2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Outdoor Leadership And Education [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
John Schaub
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Session II Many cultures have a tradition of teachers and students spending time in wilderness. We’ll let wilderness work in us, inspire us and help immerse us in writing. Carrying our own food and shelter brings focus, and opens new viewpoints on sustainability. We’ll study and live Leave-No-Trace ethics as we paddle to Squaxin Island and backpack at Mts. Rainier, St. Helens and the Olympics. We’ll seminar, write and engage in peer review, with ongoing faculty feedback.This all-level program could be orientation for incoming students, and a chance for anyone to engage deeply with writing, and/or produce a finished publishable manuscript.Students who wish to extend work into the other session for additional credit may do so through individual learning contracts. John Schaub Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
David Phillips
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This interdisciplinary 16-credit program focuses on ecotourism, culture-based tourism and adventure travel. Ecotourism offers wildlife and nature experiences in protected habitats and pristine areas. Participative tourism is based on visits to traditional rural communities where travelers share in the daily lives of unique host cultures. Adventure travel involves endurance sports and high-skill challenges in natural settings. Ecotourism is often touted as a contributor to the conservation of ecosystems and wildlife habitats, and to economic development in rural communities. We explore the history, outcomes and future potential of ecotourism in different parts of the world.We study historic travel accounts and the literature of travel, changing modes of tourism, including solo travel and the global trend toward leisure travel. Creative writing and storytelling allow students to share their own travel experiences and goals. Travel media and journalism, books, films and the internet provide sources for discussion and writing, and topics for research.We study current theory of ecotourism, including policy and case studies, and acquire tools for critical analysis. Students study the ecotourism market, including planning, management, operations, and project outcomes. Sustainability criteria for ecotourism is a key topic. We study impacts of culturally-focused “participative” travel in developing countries, and the relationship of tourism to environmental changes. Students’ weekly essays, journals and narratives serve to elaborate on diverse topics and the learning process.The program includes a Spanish language component.  Students are encouraged to study the language for the full 16 credits (or to take another foreign language or elective course, as a 12-credit option).Students collaborate in groups or work individually to design and present models for ecotourism and adventure travel. Term projects can focus on business development, operations, outdoor safety and environmental education, travel writing, eco-lodge design, photography, travel films, internet and other media, applied research in tourism, or other related areas of interest.Guest speakers relate their experiences in the adventure travel and ecotourism businesses. Day-long outdoor experiences and multi-day class trips add an experiential component to the program, and films and videos round out our learning about ecotourism and adventure travel. David Phillips Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Joel Reid
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II Joel Reid Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer