2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Beth Schoenberg
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In winter quarter we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In spring quarter we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events. Beth Schoenberg Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Beth Schoenberg
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In winter quarter we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.  In spring quarter we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events. Beth Schoenberg Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Rachel Hastings and Steven Scheuerell
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a yearlong interdisciplinary program that incorporates sociolinguistics, geography, history, cultural ecology, global change, biocultural diversity conservation, food systems and sustainable development studies to explore how societies evolve and survive in relation to their environment and a globalizing world. Our studies are based on the belief that many cultures have developed rich linguistic and ecological traditions that have provided the means for communication, food, clothing and shelter based on a sustainable relationship with the land. More recently, cultural and economic globalization are increasingly impacting local knowledge systems worldwide, in particular when measured by changes to language, land-use and food systems. These changes, together with such factors as increasing human population, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and climate change, compel us to explore the ways in which knowledge systems are preserved or lost. In particular, we recognize the urgent need to preserve cultural knowledge that allows a society to be rooted in place, recognize ecological limits and provide for its needs. The Andean region of South America is an ideal region to study these issues.The academic program consists of two phases. The first phase over fall quarter will focus on program themes using texts, lectures, workshops, film, writing and local field trips. Fall quarter the program will be offered for 12 credits to provide students with the option to separately register for an appropriate Spanish language course. Selection for the second phase over winter and spring quarters will be based upon criteria including successful completion of fall quarter work, demonstrated readiness for study abroad and Spanish language ability. In winter and spring, students will be full time in the program, which will be offered for 16 credits per quarter. Winter quarter will begin with 5 weeks of travel preparations and intensive study on Peru, followed by a 15-week study abroad experience in the Cusco region of the Peruvian Andes that incorporates intensive Spanish or Quechua language study, regional travel, seminars, urban and rural home stays and independent research or service learning with local organizations. At the end of the independent project period, we will reconvene for final student presentations and evaluation conferences in the Sacred Valley near Cusco.As the former Incan capital, and home to vibrant cultures and immense biodiversity, the Cusco region of Peru offers immersion in the study of biocultural diversity and how the preservation of linguistic diversity is related to the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge, biodiversity and local food systems. While in Peru, we will continue language and cultural studies while experiencing regional initiatives to preserve cultural landscapes and indigenous knowledge systems in the midst of development pressure. Given the region's rich history, knowledge systems, architecture, agriculture, weaving, ceramics and music, we will ask how is knowledge transferred across generations and between communities, and how can traditional knowledge be maximized in sustainable development projects?  As we address these academic questions, our own experiences will also lead us on to consider on a more individual level how learning another language and traveling abroad can increase our understanding of culture and what it means to fit into place. Rachel Hastings Steven Scheuerell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In this year-long sequence, students will learn to read and write in both classical and modern Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries.  (All Muslims are instructed to pray in Arabic.)  By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level.  The objectives are to continually increase vocabulary; to learn suffixes, pronouns, and verbs for personalization; to learn to conjugate verbs; and to recognize proper and inverted sentences as well as those starting with infinitive verbs and indefinite nouns.  Students are required to master verbs tenses, superlatives, sentence analyzing, and subject-verb agreement as well as all other areas of grammar.  Students will also learn some songs, short poems, and stories while studying Arabic culture and learning some conversational Arabic.  Yasmin Khattab Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring The Basque Country is an ancient country the size of the Puget Sound region that sits between France and Spain. In this class we will explore Basque history, culture, and socio political movements including the Basque conflict. We will immerse ourselves in the prehistoric Basque language (Euskera) and learn about Mondragon, the largest worker owned industrial cooperative system in the world. Music, literature, art and gastronomy will be experienced and discussed in the class led by a native Basque from Mondragon. Amaia Martiartu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Lin Crowley
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course is designed for students who have some prior experience in Chinese language and know the use of Chinese pinyin system. The course will begin with a review and assessment from which the starting points for new learning will be determined. The emphasis is placed on continued introduction of standard Mandarin Chinese listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with special attention to the building of useful vocabularies through interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. The course is highly recommended for those who want to take part in the summer Chinese travel study program. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Lin Crowley
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is designed for students who have some prior experience in Chinese language and know the use of Chinese pinyin system. The course will emphasize on continued introduction of standard Mandarin Chinese listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with special attention to the building of useful vocabularies through interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. The course is highly recommended for those who want to take part in the summer Chinese travel study program. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marianne Bailey, Olivier Soustelle, Shaw Osha (Flores), Bob Haft, Judith Gabriele and Stacey Davis
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring ... ...—Hölderlin, "Bread and Wine" We will study art history, literature, philosophy and music in their social and historical contexts in order to understand the Romantic avant-garde thinkers and artists, outsiders in 19th- and early 20th-century Europe, and their tenuous but fruitful dialogue with mainstream culture and the emerging popular culture of the laboring class. We will emphasize French Romanticism, but will also consider the pan-European nature of the phenomenon. This era offers a figurative battlefield where concepts of art, nature and self, order and chaos, locked swords, testing the limits of rational thought. French language study will be an important component of our weekly work; students will study French at one of four levels, from beginning to advanced.The 19th century was an era of immense political change spanning revolutions, empires and finally the establishment of democracy at home, just as European imperialism spread across Africa and Asia. We will study ways in which average women and men crafted their own identities and responded to the larger social forces of industrialization, the creation of a new working class, the solidification of gender and class roles, the rise of modern cities and the redefinition of the criminal, the socially-acceptable and the outsider.In fall, our work will begin with the paintings, poems and ideas of the early Romantics. The Romantics privileged feeling, intuition and empathy. Like adepts in an ancient mystery cult, they sought to commune with Nature. Romantic philosophers, from Schopenhauer to Nietzsche, spoke of Becoming rather than Being. Rejecting Classical order, clarity and restraint, they envisioned a pure art, beyond language and depiction, which speaks musically through color, passion, suggestion, enigmatically, as do dreams.In winter, focus will turn to the late Romantics. Decadents pushed the Romantic temperament and aesthetic to extremes through self parody and the aesthetic of fragmentation. Symbolists attempted to express the inexpressible through their art. Yet Mallarmé, Wilde and Yeats, Moreau and Gauguin, among others, helped prepare the “rites of spring” of the dawning 20th century, the arising vanguard of modernist and postmodern movements.In spring quarter, students may pursue individual research/creative projects on campus or may travel to France for 10 weeks. There they will study in a Rennes, Brittany, language school, do cultural and historical study in Paris and Lyon, as well as make side trips for research of their own.In this program, students will gain a significant grasp of key ideas in art, history and thought within their context, and will have the opportunity to specialize, creating advanced work in their choice of history, art history or writing and literature. We expect strong interest and background in humanities, and considerable self-discipline and motivation. The workload, including French language study, will be substantial and rigorous. Students will work in interdisciplinary all-program sessions and assignments, as well as choose one of three possible seminar groups. These emphasize: 1) literature and philosophy, 2) history, and 3) photography and visual arts, practice and theory. Marianne Bailey Olivier Soustelle Shaw Osha (Flores) Bob Haft Judith Gabriele Stacey Davis Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
David Phillips
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This interdisciplinary 16-credit program focuses on ecotourism, culture-based tourism and adventure travel. Ecotourism offers wildlife and nature experiences in protected habitats and pristine areas. Participative tourism is based on visits to traditional rural communities where travelers share in the daily lives of unique host cultures. Adventure travel involves endurance sports and high-skill challenges in natural settings. Ecotourism is often touted as a contributor to the conservation of ecosystems and wildlife habitats, and to economic development in rural communities. We explore the history, outcomes and future potential of ecotourism in different parts of the world.We study historic travel accounts and the literature of travel, changing modes of tourism, including solo travel and the global trend toward leisure travel. Creative writing and storytelling allow students to share their own travel experiences and goals. Travel media and journalism, books, films and the internet provide sources for discussion and writing, and topics for research.We study current theory of ecotourism, including policy and case studies, and acquire tools for critical analysis. Students study the ecotourism market, including planning, management, operations, and project outcomes. Sustainability criteria for ecotourism is a key topic. We study impacts of culturally-focused “participative” travel in developing countries, and the relationship of tourism to environmental changes. Students’ weekly essays, journals and narratives serve to elaborate on diverse topics and the learning process.The program includes a Spanish language component.  Students are encouraged to study the language for the full 16 credits (or to take another foreign language or elective course, as a 12-credit option).Students collaborate in groups or work individually to design and present models for ecotourism and adventure travel. Term projects can focus on business development, operations, outdoor safety and environmental education, travel writing, eco-lodge design, photography, travel films, internet and other media, applied research in tourism, or other related areas of interest.Guest speakers relate their experiences in the adventure travel and ecotourism businesses. Day-long outdoor experiences and multi-day class trips add an experiential component to the program, and films and videos round out our learning about ecotourism and adventure travel. David Phillips Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Experience Japan is an intensive, in-country program that gives students first-hand experience of contemporary Japanese culture, society and language. During the three-week program you will live and take classes at Tamagawa Universty in Tokyo, engage in activities with Tamagawa students, meet local residents, conduct research on a topic of your choice and go on field trips in the Tokyo area. Classes at Tamagawa University are regular bilingual classes on Japanese culture and society. Extra-curricular activities and field trips will be arranged according to your research topic and interests, and will include visits to Tokyo's historically and culturally significant sites and nearby towns such as Kamakura. Admission is open to all students regardless of language ability. Interested students should contact faculty via email at ulmert@evergreen.edu and attend an explanatory meeting either on Wednesday, April 2 or Friday, April 4. The past participants will be there to answer your questions as well.   Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students work on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Classes use immersion style learning and are conducted primarily in French. Students develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn to develop conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun, creative activities with music, poetry, videos, role play, and use of Internet sites.  Winter quarter themes focus on poetry and fables, regional French traditions, cuisine, and contemporary issues in France.  Spring quarter focuses on themes from the Francophone world along with continued grammatical study.  Students learn from viewing films from Francophone countries and reading a small book of legends and tales from these countries.  Through oral reading and discussions in French, students expand skills in vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and situational role-plays based on the legends.  Throughout the year, students use the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marianne Bailey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II This course is appropriate for beginners and for low and high intermediate students who wish to improve oral proficiency.  All instruction is in French. The summer is the perfect time to concentrate on French language.  This course offers basic communicative skills, both structures and vocabulary, which allow you to function comfortably in French speaking areas.  It is also excellent for past students of French who want to gain oral fluency.  Be prepared to work hard both in class and outside class and to learn more French than you might imagine possible in a short five weeks. Marianne Bailey Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French is designed to reinforce, practice, and build upon previous skills. All classes are conducted in French. They are fast paced, interactive, and focus on continued review of grammatical structures, conversational skills with native speakers, discussion of short videos, music, poetry, Francophone themes, and Internet news clips. Students are expected to use French in discussions, increase their reading and writing skills through study of selected literary excerpts. Winter quarter focuses on theater, reading plays and performances of short scenes from them. In spring, students work with a selection of films and a short novel. Through focus on in-depth discussions of French identity, history, and culture, students learn to analyze, compare, and write about aspects of film increasing their acquaintance with media vocabulary. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marianne Hoepli
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Komm und lern Deutsch! This year-long sequence of courses for beginning German students will cover basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and conversation.  Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating, and writing standard high German.  Students will also learn about culture, traditions, and customs of the German people, new and old.  Through involvement in children’s stories, music, and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions.  By the end of the year, students will improve their oral skills to the point of discussing short films and modern short stories and learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé, or a job application. Classes will use a communicative method and will move quickly toward being conducted primarily in German. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Harumi Moruzzi
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This Individual Study offers two options for students: (1) to continue their studies of Japanese literature, culture and society, in the form of Individual Learning Contracts, and (2) to continue their Japanese language and culture studies by studying abroad in Japan. This Individual Study also offers opportunities for students who are interested in creating their own courses of study and research, including study abroad. Possible areas of study are Japanese studies, cultural studies, literature, art and film. Interested students should first contact the faculty via email ( at least 2 weeks before the Academic Fair for spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter program explores the fascinating world of languages. What do you know when you know a language? How do you get that knowledge? Are there properties that all languages share? How do languages change over time? Why are half of the world's languages now under threat of extinction? How are communities held together or torn apart by the languages they speak?We will consider these questions and others through the lens of linguistics. Topics to be examined for winter include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, language change, the history of English and English dialects, key issues facing multilingual communities and language planning. In spring, topics will include: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, first language acquisition, language and gender and linguistic politeness. We will look at well-known languages and lesser-known languages and discover why they matter in our lives today. Through the course of the program students will learn a variety of conceptual and empirical techniques, from analyzing speech sounds to interpreting the rationale behind current language policy.This program will be an intensive examination of topics requiring a significant amount of reading as well as regular problem sets and essays.Students interested in taking a language course alongside this program can arrange to take this program for 12 credits.  Diego de Acosta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Sean Williams
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I Sean Williams Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Harumi Moruzzi and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Japan is a vital, energetic and dynamic country which has been constantly reinventing and revitalizing itself even in the midst of gargantuan natural disasters, while struggling to maintain a sense of cultural and social continuity from the long lost past. Meanwhile, the conception and image of Japan, both in Japan and throughout the West, has varied widely over time, mostly due to Japan’s changing political and economic situation in the world. In the late 19th century, when Japan re-emerged into Western consciousness, Lafcadio Hearn, the Greek-Irish-American writer who later became Japanese, thought of Japanese society and its people as quaintly charming and adorable. In contrast, Americans in the 1940s viewed Japan as frighteningly militaristic and irrational. The French philosopher/semiotician Roland Barthes was bewitched and liberated by Japan’s charmingly mystifying otherness during his visit in 1966, when Japan began to show its first sign of recovery from the devastation of the WWII. The Dutch journalist Karel Van Wolferen was disturbed by the intractable and irresponsible system of Japanese power in 1989, when the Japanese economy was viewed as threatening to existing international power relations. These examples show how Japan has been viewed by Westerners in the past. The idea and image of Japan is highly dependent on the point of view that an observer assumes and that history makes possible.This full-time interdisciplinary program is devoted to understanding contemporary Japan, its culture and its people, from a historical point of view. We will study Japanese history, literature, cinema, culture and society through lectures, books, films, seminars and workshops, including study of Japanese language embedded in the program. Three levels of language study (1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-year Japanese) will be offered for 4 credits each during the fall and winter quarters.In the fall quarter, we will explore the cultural roots of Japan in its history. In the winter quarter, we will examine Japan after 1952, when the Allied occupation ended. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination of contemporary Japanese popular culture and its position in economic and cultural globalization. Students who are interested in experiencing Japan in person can take Japanese language classes in Tokyo through Harumi Moruzzi’s Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society, and Study Abroad in spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence covers the second year of Japanese language studies.  Students must be familiar with basic verb forms and elementary kanji letters.  Students will build on previous skills and learn new grammar and vocabulary so they can function in a variety of situations.  Classroom activities include presentations, watching film and TV clips, and discussion. Students will continue their kanji studies at their own levels in small groups.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course.  The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence covers the first year of Japanese language studies.  Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations by learning useful expressions and basic sentence structures.  Both hiragana and katakana letters as well as elementary kanji characters will be introduced.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter This course is for students who have taken two years of college-level Japanese.  Students will review important grammar, increase their vocabulary and strengthen their reading and writing skills.  The class is ideal for students who are preparing for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.  Students will improve their overall proficiency through a variety of activities such as watching film/TV clips, discussion, and presentations. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ulrike Krotscheck
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Are you interested in learning the language of Virgil, Caesar, and Cicero? Are you a scientist or incipient medical professional who needs more experience with the etymology of your field's vocabulary? Would you like an introduction to the vocabulary and grammatical structure of Romance languages? Or do you struggle with English grammar? If any of these apply to you, you should take this introduction to Latin! This course provides an introduction to the Classical Latin language, that is, the language of the later Roman Republic and the earlier Roman Empire—the language of authors like Cicero, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, and Tacitus.  It also prepares one to read Medieval, Renaissance, or Ecclesiastical Latin texts. The principle objective of the course is the development of your ability to read ancient Latin texts as well as you can, as soon as you can. Another considerable benefit is a greater understanding of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of related languages, including the prominent spoken languages in the United States, English and Spanish, as well as French and Italian. You will also improve your grasp of the specialized languages of the sciences, law, and philosophy; as such, Latin is a great way to prepare for law school or medical school. Last, but not least, you will acquire the unmistakable sophistication, ,and seductive wit that distinguish the student of the Classics. This intensive summer course constitutes roughly 1/2 of a traditional 3-quarter or two-semester first – year Latin course.  At its completion students should have a solid grounding in basic Latin vocabulary, forms, and syntax, and with some additional study, they will soon be able to read texts of moderate difficulty with the help of a dictionary and grammar. Ulrike Krotscheck Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Elena Smith
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long course is designed to teach students to read the mysterious looking Cyrillic script, write the unique Russian cursive, construct sentences and express themselves in Russian. Students will immerse themselves in the colorful cultural and historical context provided by authentic text, film, music, and visual arts. Exploring selected works by such literary masters as A. Pushkin, L. Tolstoy, and A. Chekhov, to name a few, students will be able to understand not only the specifics of Russian grammar and vocabulary but also the complexities of Russian character and the Russian way of thinking as documented and preserved by outstanding Russian authors. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dawn Williams
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course covers the first quarter of the first year of Spanish.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access.  Courses to complete the first-year of Spanish will be available throughout the following academic year. Dawn Williams Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Joseph Alonso
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course covers the first quarter of the first year of Spanish.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access.  Students from this section will need to join section A or B to continue learning first-year Spanish in winter and spring quarters. Joseph Alonso Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Joseph Alonso and Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter sequence of courses covers two-thirds of the first year of Spanish.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access.  The final quarter of first-year Spanish will be available in fall quarter and may be offered during summer quarter. Joseph Alonso Amaia Martiartu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring Spring
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses covers the first year of Spanish.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access. Amaia Martiartu Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Arleen Sandifer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses covers the first year of Spanish.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access. Arleen Sandifer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Amaia Martiartu and David Phillips
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter sequence completes the first year of Spanish language study.  Students will gain a basic foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access.  Students seeking to continue in second-year Spanish after this sequence will have to wait until summer or the following fall to begin the intermediate Spanish sequence. Amaia Martiartu David Phillips Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course covers the final quarter of the first year of Spanish.  Students will build on their foundation of Spanish vocabulary and grammar and will focus on speaking, listening, writing, and reading activities to acquire essential vocabulary and develop communication skills. The course is taught primarily in Spanish and involves work in small groups.  Many aspects of Latino and Spanish culture will be presented throughout.  Some homework activities require Internet access.  Successful completion of this course serves as preparation to take Intermediate Spanish I in winter quarter. Amaia Martiartu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hugo Flores
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Conversación y composición is designed for students who are interested in learning and practicing advanced-level Spanish reading and essay writing strategies. For the Spring quarter, students will read García Márquez "Cien Años de Soledad” in Spanish. In addition to this, students are expected to actively participate in seminar-like activities talking about grammatical topics of interest as well as analyzing the book's form and content. Students will write several short response papers and a final essay.   Hugo Flores Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
David Phillips
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This sequence of courses is designed for students who have developed conversational Spanish language skills.  Communication in class takes place entirely in Spanish.  These courses build upon previous work to strengthen communication skills and fluency in Spanish.  Coursework focuses on intensive conversation, reading, and writing, as well as practice of grammatical structures.  Group conversations and written work will focus on practical themes as well as on many topics related to Latin American societies and Hispanic cultures. David Phillips Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Hugo Flores
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring These consecutive courses are designed for students who have developed conversational Spanish language skills.  Communication in class takes place entirely in Spanish.  These courses build upon previous work to strengthen communication skills and fluency in Spanish.  Coursework focuses on intensive conversation, reading, and writing, as well as practice of grammatical structures.  Group conversations and written work will focus on practical themes as well as on many topics related to Latin American societies and Hispanic cultures. The spring course has been cancelled. Hugo Flores Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Crowley
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Day Su 14Summer Full This interdisciplinary study-abroad program offers an introduction to Chinese culture through the lenses of language and social and political systems. Students will experience Taiwan, the Republic of China, one of the four Asian Tigers up close. We will travel to the city of Taipei, (the capital of the Republic of China), Tainan (a historical gem), and Kaohsiung (the largest harbor in Taiwan), to learn about the modern Chinese business and cultural centers in a modern democratic republic. Students will have the opportunity to witness modern, traditional, urban, suburban and rural life in this land and discover how Chinese traditional culture coexists with a modern westernized society. The program includes academic study at two of the Chinese universities in Taiwan. There will be language study, day trips, and guided study tours to museums, including the National Palace of Museum and historical sites. Students can also explore the blossoming artistic and cultural scenes on this beautiful tropical island. China is one of the world’s oldest and richest continuous cultures. It is one of largest trading partners of the United States, while Taiwan, with its Chinese roots, focuses investment in latest information technology, advanced sustainable agriculture and ecological development, which made it an international trading powerhouse with impressive foreign exchange reserve. Students can examine the contemporary Chinese culture in Taiwan and how it exerts its influence to the world by working with its Chinese counterpart on the mainland. We will also have a closer look into Chinese ethnic culture, religion, and its people. During the first session of the summer, all students will travel with the class for a three week study trip. After the study trip, students will return to Evergreen campus to continue their studies in the second session using on-line resources and communication for continuous Chinese studies. Portfolios including video and/or blog documentary can be developed from the study trip. Enroll for eight credits for first session only or 12 credits for the full summer session.  Students enrolled for 12 credits will continue to meet on campus during second session to work on video or photo journals documenting the trip and reflect on the learning through seminars, readings, and film discussions on related topics and issues. For more information please contact the faculty or see  Lin Crowley Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer