2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Leadership Studies [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Paul McCreary, Linda Gaffney, Carl Waluconis, Frances Solomon, Suzanne Simons, Arlen Speights, Barbara Laners, Peter Bacho, Jose Gomez, Gilda Sheppard and Tyrus Smith
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year’s program takes a holistic approach to systemic change at the community level. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy. We will focus on individual- and community-building practices based on literacy in humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, media and technology. A major emphasis of this program will be the examination of how citizens effectively advocate and engage in activism to address pressing social, legal, economic and ecological problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding, action and leadership in their areas of interest.During fall quarter, students will study historical notions of leadership and strategies employed to achieve social change through activism and advocacy in institutional and non-institutional settings. Students will reflect on their personal experiences and the world around them in order to understand how they may apply the insights, knowledge and skills to promote civic engagement and foster change.Winter's work will be based upon the foundations built in fall quarter. Students will identify, develop and explore models of advocacy and activism that have led to systemic change. They will enhance their knowledge of contemporary social movements, political interest groups, and scientific and legal advocacy. Students will work actively toward the application of this knowledge by developing collaborative action research projects.In spring quarter, students will join theory with practice, utilizing a variety of expansive methods, from writing to media, in order to demonstrate and communicate their perceptions and findings to a wider audience. They will present their collaborative research projects to the public. The information presented will be directed toward benefiting individual and community capacity as well as communicating a wider understanding of their findings to enhance their own lives, the lives of those in their community and the world that we all share. Paul McCreary Linda Gaffney Carl Waluconis Frances Solomon Suzanne Simons Arlen Speights Barbara Laners Peter Bacho Jose Gomez Gilda Sheppard Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in finance, economics, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of business management, economics, and finance.  This course focuses on the micro aspect of business management, namely business planning, microeconomics, business finance, fund raising, and human resource management.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Allen Jenkins
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Business Foundations program provides a functional overview of all phases of business, including ownership, marketing, personnel, accounting, finance, managerial controls, leadership, and the relationship of business to the ethical, economic, and social environment in which it operates.  Business Foundations provides students a window on global business: how the global marketplace operates and how a country’s customs, politics, and ethnicity affect business. The program is designed for business and non-business degree seeking students, current and future entrepreneurs, or anyone who wants a practical foundation in business. Winter’s studies will focus on Financial and Managerial Accounting Fundamentals. As the program continues in the spring quarter, students will continue to study finance, do independent study, and learn through a four-credit internship.Each quarter's specific topics are designed as foundations for students with no prior academic business background. The instructor will strive to teach the program in an engaging manner, using a mix of uncluttered reading materials, conversational language, and humor to introduce students to the essentials of business and management without sacrificing rigor or content.  We will use a real-world focus to illustrate fundamental concepts and employ case studies of companies whose products and services are familiar.The intent of the program is to provide a theoretical framework for the realities of starting, managing, and growing a small to medium size business.  Our goal is for students to gain insight into the operational, legal, financial, ethical, and practical challenges associated with running a business.  We will explore how organizations are legally and financially defined, what is unique about them, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type.  The program uses seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions, assignments, self-study, and an internship to integrate classroom knowledge with current best practices, protocols, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's global, diverse economies. Allen Jenkins Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
David Shaw
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This China studies program will take an in-depth look at modern China through the perspective of the social sciences, building on readings and issues discussed in the fall program However, any student with an interest in China or East Asian studies should be able to join the program in winter or spring quarter and succeed in their studies. Our overriding goals are to understand today's China as a vital global power, while critically exploring the lingering influence of its rich yet strife-torn cultural past on behavior and decisions made at the national, institutional and individual levels. Building on our shared texts and themes, students will do independent research individually or in small groups, becoming experts in a particular facet of Chinese business, economy. society and/or sustainability. Our work will also extend beyond uniquely Chinese experiences into topics on which the future of Asia, the global economy and our small planet depend, including the natural environment, paths to ecological, social and economic sustainability and strategies to redress economic inequalities and social dislocations. China's environmental history, its rural-urban dynamic and its economic development will also serve as core threads through both quarters of study. During winter quarter, we will study ancient Chinese texts (in translation), as well as popular and academic articles, books, films and documentaries on China, particularly those exploring and reinterpreting ancient themes. Chinese philosophy, comprised of the primary "Three Teachings" of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, will inform our study of Chinese culture. Sun Tzu's will introduce us to one of the world's oldest sources of strategic thought and Chinese concepts of leadership. Other topics likely to be covered include China’s trade and travel with the outside world, the Chinese diaspora, China's contact and interactions with foreign powers and its industrialization and political transformations from an imperial dynasty to a republic to a Communist state. Spring quarter we will focus on present-day China. We will examine China's current image as a dynamic economic powerhouse and “global factory” and as an enigmatic political player internationally. We will also look at its internal, problematic quests for domestic harmony, a well-functioning legal system and a truly civil society.In both quarters, we will meet in seminar, workshop and lecture settings. Weekly readings from books, popular media (newspapers, magazines) and academic journal articles should be expected for seminar and workshop. A peer-review approach will be taken in a Writing and Research Workshop to complement individual or small-group efforts on their research projects. Regular film and documentary viewings will build a closer familiarity with Chinese culture and society. Finally, in spring quarter, students will make an individual presentation on a book they have read and critically reviewed on their own. Another student completing the same reading will provide feedback on the presentation based on their reading of the book. This should expand the range of perspectives covered beyond the readings assigned to the entire class.Separate enrollment in Chinese language courses is strongly encouraged as a complement to this program. This program would also serve as good preparation for students who plan to travel to China via independent learning contracts or subsequent study abroad programs. David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
George Freeman and Terry Ford
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist-practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the fields of education and human services. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. Students will be required to begin a two-quarter long, 15 hour/week internship winter quarter in the fields of education and social services. Constructing a research project may be an option if students prefer research to the internship. Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology and its application to clinical settings and schooling, quantitative and qualitative research methods, multicultural studies and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology and applied settings such as educational settings. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism and humanistic psychology. Students will also begin their self-identified internships for winter and spring quarters in an area of the social services or an educational setting. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Students may opt for independent literature-based reviews with faculty approval.Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of theory to practice through communication skills practicum and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their internships started winter quarter through spring quarter.Variable credit options are available to students participating in internships. George Freeman Terry Ford Mon Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Lori Blewett
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This course will introduce students to core concepts and theoretical frameworks that enhance our ability to analyze and successfully manage conflict.  It will include skill building and communication practice aimed at expanding our conflict negotiation repertoire and our capacity for collaborative problem-solving. Lori Blewett Mon Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 16 04 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Kathy Kelly
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Systems theory offers a holistic approach to group development, along with a framework for identifying leverage points for improving group performance. Whether for senior managers in large businesses or agencies or for members of volunteer community organizations, systems thinking provides a vantage point to better understand group dynamics and useful tools to develop a group's capacity to work together effectively. Following an introduction to systems theory, students will explore key concepts when applied to cases in their own experiences and in cases presented in class. Resources include Peter Senge, Margaret Wheatley, Otto Scharmer, Linda Booth Sweeney, Ron Heifetz, and others. Kathy Kelly Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to develop themselves as leaders with a mission to serve the common good, this course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including cases, videos, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to develop themselves as leaders with a mission to serve the common good, this course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including cases, videos, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to create sustainable organizations, this course will lead students through an investigation of leadership concepts and practices using a simulation, including real life and interactive scenarios, virtual role plays, cases, class and group activities and discussions. Dariush Khaleghi Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to create sustainable organizations, this first course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including self-evaluation questionnaires, cases, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Mukti Khanna and Cynthia Kennedy
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program explores the creation of health through mind-body perspectives. How can we engage in transformational conversations about the connections between personal, community and planetary health? Knowing that in every moment choices we make can move us toward health, or away from it, this program will explore the myriad ways we can embody choices that keep us and our communities vital and alive. Throughout the program, we will recognize that our individual choices can help us create both personal health and a sustainable environment, a conscious life and a positive presence in society.Fall quarter we will explore systems of health and healing from multicultural, neurobiological and ecopsychological lenses. There is a synergistic relationship between planetary and personal well-being; the health of one is related to the health of the other. We will explore the relationship between the body and the natural world. We'll also explore somatic (body-based) literacy as it relates to leadership, communication and engagement with social issues. Somatic literacy includes listening and acting on information from the body. Winter quarter will allow students to design their own health-based project studies while continuing to explore self-leadership, creativity, emotional intelligence, health and self-image.Students will have an opportunity to learn in many ways using diverse modalities and multiple intelligences. We will integrate somatic learning into our studies, including movement workshops (no prior experience necessary). Our inquiry will ask us to attune ourselves to the wisdom that is available and present in our mind-body awareness. We will participate in community readings, community service, rigorous writing assignments and critical study of important texts. Learning through multiple intelligences can be enjoyable.Come join us! Mukti Khanna Cynthia Kennedy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Lori Blewett
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I This two-week intensive course focuses on the fundamentals of public speaking. It is aimed at improving speaking confidence and skill regardless of one’s current level of experience.  Students will learn to control speech anxiety, compose well-organized presentations, and produce dynamic performances.  We will draw on contemporary and traditional rhetorical theories in relation to persuasive and informative speaking goals.  All students will receive individualized feedback and coaching in order to enhance their ability to speak effectively in the classroom, workplace, or public arena. The course provides communication credit for selected Master In Teaching endorsement areas. Lori Blewett Tue Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Myra Downing
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Myra Downing Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Mary DuPuis
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Mary DuPuis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tracey Hosselkus
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Tracey Hosselkus Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Colleen Almojuela
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Colleen Almojuela Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dorothy Flaherty
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Dorothy Flaherty Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Renee Swan-Waite
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Renee Swan-Waite Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Doreen Swetkis
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who have completed work in community learning programs (such as ) and are prepared to complete an internship in a public or nonprofit agency. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested students must consult with the faculty about their proposed internship and/or course of study. Contracts that are completed before the beginning of spring quarter will be given priority.  All contracts must follow the college procedures for internships. While students are encouraged to seek out their own internship possibilities, we will work with campus resources and the faculty member's contacts to identify internship possibilities in public and nonprofit agencies.Students will hold 20-28 hour/week internships (depending upon amount of credits: 12-16 variable option) and will come together as a class on Fridays to study more about doing nonprofit work through seminars, lectures, guest speakers and/or films. There will be common readings and individual written assignments.  The faculty member will work with the interning agencies, making at least one site-visit to each agency during the quarter and meeting regularly with students outside of scheduled class times as needed.  Internships must be located in the Seattle/Portland I/5 corridor or on the Olympic Peninsula within a reasonable distance (i.e., Mason County).   Participation in the weekly class meeting is required – no internships located nationally or internationally will be sponsored. Doreen Swetkis Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Kathy Kelly
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring   Kathy Kelly Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Gail Wootan
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This course will examine the historical, cultural, and social reasons why women, despite their majority in many other sectors of life, are not filling leadership positions in the United States.  We will also identify solutions that exist for individuals and groups, and what has been done historically and presently to improve the path to leadership for women.  This course will primarily focus on US-related issues, but will also briefly study other countries and their struggles and successes in increasing gender diversity in leadership positions.  Students will learn through course readings, research projects, group activities, videos, seminars, presentations, guest lecturers, and personal reflection.   Gail Wootan Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer