2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Media Arts [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Terry Setter
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a year-long long sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording and producing music. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history, and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students’ ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio. In fall, students will train to pass the related proficiency test and develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic history of audio production. Topics and activities will include basic acoustics; microphone design and placement; the use of compressors, limiters, and console block diagrams; and the theory of digital audio recording, with a strong emphasis on Digidesign’s Pro Tools software.  In winter, students will be provided with increasingly advanced instruction and exercises in the use of recording technologies with an emphasis on Pro Tools software, a number of plug-ins, and the creation of mixes, including those for inclusion in the Evergreen Student CD Project. Topics and activities will include techniques for recording a rock band, mixing techniques, and applications of various signal processors.  In spring, students will work to create well-balanced, innovative tracking and mixing. There will be an emphasis on mastering techniques and a field trip to four of Seattle’s most active recording studios.  The courses do not cover music production from electronic sources. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Hirsh Diamant
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This opportunity for student-originated studies is designed for students who have taken one or both of the courses in fall and winter quarters and wish to further pursue the topics of those courses.  In the first week of the quarter, each student will submit their project proposal and then complete that project during the quarter. This proposal will be designed with input from the faculty member.All students will also participate in readings, classes, and on-line assignments in collaboration with other students.  A weekly class meeting will include seminars, workshops, and opportunities to share learning and project work.  Weekly on-line posts will highlight students' progress and learning. Students must attend and participate in all weekly sessions. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Zenaida Vergara
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses introduces the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Winter continues this work while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb, and digital effects processing.  In spring, additional topics will include sound design for film with sync sound production for dialogue, Foley, sound effects, and music composition. There will also be an interview-style production meant for radio broadcast.  In each quarter, students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David Cramton
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Session I What makes a beautiful image?  What images best tell a story?  What separates phone vids from ? We will watch films, seminar around films, and create our own moving images.  We will cover the art, technology and technique of the moving image.  We will study how lighting, composition, and camera placement all affect and reflect the story, characters and landscapes that we capture.  We will spend a significant amount of time working with cameras and watching our own creations as a group, plus a few field trips to Seattle and/or Portland to look at the tools and resources used by professional image creators. David Cramton Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Karen Gaul, Rita Pougiales and Julie Russo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In , the historian William Leach writes, “Whoever has the power to project a vision of the good life and make it prevail has the most decisive power of all.” Since the early 20th century, the pleasures of consumption have dominated prevailing visions of the good life in the United States. Innovations in mass production and mass media went hand in hand to link pleasure and prosperity with acquiring the latest commodities. Leisure has also been central to those pleasures, often in the form of tourism, fashion and entertainment, as people consume not only goods but experiences and ideas about what it means to be successful and happy. This program is an inquiry into these features of American consumer culture, particularly the values of convenience and authenticity that characterize the objects and desires it produces and exchanges.Students in this program will study the history and logic of U.S. consumer culture. We will consider the forces that have shaped each of us into consumers in this capitalist society, from representation and ideology to material and technological development. Sustainability will be a critical lens for our inquiry, as we consider the raw materials, labor and waste streams inherent in goods and in cultural experiences. Life cycle analysis of objects—from their origins in nature to their presence on retail shelves, personal spaces, garbage bins and landfills—will help us build a broader context for understanding the materiality with which we all engage every day.Our historical arc will be sweeping: from hunter-gatherers nearly two million years ago, to the origins of animal and plant domestication, to the formation of colonial settlements which created unprecedented challenges and opportunities, to the modern era. We will explore the patterns of resource use, social inequality and relative sustainability. We will examine how habits of conservation, thrift and re-use that were endemic to pre-modern societies transformed in tandem with the unprecedented energies of industrialization. We will investigate the theory and economics of post-industrial capitalism to better understand the impact of new media and technologies on the ways we produce and consume in the present day. We will also examine how curiosity about foreign and mysterious cultures in the context of globalization paved the way for tourism in which cultural authenticity is a central attraction. We will study the relationship between consumption and sustainability, pursuit of the good life through self-help and imported cultural practices such as yoga and meditation, between entertainment industries and communication networks, advertising and buying habits, spending money and self-worth. These contexts will enable us to destabilize and interrogate notions of what feels "normal" in the ways we engage as consumers today, including as consumers of knowledge in increasingly digitized institutions of higher education.Students will have the opportunity to examine ingrained routines of daily life, become conscious of the origins and meanings of their own habits and desires, and thereby become critical thinkers and actors in consumer culture. Our activities will include reading, writing papers and participating in seminar discussions on program topics, learning ethnographic research methods, experimenting with multimodal and collaborative work, viewing relevant films and participating in field trips. In fall quarter, we will build foundational skills and introduce key concepts and themes; winter quarter students will begin to develop their own research agenda; and in spring quarter, they can apply theory to practice in research and/or community-based projects. Spring quarter readings emphasize responses to consumer culture through alternative practices and collectives. Texts on on intentional communities include by Juliet Schor, by Karen Litfin, , and . Texts on virtual communities include by Fred Turner, by Lawrence Lessig, and selections from the anthology Digital Labor. These and related topics comprise an 8 credit academic block taught on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Students enrolling for 16 credits should be prepared to engage in substantial independent learning or work in the community (faculty can structure or guide this piece for new students). One option is a media production intensive that includes a series of technical workshops and a collaborative project. Program learning activities include: seminar responses and essay assignments, field trips, digital media workshops, yoga and awareness practices. Field trips may include Procession of the Species, visits to Fertile Ground, NW Ecobuilders Guild, the Arbutus School, and intentional communities in the PNW, and/or a tour of tiny homes. Karen Gaul Rita Pougiales Julie Russo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Therese Saliba and Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Dangerous creations" emerge out of adverse political conditions and embody new creative strategies and possibilities. This program will explore how writers, media makers, artists and community activists use experimental modes of address to challenge dominant narratives and formal structures, and to confound notions of "the real." With an emphasis on multiculturalism, identity and especially African and Arab Diasporas, this program will examine the histories of slavery, colonialism and Empire and how art, media and literature have been used as tools of both conquest and resistance. We will draw on theoretical tools  to analyze the "politics of representation" in popular media, including critiques of Orientalism, the Africanist presence and the gaze. And we will explore how diasporic communities, particularly feminists of color, "talk back" to these representations—by creating dangerously. That is, how do these artists use experimental forms to challenge fixed notions of individual and communal identity, as well as the consumerist system of media and literary production?Through the study of diasporic cultural production, African and Arab American literature and film, Third World Cinema and queer and feminist film theory, we intend to foster critical thinking about race, class and gender identities, and how they are negotiated. We will also explore how certain models of cultural-mixing, hybridity, and border-crossing have created a dispersal of identities and strategic possibilities for solidarities and connections across community struggles.In fall and winter quarters, students will learn to read cultural texts, including film, visual art and literature, to understand the relationships of people and communities, their sense of identity and possibilities for solidarity across differences. Students will develop skills in visual and media literacy, creative and expository writing, analytical reading and viewing, literary analysis, and the terminologies and methodologies of cultural and gender studies, film history and theory. Through workshops, students will also learn a range of community documentation skills, including photography, video, interviewing and oral history. In spring, students will have the opportunity to work on in-depth independent projects in autobiographical representations either through moving image or narrative writing. With faculty guidance and small group workshops, students will write proposals, conduct research and engage in critique groups to produce a major individual or colloborative creation.  visual studies, film studies, cultural studies, literary studies, African-American studies, Arab/Middle East studies, gender studies, community organizing and advocacy, and education. Therese Saliba Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate digitally generated waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, additive synthesis, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis algorithms.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of this class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, and contemporary research in music composition. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ulrike Krotscheck and Caryn Cline
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Must quotidian always be associated with humdrum? Rather, it is perhaps the quotidian—the everyday, the banal—that, in the long run, heroically ensures the survival of the individual and the group as a whole. -Michel Maffesoli, An “epic” is generally defined as a poem or narrative of considerable length, which explores grand themes such as a hero’s journey, or the origin myth of a country or peoples. As an adjective, “epic” refers to something that is larger than life and often extra-ordinary. By contrast, the “everyday” is flatly defined as ordinary and is often seen as boring, trivial, and lacking in grandeur. Yet, the “everyday” has a rich creative history and garners remarkable attention in contemporary art, spiritual practices, and other areas of study and praxis. Our lives are made up of both the epic and the everyday; both are integral components of the human experience. And the tension that exists between the two is rich territory for insight and imagination.This program interrogates how the essence of the epic enters the everyday and how the quotidian gives meaning to the epic.We will juxtapose the exploration of the “epic” as a literary form with the exploration of the “everyday” as a creative practice that engages experiments in text, sound, and image. We will conduct these explorations through readings, film screenings, analyses, lectures, workshops, seminars, and by developing discovery strategies rooted in the creative practices of writing nonfiction and of crafting video essays.During fall quarter students will read ancient Greek epic poetry, myth, and tragedy. These works tap deeply into the human condition, and they explore our most persistent and universal questions, such as the concepts of destiny, power, morality, mortality, and the (in-)evitabilty of fate. As we analyze the grand questions raised by epic texts we will also consider if or how we encounter such themes in everyday life. Conversely, we will examine how everyday life may intersect with epic-scale experiences and insights.To facilitate these considerations students will develop a daily writing practice and craft a variety of creative nonfiction essays—meditative, lyrical, personal, and hybrid forms—and we will factor into our studies exemplars that engage thematically with the everyday. Fall quarter explorations will move off the page to incorporate sound and image as tools for creative and critical inquiry. Students will take a series of electronic media workshops and gain hands-on experience with audiovisual scriptwriting, audio recording, photography, and video editing. Fall quarter will conclude with students applying their creative writing skills and electronic media competencies in collaboratively crafted video essays that blend students' literary works with audio and images to explore the realm between the epic and the everyday.During winter quarter we will deepen our investigations into the epic and the everyday through additional readings and analyses of classic Greek texts and by furthering our audiovisual inquiries. One goal of this quarter will be to advance students’ understanding of various film and adaptation theories to put into practice in their individual work. Winter quarter will conclude with rigorous individual projects that encompass a research paper on sources and methods of adaptation, and an independently made video essay.This is a full-time program emphasizing classical Greek literature and media arts, creative and critical practice, collaborative learning, and individual accountability. Expect assignments to be process-driven, highly structured, and challenging. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. If you’re eager to blend the study of Ancient Greek literature with experiments in media arts, then this program is for you. Ulrike Krotscheck Caryn Cline Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Devon Damonte
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In direct animation, a century-old camera-less form, artists use painting, scratching and myriad techniques not recommended by manufacturers to animate on motion picture film. It is an analog art offering experiential escape from increasingly digital visual cultures. In this intensive hands-on class students will practice numerous methods of direct animation including darkroom hand-processing, and invent their own techniques to create lots of footage in a short time, while studying genre masters like Len Lye, Norman McLaren, and Barbel Neubauer. Final culminating projects will explore analog and digital methods for publicly presenting students' work in a grand, celebratory projection performance extravaganza. Devon Damonte Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Laurie Meeker
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a program for advanced media students who want to continue to build their skills in media history, theory and production with the support of a learning community. It is designed for students who have already developed some expertise in media production, have academic experience with media history/theory and wish to work on advanced media projects involving research, development, production and exhibition. It provides students with the opportunity to produce yearlong media projects based on individual or collective interests developed out of previous academic projects or programs. Each student or team of students will do extensive pre-production planning and research for a media project to be completed by the end of the academic year. One or two-quarter projects are also possible, but must include research, design, production and editing appropriate to the academic schedule. Students who are interested in one or more of the following are invited to join this learning community of media artists: experimental film and digital video production, media history/theory, documentary, sound design, writing, photography, installation and contemporary art history.The focus of this program is on the development of each student's personal style and creative approach to working with moving images and sound. During the fall, students will engage in a period of idea development, research and reflection, including a 2-3 day retreat for concentrated work. Interdisciplinary research will inform students’ creative work, and will result in a research paper, annotated bibliography and presentation to the group. Grant writing workshops will result in student proposals for individual or collaborative media projects. Fall quarter will also involve opportunities for students to expand their media skills through workshops, exercises and a collaborative project. In particular, cinematography workshops will deepen student understanding of light, exposure and image quality in the 16mm format. Students will also work in teams of 3-4 to develop experimental projects that will enhance their collaborative skills and production experience. Students will also conduct research into new and old media technologies, presenting their findings to the group.During winter quarter, the focus will shift from idea development to the production phase. Students will acquire all their images and production elements for their projects, which could involve production work off campus for an extended period. Students are encouraged to think creatively and broadly about their subject matter and will be able to propose media projects that may require travel to other areas of the United States during the winter production phase. The critique process will be a central focus for the learning community during winter and spring, requiring students to participate regularly in the critical analysis of one another’s creative work. Winter research projects will explore contemporary media artists who have made special contributions to the development of experimental media practice and have attempted to push the technological as well conceptual boundaries of the moving image. Audio production workshops will be offered to expand student expertise with sound design and technology. Students will be encouraged to decide as a group on additional workshops in Web design and online media practices and will choose texts for winter and spring seminars.During spring quarter, each student will complete post-production work, develop a media artist website, explore ways to sustain their work as media artists and participate in a public screening of their work. Laurie Meeker Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe, Ruth Hayes, Julia Zay, Anne Fischel, Laurie Meeker and Peter Randlette
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Electronic Media internships provide opportunities for in-depth learning of a variety of media skills and concepts. They require a year-long commitment for fall, winter and spring quarters. Interns enroll for 12-16 credits per quarter with room for a 4-credit part-time class or other academic components. Interns work 30 to 40 hours a week and are paid 15 to 19 hours a week, depending on credit distribution. The intern's primary responsibilities are focused on supporting instruction, maintenance and administration for specific labs, facilities and production needs under the supervision of the staff. The interns meet weekly as a group to share skills, collaborate on projects, and to facilitate working together on productions and cross training between areas. All interns will be working in the Center for Creative and Applied Media, the rebuilt HD video and 5.1 surround audio production studios. For specific descriptions of the internships, please refer to . Naima Lowe Ruth Hayes Julia Zay Anne Fischel Laurie Meeker Peter Randlette Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Terry Setter
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Su 14Summer Full This program provides instruction in the use of digital recording studio equipment, microphone design and placement techniques, mixing console design, signal flow, monitoring techniques, room acoustics, and signal processing.  There will be written assignments based upon readings in Huber's , and students will present research on topics related to audio production.  Students will do at least 50 hours of recording and familiarization work in teams of two in addition to the in-class activities. We will record local musicians and produce finished mixes of the sessions. Terry Setter Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Anne Fischel and Ruth Hayes
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring   Anne Fischel Ruth Hayes Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ben Kamen
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this course, students will look at two open-source platforms for creative coding (Processing and Arduino) and explore their use in creating interactive and generative works of art.  Using Processing, students will develop techniques for creating algorithmic animations, visualizing data, networking, and manipulating live video.  Students will use the Arduino microcontroller platform to connect digital work to the real world, using sensors to gather and interpret information.  Students will be introduced to basic programming concepts and develop simple electronic circuits.  Reading and seminar will provide a conceptual basis for our technical work.  No prior experience is required. Ben Kamen Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this course, students will develop independent projects building upon their work from previous quarters.  Students will dive deeper into technical issues of interactivity and programming using Max/MSP/Jitter, Arduino, and Processing.  Students will present project proposals and participate in workshops and critiques along the path to a finished work.  Readings and seminar will ground and contextualize our creative work.  This course is only open to students previously enrolled in one of the previous "Numbers" courses or with equivalent experience. Ben Kamen Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steve Davis
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course emphasizes beginning-level skill development in camera use, lighting, exposure, b/w film and print processing. We will also briefly explore basic color printing and digital photography techniques. The essential elements of the class will include assignments, critiques and surveys of images by other photographers. Students of this class will develop a basic understanding of the language of photography, as a communications tool and a means for personal expression. Students must invest ample time outside of class to complete assignments. Steve Davis Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Hugh Lentz
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course emphasizes beginning-level skill development in camera function, exposure, and black-and-white film development and printing as well as an introduction to digital imaging.  We will focus on photography's role in issues of the arts, cultural representation, and mass media.  Students will have assignments, critiques, collaborations, and viewing of work by other photographers.  Each student will complete a final project for the end of the quarter. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hugh Lentz
Signature Required: Winter 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this course we'll be learning to print from color negatives, work with medium format cameras, photograph with electronic flash, and work in the studio environment.  There will be assignments, critiques, and viewing the work of other photographers.  All assignments and all work for this class will be in the studio with lighting set-ups.  In addition to assignments, each student will be expected to produce a final project of their own choosing and turn in a portfolio at the end of the quarter. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Steve Davis
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course will introduce students to photographic practice through digital means.  We will explore the fundamentals of image-making through digital photographic processes.  We will work with digital cameras, software applications, and inkjet printers. Students will create work as exhibition-quality prints, and also create a photographic portfolio for the Web. Steve Davis Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Steve Davis
Signature Required: Winter 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This class will explore how photography can be effectively used as a tool for creative documentation. You may work in any photographic mediums with which you are experienced (conventional B/W, color, digital). Final projects must address a particular topic (from your perspective) and clearly communicate your message to a broad audience. Steve Davis Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Steve Davis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This class is an introduction to photographic expression using digital cameras, computers, and printers. Image-making will take the forms of digital prints and online portfolios. A brief introduction to digital video, HD panoramas, and the black-and-white darkroom will also be included. You will have full access to the Digital Imaging Studio and to our darkroom facilities. Digital cameras are available through Media Loan. Class requirements include scheduled assignments, research, and a final project consisting of new, photographically-derived, digital work. Steve Davis Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Hugh Lentz
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This is an intermediate to advanced photography class where students will be using older methods and techniques of the medium.  We’ll be spending a significant part of this class learning about and using 4x5 cameras. Additionally, we'll be working with UV printing, lith films, pinhole cameras, and more.  There will be assignments based in these processes, and each student will produce a final project.  We’ll also look at the work of contemporary and historical artists using these methods. Hugh Lentz Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Ready Camera One investigates the politics of representation. Therefore, students who choose to enroll should be vitally and sincerely interested in the issues and ideas concerning the representation of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in the mass media. Ready Camera One’s focus on gender and identity in American television will be explored in a research project called INTO FOCUS that will combine media research, critical writing, a visual essay, and an oral presentation.This program is also designed for students interested in exploring visual literacy, television production, performance, and media criticism. Students will be introduced to both media deconstruction and media production skills through a series of lecture/screenings as well as workshops and design problems that focus primarily on collaborative multi-camera studio production. In addition to a series of studio exercises, students will complete a collaborative final project that combines media analysis, research, performance and production about broadcast content and ideology.We will take a critical, performative and historical approach as we examine and even emulate the production style and lessons from the early history of 20th century live television as well as more contemporary models. Students will be expected to perform in front of as well as behind the camera and will explore the logistics and aesthetics of multi-camera direction and design. Activities will include training in the CCAM, a multi-camera TV studio facility, instruction in basic performance and writing for television, and an immersive production schedule that requires a professional attitude including perfect attendance and timeliness.No prior media production experience is required. However, Ready Camera One is also an excellent opportunity for students who do have experience in the performing arts or media arts to explore intensive studio production and collaboration. Sally Cloninger Tue Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Zenaida Vergara
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This program will cover the fundamental elements of producing, recording, designing, and editing sound for film. Students will learn the basics of multi-track sound design specifically for the moving image. Topics to be covered include microphone techniques, field and studio recording, and Foley techniques. Students will collaborate in creating and performing music compositions, sync sound effects, and sync sound dialogue recording. We will also be studying historical and present-day techniques in sync sound production. Zenaida Vergara Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Julia Zay and Amjad Faur
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This is an art foundations program invested in opening up the dense histories and meanings of photographic images in their many forms, from still to moving and back again--and the unsettled places between. We explore what it means both to know and to make an image– photographic, moving, and time-based. We will pay equal attention to the history, theory and practice of the photographic image, both still and moving, in the context of visual studies--a field that yokes a broad study of the visual arts with social and cultural history and theory--art history, film/cinema history, and philosophy. Through a critical engagement with still and moving photographic images as well as related forms of visual art, we will map a broad contextual territory and challenge received notions of the boundaries between forms, genres, and mediums.Photography can never be thought of as simply a medium, technology or practice but a convergence of material, history, culture and power. In the Fall, we will start with the unfolding of the Western enlightenment, from the 16th to the 19th century, when optical technologies radically reorganized the senses and methods of knowledge production, posing new questions about temporal, spatial and visual relationships to artists and scientists alike.  We will then move more deeply into the 19th and first half of the 20th century, when photography emerged into an art world dominated by painting, a visual culture organized around print technologies, and societies in the throes of rapid industrialization. Photography initially emerged not out of art contexts but out of the institutions of science and industry, so we will consider, in particular, the ways it was used to produce social categories, shaping dominant discourses of gender, class and criminality. For example, we’ll look at the language of portraiture so central to the emergence of both a middle class and the language of criminal and medical photography. Our materials and techniques will first be limited to those from the 19th century (proto-photography, early processes, hand-built cameras). In winter, we move from the 19th to the long 20th century and the emergence of cinema. We will look at the way early cinema was organized around a fascination with duration, spectacle, and experimentation and on the relationship between photography and cinema, stillness and movement. We will continue to work in still photography, broadening our range of techniques, and add a small amount of 16mm filmmaking to the mix as we explore the larger social and historical contexts and philosophical questions surrounding the relationship between still and moving photographic images. In our creative and intellectual work, we’ll ask many questions about the phenomenon, concept and experience of time--for example, how is a four minute exposure in a still photograph both similar to and different from a four minute continuous shot of film or video of the same subject?In all our work we will focus on building essential skills in practices of attention--learning how to slow down our modes of seeing, experiencing and working. In our photographic practice, this will mean moving away from the pursuit of “finished” images and towards experimental processes and conceptual problem solving. In our work with texts and images, this will mean developing our ability to read and view closely and write with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures/screenings, workshops, seminar, critical reading and writing, and critique. In addition to working individually, students can expect to collaborate regularly with their peers on a variety of assignments and larger projects. All along the way we will intentionally examine how our investments in collaboration animate our intellectual and creative work. We will spend significant time in critique to help each other see, describe, evaluate and improve our creative and critical work.  Julia Zay Amjad Faur Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Sarah Williams
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program provides an opportunity for students to work on a large, highly collaborative project that requires a multiplicity of skills and knowledge: documenting an Olympian patron of the arts. Students will form a learning community in order to work collectively and collaboratively on a feature-length documentary film about philanthropy and patronage of the arts. Each student will take on specific roles related to editing, marketing/PR, soundtrack composition, and interviewing/researching. However, in order to build new skills, all students will collaborate on every aspect of the project. Students will work together, share research results, and participate in regular critiques with faculty and staff. Collaborative work will include field trips, audio recording, cinematography, marketing, interviewing, and editing. Faculty and staff will support student work through regular meetings, critiques and problem-solving discussions. The peer learning community will collaboratively determine the direction and success of this project. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly meetings with the continuing student director/producer and bi-monthly meetings with faculty and staff in Media as well as Development and Alumni Programs. In addition, students will maintain an academic blog to document the progress of the on-going project . For Fall and Winter Quarters the students will produce a work-in-progress screening.  In the spring, the students will organize a campus-wide screening and prepare the film for festival submission. This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. Sarah Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Terry Setter
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This SOS is an opportunity for well-prepared students to do highly independent work in music composition, music technology, audio production, and consciousness studies.  Participants will meet as a group on Thursday mornings to review progress and share ideas for increasing the quantity and quality of the work that students are doing.  Specific descriptions of learning goals and activities will be developed individually between the student and faculty. Terry Setter Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Gilda Sheppard and Carl Waluconis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full This program will explore the role that movement, visual art, music, and media can play in problem solving and in the resolution of internalized fear, conflicts, or blocks.  Through a variety of hands-on activities, field trips, readings, films/video, and guest speakers, students will discover sources of imagery, sound, and movement as tools to awaken their creative problem solving from two perspectives—as creator and viewer.  Students interested in human services, social sciences, media, humanities and education will find this course engaging. This course does not require any prerequisite art classes or training. Gilda Sheppard Carl Waluconis Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring