2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Law And Public Policy [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Paul McCreary, Linda Gaffney, Carl Waluconis, Frances Solomon, Suzanne Simons, Arlen Speights, Barbara Laners, Peter Bacho, Jose Gomez, Gilda Sheppard and Tyrus Smith
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year’s program takes a holistic approach to systemic change at the community level. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy. We will focus on individual- and community-building practices based on literacy in humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, media and technology. A major emphasis of this program will be the examination of how citizens effectively advocate and engage in activism to address pressing social, legal, economic and ecological problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding, action and leadership in their areas of interest.During fall quarter, students will study historical notions of leadership and strategies employed to achieve social change through activism and advocacy in institutional and non-institutional settings. Students will reflect on their personal experiences and the world around them in order to understand how they may apply the insights, knowledge and skills to promote civic engagement and foster change.Winter's work will be based upon the foundations built in fall quarter. Students will identify, develop and explore models of advocacy and activism that have led to systemic change. They will enhance their knowledge of contemporary social movements, political interest groups, and scientific and legal advocacy. Students will work actively toward the application of this knowledge by developing collaborative action research projects.In spring quarter, students will join theory with practice, utilizing a variety of expansive methods, from writing to media, in order to demonstrate and communicate their perceptions and findings to a wider audience. They will present their collaborative research projects to the public. The information presented will be directed toward benefiting individual and community capacity as well as communicating a wider understanding of their findings to enhance their own lives, the lives of those in their community and the world that we all share. Paul McCreary Linda Gaffney Carl Waluconis Frances Solomon Suzanne Simons Arlen Speights Barbara Laners Peter Bacho Jose Gomez Gilda Sheppard Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Yvonne Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Johnson Charles, Jr., Lower Elwha Klallam This program is intended for students wishing to analyze a modern day dilemma: American Indians have standing in their land, cultural protocols, and legal relationships with the U.S. Government; the State of Washington wants/needs to repair a bridge and provide jobs; and local community people plan to develop a waterfront. Students will use the text , related print/non-print documents, the case study and interview WSDOT employees and Lower Elwha Klallam tribal members to formulate cross-cultural communication models. Students will build an academic foundation in law and public policy as they move from theory to praxis using the following texts: , , and . We are interested in providing an environment of collaboration in which faculty and learners will ask essential questions, identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics. Learners will be exposed to research methods, the politics of ethnographic research, interview techniques, writing workshops, and educational technology. Students will effectively use Bloom’s Taxonomy, develop essential questions, and commit to Paul’s 35 Elements of Critical Thinking. Students will also use the expectations of an Evergreen graduate and the five foci as a guide to their development.  Students will have the opportunity to improve their skills in self- and group-motivation as well as communication (including dialogue, email, resources on the Web and our moodle site).Students (in groups) will propose, undertake and evaluate a three-week ethnographic interview project to understand how student groups have formed on campus and the politics of their existence. Students will present their academic project during week ten. Yvonne Peterson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jennifer Gerend and Steven Niva
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Does the way we live—in suburbs, malls and automobiles—shape the foreign policy conducted in our name? Can we change our foreign policy by living differently?Our program will explore these questions through the prism of American foreign policy in the Middle East. The program will examine how the suburbanized and automobile dependent culture of the United States after World War II was made possible by American involvement in the Middle East to secure access to cheap and plentiful oil, particularly through our close alliances with oil-rich regimes. This ongoing involvement has been central to the rise of anti-American sentiment and the resultant wars in the Middle East during the past decade. While some have called for a new foreign policy which supports democracy, this program will also explore the question of whether a new domestic policy—one focused on shifting our way of living from suburbia to more walkable, dense and sustainable ways of urban living--may also be a necessary element of a new foreign policy. How do we create ways to live that reduce our dependency on access to non-renewable resources and support for repressive regional governments? What do sustainable and walkable cities look like? Should urban planning be a key element of foreign policy? Where do these decisions get made, and how can residents help shape their communities?Students will be introduced to the history and practice of U.S. foreign in the Middle East as well as central issues in the history and theory of U.S. urban planning and development. We will read texts, watch films and hear guest speakers who will address these issues, as well as write papers and engage in discussion and debates. Jennifer Gerend Steven Niva Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Jose Gomez
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Full This program will take a critical look at controversial issues in the criminal justice system, including police misconduct and interrogation, mandatory minimum sentencing, decriminalization of marijuana and prostitution, needle exchange programs, the insanity defense, children tried as adults, privatization of prisons, and physician-assisted suicide. It will be taught via the Internet through a virtual learning environment (Moodle or Canvas), a chat room for live webinars, and e-mail. A one-time face-to-face orientation will take place 7:00 to 9:30 pm on Monday, June 23. Contact instructor for alternate arrangements for the orientation. Jose Gomez Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 16 04 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 14Summer Full The goal of this program is to equip  students with knowledge and understanding of national and state governmental institutions  and how they function in order to serve the people . The objective is achieved through extensive exploration into  theoretical and pragmatic knowledge about how democratic systems work. This program offers an opportunity to engage in an intense collaborative exercise in  participatory governance in order to know  how the multiple layers of government in our state and nation continue to evolve as the nation expands.   To this end, we will delve deeply to learn how government  has worked from its inception to the present.   Participatory governance is based not only on knowledge about how government works, but also on voting patterns and vote-counts; thus, this program seeks to interrogate issues, legislation and proposed laws that obstruct citizens’ access to the right to vote.  We will also investigate the causes and effects of declining citizen interest  in voting, a factor that critically erodes the ideal of government of, by and for the people.   We will also examine the roles of “the people” in this evolving democracy  through texts, journal articles, governmental websites, significant court cases,  films, lecture, guest speakers and student oral presentations.  The approach to this body of information focuses on the content and processes by which the people acquire information and engage officials in national and state branches of government.  Themes include, but are not limited to, federalism, states' rights, and citizens' participatory governance and rights.  Students will also visit the Washington State Capitol and legislative offices,  the Washington State Archives  as well as the Temple of Justice  Artee Young Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring With the aging of the post-war baby boom generation, the United States population aged 65 years and older is increasing rapidly. Between 2010 and 2030 this age group is expected to double in size, from 35 million to 72 million individuals and, by 2030, will represent nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population. Relative to earlier generations, today's seniors tend to be more affluent, better educated and in better health. But the aging of the population will present challenges to institutions and individuals. This program will examine the impacts of growth of the senior population on U.S. society.The central focus of our study will be on the social and economic impacts of an aging population. We will try to sort out the effects on Social Security, Medicare the Affordable Care Act and other programs, and consider alternative public policy responses to these impacts. We will also study the economic impacts on individuals and families. What economic and financial decisions do we face as we grow older? How can we make choices that will secure a reasonable quality of life in our senior years?Young people should not assume that this is a program for old people.  It is intended for students of any age who want to learn how an aging population will affect the next generations.  This younger generation can expect looming demographic changes to impact their job choices and prospects, their income and wealth expectations and their responsibilities toward their aging parents and grandparents.  We will develop concepts from economics and political science within the program; no prior study in these fields is necessary. Bill Bruner Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring
Arleen Sandifer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I In its first words on the subject of citizenship, Congress in 1790 restricted naturalization to ‘white persons.’   [T]his racial prerequisite to citizenship endured for over a century and a half, remaining in force until 1952.   From the earliest years of this country until just a generation ago, being a "white person" was a condition for acquiring citizenship.” -- Ian Haney Lopez, , 1. Most people do not realize that the notion of the United States as a “white” majority nation is largely a construction of law. In this course, we examine how our understanding of immigration history and law changes if we shift our view from Ellis Island in New York’s harbor to the U.S. southern border.  We’ll examine the current landscape of immigration law and policy and restrictionist and immigrant-rights movements.  We’ll critically analyze how concepts of race are embedded in immigration law and policy and how those embedded concepts drive the current debates on immigration reform. Students will build some basic legal skills through reading and researching important cases and laws. We’ll look at the historical context within which immigration issues relating to the southern U.S. border have arisen and continue to be defined.  We will examine current controversies about immigration, immigrant workers, labor movements, and the varied ways communities respond to the most recent immigration boom.Major areas of study include: U.S. history, immigration history, immigration law, politics, American studies, and critical race theory. This course is preparatory for careers and future studies in history, law, labor organizing, government and politics.               Arleen Sandifer Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lawrence Mosqueda
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This Individual Learning Contract can be a specific in-depth topic or an internship that the student has already researched and begun to get approval from an outside agency. A group of students can also work together and develop a reading list and timetable for completion of a group project. Students can also contact Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action for projects that may fit into the parameters of this description. Students should contact the faculty before the fall of 2013. The best time to contact the faculty is at the Academic Fair in spring 2013. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in political economy or political science should contact the faculty by email at . Lawrence Mosqueda Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Peter Impara and Dina Roberts
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do we manage the habitat of mammals and birds, especially endangered species, in the Pacific Northwest? Mammals and birds are intelligent, complex animals that often have very specific habitat needs for successful living and reproduction. They interact in very elaborate ways with members of their species, other species, and with the landscape as a whole.  A detailed understanding of habitat needs and how these habitats are distributed across the landscape is crucial to managing landscape to ensure future survival of particular species.This upper-division program will focus on examining and analyzing the habitat needs of specific species. Students will learn, develop and apply an intricate interdisciplinary suite of knowledge and techniques that include spatial analysis, ecological modeling, integration of scientific, legal and political information, and computer tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop habitat conservation plans for threatened and endangered species as listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.Students will learn about the natural history of specific mammals and birds of the Pacific Northwest and other regions.  Habitat analysis will be conducted at the landscape scale, integrating the disciplines of landscape ecology with wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, and habitat conservation planning. A final two-quarter project will be to develop and present a formal habitat conservation plan (HCP) for a threatened or endangered Pacific Northwest mammal or bird. Students will be required to understand and apply legal concepts associated with the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended) as well as develop an understanding of stakeholders’ concerns and related issues surrounding resource users that may or may not come into conflict with the conservation of their selected species.Lectures will cover the areas of landscape ecology, wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, evolution, and habitat conservation planning. Guest speakers will present recent case studies and approaches to conservation planning. Field trips to locations where wildlife management and conservation are occurring will expose students to methods of habitat assessment, conservation and restoration. Peter Impara Dina Roberts Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jennifer Gerend and Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program focuses on Northwest communities from the perspective of public policy, land use and economics/personal finance. This program will be an eye opener for anyone who wonders why and how places develop. Where did that Walmart come from? Why did those trees get cut down for new homes? What will happen to that empty building? We will focus on the local decision making that shapes our built and natural environments while considering what types of development and redevelopment are more sustainable, both financially and environmentally.As the Northwest continues to grow, we will consider the voices of property owners, renters, business owners and other community members who often have divergent views on growth, preservation, conservation and property rights. These perspectives will aid our understanding of public places from urban and suburban cities to less connected subdivisions or rural developments. What do we want our public and private spaces to look like? How do communities plan for and accommodate growth? How are progressive policies developed and financed? Comparisons to other communities, cities, states and countries (Germany in particular) will be examined and discussed.Students will explore different communities' orientation to cars, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Architecture and urban design aspects will round out our analysis. Class sessions will include lectures, workshops, films and field trips to Port Townsend and Seattle. The fall quarter will focus on the public policy, land use planning and economics necessary for students to conduct their own significant project during winter quarter. Seminar texts will offer a theoretical background in these issues as well as a look at some contemporary communities in the news.During winter quarter, students will continue their theoretical learning while taking on an applied group project around community planning and economic development. Specifically, students will work in teams to prepare research or other solutions for selected urban and rural planning issues around Washington. These projects may involve group travel. With faculty support, students will hone their ability to work in teams and develop their presentation skills. Jennifer Gerend Glenn Landram Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Erik Thuesen
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this full-year program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and biology laboratory exercises. Work in the field and multi-day field trips in fall and winter are also planned to gain first-hand exposure to various marine environments.In the fall, we will cover standard topics of first year college biology, using marine organisms as our foci. The overall objective of this component is to gain basic familiarity with the biology and ecology of ocean life. We will examine the use and abuse of decision-making authority in order to assess how science and culture interact to safeguard endangered biota. Specific topics will include policies surrounding marine mammals, anadromous fish, ocean acidification, etc.  Fall quarter topics will be mostly gathered from local and regional issues. Erik Thuesen Freshmen FR Fall Fall
Rika Anderson
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day W 14Winter Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and laboratory exercises.We will approach these issues from the perspective of the whole ocean ecosystem: how do currents, seasons, nutrient cycles, and other physical and chemical properties affect life in our oceans? What part does each type of organism play within the ecosystem? How can changes in one component of the ecosystem have ripple effects on the rest? We will apply this scientific knowledge to critically assess important marine environmental issues, focusing on ocean acidification, climate change, fisheries policy, and deep-sea mining. A week-long field trip to Friday Harbor will provide hands-on oceanographic experience, and a trip to the Capitol will allow us to witness legislation of important marine issues in action. Rika Anderson Freshmen FR Winter Winter
Lawrence Mosqueda and Michael Vavrus
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring In this program students will investigate how political events are constructed and reported in the media, compared to actual political and economic realities. By media we mean mainstream periodicals, television, radio and films and emerging social media. We also include the growth of Internet blogs, websites, independent media and other media outlets in the 21st century. We will take a historical approach that focuses on U.S. history from the colonial era to contemporary globalization. We will compare corporate media concentration of ownership to community-controlled media and social media. We will examine how issues surrounding race, class and gender are perceived by the media and subsequently by the public. During winter quarter, students will receive a theoretical and historical grounding in the political economy of the media. We will explore the question of who owns the media and what difference this makes to how stories are reported, framed, sourced or just ignored. Films, lectures and readings, along with text-based seminars, will compose the primary structures used by this learning community. Students will regularly engage in a critical reading of and other media outlets. Also during the winter quarter, students will create a research proposal that includes an annotated bibliography. Research projects may either be traditional research papers or equivalent projects determined in collaboration with the faculty, such as an independent media blog or website. During spring quarter, students will devote approximately half of the program time to completing their proposed projects and presenting the results of their research. The remaining program time will focus more in-depth on program themes as we examine contemporary issues through a variety of sources. Lawrence Mosqueda Michael Vavrus Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Myra Downing
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Myra Downing Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Mary DuPuis
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Mary DuPuis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tracey Hosselkus
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Tracey Hosselkus Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Colleen Almojuela
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Colleen Almojuela Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dorothy Flaherty
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Dorothy Flaherty Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Renee Swan-Waite
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Renee Swan-Waite Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Doreen Swetkis
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who have completed work in community learning programs (such as ) and are prepared to complete an internship in a public or nonprofit agency. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested students must consult with the faculty about their proposed internship and/or course of study. Contracts that are completed before the beginning of spring quarter will be given priority.  All contracts must follow the college procedures for internships. While students are encouraged to seek out their own internship possibilities, we will work with campus resources and the faculty member's contacts to identify internship possibilities in public and nonprofit agencies.Students will hold 20-28 hour/week internships (depending upon amount of credits: 12-16 variable option) and will come together as a class on Fridays to study more about doing nonprofit work through seminars, lectures, guest speakers and/or films. There will be common readings and individual written assignments.  The faculty member will work with the interning agencies, making at least one site-visit to each agency during the quarter and meeting regularly with students outside of scheduled class times as needed.  Internships must be located in the Seattle/Portland I/5 corridor or on the Olympic Peninsula within a reasonable distance (i.e., Mason County).   Participation in the weekly class meeting is required – no internships located nationally or internationally will be sponsored. Doreen Swetkis Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jay Stansell
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II “The transcontinental railroad and the U.S. deportation system have much in common.  Both started at the coasts and now span the country.  Both implicate our grandest national aspirations and hide some of our most shameful historical truths… And both were in large measure built on the backs of Chinese immigrant workers who suffered immense hardships in the process of their creation.”  Daniel Kanstoom, , p. 1. The dramatic, large scale migration of Chinese laborers into the United States from 1850 onward was met with wide-spread racism, vigilante actions, and ultimately the first efforts by Congress to establish laws that have since become commonplace: the federal power to control immigration, including the power to expel -- to deport -- another person back to his or her country of origin.  The racist backlash against the Chinese has been repeated in cycles against other groups to this day.  The laws that were passed by Congress formed the foundation of a modern immigration enforcement system of a size and ferocity unimaginable at the time.This class will closely consider the social, political and economic circumstances of America in the 1800’s, particularly the West; when former slaves, Native Americans, and Irish, were also persecuted and vilified.  Students will then study the first early deportation and exclusion laws passed by Congress, and the Supreme Court decisions considering the constitutionality of these statutes.  With this background, we will move to a study of selected issues in modern immigration policy, including the refugee experience in the U.S., and the growth of the immigration enforcement state in post- 9/11 America. Jay Stansell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Winter 
  SOS JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity to explore the broad conditions that shape legislation. We will examine models, evidence and debates about the sources, causal connections and impacts of evolving systems of law, regulation, governance and a broad array of community response. Each student will be learning through work as an intern with a legislator and her or his staff. This will involve intensive staff-apprenticeship activities, especially legislative research and draft development, bill-tracking and constituent correspondence. Students apply to become interns for the 2014 Washington State Legislative session in the fall of 2013. Information sessions will be held in early October. The Academic Advising Office will inform students about the process, with applications due mid-to-late October. Applications are available online through . Two copies of the complete application, including personal essay; a letter of reference from faculty (discussing research and writing skills), and a personal (character, work-habits) reference are due to the Office of Academic Advising, Olympia campus Students will interview and and be informed of acceptance by late November. Each student accepted as an intern will develop an internship learning contract, profiling legislative responsibilities and linkages to academic development.In regular in-capitol seminars, each student intern will translate her or his activities in the Legislature into analytic and reflective writing about the challenges, learning and implications of the work. Students will make presentations about their learning and participate in various workshops. Each intern will keep a portfolio of activities completed at the capitol, to be submitted to their field supervisor and faculty sponsor on a regular basis. Interns will complete a minimum of four short essays, with cited references to listed resource materials related to legislative work. Drawing broadly from the social sciences, we will explore relationships between elected officials, legislative staff, registered lobbyists, non-governmental organizations, citizen activists and district constituents. Students will learn through a range of approaches - responsibilities in an 8:00-5:00 work-week, guest presentations, seminars, workshops on budget, media panels and job-shadowing of regional officials and activists of choice. Interns will participate in a final mock hearing floor debate on current legislative issues.The 2014 session will involve student-interns for winter quarters and varied continued capitol-based research and policy-making actvities for spring quarter. Each quarter will comprise a different 16-credit contract. In spring, students can develop an 8-credit Legislative Internship Contract, augmented by another 8-credit project or program involving specific post-session research and writing. Student performance will be evaluated by the faculty sponsor, field supervisors and legislative office staff. Cheri Lucas-Jennings Wed Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter