2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Moving Image [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
David Cramton
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Session I What makes a beautiful image?  What images best tell a story?  What separates phone vids from ? We will watch films, seminar around films, and create our own moving images.  We will cover the art, technology and technique of the moving image.  We will study how lighting, composition, and camera placement all affect and reflect the story, characters and landscapes that we capture.  We will spend a significant amount of time working with cameras and watching our own creations as a group, plus a few field trips to Seattle and/or Portland to look at the tools and resources used by professional image creators. David Cramton Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Therese Saliba and Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Dangerous creations" emerge out of adverse political conditions and embody new creative strategies and possibilities. This program will explore how writers, media makers, artists and community activists use experimental modes of address to challenge dominant narratives and formal structures, and to confound notions of "the real." With an emphasis on multiculturalism, identity and especially African and Arab Diasporas, this program will examine the histories of slavery, colonialism and Empire and how art, media and literature have been used as tools of both conquest and resistance. We will draw on theoretical tools  to analyze the "politics of representation" in popular media, including critiques of Orientalism, the Africanist presence and the gaze. And we will explore how diasporic communities, particularly feminists of color, "talk back" to these representations—by creating dangerously. That is, how do these artists use experimental forms to challenge fixed notions of individual and communal identity, as well as the consumerist system of media and literary production?Through the study of diasporic cultural production, African and Arab American literature and film, Third World Cinema and queer and feminist film theory, we intend to foster critical thinking about race, class and gender identities, and how they are negotiated. We will also explore how certain models of cultural-mixing, hybridity, and border-crossing have created a dispersal of identities and strategic possibilities for solidarities and connections across community struggles.In fall and winter quarters, students will learn to read cultural texts, including film, visual art and literature, to understand the relationships of people and communities, their sense of identity and possibilities for solidarity across differences. Students will develop skills in visual and media literacy, creative and expository writing, analytical reading and viewing, literary analysis, and the terminologies and methodologies of cultural and gender studies, film history and theory. Through workshops, students will also learn a range of community documentation skills, including photography, video, interviewing and oral history. In spring, students will have the opportunity to work on in-depth independent projects in autobiographical representations either through moving image or narrative writing. With faculty guidance and small group workshops, students will write proposals, conduct research and engage in critique groups to produce a major individual or colloborative creation.  visual studies, film studies, cultural studies, literary studies, African-American studies, Arab/Middle East studies, gender studies, community organizing and advocacy, and education. Therese Saliba Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Ulrike Krotscheck and Caryn Cline
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Must quotidian always be associated with humdrum? Rather, it is perhaps the quotidian—the everyday, the banal—that, in the long run, heroically ensures the survival of the individual and the group as a whole. -Michel Maffesoli, An “epic” is generally defined as a poem or narrative of considerable length, which explores grand themes such as a hero’s journey, or the origin myth of a country or peoples. As an adjective, “epic” refers to something that is larger than life and often extra-ordinary. By contrast, the “everyday” is flatly defined as ordinary and is often seen as boring, trivial, and lacking in grandeur. Yet, the “everyday” has a rich creative history and garners remarkable attention in contemporary art, spiritual practices, and other areas of study and praxis. Our lives are made up of both the epic and the everyday; both are integral components of the human experience. And the tension that exists between the two is rich territory for insight and imagination.This program interrogates how the essence of the epic enters the everyday and how the quotidian gives meaning to the epic.We will juxtapose the exploration of the “epic” as a literary form with the exploration of the “everyday” as a creative practice that engages experiments in text, sound, and image. We will conduct these explorations through readings, film screenings, analyses, lectures, workshops, seminars, and by developing discovery strategies rooted in the creative practices of writing nonfiction and of crafting video essays.During fall quarter students will read ancient Greek epic poetry, myth, and tragedy. These works tap deeply into the human condition, and they explore our most persistent and universal questions, such as the concepts of destiny, power, morality, mortality, and the (in-)evitabilty of fate. As we analyze the grand questions raised by epic texts we will also consider if or how we encounter such themes in everyday life. Conversely, we will examine how everyday life may intersect with epic-scale experiences and insights.To facilitate these considerations students will develop a daily writing practice and craft a variety of creative nonfiction essays—meditative, lyrical, personal, and hybrid forms—and we will factor into our studies exemplars that engage thematically with the everyday. Fall quarter explorations will move off the page to incorporate sound and image as tools for creative and critical inquiry. Students will take a series of electronic media workshops and gain hands-on experience with audiovisual scriptwriting, audio recording, photography, and video editing. Fall quarter will conclude with students applying their creative writing skills and electronic media competencies in collaboratively crafted video essays that blend students' literary works with audio and images to explore the realm between the epic and the everyday.During winter quarter we will deepen our investigations into the epic and the everyday through additional readings and analyses of classic Greek texts and by furthering our audiovisual inquiries. One goal of this quarter will be to advance students’ understanding of various film and adaptation theories to put into practice in their individual work. Winter quarter will conclude with rigorous individual projects that encompass a research paper on sources and methods of adaptation, and an independently made video essay.This is a full-time program emphasizing classical Greek literature and media arts, creative and critical practice, collaborative learning, and individual accountability. Expect assignments to be process-driven, highly structured, and challenging. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. If you’re eager to blend the study of Ancient Greek literature with experiments in media arts, then this program is for you. Ulrike Krotscheck Caryn Cline Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Devon Damonte
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In direct animation, a century-old camera-less form, artists use painting, scratching and myriad techniques not recommended by manufacturers to animate on motion picture film. It is an analog art offering experiential escape from increasingly digital visual cultures. In this intensive hands-on class students will practice numerous methods of direct animation including darkroom hand-processing, and invent their own techniques to create lots of footage in a short time, while studying genre masters like Len Lye, Norman McLaren, and Barbel Neubauer. Final culminating projects will explore analog and digital methods for publicly presenting students' work in a grand, celebratory projection performance extravaganza. Devon Damonte Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Harumi Moruzzi
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This Individual Study offers two options for students: (1) to continue their studies of Japanese literature, culture and society, in the form of Individual Learning Contracts, and (2) to continue their Japanese language and culture studies by studying abroad in Japan. This Individual Study also offers opportunities for students who are interested in creating their own courses of study and research, including study abroad. Possible areas of study are Japanese studies, cultural studies, literature, art and film. Interested students should first contact the faculty via email ( at least 2 weeks before the Academic Fair for spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Laura Citrin and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What are emotions, sentiments, and feelings? What functions do they serve, both for the individual and for society? In this full-time, two-quarter program, we will use social pyschology, scientific research, creative writing, and literary and film analysis as methods of inquiry into the ways that emotions are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions. We will study the ways emotions are expressed, avoided, embraced, and rejected according to complex display rules that vary across and within cultures based on gendered, raced, and classed social norms. Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions: our emotions. If we read between the lines, what is the subtext of our cultural narratives about fear, love, guilt, anger…? We will look to literature and film for examples of dominant and alternative narratives, and we will experiment with creative writing—fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid forms—as both a mode of expression and a method of inquiry: a way of looking under the surface of our habitual reactions and cultural norms.Fall QuarterWe'll survey the "big six" emotions: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride. We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions (e.g., joy, hope, interest, love) and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life."  We will consider published psychology research and literature from the field of social psychology, and students will design, propose and lay the groundwork for Winter Quarter research projects. Through analysis of films and literary and critical texts, students will consider how stories convey, evoke, and manipulate our emotions. They will develop fluency with critical terminology and concepts related to narrative, literary and cinematic theories. Through creative writing assignments and workshops, students will cultivate facility with elements of narrative discourse such as scene, summary, description, exposition, and dialogue.Winter QuarterOur interrogation of emotions will continue winter quarter with greater focus on independent, in-depth, and finely-crafted work. In addition to continued reading, screening and discussion of literary, critical and research-based texts, students will conduct the primary research projects approved during Fall Quarter, and will work to develop a portfolio of creative work representative of their inquiry. Winter quarter is an opportunity to participate first-hand in knowledge production within the interdisciplinary domain of affect studies, and to engage directly in the contemporary critical/creative discourse as art-makers.The interrogation of emotions in this program will occur via readings, screenings, lectures, research and creative writing workshops, and student-led seminars. Designed as a two-quarter program, the Fall Quarter will lay the foundation for more in-depth work in Winter. We strongly encourage students to enroll who are interested in sustained inquiry. Laura Citrin Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Harumi Moruzzi and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Japan is a vital, energetic and dynamic country which has been constantly reinventing and revitalizing itself even in the midst of gargantuan natural disasters, while struggling to maintain a sense of cultural and social continuity from the long lost past. Meanwhile, the conception and image of Japan, both in Japan and throughout the West, has varied widely over time, mostly due to Japan’s changing political and economic situation in the world. In the late 19th century, when Japan re-emerged into Western consciousness, Lafcadio Hearn, the Greek-Irish-American writer who later became Japanese, thought of Japanese society and its people as quaintly charming and adorable. In contrast, Americans in the 1940s viewed Japan as frighteningly militaristic and irrational. The French philosopher/semiotician Roland Barthes was bewitched and liberated by Japan’s charmingly mystifying otherness during his visit in 1966, when Japan began to show its first sign of recovery from the devastation of the WWII. The Dutch journalist Karel Van Wolferen was disturbed by the intractable and irresponsible system of Japanese power in 1989, when the Japanese economy was viewed as threatening to existing international power relations. These examples show how Japan has been viewed by Westerners in the past. The idea and image of Japan is highly dependent on the point of view that an observer assumes and that history makes possible.This full-time interdisciplinary program is devoted to understanding contemporary Japan, its culture and its people, from a historical point of view. We will study Japanese history, literature, cinema, culture and society through lectures, books, films, seminars and workshops, including study of Japanese language embedded in the program. Three levels of language study (1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-year Japanese) will be offered for 4 credits each during the fall and winter quarters.In the fall quarter, we will explore the cultural roots of Japan in its history. In the winter quarter, we will examine Japan after 1952, when the Allied occupation ended. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination of contemporary Japanese popular culture and its position in economic and cultural globalization. Students who are interested in experiencing Japan in person can take Japanese language classes in Tokyo through Harumi Moruzzi’s Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society, and Study Abroad in spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Laurie Meeker
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a program for advanced media students who want to continue to build their skills in media history, theory and production with the support of a learning community. It is designed for students who have already developed some expertise in media production, have academic experience with media history/theory and wish to work on advanced media projects involving research, development, production and exhibition. It provides students with the opportunity to produce yearlong media projects based on individual or collective interests developed out of previous academic projects or programs. Each student or team of students will do extensive pre-production planning and research for a media project to be completed by the end of the academic year. One or two-quarter projects are also possible, but must include research, design, production and editing appropriate to the academic schedule. Students who are interested in one or more of the following are invited to join this learning community of media artists: experimental film and digital video production, media history/theory, documentary, sound design, writing, photography, installation and contemporary art history.The focus of this program is on the development of each student's personal style and creative approach to working with moving images and sound. During the fall, students will engage in a period of idea development, research and reflection, including a 2-3 day retreat for concentrated work. Interdisciplinary research will inform students’ creative work, and will result in a research paper, annotated bibliography and presentation to the group. Grant writing workshops will result in student proposals for individual or collaborative media projects. Fall quarter will also involve opportunities for students to expand their media skills through workshops, exercises and a collaborative project. In particular, cinematography workshops will deepen student understanding of light, exposure and image quality in the 16mm format. Students will also work in teams of 3-4 to develop experimental projects that will enhance their collaborative skills and production experience. Students will also conduct research into new and old media technologies, presenting their findings to the group.During winter quarter, the focus will shift from idea development to the production phase. Students will acquire all their images and production elements for their projects, which could involve production work off campus for an extended period. Students are encouraged to think creatively and broadly about their subject matter and will be able to propose media projects that may require travel to other areas of the United States during the winter production phase. The critique process will be a central focus for the learning community during winter and spring, requiring students to participate regularly in the critical analysis of one another’s creative work. Winter research projects will explore contemporary media artists who have made special contributions to the development of experimental media practice and have attempted to push the technological as well conceptual boundaries of the moving image. Audio production workshops will be offered to expand student expertise with sound design and technology. Students will be encouraged to decide as a group on additional workshops in Web design and online media practices and will choose texts for winter and spring seminars.During spring quarter, each student will complete post-production work, develop a media artist website, explore ways to sustain their work as media artists and participate in a public screening of their work. Laurie Meeker Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe, Ruth Hayes, Julia Zay, Anne Fischel, Laurie Meeker and Peter Randlette
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Electronic Media internships provide opportunities for in-depth learning of a variety of media skills and concepts. They require a year-long commitment for fall, winter and spring quarters. Interns enroll for 12-16 credits per quarter with room for a 4-credit part-time class or other academic components. Interns work 30 to 40 hours a week and are paid 15 to 19 hours a week, depending on credit distribution. The intern's primary responsibilities are focused on supporting instruction, maintenance and administration for specific labs, facilities and production needs under the supervision of the staff. The interns meet weekly as a group to share skills, collaborate on projects, and to facilitate working together on productions and cross training between areas. All interns will be working in the Center for Creative and Applied Media, the rebuilt HD video and 5.1 surround audio production studios. For specific descriptions of the internships, please refer to . Naima Lowe Ruth Hayes Julia Zay Anne Fischel Laurie Meeker Peter Randlette Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Anne Fischel and Ruth Hayes
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring   Anne Fischel Ruth Hayes Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Ready Camera One investigates the politics of representation. Therefore, students who choose to enroll should be vitally and sincerely interested in the issues and ideas concerning the representation of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in the mass media. Ready Camera One’s focus on gender and identity in American television will be explored in a research project called INTO FOCUS that will combine media research, critical writing, a visual essay, and an oral presentation.This program is also designed for students interested in exploring visual literacy, television production, performance, and media criticism. Students will be introduced to both media deconstruction and media production skills through a series of lecture/screenings as well as workshops and design problems that focus primarily on collaborative multi-camera studio production. In addition to a series of studio exercises, students will complete a collaborative final project that combines media analysis, research, performance and production about broadcast content and ideology.We will take a critical, performative and historical approach as we examine and even emulate the production style and lessons from the early history of 20th century live television as well as more contemporary models. Students will be expected to perform in front of as well as behind the camera and will explore the logistics and aesthetics of multi-camera direction and design. Activities will include training in the CCAM, a multi-camera TV studio facility, instruction in basic performance and writing for television, and an immersive production schedule that requires a professional attitude including perfect attendance and timeliness.No prior media production experience is required. However, Ready Camera One is also an excellent opportunity for students who do have experience in the performing arts or media arts to explore intensive studio production and collaboration. Sally Cloninger Tue Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Sarah Williams
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program provides an opportunity for students to work on a large, highly collaborative project that requires a multiplicity of skills and knowledge: documenting an Olympian patron of the arts. Students will form a learning community in order to work collectively and collaboratively on a feature-length documentary film about philanthropy and patronage of the arts. Each student will take on specific roles related to editing, marketing/PR, soundtrack composition, and interviewing/researching. However, in order to build new skills, all students will collaborate on every aspect of the project. Students will work together, share research results, and participate in regular critiques with faculty and staff. Collaborative work will include field trips, audio recording, cinematography, marketing, interviewing, and editing. Faculty and staff will support student work through regular meetings, critiques and problem-solving discussions. The peer learning community will collaboratively determine the direction and success of this project. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly meetings with the continuing student director/producer and bi-monthly meetings with faculty and staff in Media as well as Development and Alumni Programs. In addition, students will maintain an academic blog to document the progress of the on-going project . For Fall and Winter Quarters the students will produce a work-in-progress screening.  In the spring, the students will organize a campus-wide screening and prepare the film for festival submission. This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. Sarah Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring