We will also explore the role of innovation, creativity and Active Hope in ecopsychological healing. Students will review the literature, engage in experiential activities and projects, and brainstorm solutions. Depending on the weather, we may spend sometime outdoors. Susan Cummings Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Laura Citrin and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What are emotions, sentiments, and feelings? What functions do they serve, both for the individual and for society? In this full-time, two-quarter program, we will use social pyschology, scientific research, creative writing, and literary and film analysis as methods of inquiry into the ways that emotions are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions. We will study the ways emotions are expressed, avoided, embraced, and rejected according to complex display rules that vary across and within cultures based on gendered, raced, and classed social norms. Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions: our emotions. If we read between the lines, what is the subtext of our cultural narratives about fear, love, guilt, anger…? We will look to literature and film for examples of dominant and alternative narratives, and we will experiment with creative writing—fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid forms—as both a mode of expression and a method of inquiry: a way of looking under the surface of our habitual reactions and cultural norms.Fall QuarterWe'll survey the "big six" emotions: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride. We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions (e.g., joy, hope, interest, love) and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life."  We will consider published psychology research and literature from the field of social psychology, and students will design, propose and lay the groundwork for Winter Quarter research projects. Through analysis of films and literary and critical texts, students will consider how stories convey, evoke, and manipulate our emotions. They will develop fluency with critical terminology and concepts related to narrative, literary and cinematic theories. Through creative writing assignments and workshops, students will cultivate facility with elements of narrative discourse such as scene, summary, description, exposition, and dialogue.Winter QuarterOur interrogation of emotions will continue winter quarter with greater focus on independent, in-depth, and finely-crafted work. In addition to continued reading, screening and discussion of literary, critical and research-based texts, students will conduct the primary research projects approved during Fall Quarter, and will work to develop a portfolio of creative work representative of their inquiry. Winter quarter is an opportunity to participate first-hand in knowledge production within the interdisciplinary domain of affect studies, and to engage directly in the contemporary critical/creative discourse as art-makers.The interrogation of emotions in this program will occur via readings, screenings, lectures, research and creative writing workshops, and student-led seminars. Designed as a two-quarter program, the Fall Quarter will lay the foundation for more in-depth work in Winter. We strongly encourage students to enroll who are interested in sustained inquiry. Laura Citrin Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
George Freeman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This program explores the central personality theories from a traditional perspective as well as a nontraditional perspective. We examine the relationship of personality theories to abnormal behavior and develop an understanding of the DSM classification system and other diagnostic methods. We use an on-line Canvas site to facilitate discussions of the texts and other pertinent issues. We use  films to reinforce the theoretical and practical concepts we’re learning.Although the program is structured for a combined 8 credits, students wanting to complete only the abnormal psychology credits or the personality theory credits separately may register for only 4 credits. George Freeman Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Carrie Margolin
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This course will focus on milestones of human development from conception through death. We will consider the nature of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development throughout the lifespan, addressing major theories and current research that explain how and why developmental change occurs. Some practical topics to be explored will include child rearing, learning disorders, adolescent rebellion, adult midlife crisis, and care giving for elderly parents. This course serves as a prerequisite for upper-division work and graduate school admission in psychology, education, and health care.    psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Patricia Krafcik, Evan Blackwell and Carrie Margolin
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What is creativity? Is there a relationship between states of mind and a fertile imagination? What are the psychological mechanisms involved in the larger action of the human imagination, urging us to explore new avenues, to see what others have not seen, to create what no one has yet created? Many of the world's greatest writers, artists and thinkers have been known to struggle with conditions classified as abnormal by psychologists. We will explore these conditions and their impact on creativity, searching further for any special links between certain kinds of abnormal psychological conditions and the drive to create.Our interdisciplinary program is not intended to serve as therapy, but rather is a serious study of psychology, literature, the arts, imagination and the creative impulse. We will approach our questions through various modes of inquiry. Through an in-depth study of abnormal psychology, we will learn to identify and understand a number of conditions. We will investigate modern art history and its fascination with the art produced by individuals reputed to be cultural "outsiders," such as folk art, art of the insane, art brut and self-taught artists.  Through this study we will explore how societies form a group identity which is established in relation to some designated "other."  Our readings combine art theory with psychological case studies by writers such as Sacks and Ramachandran and with imaginative literature by Gogol, Dostoevsky, Poe, Kafka, Plath, Gilman and many others that all describe abnormal psychological conditions. We will respond to our readings by channeling the imagination with a variety of creative projects. Finally, we will also study the normal mind and how it functions in both mundane and creative ways.In both quarters of our program students will discuss assigned readings in seminars, will engage in active writing exercises and in rigorous two-dimensional and thre-dimensional visual art work in ceramics, mixed-media sculpture, collage, and drawing.  Assignments may include research papers, poster projects, creative writing, performances and visual arts projects. Weekly films and discussions of these films will enhance our examination of the uses or influence of psychological conditions in the creation of literature, art and music. Guest speakers will provide additional workshops and lectures in various artistic modalities. In fall term we will take field trips to the Tacoma Art Museum and the Museum of Glass, and our work that term will prepare students to undertake a culminating project in winter term. In all our activities, students will have ample opportunities to explore their own creativity and imagination. Patricia Krafcik Evan Blackwell Carrie Margolin Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Mukti Khanna
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II Mind-body Medicine focuses on the applications of sociocultural, psychosocial, and behavioral knowledge relevant to health and wellness.  The course will explore historical foundations of mind-body medicine in addition to clinical practices including energy psychology, qigong, expressive arts therapy, somatic practices and mindfulness.  Questions to be explored include "What practices are emering at the creative edge of healthcare?"  and " How are healthcare providers preparing themselves to work in an integrative healthcare system?" Students have the option of doing additional health project work and theoretical readings for an additional 4 credits. Mukti Khanna Wed Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring This course will emphasize mindfulness psychology as a clinical tool as well as a method of professional self-care. Recent research has proven the effectiveness of mindfulness training to treat conditions such as stress and pain, addictions, chronic depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and other health conditions. Students will explore the similarities and differences between Mindfulness Psychology and Western Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and gain practical skills to help alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics. Students will have opportunities for personal practice, observational learning, and the development of counseling skills through role-play, reading, and discussion. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Mukti Khanna and Cynthia Kennedy
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program explores the creation of health through mind-body perspectives. How can we engage in transformational conversations about the connections between personal, community and planetary health? Knowing that in every moment choices we make can move us toward health, or away from it, this program will explore the myriad ways we can embody choices that keep us and our communities vital and alive. Throughout the program, we will recognize that our individual choices can help us create both personal health and a sustainable environment, a conscious life and a positive presence in society.Fall quarter we will explore systems of health and healing from multicultural, neurobiological and ecopsychological lenses. There is a synergistic relationship between planetary and personal well-being; the health of one is related to the health of the other. We will explore the relationship between the body and the natural world. We'll also explore somatic (body-based) literacy as it relates to leadership, communication and engagement with social issues. Somatic literacy includes listening and acting on information from the body. Winter quarter will allow students to design their own health-based project studies while continuing to explore self-leadership, creativity, emotional intelligence, health and self-image.Students will have an opportunity to learn in many ways using diverse modalities and multiple intelligences. We will integrate somatic learning into our studies, including movement workshops (no prior experience necessary). Our inquiry will ask us to attune ourselves to the wisdom that is available and present in our mind-body awareness. We will participate in community readings, community service, rigorous writing assignments and critical study of important texts. Learning through multiple intelligences can be enjoyable.Come join us! Mukti Khanna Cynthia Kennedy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Heesoon Jun and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter The human mind is perhaps the most fascinating, and least understood, product of Darwinian evolution. In this program we will endeavor to understand how the mind functions and why it has come to work in the way that it has. We will study human psychology as modern empirical science has come to understand it, and we will combine that hybrid model with a consideration of the evolutionary path humans have traversed, as well as a deep investigation of those portions of evolutionary theory most relevant to hominid cognition, perception and behavior. Our program will seek to unify important conclusions from multiple schools of thought within psychology as we consider humans from a broadly cross-cultural perspective. We will range from the Jungian to the Cognitive, and from the modern !Kung people of the Kalahari to the ancient Maya of Central America. Our objective is to generate an integrative model of the human mind that can accommodate humans as individuals and as interdependent social beings.Winter materials will build on content covered in the fall. There will be educational value and intellectual reward for staying in the program both quarters. biology, psychology, health related studies, human and social services. Heesoon Jun Bret Weinstein Tue Tue Wed Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Mark Hurst
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Following Frankl's existentialist urgings toward hope and meaning, as well as the humanists’ emphasis on self-actualization, leading scholars in psychology founded "positive psychology" in 1998. Since that time, we now have a better understanding of humans at their best. This worldwide collaborative effort has attempted to balance early psychology’s focus on psychopathology. In this class, we will study correlates to life satisfaction and examine empirical science as well as practical strategies for promoting well being, quality of life, and resilience. We will Skype with leading researchers; engage in experiential activities related to gratitude, hope, altruism, etc.; and seminar with inmates in a state prison.This section of the class meets on Saturdays.  There is also a Sunday section of the class available. Mark Hurst Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Mark Hurst
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Following Frankl's existentialist urgings toward hope and meaning, as well as the humanists’ emphasis on self-actualization, leading scholars in psychology founded "positive psychology" in 1998. Since that time, we now have a better understanding of humans at their best. This worldwide collaborative effort has attempted to balance early psychology’s focus on psychopathology. In this class, we will study correlates to life satisfaction and examine empirical science as well as practical strategies for promoting well being, quality of life, and resilience. We will Skype with leading researchers; engage in experiential activities related to gratitude, hope, altruism, etc.; and seminar with inmates in a state prison.This section of the class meets on Sundays.  There is also a Saturday section of the class available. Mark Hurst Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Mark Hurst
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter S 14Spring Over recent decades, the basic and applied research related to human behavior and cognition has continued to accelerate in terms of quantity and impact, influencing people’s everyday lives as well as myriad fields—economics, political strategy and policy, the world of business, and the legal system. Development of a solid foundation in this far-reaching discipline seems critical to success across life domains (love, work, and leisure) as well as the realms that relate to human endeavor: education, social service, medicine, government, finance, and criminal justice among them. In this program we will explore the essential universalities and diversities of human experience, the intra-personal and interpersonal correlates to suffering and flourishing, and the uses of social power and influence—all of which can enhance both the knowledge and skill base of the individual and bring about change in any setting.Over the course of winter and spring quarters, students will critically examine empirical research in psychology and move toward a working model or theoretical orientation for application in the real world. To assist in this process, they will also draw on personal experience, literature, history, drama and film, and other resources to enliven and enrich their papers, presentations, and projects.We will also Skype each quarter with some of the most prominent scientists in the field after reading their books on topics such as social cognition, influence, attraction, aggression, and group dynamics.  Our studies will explore the recent science regarding self-control (which follows decades of failure promoting unsupported notions regarding self-esteem), the therapeutic benefits (both physiological, psychological, and social) of self-disclosure through talking and writing, and the new movement toward a strengths-based model of mental health (positive psychology, well-being theory, and quality of life research).Spring quarter builds on previous material, so the intention is for students to continue through from winter, culminating in a final spring project related to their future studies or professional goals. psychology, education, health care, criminal justice, political science,  management Mark Hurst Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Candace Vogler
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This 4-credit upper division course is offered for students who anticipate relationship-based careers in clinical or educational contexts.  Goals for the course are to build cognitive and experiential understanding of the function of earliest relationships in child development and to examine theories of family development and structures for 'good enough' families as a context for individual development. Students will explore their own development and families as a context for applying theories. Class work include reading response papers, a final synthesis project, active participation in large and small discussion formats, and role play activities. This is an intense reading class- success will require staying current with weekly readings. Candace Vogler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Candace Vogler
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course is intended to fill two sets of educational goals. First, abnormal psychology is frequently required for applications to graduate studies in psychology, social work, etc. Second, psychopathology and abnormal psychology have important implications for everyday life relationships and daily functioning, separate from clinical diagnoses and categorizing. In this course, inquiry-based exploration of the role of early attachment and first relationships in psychological development will provide students with perspectives needed to understand how human relationships and the brain interact to shape levels of social and emotional functioning. Readings will include fiction, DSM V, and current articles and texts pertaining to the early developmental substrates of psychopathology. Students will be expected to work both independently and in small and large groups. Written assignments will include exploring personal psychological history, and more formal exploration of some aspect of psychopathology.  Successful completion of this course will meet expectations for abnormal psychology credit, and provide foundation for ongoing work in human services fields. Candace Vogler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Laura Citrin and Kathleen Eamon
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How does shame differ from disgust, guilt and embarrassment? How does shame function both socially and individually? In this program, we will pursue a set of themes and questions clustered around . We will look at attempts in social psychology, sociology, psychoanalysis, and philosophy to define shame, to differentiate it from its neighboring emotions and states, and to understand how it functions both socially and individually. We will look at both general theories and case studies, ranging from topics like morality and moralization, marginalization, bodies and shame, the social life of the emotions, feminist critiques of shame, as well as turning our attention to “counter-shame” movements like sex positivity.Our work in psychoanalysis and philosophy will likely include readings by Freud, Lacan, Donald Winnicott, Slavoj Žižek, Hannah Arendt, and Michel Foucault.  Our work in social psychology and sociology will draw from Silvan Tomkins, Erving Goffman, Michael Lewis, Thomas Scheff, June Tangney, and Susan Miller.  And we will examine at least one novel that deals thematically with shame: Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir, We will be reading broadly in both contemporary and historical texts, engaging in seminar discussion and writing workshops, and writing reflective, expository, and research papers on shame and related phenomena throughout the quarter.Although any background in the fields of psychology or philosophy will be helpful, successful participation in the inquiry does not depend on it. However, we do recommend the program for students with some lower division experience with the humanities and/or the social sciences.  Laura Citrin Kathleen Eamon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Carrie Margolin
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will investigate theories and practices of psychologists to enhance their understanding of counseling, social services and the science of psychology. We will cover history and systems of psychology. Students will read original source literature from the major divisions of the field, including both classic and contemporary journal articles and books by well-known psychologists. Students will explore careers in psychology and the academic preparations necessary for these career choices. We will cover the typical activities of psychologists who work in academia, schools, counseling and clinical settings, social work agencies and applied research settings.Among our studies will be ethical quandaries in psychology, including the ethics of human and animal experimentation. Library research skills, in particular the use of PsycInfo and Science and Social Science Citation Indexes, will be emphasized. Students will gain expertise in the technical writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). The class format will include lectures, guest speakers, workshops, discussions, films and an optional field trip.There's no better way to explore the range of activities and topics that psychology offers—and to learn of cutting edge research in the field—than to attend and participate in a convention of psychology professionals and students. To that end, students have the option of attending the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association, which is the western regional arm of the APA. This year's convention will be held in Portland, Oregon, on April 24-27, 2014. psychology, education and social work. Carrie Margolin Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Carrie Margolin
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course provides a concentrated overview of the statistics and research methodology required for the GRE and prerequisites for graduate schools in psychology, education, and other social sciences. We emphasize hands-on, intuitive knowledge and approach statistics as a language rather than as math alone; thus this course is gentle on "math phobics."  No computer skills are required. You will become an informed and savvy consumer of information, from the classroom to the workplace. We will cover descriptive and inferential statistics, research methodology and ethics. psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Mukti Khanna and Heesoon Jun
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who want to deepen their work in psychology through integrating theory and practice, in a setting that combines student-designed and faculty-designed study and projects. The faculty-designed component of the program will train students in the American Psychological Association ethics code that can be applied to working with diverse populations and internship sites. Students will also receive training in writing APA style social science papers and working with social science library data bases. Students will have the option of attending the Western Psychological Association meeting, which is the western regional arm of the American Psychological Association, that will be held in Portland, Oregon, April 24- 27, 2014. Attending this professional conference is one of the best ways to explore the range of work and research that is emerging in the field of psychology nationally.The student-designed component of the program may be a six-credit (15 hour a week) internship or independent study project related to psychology or health. Students will meet with faculty weekly to study more about psychological ethics, psychological writing and community work. Mukti Khanna Heesoon Jun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marla Elliott and Marcella Benson-Quaziena
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring You are the most powerful and versatile tool you have. Do you know who you are and what you stand for?  Is that who you want to be? How can you use your presence as an instrument of change? How do you know what you evoke/provoke in others?  How do you move in the world with awareness of your authentic self? The ability to communicate and influence is crucial to our effectiveness as we move through many systems.  This program is designed for students who want to develop skills of self-knowledge and “use of self” as an instrument of social change. Marla Elliott Marcella Benson-Quaziena Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter The major personality theorists will be presented sequentially within their cultural and historical contexts. This will provide the students with a broader understanding of the evolution of ideas concerning human nature. Exploration of theories will be limited to those that apply specifically to the practice of counseling. Attention will be paid to the interaction of the individual with the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Gilda Sheppard and Carl Waluconis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full This program will explore the role that movement, visual art, music, and media can play in problem solving and in the resolution of internalized fear, conflicts, or blocks.  Through a variety of hands-on activities, field trips, readings, films/video, and guest speakers, students will discover sources of imagery, sound, and movement as tools to awaken their creative problem solving from two perspectives—as creator and viewer.  Students interested in human services, social sciences, media, humanities and education will find this course engaging. This course does not require any prerequisite art classes or training. Gilda Sheppard Carl Waluconis Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Western psychology has so far failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understanding—our everyday mind and our immediate awareness of being—with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, Western psychology has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology's neglect of the living mind--both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities--has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Asia, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.In contrast to Western psychology, Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer and instead studies consciousness as a living reality which shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.Learning mainly from lectures, readings, videos, workshops, seminar discussions, individual and group research projects and field trips, in fall quarter we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional Western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. In winter quarter, we will then investigate the Eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most Western interpretations of Eastern thought—the attempt to fit Eastern ideas and practices into unexamined Western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between Eastern and Western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns. psychology, counseling, social work, education, Asian-American studies, Asian studies and religious studies. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I In recent decades, a growing body of Western research has examined the nature and function of mind and emotions through the perspectives of Buddhist psychology and philosophy. Advanced Buddhist studies emphasize deep understanding of mind/consciousness, particularly the functions of various mental factors and their influence on our capacity to differentiate appearance versus reality, as well as constructive versus destructive emotions.  through the systematic cultivation of refined attention and mindfulnes/introspection, analytical observation, dvds, readings, and direct experience.  After broadly examining Eastern theories of mind/emotion, students will choose one emotion or state of mind to study in depth and develop a well-researched model, suitable for clinical use or personal-growth, that either cultivates or transforms the chosen state of mind/emotion.  Jamyang Tsultrim Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Kelly Brown
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full In this interactive and experiential class, students will develop an understanding of the impact that social-emotional distress has on how both children and adults interact with the world. During the first half of the program, students will explore ideas which look at what accounts for individual differences among people, why people might act in the ways in which they do, and why they might change. We will also explore cultural factors that increase and decrease psychological well-being in the USA. In the second half of the program, students will explore the skills and techniques needed to work with people in various interpersonal and clinical situations. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of various theories and techniques to case examples and other real-life scenarios. Kelly Brown Mon Thu Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer