2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Andrea Gullickson and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Humans are unique products of adaptive evolution. Our most remarkable evolutionary features are associated with our overwhelmingly cultural brains, far more flexible and dynamic than the brains of any other creature on earth. But this level of uniqueness creates a problem in the quest to understand ourselves. How are we to comprehend human characteristics that have no parallel, and little precedent, elsewhere in the biota?Of all the unique cultural attributes of humans, music is uniquely perplexing. It exists in every culture, is a significant feature of nearly every human life. Music is produced by both males and females. It can be made with tools as elaborate as a piano, or as sparingly as with a single human voice. It is both collaborative and solitary. It can be enjoyed as a participant or spectator. And music is powerful—reaching into our deepest emotional core where it has the capacity to trigger profound responses, often with zero associated narrative content.This program will confront this deepest evolutionary mystery full force, and on its own terms. We will cultivate an appreciation and comprehension of the structure, meaning and effect of music as we address the evolutionary mechanisms that must have produced it. We will strive as a learning community to experience music’s full glory and mystery, while we grapple rigorously with it as an evolutionary phenomenon. Weekly program activities will include reading, focused listening, workshops, lectures and seminars. Together we will approach program content in a manner that is accessible to students with little background in these areas, while still challenging those with prior experience.  Andrea Gullickson Bret Weinstein Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Terry Setter
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a year-long long sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording and producing music. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history, and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students’ ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio. In fall, students will train to pass the related proficiency test and develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic history of audio production. Topics and activities will include basic acoustics; microphone design and placement; the use of compressors, limiters, and console block diagrams; and the theory of digital audio recording, with a strong emphasis on Digidesign’s Pro Tools software.  In winter, students will be provided with increasingly advanced instruction and exercises in the use of recording technologies with an emphasis on Pro Tools software, a number of plug-ins, and the creation of mixes, including those for inclusion in the Evergreen Student CD Project. Topics and activities will include techniques for recording a rock band, mixing techniques, and applications of various signal processors.  In spring, students will work to create well-balanced, innovative tracking and mixing. There will be an emphasis on mastering techniques and a field trip to four of Seattle’s most active recording studios.  The courses do not cover music production from electronic sources. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary times. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history, media and popular culture to investigate the lives of these men and women lives, their historical, cultural and spiritual contexts and legacies.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills and insights about the mis-education/re-education process through a quarter -long reflective journal project , a mid -quarter contextual research project;  and an end-of-the-quarter final paper and a collaborative performance about the journey from mis-education to education and those factors that allow one to retain their humanity in spite of horrific dehumanizing attempts. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Andrea Gullickson and Robert Esposito
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do our experiences in the performing arts impact our understanding of and relationship to our environment?  How can music and dance be used to transform lives?  This two-quarter, core program will focus on the study of music and dance as powerful methods for both exploring and expressing our experiences in the world.  Throughout the program we will examine fundamental concepts of music and dance and consider cultural and historical environments that influence the development of and give meaning to the arts. Our work with progressive skill development will require physical immersion into the practices of listening, moving, dancing and making music.  Theory and literature studies will require the development of a common working vocabulary, writing skills, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking skills.Weekly activities will include readings, lectures, seminars and interactive workshops, which will provide the basis for focused consideration of the ways in which our relationship with sound and motion impact our daily lives. Weekly in-program performance workshops will provide opportunities to gain first-hand understanding of fundamental skills and concepts as well as the transformative possibilities that exist through honest confrontation of challenging experiences. Weekly writing workshops and assignments will encourage thoughtful consideration of a broad range of program topics with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the power and importance of bringing one’s own voice into the conversation.This balanced approach to the development of physical craft, artistry and intellectual engagement is expected to culminate in a significant written and performance work each quarter. Andrea Gullickson Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Andrew Buchman, Doreen Swetkis and Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is a tour of social forces that shape our arts communities, including cultural, organizational, managerial, financial and historical. By examining art, music and theatre worlds, we will discover structures that help foster vibrant artistic communities. We will meet business and nonprofit leaders (often artists themselves) who bring artists and art lovers together. Artistic entrepreneurs with business savvy, as we will see, often make the art world go 'round.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in making a living as an artist, musician or performer, operating in the nonprofit art world, or making a career in creative industries, and bridging the conventional gaps between creativity, business sense and social engagement. Each quarter's work will include an optional week of travel and study an art center in the United States: to New York City during the fall and Los Angeles during the winter. Students unable to travel to these cities can pursue related studies in Seattle and Portland.The program will combine studies of the arts, business and nonprofit administration and management through a rich mix of critical and creative projects, such as analyzing a local arts business or nonprofit organization. An artist who understands the principles of a well-run business and can deal effectively with contracts, grants and negotiations, we'll find, is likely to gain more artistic and professional freedom. Business people who understand and care about the arts, we'll discover, can build careers that include doing good as well as doing well. Organizations built around art forms can help support local cultures and create sustainable manufacturing ventures, too.The nonprofit arts community encompasses a broad range of artistic endeavors such as summer arts camps and festivals, art and music therapy, community theaters, arts foundations and after-school arts programs. For-profit and nonprofit organizations are different, and we want to make sure students gain knowledge of the vast range of ways they can make a living in and around the arts.By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to connect your own artistic and wage earning work, have an impact on organizations in communities you care about, acquire first-hand knowledge of a diversity of successful arts initiatives, and communicate effectively in the language of business and nonprofit administration. Andrew Buchman Doreen Swetkis Zoe Van Schyndel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate digitally generated waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, additive synthesis, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis algorithms.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of this class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, and contemporary research in music composition. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 13 Fall The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 14Spring The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 14Winter The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Peter Randlette
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long series of courses is intended for the musician interested in exploring compositional experimentation with analog and digital synthesis technology and computer applications.  In fall, the course will focus on analog synthesis techniques, studio production, and the creation of musical pieces with a focus on new options presented by this compositional environment.  Winter will focus on building pieces from techniques of synthesis introduced in fall quarter and learning new digital synthesis techniques, different controllers and sequencers, signal processing, and surround 5.1 production skills.  Techniques will include use of percussion controllers, synthesizer voice editing, sample based applications, and plug-in signal processing.  In spring, students will develop pieces based on design problems using combinations of computer-based and analog resources covered in prior quarters.  New material will include acoustic/electronic sound source integration, mastering techniques, object-oriented voice construction, and advanced production methods.  Each quarter, students will complete projects, attend weekly seminar/lecture/critique sessions, use weekly studio times, and maintain production journals. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In this year long sequence, students will explore the creative use of the music technology labs.  Original compositions will be the primary goal of the course work, with clear technical learning objectives for each assignment.  Reading and listening will provide a historical and theoretical context for the creative work.  Fall quarter will focus on the operation of mixers, tape machines, and analog synthesizers, looking to the work of early electroacoustic composers for inspiration.  In the winter, students will begin working with the computer as a compositional tool, creating sound collages and compositions using MIDI to control hardware and software instruments. The spring quarter will focus on electronic music in performance and the development of independent projects.   Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sean Williams
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I Sean Williams Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Terry Setter
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Su 14Summer Full This program provides instruction in the use of digital recording studio equipment, microphone design and placement techniques, mixing console design, signal flow, monitoring techniques, room acoustics, and signal processing.  There will be written assignments based upon readings in Huber's , and students will present research on topics related to audio production.  Students will do at least 50 hours of recording and familiarization work in teams of two in addition to the in-class activities. We will record local musicians and produce finished mixes of the sessions. Terry Setter Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Andrea Gullickson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Music & Theater:  Exploring Form and Freedom   " "  Saint Augustine   Albert Einstein  This program will focus on the study of music and theater as powerful methods for exploring and expanding our understanding of the critical role of formal structures in providing access to freedom and creativity.  Throughout the program we will examine fundamental concepts of music and theater and consider cultural and historical environments that influence the development of and give meaning to the arts. Our work with progressive skill development will require physical immersion into the practices of listening, moving, acting and making music.  Theory and literature studies will require the development of a common working vocabulary, writing skills, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking skills.Weekly activities will include readings, lectures, seminars and interactive workshops designed to encourage students to expand and meld their creative interests within an intellectual infrastructure.  Daily performance workshops will provide opportunities to gain first-hand understanding of fundamental skills and concepts as well as the transformative possibilities that exist through honest confrontation of challenging experiences. Writing workshops and assignments will encourage thoughtful consideration of a broad range of program topics.This balanced approach to the development of physical craft, artistry and intellectual engagement is expected to culminate in a significant written and performance project. Andrea Gullickson Mon Wed Thu Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Terry Setter
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is a two-quarter-long investigation of the relationship between sound, music and human consciousness. We will compose original music and explore the psychological and aesthetic effects that music has on us. The program is for experienced composers and performers. It is primarily a musical endeavor, working with aspects of psychology and contemplative studies, rather than a study of psychology that involves aspects of music. The program goal is to become better composers and performers and to develop greater understanding of the qualitative aspects of listening, how music “functions” in our lives and how it relates to the broad field of Consciousness Studies. To do this, we will read texts that deal with established contemporary compositional techniques as well as seminal texts and recent findings in Consciousness Studies. Research topics could include the effects of music at the somatic level, studies in psycho acoustics, and surveys of techniques used in music therapy. Students will be expected to complete compositions, research projects and listening exercises and to keep a journal related to their experiences with the music that we create.In fall, we will build listening and compositional skills and begin to relate these to the psychological and spiritual dimensions of the pieces, learning to use appropriate vocabulary and critical techniques. In winter, students will deepen these musical skills and they will select a topic for a twenty-minute formal research presentation that will be presented during week nine. There will also be a public concert of original pieces at the end of the winter quarter. Terry Setter Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How shall we study music? We can watch others doing it on YouTube, we can hear others doing it on YouPod or we can read about others doing it on YouKindle.Let's DO it! (Sadly, there's no "YouDo".)Let's study music by creating and performing it. After all, music's a thing made by the brain, the heart and the fingers.You'll be asked to sing, study an instrument and perform for others in the class, write vocal and instrumental arrangements and sing and perform them. The class environment will not be a competitive one: the goal is to stretch out and learn and challenge oneself and not compare one someone with another one someone. The study of music requires a commitment to practice, to listen, to remember and to learn. This program aims to offer you time in which to do just that.You'll learn about writing harmonies, singing them, and about how difficult it is to write vocal parts that are interesting both melodically and harmonically. There will be a strong emphasis on ear training, sight singing and aural dictation, along with studies in tonal harmony. You'll be asked to write and perform musical canons. We'll study the history of Western classical music, jazz music from the early 20th century, popular music of the past 50 years and experiments in music composition as well. There will be regular listening sessions, along with readings from the arts.In class, students will be assigned performance groups, and each group will be asked to prepare a vocal or instrumental work. This will happen twice each quarter. Rehearsal time will be set aside for such practice, and the faculty will act as a coach for the rehearsals. Each quarter, students will be asked to write one substantial research paper exploring an aspect of music they are unfamiliar with. There will be class trips to concerts in Seattle and Portland, along with visiting guest artists throughout the year. During spring quarter, students will be working on independent projects under faculty supervision. These projects will be developed and submitted by the end of winter quarter. They should combine research and study with creativity and performance, culminating in an end-of-spring-quarter mini-conference, with students delivering both research presentations and musical performances.In addition to classroom activities, each student will be expected to take instruction in a musical instrument outside of class and bear the cost of that instruction (the faculty member can help you find a teacher for your instrument). Practicing an instrument is a way to bring together the seemingly separate activities of the brain, the heart and the fingers: it concretizes music theory, gives a goal to the wobbling fingers and releases the heart from its regularity of "thump thump thump". Arun Chandra Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Ratna Roy and Joseph Tougas
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Have you ever felt that your mind and your body were just “out of sync”? How about the other experience—when your mind and body were working together flawlessly—when you felt “in the flow”? These kinds of experiences invite other questions about the relation between the mind and the body, questions that have been the focus of thinking and research in cultures around the world. There is, for examples, a tradition in Western philosophy that has emphasized the separation between the mind and the body. Other traditions emphasize mind/body interaction and unity. Does the mind control the body? Or is it the other way round? What can we learn about these questions if we challenge ourselves to use our bodies to interact precisely and skillfully with others?  This is the kind of thing people do when they learn to move together in dance, to raise their voices in song, or to make music together.This program will explore the connections between the mind and the body through the media of music and dance. We will learn about the scientific investigation of the interaction between mind and body, especially in connection with the kinds of social activities that bring people together in communities of artistic endeavor—for example, a jazz band or dance group. We will examine both Eastern and Western philosophical traditions to see what we can learn about different ways of understanding the relationship between the mind and body as manifested in disciplines of motion and rest.  We will also engage in practice involving music and dance, experiencing first hand the unity of thought and action. The work of the program will include readings about music and dance from a variety of cultures as well as philosophical and scientific texts. The philosophical texts deal with the relationship between the mind and the body; the scientific texts provide information about brain function and what neuroscience can teach us about how the mind and body interact in music and dance. Students will write essays on the weekly readings in preparation for seminar discussions and a final research paper. They will also participate in workshop activities learning musical and dance skills. During the fall quarter the workshop emphasis was on building skills. At the end of fall quarter students, working in groups, created scripts of performance pieces combining music and dance. During winter our attention in the workshops will be directed toward developing those scripts into fully realized music and dance performances for presentation to an audience in the 9 week of the quarter. Ratna Roy Joseph Tougas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 13 Fall This class will help students learn fundamentals of music literacy and beginning piano technique and also help them develop free, healthy singing voices. At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends.  This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day; credit will be awarded in musicianship. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 14Winter This class will help students learn fundamentals of music literacy and beginning piano technique and also help them develop free, healthy singing voices. At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends.  This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day; credit will be awarded in musicianship. Marla Elliott Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 14Spring This class will help students learn fundamentals of music literacy and beginning piano technique and also help them develop free, healthy singing voices. At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends.  This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day; credit will be awarded in musicianship. Marla Elliott Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this course, students will develop independent projects building upon their work from previous quarters.  Students will dive deeper into technical issues of interactivity and programming using Max/MSP/Jitter, Arduino, and Processing.  Students will present project proposals and participate in workshops and critiques along the path to a finished work.  Readings and seminar will ground and contextualize our creative work.  This course is only open to students previously enrolled in one of the previous "Numbers" courses or with equivalent experience. Ben Kamen Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ben Kamen
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course will examine music theory and sound synthesis through the lens of the Max/MSP/Jitter programming environment. Students will learn how musical ideas can be expressed and manipulated using numbers, simple mathematics, and logic. We will work with musical scales, intervals, chords, and rhythms as well as 20th century concepts of musical organization.  Students will dive into digital synthesis techniques, exploring the overtone series and its relationship to timbre.  Students will create compositions that explore generative compositional processes, synthesis techniques and tuning systems.  No prior musical experience is necessary. Ben Kamen Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Andrew Buchman and Ratna Roy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring We will focus on the dance and music culture of central eastern India, specifically the art-rich state of Orissa. While some music or dance background would be useful, it is not necessary. This is a culture and history offering, along with some practical hands-on experience in dance and music. We will immerse ourselves in both the history and sources of this ancient culture of dance and music, and its active contemporary scene. Our readings will include cutting-edge articles and book chapters exploring themes such as gender, colonial history and post-colonial theory and the economic ferment that is transforming many aspects of Indian society today. In seminars, we'll compare and contrast ancient and modern, Indian and American aesthetics, world views, values and attitudes. In workshops, we will explore the rich vocabularies of sound and movement that make Orissa's traditional performing arts so rewarding to study. The music workshop will focus on modal improvisation, performance, and composition, and study contemporary improvisational musicians influenced by South Asian aesthetics, like Vijay Iyer and John Coltrane, as well as traditionally trained musicians with multiple musical careers, such as Ravi Shankar.  The dance workshop will focus on classical Odissi dance, technique and repertoire.The first evidence of Orissa's dance and music culture is preserved in sculptures and images that are about 2,000 years old. The culture thrived for centuries before it declined under colonial rule in the 1800s, and began to revive in the 1950s and 60s after India became an independent nation-state. This revival still continues, and we will be a part of that effort. Dancers, musicians and scholars will work together and re-create the tradition for our own times. At the end of the quarter, we will present a performance incorporating music and dance from Orissa at various levels of skill so that most students can participate.Some previous training in dance or music would be useful, but is not expected. Students who don't wish to focus on music or dance performance can pursue a research option, in consultation with faculty. Andrew Buchman Ratna Roy Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Peter Randlette
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Computers are now the basic sketchpad for creating music. From recording instruments into them to using software instruments that sound like nearly anything, software recording allows extremely complex production. This 5 week program will familiarize members with the use of computer based MIDI soft and hardware, synthesizers, mixers, and cover some of the technical ‘mysteries’ which are critical to comprehending use.  This program is mostly about exploring the musical production process.  The only prerequisites are interest in music, some keyboard and/or guitar skill, and curiosity.  The class structure will consist of three separate elements.  Lecture/Workshop sessions will cover operation of the systems, demonstrating different techniques in a group setting.  This will be the time for reviewing readings, presenting questions and troubleshooting. Students will play back their pieces for feedback, and so others can see how different people compose. Individual studio times will be assigned to each student.  These times are for trying the different functions of the software, creating short musical ideas to apply learned skills, and experimenting with new techniques. Members will be expected to spend a minimum of two 4 hour blocks in the studio per week.  Consulting times will be scheduled to permit members to meet for individual or small group assistance in the studio.  If members are having problems understanding operation, this is the time to get additional help. Peter Randlette Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sarah Williams
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program provides an opportunity for students to work on a large, highly collaborative project that requires a multiplicity of skills and knowledge: documenting an Olympian patron of the arts. Students will form a learning community in order to work collectively and collaboratively on a feature-length documentary film about philanthropy and patronage of the arts. Each student will take on specific roles related to editing, marketing/PR, soundtrack composition, and interviewing/researching. However, in order to build new skills, all students will collaborate on every aspect of the project. Students will work together, share research results, and participate in regular critiques with faculty and staff. Collaborative work will include field trips, audio recording, cinematography, marketing, interviewing, and editing. Faculty and staff will support student work through regular meetings, critiques and problem-solving discussions. The peer learning community will collaboratively determine the direction and success of this project. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly meetings with the continuing student director/producer and bi-monthly meetings with faculty and staff in Media as well as Development and Alumni Programs. In addition, students will maintain an academic blog to document the progress of the on-going project . For Fall and Winter Quarters the students will produce a work-in-progress screening.  In the spring, the students will organize a campus-wide screening and prepare the film for festival submission. This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. Sarah Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Terry Setter
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This SOS is an opportunity for well-prepared students to do highly independent work in music composition, music technology, audio production, and consciousness studies.  Participants will meet as a group on Thursday mornings to review progress and share ideas for increasing the quantity and quality of the work that students are doing.  Specific descriptions of learning goals and activities will be developed individually between the student and faculty. Terry Setter Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marla Elliott and Marcella Benson-Quaziena
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring You are the most powerful and versatile tool you have. Do you know who you are and what you stand for?  Is that who you want to be? How can you use your presence as an instrument of change? How do you know what you evoke/provoke in others?  How do you move in the world with awareness of your authentic self? The ability to communicate and influence is crucial to our effectiveness as we move through many systems.  This program is designed for students who want to develop skills of self-knowledge and “use of self” as an instrument of social change. Marla Elliott Marcella Benson-Quaziena Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rose Jang and Mingxia Li
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring Classical Chinese drama, as a literary genre, evolved from a long tradition of poetry writing and storytelling. In Chinese theatre, lyrics combine with dance, music, singing, acrobatics and martial arts. For centuries, the poetic and presentational style of Chinese drama and theatre has helped nurture and highlight the fantastic and imaginative side of Chinese culture: the magical beings and their boundless power in folk tales; dreams, fantasies, mysticism and otherworldliness of the Daoist realm of existence, and roaming spirits and ghosts of the underworld: these ever-popular Chinese archetypes have been repeatedly invoked and embodied in poetry and on stage. Many of these fantastic images and stories will form the core of our program study; they will also be absorbed and chained together into a final musical performance piece with a coherent plot and overriding theme—a symbolic, stylized production in the form and spirit of Chinese fantasy for the Western audience.The program will engage students in serious study of Chinese poetry and dramatic literature with a creative push.  The program will also serve as an ideal training ground for students who are interested in acting, performance, singing, music performance and composition, kinetic and vocal training in physical theatre, and skill building and implementation in technical theatre including set, lighting, costume, sound and stage management.  As the final performance is a meant to be an original and experimental piece bridging Chinese drama and Western theatrical sensitivities, and the performance style will reply on an innovative fusion of music and lyrics as well as creative collaboration between singing, movement and musical accompaniment on many different levels, the faculty of the program is seriously recruiting music students ready to engage in creative music composition and performance (including electronic music) to join the program.In winter quarter, we will study select dramas and stories of fantastic imagination from the Chinese tradition which bear direct relevance to our final performance piece.  We will study their literary and creative qualities in general program meetings and workshops.  We will also work through sequential theatre exercises in workshop and performance projects to bring these literary qualities into staging possibilities and physical realizations.  A weekly music workshop will also be offered to prepare students for the unique musical creation and implementation for the final performance.In spring, we will focus on rehearsals and technical theatre work in order to mount a full-fledged theatrical production bringing all the previous experimentations and innovations together into a fantastic and coherent production. This end-of-program public presentation will put to the test our collective understanding of Chinese mythology, poetry and drama, and help us convey this understanding in a complex form of the theatre of fantasy. Rose Jang Mingxia Li Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring