2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Cultural Studies [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Hirsh Diamant and Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students in this interdisciplinary program, which continues from Fall quarter, will learn how to cultivate a “sense of wonder” while building skills as writers, activists, artists, and interdisciplinary scholars.  Our work will combine theory and practice as we delve into the rich areas of literature, cultural studies, writing, creative arts, contemplative practice, natural history, and environmental/outdoor education.  We will explore how we develop roots to the natural world and explore themes related to natural history literature, the Pacific Northwest, and global multicultural traditions that have intimate connections to place, family, education, and artistic practice. At the core of our inquiry will be the questions:  What enlivens culture?  What motivates change?  Working from a rich, interdisciplinary perspective, we will study what it means to be rooted to place and how place connects us to a deep sense of purpose and meaning through word and image, language and tradition, stories and activism, and education and scholarship. Highlights of Winter quarter will include a three day Lunar New Year and Tai Ji celebration and Community Service work in areas of students’ interests.  Hirsh Diamant Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Paul McCreary, Linda Gaffney, Carl Waluconis, Frances Solomon, Suzanne Simons, Arlen Speights, Barbara Laners, Peter Bacho, Jose Gomez, Gilda Sheppard and Tyrus Smith
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year’s program takes a holistic approach to systemic change at the community level. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy. We will focus on individual- and community-building practices based on literacy in humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, media and technology. A major emphasis of this program will be the examination of how citizens effectively advocate and engage in activism to address pressing social, legal, economic and ecological problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding, action and leadership in their areas of interest.During fall quarter, students will study historical notions of leadership and strategies employed to achieve social change through activism and advocacy in institutional and non-institutional settings. Students will reflect on their personal experiences and the world around them in order to understand how they may apply the insights, knowledge and skills to promote civic engagement and foster change.Winter's work will be based upon the foundations built in fall quarter. Students will identify, develop and explore models of advocacy and activism that have led to systemic change. They will enhance their knowledge of contemporary social movements, political interest groups, and scientific and legal advocacy. Students will work actively toward the application of this knowledge by developing collaborative action research projects.In spring quarter, students will join theory with practice, utilizing a variety of expansive methods, from writing to media, in order to demonstrate and communicate their perceptions and findings to a wider audience. They will present their collaborative research projects to the public. The information presented will be directed toward benefiting individual and community capacity as well as communicating a wider understanding of their findings to enhance their own lives, the lives of those in their community and the world that we all share. Paul McCreary Linda Gaffney Carl Waluconis Frances Solomon Suzanne Simons Arlen Speights Barbara Laners Peter Bacho Jose Gomez Gilda Sheppard Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary times. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history, media and popular culture to investigate the lives of these men and women lives, their historical, cultural and spiritual contexts and legacies.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills and insights about the mis-education/re-education process through a quarter -long reflective journal project , a mid -quarter contextual research project;  and an end-of-the-quarter final paper and a collaborative performance about the journey from mis-education to education and those factors that allow one to retain their humanity in spite of horrific dehumanizing attempts. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stephanie Coontz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring This program explores changes in the social construction and cultural expectations of family life and intimate relations, from colonial times to the present. We begin by delving into the very different values and behaviors of colonial families and then trace changes in love, marriage, parenting, and family arrangements under the influence of the American Revolution and the spread of wage labor. We study the gender and sexual norms of the 19th century, including variation by race and class, then examine the changes pioneered in the early 20th century. We discuss the rise of the 1950s male breadwinner family and then follow its demise from the 1960s through the 1980s. We end the quarter by discussing new patterns of partnering and parenting in the past 30 years,Readings will be challenging, and there will be frequent writing assignments. All students are expected to complete all assignments and participate in workshops and seminar discussions. Credit depends upon consistent attendance and preparation and a demonstrated mastery of the subject matter.This class is excellent preparation for graduate work or professional employment in history, sociology, law, American studies, social work, and psychology. It provides needed context and background for people working in the social services or education. sociology, history, family studies, research, social work, teaching, family law and counseling. Stephanie Coontz Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Rachel Hastings and Steven Scheuerell
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a yearlong interdisciplinary program that incorporates sociolinguistics, geography, history, cultural ecology, global change, biocultural diversity conservation, food systems and sustainable development studies to explore how societies evolve and survive in relation to their environment and a globalizing world. Our studies are based on the belief that many cultures have developed rich linguistic and ecological traditions that have provided the means for communication, food, clothing and shelter based on a sustainable relationship with the land. More recently, cultural and economic globalization are increasingly impacting local knowledge systems worldwide, in particular when measured by changes to language, land-use and food systems. These changes, together with such factors as increasing human population, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and climate change, compel us to explore the ways in which knowledge systems are preserved or lost. In particular, we recognize the urgent need to preserve cultural knowledge that allows a society to be rooted in place, recognize ecological limits and provide for its needs. The Andean region of South America is an ideal region to study these issues.The academic program consists of two phases. The first phase over fall quarter will focus on program themes using texts, lectures, workshops, film, writing and local field trips. Fall quarter the program will be offered for 12 credits to provide students with the option to separately register for an appropriate Spanish language course. Selection for the second phase over winter and spring quarters will be based upon criteria including successful completion of fall quarter work, demonstrated readiness for study abroad and Spanish language ability. In winter and spring, students will be full time in the program, which will be offered for 16 credits per quarter. Winter quarter will begin with 5 weeks of travel preparations and intensive study on Peru, followed by a 15-week study abroad experience in the Cusco region of the Peruvian Andes that incorporates intensive Spanish or Quechua language study, regional travel, seminars, urban and rural home stays and independent research or service learning with local organizations. At the end of the independent project period, we will reconvene for final student presentations and evaluation conferences in the Sacred Valley near Cusco.As the former Incan capital, and home to vibrant cultures and immense biodiversity, the Cusco region of Peru offers immersion in the study of biocultural diversity and how the preservation of linguistic diversity is related to the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge, biodiversity and local food systems. While in Peru, we will continue language and cultural studies while experiencing regional initiatives to preserve cultural landscapes and indigenous knowledge systems in the midst of development pressure. Given the region's rich history, knowledge systems, architecture, agriculture, weaving, ceramics and music, we will ask how is knowledge transferred across generations and between communities, and how can traditional knowledge be maximized in sustainable development projects?  As we address these academic questions, our own experiences will also lead us on to consider on a more individual level how learning another language and traveling abroad can increase our understanding of culture and what it means to fit into place. Rachel Hastings Steven Scheuerell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rebecca Chamberlain and Gail Tremblay
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How does place affect the worldview and visions of writers, poets, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers from diverse cultures in the Americas? How can we develop an ecological and ethical identity that shapes culture and place through creative and artistic practice? As we study art history, natural history, and the natural world, we will use these questions to explore our connections to the earth and place through analysis and creation of poems, essays, and multimedia art projects. Through observations of the natural world, we will cultivate our ability to heighten sensory perceptions and gain insights that feed metaphors, images, and imagination.  As we examine the way in which our relationships to words, images, myths, cultural teachings, stories, and the arts enhance our understanding, we will reflect on the strategies we need to address environmental education, activism, and the ecological challenges and health of our planet.Readings include essays by American Transcendentalists like Thoreau, Emerson, and Fuller, and natural history writers and eco-poets such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Terry Tempest Williams, Linda Hogan, Alice Walker, Mary Austin, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Gary Snyder, David Abrahm, Pablo Neruda, Eric Chock, and other diverse writers.   Field trips and workshops include hikes, natural history observations, writing, a trip to Mt Rainier, and visits to museums, cultural, and arts events like the “Procession of the Species,” and the “Cascadia Poetry Festival.” We will work to develop practices of close observation of the natural world to fuel creativity. The quarter’s work will include the creation of art, poetry, personal essay, and a creative journal that allows us to refine our observations of local places, and to sketch and develop concepts for use in our artistic practice.   Students of different skill levels will work on improving their writing and editing abilities so they can write and work towards publication.  They will create multimedia art installations on campus and in the community, submitting proposals for one individual art project, and one group collaborative artistic project, and preparing the works for public presentation by the end of Spring quarter.Assignments:  Writing includes a personal essay about place, a series of ten poems, and a creative journal.  Art includes an individual multimedia installation and a group multimedia installation. Each student is responsible for presenting one of the projects on which they worked, in a community setting.  Note: This class was formerly called Creativity and Diversity in American Culture: Art and Narrative in Response to Place.  You can review fall and winter quarters at: Rebecca Chamberlain Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Chico Herbison and Frances V. Rains
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall “The rain feels heavy/on the gray sidewalks of America.” —James Masao Mitsui, Japanese American poet of the Pacific Northwest Embedded among the bricks of the Japanese American Historical Plaza—part of a picturesque waterfront park in Portland, Oregon—are thirteen granite and basalt stones. Engraved on those “story stones” are poems that, in harmony with the overall design of the plaza itself, help illuminate the tragedies and triumphs of Japanese in Oregon. Along with their counterparts in Washington State, communities of Oregon Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants, including “war brides” and a “mixed-race” population) have helped define—historically, culturally, and in other ways—the Pacific Northwest. Yet, their story is not well known, either nationally or here in this place of “rain and gray sidewalks.”This program will explore the rich, but still frequently overlooked, history and culture of Nikkei, from their first arrival in this country, through the traumatic events of the World War II period, and beyond. Although we will examine the overall experience of Nikkei in the United States, our particular focus will be on those in the Pacific Northwest. Accompanying us on our interdisciplinary journey will be historical studies, oral testimony, fiction and poetry, photographs and film, and music, among other texts and tools. We will immerse ourselves in topics such as the earliest Japanese immigration; the 19th- and 20th-century struggles against discrimination and exclusion; the World War II internment experience (including an examination of the resistance movement in the internment camps, and the legendary exploits of Nikkei soldiers in both theaters of the war); the post-war efforts by Nikkei to reassemble their lives and, for some, to seek redress and reparations; the saga of Japanese “war brides” (women who married U.S. servicemen in Occupied Japan and eventually migrated stateside); and the world of “mixed-race” Nikkei.Each student will read a series of seminar books and articles related to program topics and themes; participate in weekly seminars and write weekly seminar papers; participate in workshops; and screen and critically analyze films. In addition, there will be field trips to Pacific Northwest locations with Nikkei historical and cultural connections. Finally, students will complete substantial, individual research projects and make summative presentations of their work. This program was formerly entitled Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: "We carry strength, dignity and soul." Chico Herbison Frances V. Rains Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Chico Herbison
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter —Blue Scholars, Seattle hip-hop duo (from “Evening Chai”) From Bruce Lee to Harold & Kumar, henna to hip-hop, bulgogi to pho, manga to , Asians and Asian Americans have left an indelible imprint on U.S. popular culture. As eloquently noted by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, “[f]ew of us are immune to popular culture’s intimate address or to its pleasures and affirmations, frustrations and denials” ( ). It is, indeed, that lack of immunity and a restless hunger to understand those “pleasures, affirmations, frustrations, and denials” that will sustain us on our 10-week journey. We will begin the quarter with two fundamental questions—“What is an Asian American?” and “What is popular culture?"—that will lead us to (1) an exploration of the major historical, cultural, social, and political contours of the Asian American experience, and (2) an immersion in critical theoretical perspectives on culture in general, and popular culture in particular. We will devote the remainder of the quarter to an examination of the complex, and frequently vexed, ways in which Asians and Asian Americans have been represented in U.S. popular culture and, more importantly, how members of those communities have become active of popular culture. Our approach, throughout the quarter, will be interdisciplinary, multilayered, and transgressive in its insistence on an intertextuality that moves beyond the commonly interrogated categories of race, gender, and class. Students will read selected fiction, poetry, comics and graphic novels, scholarly articles, and other written texts. There will be weekly screenings and analysis of documentaries and a range of fiction films, such as martial arts films and anime. We will also explore Asian American popular culture in music, photography and other visual art, bodies, and cuisine. Students will participate in weekly seminars and workshops, submit short weekly writing assignments, and produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. Field trips may include visits to Pacific Northwest locations with Asian/Pacific Islander historical and cultural connections, and to off-campus film, music, and other venues.   Chico Herbison Tue Tue Thu Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring The Basque Country is an ancient country the size of the Puget Sound region that sits between France and Spain. In this class we will explore Basque history, culture, and socio political movements including the Basque conflict. We will immerse ourselves in the prehistoric Basque language (Euskera) and learn about Mondragon, the largest worker owned industrial cooperative system in the world. Music, literature, art and gastronomy will be experienced and discussed in the class led by a native Basque from Mondragon. Amaia Martiartu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Yvonne Peterson, Michelle Aguilar-Wells and Gary Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How does a group of indigenous people from different countries: (1) create an activity to reclaim ancient knowledge? (2) develop communication strategies in the 21 century to build a foundation to support gatherings numbering in the thousands? (3) relate tribal governance/rights to state agreements and understandings? (4) appraise economic impacts on local/regional economies when a Tribe hosts a canoe journey destination? and, (5) how does one move to allyship with indigenous people and begin preparation for the historic journey from coastal villages of Northwest Washington to Bella Bella in British Columbia, Canada? Evergreen has a history of providing community service coordinated with the Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to Tribes during the canoe journeys. This program expands the venture by researching the canoe journey movement, understanding Treaty rights and sovereignty, economic justice, cultural preservation, and the social economic, political and cultural issues for present day Tribes participating in the 2014 canoe journey to Bella Bella. As a learning community, we’ll pose essential questions and research the contemporary phenomenon of the tribal canoe journeys to get acquainted with Tribes and Canoe Families and the historic cultural protocol to understand Native cultural revitalization in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia.Upper-division students will have the option to engage in service learning volunteer projects and program internships during winter and spring quarters. All students will participate in orientation(s) to the program theme and issues, historic and political frameworks, and work respectfully with communities and organizations. Participation in this program means practicing accountability to the learning community and to other communities, interacting as a respectful guest with other cultures, and engaging in constant communication with co-learners. Yvonne Peterson Michelle Aguilar-Wells Gary Peterson Mon Tue Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Andrea Gullickson and Robert Esposito
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do our experiences in the performing arts impact our understanding of and relationship to our environment?  How can music and dance be used to transform lives?  This two-quarter, core program will focus on the study of music and dance as powerful methods for both exploring and expressing our experiences in the world.  Throughout the program we will examine fundamental concepts of music and dance and consider cultural and historical environments that influence the development of and give meaning to the arts. Our work with progressive skill development will require physical immersion into the practices of listening, moving, dancing and making music.  Theory and literature studies will require the development of a common working vocabulary, writing skills, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking skills.Weekly activities will include readings, lectures, seminars and interactive workshops, which will provide the basis for focused consideration of the ways in which our relationship with sound and motion impact our daily lives. Weekly in-program performance workshops will provide opportunities to gain first-hand understanding of fundamental skills and concepts as well as the transformative possibilities that exist through honest confrontation of challenging experiences. Weekly writing workshops and assignments will encourage thoughtful consideration of a broad range of program topics with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the power and importance of bringing one’s own voice into the conversation.This balanced approach to the development of physical craft, artistry and intellectual engagement is expected to culminate in a significant written and performance work each quarter. Andrea Gullickson Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Tom Womeldorff and Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In the late 1700s, Europeans saw the Caribbean as one vast sugar plantation controlled by French, English, Spanish and Dutch colonial powers. The insatiable need for labor decimated local populations who were replaced by millions of African slaves and, after emancipation, indentured labor from East India and China. Historically, this represents the largest forced mixing of cultures in the world; the result was a host of new Caribbean identities, all developing in the context of the political, economic and ideological structures imposed by Europeans. Today, the identities and cultural expressions of all Caribbean peoples continue to be shaped by the colonial legacy and the rise of post-colonial consciousness. Thinkers like José Martí (" América"), Aimé Césaire ( ), and Frantz Fanon ( ) exposed the negative effects of colonial subjugation and envisioned liberatory processes of social change. Despite the region's shared colonial and post-colonial legacies, a sense of a common Caribbean identity should not be exaggerated. As Jean Casimir writes, the Caribbean is simultaneously united and divided. A Guadeloupian may be more connected psychologically and physically to Dakar, or even Paris, than she is to Puerto Rico. Out of this intense forced mixing of cultures, what forms of identity emerged and continue to emerge? Is there such a thing as a Caribbean culture, or are identities complex amalgams that defy easy categorizations such as Caribbean, Dominican American, creole Martinican, Afro-Cuban, East-Indian Trinidadian? What are the factors that make the identities of each island's peoples similar and in what ways do they defy categorization--even on a single island? How have cultural movements such as and the "New World baroque" contributed to the construction of Caribbean identities and post-colonial consciousness? These will be the questions at the center of this program. We will begin with an exploration of the colonial legacy with close attention to the political and economic forms central to extracting sugar profits from land and laborers. We will explore the impact of diverse political statuses such as independence (e.g., Jamaica), complete incorporation with the motherland (Martinique) and more nebulous forms in between (Puerto Rico). We will explore the symbioses and tensions between these political and economic issues and cultural movements. Finally, we will investigate how migration and globalization continue to play a major role in shaping local realities. Throughout the quarter, we will examine our own positionality with relation to these questions, asking: How can we study about, learn from, and engage across cultural differences in non-dominating ways? Readings will range from fiction and poetry to history and political-economic analysis. In addition to shared readings, lectures and films, each student will engage in synthesis work and a small project. The latter will be on a topic of the student's choosing, such as cultural expression through music and art, political status, religious syncretism, post-colonial literature, globalization, or migrant identities abroad. Tom Womeldorff Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Rose Jang and David Shaw
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In the fall of 2012, China’s 18th Communist Party Congress selected the current generation of Chinese political leaders, moving China into the next chapter of its 3,000-plus years of political history.Today, China’s economic power continues to grow, and its rise globally has drawn increasing attention. Many developing countries are viewing the China model as an alternative to the Western experience of economic growth and middle class prosperity. However, China is faced with many internal and external challenges. Challenges like these have repeatedly threatened China’s social stability in the past. In the extreme case, they might alter its current ideological foundations, potentially undercutting the premises of the China “success story.”This introductory China studies program will focus on China's present situation as a modern state and global power evolved from a lengthy and complicated cultural development over centuries. Within the time constraint of a quarter, we will examine China from selective angles and subject matters suggesting recurrent cultural patterns and distinct national characteristics. In the social sciences, we will touch on China’s geography, political structure and economic and business systems, including sustainability and environmental issues. From the humanities perspective, we will look at prominent examples of China’s religion, philosophy, arts and literature. All these issues are potentially interrelated, leading to a more coherent set of inquiries into the myth or reality of China’s current image of success.Students will be exposed to multiple topics and issues through weekly readings, lectures, discussions and workshops. They will also conduct a research project on a China-related topic of their own choice. This research project will provide them with opportunities to develop skills in research methods and academic writing. The program will introduce the fundamentals of Chinese language and linguistics through program studies but does not contain an independent Chinese language study component. Rose Jang David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
George Freeman and Terry Ford
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist-practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the fields of education and human services. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. Students will be required to begin a two-quarter long, 15 hour/week internship winter quarter in the fields of education and social services. Constructing a research project may be an option if students prefer research to the internship. Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology and its application to clinical settings and schooling, quantitative and qualitative research methods, multicultural studies and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology and applied settings such as educational settings. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism and humanistic psychology. Students will also begin their self-identified internships for winter and spring quarters in an area of the social services or an educational setting. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Students may opt for independent literature-based reviews with faculty approval.Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of theory to practice through communication skills practicum and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their internships started winter quarter through spring quarter.Variable credit options are available to students participating in internships. George Freeman Terry Ford Mon Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Thomas Rainey and John Baldridge
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program offers comparative study of the Russian conquest of northern Eurasia (Siberia) and the Euro-American conquest of North America.  It will explore the impact of what environmental historian Alfred Crosby calls "ecological imperialism" on native populations, economic development of the nations based on the exploitation of natural and agricultural resources, the ecological consequences of this exploitation, and the successes and failures of conservation efforts in Russia east of the Urals and in the United States west of the Mississippi.  It will also consider the religious, economic, and social motivations and apologias for the ecological conquests.  During the winter quarter, the program will examine these two world historical examples of ecological expansion and its consequences from 1600-1900; during the spring quarter, the program will explore the course and legacy of these conquests in the twentieth century as well as the current ecological state of these two continent-wide environments. Students can expect to read and write about bio-geographical, environmental-historical, ethnographic, natural historical, demographic, and political economic texts focusing on the western United States and on northern Eurasia. Personal and fictional accounts as well as films will also be used to enhance understanding of the environmental, economic, and social consequences of conquest. During the spring quarter, students can also expect to research and write short environmental histories of local areas in Western Washington.  Credit will largely be in environmental history, bio-geography, and political economy. Thomas Rainey John Baldridge Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Karen Gaul, Rita Pougiales and Julie Russo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In , the historian William Leach writes, “Whoever has the power to project a vision of the good life and make it prevail has the most decisive power of all.” Since the early 20th century, the pleasures of consumption have dominated prevailing visions of the good life in the United States. Innovations in mass production and mass media went hand in hand to link pleasure and prosperity with acquiring the latest commodities. Leisure has also been central to those pleasures, often in the form of tourism, fashion and entertainment, as people consume not only goods but experiences and ideas about what it means to be successful and happy. This program is an inquiry into these features of American consumer culture, particularly the values of convenience and authenticity that characterize the objects and desires it produces and exchanges.Students in this program will study the history and logic of U.S. consumer culture. We will consider the forces that have shaped each of us into consumers in this capitalist society, from representation and ideology to material and technological development. Sustainability will be a critical lens for our inquiry, as we consider the raw materials, labor and waste streams inherent in goods and in cultural experiences. Life cycle analysis of objects—from their origins in nature to their presence on retail shelves, personal spaces, garbage bins and landfills—will help us build a broader context for understanding the materiality with which we all engage every day.Our historical arc will be sweeping: from hunter-gatherers nearly two million years ago, to the origins of animal and plant domestication, to the formation of colonial settlements which created unprecedented challenges and opportunities, to the modern era. We will explore the patterns of resource use, social inequality and relative sustainability. We will examine how habits of conservation, thrift and re-use that were endemic to pre-modern societies transformed in tandem with the unprecedented energies of industrialization. We will investigate the theory and economics of post-industrial capitalism to better understand the impact of new media and technologies on the ways we produce and consume in the present day. We will also examine how curiosity about foreign and mysterious cultures in the context of globalization paved the way for tourism in which cultural authenticity is a central attraction. We will study the relationship between consumption and sustainability, pursuit of the good life through self-help and imported cultural practices such as yoga and meditation, between entertainment industries and communication networks, advertising and buying habits, spending money and self-worth. These contexts will enable us to destabilize and interrogate notions of what feels "normal" in the ways we engage as consumers today, including as consumers of knowledge in increasingly digitized institutions of higher education.Students will have the opportunity to examine ingrained routines of daily life, become conscious of the origins and meanings of their own habits and desires, and thereby become critical thinkers and actors in consumer culture. Our activities will include reading, writing papers and participating in seminar discussions on program topics, learning ethnographic research methods, experimenting with multimodal and collaborative work, viewing relevant films and participating in field trips. In fall quarter, we will build foundational skills and introduce key concepts and themes; winter quarter students will begin to develop their own research agenda; and in spring quarter, they can apply theory to practice in research and/or community-based projects. Spring quarter readings emphasize responses to consumer culture through alternative practices and collectives. Texts on on intentional communities include by Juliet Schor, by Karen Litfin, , and . Texts on virtual communities include by Fred Turner, by Lawrence Lessig, and selections from the anthology Digital Labor. These and related topics comprise an 8 credit academic block taught on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Students enrolling for 16 credits should be prepared to engage in substantial independent learning or work in the community (faculty can structure or guide this piece for new students). One option is a media production intensive that includes a series of technical workshops and a collaborative project. Program learning activities include: seminar responses and essay assignments, field trips, digital media workshops, yoga and awareness practices. Field trips may include Procession of the Species, visits to Fertile Ground, NW Ecobuilders Guild, the Arbutus School, and intentional communities in the PNW, and/or a tour of tiny homes. Karen Gaul Rita Pougiales Julie Russo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Therese Saliba and Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Dangerous creations" emerge out of adverse political conditions and embody new creative strategies and possibilities. This program will explore how writers, media makers, artists and community activists use experimental modes of address to challenge dominant narratives and formal structures, and to confound notions of "the real." With an emphasis on multiculturalism, identity and especially African and Arab Diasporas, this program will examine the histories of slavery, colonialism and Empire and how art, media and literature have been used as tools of both conquest and resistance. We will draw on theoretical tools  to analyze the "politics of representation" in popular media, including critiques of Orientalism, the Africanist presence and the gaze. And we will explore how diasporic communities, particularly feminists of color, "talk back" to these representations—by creating dangerously. That is, how do these artists use experimental forms to challenge fixed notions of individual and communal identity, as well as the consumerist system of media and literary production?Through the study of diasporic cultural production, African and Arab American literature and film, Third World Cinema and queer and feminist film theory, we intend to foster critical thinking about race, class and gender identities, and how they are negotiated. We will also explore how certain models of cultural-mixing, hybridity, and border-crossing have created a dispersal of identities and strategic possibilities for solidarities and connections across community struggles.In fall and winter quarters, students will learn to read cultural texts, including film, visual art and literature, to understand the relationships of people and communities, their sense of identity and possibilities for solidarity across differences. Students will develop skills in visual and media literacy, creative and expository writing, analytical reading and viewing, literary analysis, and the terminologies and methodologies of cultural and gender studies, film history and theory. Through workshops, students will also learn a range of community documentation skills, including photography, video, interviewing and oral history. In spring, students will have the opportunity to work on in-depth independent projects in autobiographical representations either through moving image or narrative writing. With faculty guidance and small group workshops, students will write proposals, conduct research and engage in critique groups to produce a major individual or colloborative creation.  visual studies, film studies, cultural studies, literary studies, African-American studies, Arab/Middle East studies, gender studies, community organizing and advocacy, and education. Therese Saliba Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe and Therese Saliba
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of Junior-Senior students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: visual art, art history, literature, creative writing, media theory, cultural studies, critical race studies, or feminist studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of , but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a large-scale project that will be developed over the course of the year. These students will also act as peer mentors for the Freshman-Sophomore students in the class, and will have opportunities for ongoing critique on projects with program faculty. In addition, advanced students will be required to take a year-long, 2-credit sequence in Critical and Cultural Theory offered one evening a week by Greg Mullins. Naima Lowe Therese Saliba Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Gail Tremblay and Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How does culture affect the worldviews and visions of writers, artists, storytellers, and filmmakers? How does place affect culture? We will explore these questions and connections through careful reading and analysis of literature, film, and art history which reflects a multicultural perspective. As students of diversity in American culture, we will examine the way in which place, and migration from place, shapes cultural production of texts and art, as well as how our connection to the natural world affects creativity.Over the course of the year we will study works by a diverse group of writers, artists, and filmmakers, including African American, Native American, Asian American, European American, Chicano, Latino writers, and other cultures. We will take field trips to museums and cultural events. Guest speakers from diverse communities will share their perspectives about their practice as writers, artists, and scholars.  Workshops in writing, composition, poetry, and art will provide the opportunity to develop a creative practice and create art, poetry, and various forms of narrative. All students will work on improving their academic and writing skills so by the end of the program they can write and work towards publication. Fall quarter, we will study works by a diverse group of American writers, artists, and filmmakers, beginning with Linda Hogan's novel,  A multi-day field trip to the Makah Nation in Neah Bay, on the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula will allow us to study the artifacts from Ozette, a village on the Pacific Coast buried by a mud slide during the 17th century, some of whose artifacts carbon date from the 1500s. We will meet with contemporary artists, and cultural experts, from the Makah Nation and learn about their relationship to place. We will also study works by African American, Chicano, Jewish American, Armenian American, and Arab American writers and filmmakers.  Students will explore the role of art, film, literature, storytelling, and filmmaking as they begin their own artistic practice.  They will participate in workshops on creating narrative and visual art and will write weekly synthesis essays that reflect on texts and integrate the various materials we are studying. Winter quarter, students will continue to explore creative works and anthologies by diverse writers, including texts by a variety of Asian Americans, European Americans, and other Native Nations and cultural groups.  We will also continuie our study of the works of diverse artists and filmmakers.  In addition to field trips and workshops on poetry and art, students will write two five-page expository essays and one ten-page research paper.  Students will continue to participate in creative workshops and complete two creative projects that grow out of our work over the past two quarters.  They will present their creative projects for their classmates and friends on campus. literature, education, art, and cultural studies. Gail Tremblay Rebecca Chamberlain Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rita Pougiales
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I The processes of economic and political globalization reshape and undermine the lives of people and communities throughout the world. Some anthropologists have turned their attention to the effects of globalization on traditional and modern societies, attempting to bring to light the full complexities and consequences of these transnational practices. For example, Joao Biehl develops an argument linking global economic activity in Brazil to what he calls the development of "zones of social abandonment" in most urban settings. Anthropologists conduct their studies through research, which involves gathering data, over long periods of time, as both "participant" and "observer" of those they are studying. Doing ethnographic research is simultaneously analytical and deeply embodied. This program includes an examination of ethnographic research methods and methodologies, a study of varied theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists today to interpret and find meaning in data, and an opportunity to design an ethnographic project of interest. Students will read and explore a range of ethnographic studies that reveal what an anthropologist—whom Ruth Behar calls a "vulnerable observer"—can uncover about the lives of people today, and advocate on their behalf. Rita Pougiales Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Barbara Laners
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full This class will examine the role of women of color in the development of America's social, economic, legal, and political history. It will focus on issues ranging from suffrage to the civil rights movement and beyond; all aspects of the gender/racial gap in those spheres will be explored. Barbara Laners Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Marianne Bailey, Olivier Soustelle, Shaw Osha (Flores), Bob Haft, Judith Gabriele and Stacey Davis
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring ... ...—Hölderlin, "Bread and Wine" We will study art history, literature, philosophy and music in their social and historical contexts in order to understand the Romantic avant-garde thinkers and artists, outsiders in 19th- and early 20th-century Europe, and their tenuous but fruitful dialogue with mainstream culture and the emerging popular culture of the laboring class. We will emphasize French Romanticism, but will also consider the pan-European nature of the phenomenon. This era offers a figurative battlefield where concepts of art, nature and self, order and chaos, locked swords, testing the limits of rational thought. French language study will be an important component of our weekly work; students will study French at one of four levels, from beginning to advanced.The 19th century was an era of immense political change spanning revolutions, empires and finally the establishment of democracy at home, just as European imperialism spread across Africa and Asia. We will study ways in which average women and men crafted their own identities and responded to the larger social forces of industrialization, the creation of a new working class, the solidification of gender and class roles, the rise of modern cities and the redefinition of the criminal, the socially-acceptable and the outsider.In fall, our work will begin with the paintings, poems and ideas of the early Romantics. The Romantics privileged feeling, intuition and empathy. Like adepts in an ancient mystery cult, they sought to commune with Nature. Romantic philosophers, from Schopenhauer to Nietzsche, spoke of Becoming rather than Being. Rejecting Classical order, clarity and restraint, they envisioned a pure art, beyond language and depiction, which speaks musically through color, passion, suggestion, enigmatically, as do dreams.In winter, focus will turn to the late Romantics. Decadents pushed the Romantic temperament and aesthetic to extremes through self parody and the aesthetic of fragmentation. Symbolists attempted to express the inexpressible through their art. Yet Mallarmé, Wilde and Yeats, Moreau and Gauguin, among others, helped prepare the “rites of spring” of the dawning 20th century, the arising vanguard of modernist and postmodern movements.In spring quarter, students may pursue individual research/creative projects on campus or may travel to France for 10 weeks. There they will study in a Rennes, Brittany, language school, do cultural and historical study in Paris and Lyon, as well as make side trips for research of their own.In this program, students will gain a significant grasp of key ideas in art, history and thought within their context, and will have the opportunity to specialize, creating advanced work in their choice of history, art history or writing and literature. We expect strong interest and background in humanities, and considerable self-discipline and motivation. The workload, including French language study, will be substantial and rigorous. Students will work in interdisciplinary all-program sessions and assignments, as well as choose one of three possible seminar groups. These emphasize: 1) literature and philosophy, 2) history, and 3) photography and visual arts, practice and theory. Marianne Bailey Olivier Soustelle Shaw Osha (Flores) Bob Haft Judith Gabriele Stacey Davis Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Elena Smith
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I This course attempts to inspire a better understanding of today's Russia and the people of Russia through a study of their history, literature, arts, and culture.  Everyone who has an interest in exploring Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks is welcome.  The students will be introduced to certain dramatic events of Russian history through film, literature, and personal experiences of the Russian people. Besides the traditional academic activities, the students will have hands-on experiences of Russian cuisine, song, and dance.  Armed with an open mind and lead by a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive, and learn to appreciate the similarities of Russian and American cultures. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Eddy Brown
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring In what situations, milieus, and other kinds of settings do characters find or put themselves? How and why did they get there? How do they then behave? What habits, values, self-identity paradigms, world views, conscious and unconscious needs, goals and fears drive them and affect or determine their actions and decisions? The answers to these key questions help authors to create compelling, rounded characters in realistic settings, dramatized through vivid, engaging scenes with meaningful subtexts, in stories that are surprising yet convincing. With that in mind, this class will explore these and other narrative design elements in service of students constructing their own short fiction prose narratives.Students will also be given the guidance and tools for analyzing existing literary texts. Along with reading, discussing and writing about selected published materials, students will consider and practice spontaneous and experimental modes of story development, as well as apply some established cinematic and classical dramatic paradigms for story structure and development.Typical program activities will include writing exercises, story drafting, self-editing, small- and large-group peer activities including writing critiques, and weekly seminars on assigned readings. The major project will be a short story that has undergone revision through several drafts.In general, students will explore and practice story crafting, writing as a process, fiction genres, and literary analysis, and are expected to be active, consistently engaged members of a learning community. Eddy Brown Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ulrike Krotscheck and Caryn Cline
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Must quotidian always be associated with humdrum? Rather, it is perhaps the quotidian—the everyday, the banal—that, in the long run, heroically ensures the survival of the individual and the group as a whole. -Michel Maffesoli, An “epic” is generally defined as a poem or narrative of considerable length, which explores grand themes such as a hero’s journey, or the origin myth of a country or peoples. As an adjective, “epic” refers to something that is larger than life and often extra-ordinary. By contrast, the “everyday” is flatly defined as ordinary and is often seen as boring, trivial, and lacking in grandeur. Yet, the “everyday” has a rich creative history and garners remarkable attention in contemporary art, spiritual practices, and other areas of study and praxis. Our lives are made up of both the epic and the everyday; both are integral components of the human experience. And the tension that exists between the two is rich territory for insight and imagination.This program interrogates how the essence of the epic enters the everyday and how the quotidian gives meaning to the epic.We will juxtapose the exploration of the “epic” as a literary form with the exploration of the “everyday” as a creative practice that engages experiments in text, sound, and image. We will conduct these explorations through readings, film screenings, analyses, lectures, workshops, seminars, and by developing discovery strategies rooted in the creative practices of writing nonfiction and of crafting video essays.During fall quarter students will read ancient Greek epic poetry, myth, and tragedy. These works tap deeply into the human condition, and they explore our most persistent and universal questions, such as the concepts of destiny, power, morality, mortality, and the (in-)evitabilty of fate. As we analyze the grand questions raised by epic texts we will also consider if or how we encounter such themes in everyday life. Conversely, we will examine how everyday life may intersect with epic-scale experiences and insights.To facilitate these considerations students will develop a daily writing practice and craft a variety of creative nonfiction essays—meditative, lyrical, personal, and hybrid forms—and we will factor into our studies exemplars that engage thematically with the everyday. Fall quarter explorations will move off the page to incorporate sound and image as tools for creative and critical inquiry. Students will take a series of electronic media workshops and gain hands-on experience with audiovisual scriptwriting, audio recording, photography, and video editing. Fall quarter will conclude with students applying their creative writing skills and electronic media competencies in collaboratively crafted video essays that blend students' literary works with audio and images to explore the realm between the epic and the everyday.During winter quarter we will deepen our investigations into the epic and the everyday through additional readings and analyses of classic Greek texts and by furthering our audiovisual inquiries. One goal of this quarter will be to advance students’ understanding of various film and adaptation theories to put into practice in their individual work. Winter quarter will conclude with rigorous individual projects that encompass a research paper on sources and methods of adaptation, and an independently made video essay.This is a full-time program emphasizing classical Greek literature and media arts, creative and critical practice, collaborative learning, and individual accountability. Expect assignments to be process-driven, highly structured, and challenging. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. If you’re eager to blend the study of Ancient Greek literature with experiments in media arts, then this program is for you. Ulrike Krotscheck Caryn Cline Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Experience Japan is an intensive, in-country program that gives students first-hand experience of contemporary Japanese culture, society and language. During the three-week program you will live and take classes at Tamagawa Universty in Tokyo, engage in activities with Tamagawa students, meet local residents, conduct research on a topic of your choice and go on field trips in the Tokyo area. Classes at Tamagawa University are regular bilingual classes on Japanese culture and society. Extra-curricular activities and field trips will be arranged according to your research topic and interests, and will include visits to Tokyo's historically and culturally significant sites and nearby towns such as Kamakura. Admission is open to all students regardless of language ability. Interested students should contact faculty via email at ulmert@evergreen.edu and attend an explanatory meeting either on Wednesday, April 2 or Friday, April 4. The past participants will be there to answer your questions as well.   Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 16 04 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Vavrus
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full             Human Geography focuses on geography as a cultural encounter.  We will study patterns and processes that have shaped human interaction with various environments. The course encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of geography.  Central guiding questions we will be addressing in this course:This survey of human geography introduces broad concepts that are the focus of contemporary studies in geography.  These concepts includeGraduate students are welcome to attend this course for undergraduate credit.     Michael Vavrus Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Harumi Moruzzi
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This Individual Study offers two options for students: (1) to continue their studies of Japanese literature, culture and society, in the form of Individual Learning Contracts, and (2) to continue their Japanese language and culture studies by studying abroad in Japan. This Individual Study also offers opportunities for students who are interested in creating their own courses of study and research, including study abroad. Possible areas of study are Japanese studies, cultural studies, literature, art and film. Interested students should first contact the faculty via email ( at least 2 weeks before the Academic Fair for spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Sean Williams
Signature Required: Fall 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This yearlong program explores Ireland and Irish America through the lenses of history, literature, politics, spirituality, language, film and the arts. In fall quarter, we begin with Irish ways of understanding the world, focusing on the roots of pre-Christian spirituality and traditional culture. We will examine the blend of pre-Christian and Christian cultures in the first millennium C.E., and move forward to the layered impact of the Vikings, Normans and English. We end fall quarter with the Celtic Revival (Yeats, Joyce and others) at the turn of the 20th century. In winter quarter, we shift to Irish America for four weeks, then return to Ireland for the 20th century and into the present.Most weeks will include lectures, seminars, small group work, songs, play reading out loud, instrumental music practice, poetry, and a film. Short pre-seminar papers will be required to focus your attention on each week's texts. In fall quarter, three papers are required (on ancient Ireland, the English conquest, and the Celtic Revival). In winter, two large papers are required (on Irish America and contemporary Ireland). At least one work of visual art will be required in each quarter. The last week of fall and winter quarters will focus on collaborative student productions. Students will learn to cook Irish food for a food-and-music gathering once each quarter.Every student is expected to work intensively with the Irish-Gaelic language all year; no exceptions. Our work will include frequent lessons and short exams in grammar and pronunciation, as well as the application of those lessons to Gaelic-language songs and poetry. If you cannot handle Gaelic study or do not take it seriously, do not sign up for this program. Similarly, you will be expected to learn to sing and play Irish music on a musical instrument if you cannot already play one. We will practice this music each week, and we will be bringing musical instruments to Ireland.Early spring quarter, we will travel to the small village of Gleann Cholm Cille in Donegal, the northernmost county of the Republic. Students will spend four weeks improving their language skills, learning traditional skills (singing, dancing, poetry writing, drumming, tin whistle playing, weaving, knitting) and exploring the region, which is rich in archaeological features like standing stones and dolmens. Students will also have the opportunity to spend two weeks doing individual learning in Ireland; that project will become part of their final work. Upon their return at the end of May 2014, students will write a significant integrative essay, combining the theory of Irish Studies with what they have learned in the practice of living and studying in Ireland. Sean Williams Mon Tue Wed Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Harumi Moruzzi and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Japan is a vital, energetic and dynamic country which has been constantly reinventing and revitalizing itself even in the midst of gargantuan natural disasters, while struggling to maintain a sense of cultural and social continuity from the long lost past. Meanwhile, the conception and image of Japan, both in Japan and throughout the West, has varied widely over time, mostly due to Japan’s changing political and economic situation in the world. In the late 19th century, when Japan re-emerged into Western consciousness, Lafcadio Hearn, the Greek-Irish-American writer who later became Japanese, thought of Japanese society and its people as quaintly charming and adorable. In contrast, Americans in the 1940s viewed Japan as frighteningly militaristic and irrational. The French philosopher/semiotician Roland Barthes was bewitched and liberated by Japan’s charmingly mystifying otherness during his visit in 1966, when Japan began to show its first sign of recovery from the devastation of the WWII. The Dutch journalist Karel Van Wolferen was disturbed by the intractable and irresponsible system of Japanese power in 1989, when the Japanese economy was viewed as threatening to existing international power relations. These examples show how Japan has been viewed by Westerners in the past. The idea and image of Japan is highly dependent on the point of view that an observer assumes and that history makes possible.This full-time interdisciplinary program is devoted to understanding contemporary Japan, its culture and its people, from a historical point of view. We will study Japanese history, literature, cinema, culture and society through lectures, books, films, seminars and workshops, including study of Japanese language embedded in the program. Three levels of language study (1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-year Japanese) will be offered for 4 credits each during the fall and winter quarters.In the fall quarter, we will explore the cultural roots of Japan in its history. In the winter quarter, we will examine Japan after 1952, when the Allied occupation ended. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination of contemporary Japanese popular culture and its position in economic and cultural globalization. Students who are interested in experiencing Japan in person can take Japanese language classes in Tokyo through Harumi Moruzzi’s Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society, and Study Abroad in spring quarter. Harumi Moruzzi Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This is an introductory course on Japanese history and culture. We will focus on a popular visual art form, and the way of tea), a centuries-old composite art. These two art forms draw from the same wellspring of Japanese culture and are both present in contemporary Japan. We will examine Japanese history, worldviews, folklore, aesthetic sensitivity, performing arts and hero/heroine archetypes through readings, lectures, seminar discussion and student presentations. This course will help you appreciate ’s stories and artistic expressions that you might otherwise overlook or misinterpret. You can start as an expert, fan or complete novice of and tea but you will deepen your understanding of these two artistic genres through your participation in this class. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In recent decades, Latin America has become well known beyond its borders for compelling, politically urgent and aesthetically vibrant literary works. Contemporary writings by Latin American women, increasingly available in English translation, challenge preconceptions about gender and sexuality in the region, while also addressing critical issues of politically motivated violence, collective memory, intersecting oppressions, language, spirituality, democratization and social change. This program seeks to foster greater understanding of the region and its diverse peoples and perspectives. Writers will include Gloria Anzaldúa (U.S.), Rosario Castellanos (Mexico), Ana Lydia Vega (Puerto Rico), Rigoberta Menchú (Guatemala), Daisy Zamora (Nicaragua), Conceição Evaristo (Brazil), Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay), Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina) and Pía Barros (Chile), among many others.We will read novels, poetry, short stories and testimonials by Latin American (indigenous, mestiza, Afro-Latina) women writers, focusing on legacies of colonialism, authoritarianism and neoliberalism, as well as projects for contesting recent histories. We will situate our literary analysis within the historical and political events that shape Latin American women’s texts, and examine their critique of masculinist narratives that justify domination and exclude women’s voices. We will also view films by and about women, and examine women's and feminist movements in the region. Students will write literary analyses and some creative work, and will conduct research on a writer of their choice. Through this study, students will consider the impact of political, economic and cultural forces on Latin American women's lives and literary production, while also examining literary and film representations as sites of resistance. Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Alice Nelson
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of advanced students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: Latin American or postcolonial studies, feminist or gender studies, literature, creative writing, film studies, or critical race studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of the program, but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a larger-scale project developed over the course of the quarter.  Alice Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Patricia Krafcik, Evan Blackwell and Carrie Margolin
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What is creativity? Is there a relationship between states of mind and a fertile imagination? What are the psychological mechanisms involved in the larger action of the human imagination, urging us to explore new avenues, to see what others have not seen, to create what no one has yet created? Many of the world's greatest writers, artists and thinkers have been known to struggle with conditions classified as abnormal by psychologists. We will explore these conditions and their impact on creativity, searching further for any special links between certain kinds of abnormal psychological conditions and the drive to create.Our interdisciplinary program is not intended to serve as therapy, but rather is a serious study of psychology, literature, the arts, imagination and the creative impulse. We will approach our questions through various modes of inquiry. Through an in-depth study of abnormal psychology, we will learn to identify and understand a number of conditions. We will investigate modern art history and its fascination with the art produced by individuals reputed to be cultural "outsiders," such as folk art, art of the insane, art brut and self-taught artists.  Through this study we will explore how societies form a group identity which is established in relation to some designated "other."  Our readings combine art theory with psychological case studies by writers such as Sacks and Ramachandran and with imaginative literature by Gogol, Dostoevsky, Poe, Kafka, Plath, Gilman and many others that all describe abnormal psychological conditions. We will respond to our readings by channeling the imagination with a variety of creative projects. Finally, we will also study the normal mind and how it functions in both mundane and creative ways.In both quarters of our program students will discuss assigned readings in seminars, will engage in active writing exercises and in rigorous two-dimensional and thre-dimensional visual art work in ceramics, mixed-media sculpture, collage, and drawing.  Assignments may include research papers, poster projects, creative writing, performances and visual arts projects. Weekly films and discussions of these films will enhance our examination of the uses or influence of psychological conditions in the creation of literature, art and music. Guest speakers will provide additional workshops and lectures in various artistic modalities. In fall term we will take field trips to the Tacoma Art Museum and the Museum of Glass, and our work that term will prepare students to undertake a culminating project in winter term. In all our activities, students will have ample opportunities to explore their own creativity and imagination. Patricia Krafcik Evan Blackwell Carrie Margolin Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Grace Huerta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 16 04 16 Day S 14Spring The intent of this 16-credit program is to undergraduate students to the foundational theories, research and pedagogies specific to teaching English language learners (ELLs) in adult and K-12 classroom or international settings. Students will examine how such conditions as history, political climate, school policies and program models impact the access and quality of education ELLs receive. Students will then focus on the study of language as a system with an emphasis on three important aspects of ELL pedagogy: a) literacy development, b) academic language/content area instruction, and, c) assessment of language proficiency and performance. Students will analyze the central theories, structures and conventions presented in functional linguistics and language acquisition research. With this knowledge base, students will design literacy curriculum and instructional strategies that align with Washington’s K-12 English language development and Common Core standards and competencies, or the TESOL (Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages) standards for adult ELLs.Next, students will explore methods for content-area teaching (i.e. math, science, social studies) and formative and summative assessments specific to the Common Core and four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the four developmental levels of language proficiency: pre-production, beginner, intermediate and advanced. Students will also learn the principles of backward design lesson planning, analyze instructional tasks for ELLs, provide ELLs opportunities for comprehensible input (receptive language instruction) and comprehensible output (productive language instruction); and offer content-area lesson demonstrations for peer feedback. A field experience, in which students will tutor ELLs in a bilingual school setting one day a week, is a required component of the "Making Meaning" program.Lastly, students will conduct a case study in which they will interview and examine the philosophy and experiences of a professional ELL educator. By analyzing the interrelationship between language learning and communities of practice, students will consider how ELLs' sociocultural experiences influence the language acquisition process.Students taking the 4-credit option will join the rest of the program during our review of language acquisition theories and will use that knowledge to design curriculum, instructional and assessment strategies for English language learners (ELLs). Students will also explore the underlying assumptions that impact language learning and how such assumptions can be addressed through the Washington state K-12 ELL and/or TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) standards. Grace Huerta Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How shall we study music? We can watch others doing it on YouTube, we can hear others doing it on YouPod or we can read about others doing it on YouKindle.Let's DO it! (Sadly, there's no "YouDo".)Let's study music by creating and performing it. After all, music's a thing made by the brain, the heart and the fingers.You'll be asked to sing, study an instrument and perform for others in the class, write vocal and instrumental arrangements and sing and perform them. The class environment will not be a competitive one: the goal is to stretch out and learn and challenge oneself and not compare one someone with another one someone. The study of music requires a commitment to practice, to listen, to remember and to learn. This program aims to offer you time in which to do just that.You'll learn about writing harmonies, singing them, and about how difficult it is to write vocal parts that are interesting both melodically and harmonically. There will be a strong emphasis on ear training, sight singing and aural dictation, along with studies in tonal harmony. You'll be asked to write and perform musical canons. We'll study the history of Western classical music, jazz music from the early 20th century, popular music of the past 50 years and experiments in music composition as well. There will be regular listening sessions, along with readings from the arts.In class, students will be assigned performance groups, and each group will be asked to prepare a vocal or instrumental work. This will happen twice each quarter. Rehearsal time will be set aside for such practice, and the faculty will act as a coach for the rehearsals. Each quarter, students will be asked to write one substantial research paper exploring an aspect of music they are unfamiliar with. There will be class trips to concerts in Seattle and Portland, along with visiting guest artists throughout the year. During spring quarter, students will be working on independent projects under faculty supervision. These projects will be developed and submitted by the end of winter quarter. They should combine research and study with creativity and performance, culminating in an end-of-spring-quarter mini-conference, with students delivering both research presentations and musical performances.In addition to classroom activities, each student will be expected to take instruction in a musical instrument outside of class and bear the cost of that instruction (the faculty member can help you find a teacher for your instrument). Practicing an instrument is a way to bring together the seemingly separate activities of the brain, the heart and the fingers: it concretizes music theory, gives a goal to the wobbling fingers and releases the heart from its regularity of "thump thump thump". Arun Chandra Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Ratna Roy and Joseph Tougas
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Have you ever felt that your mind and your body were just “out of sync”? How about the other experience—when your mind and body were working together flawlessly—when you felt “in the flow”? These kinds of experiences invite other questions about the relation between the mind and the body, questions that have been the focus of thinking and research in cultures around the world. There is, for examples, a tradition in Western philosophy that has emphasized the separation between the mind and the body. Other traditions emphasize mind/body interaction and unity. Does the mind control the body? Or is it the other way round? What can we learn about these questions if we challenge ourselves to use our bodies to interact precisely and skillfully with others?  This is the kind of thing people do when they learn to move together in dance, to raise their voices in song, or to make music together.This program will explore the connections between the mind and the body through the media of music and dance. We will learn about the scientific investigation of the interaction between mind and body, especially in connection with the kinds of social activities that bring people together in communities of artistic endeavor—for example, a jazz band or dance group. We will examine both Eastern and Western philosophical traditions to see what we can learn about different ways of understanding the relationship between the mind and body as manifested in disciplines of motion and rest.  We will also engage in practice involving music and dance, experiencing first hand the unity of thought and action. The work of the program will include readings about music and dance from a variety of cultures as well as philosophical and scientific texts. The philosophical texts deal with the relationship between the mind and the body; the scientific texts provide information about brain function and what neuroscience can teach us about how the mind and body interact in music and dance. Students will write essays on the weekly readings in preparation for seminar discussions and a final research paper. They will also participate in workshop activities learning musical and dance skills. During the fall quarter the workshop emphasis was on building skills. At the end of fall quarter students, working in groups, created scripts of performance pieces combining music and dance. During winter our attention in the workshops will be directed toward developing those scripts into fully realized music and dance performances for presentation to an audience in the 9 week of the quarter. Ratna Roy Joseph Tougas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Heesoon Jun and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter The human mind is perhaps the most fascinating, and least understood, product of Darwinian evolution. In this program we will endeavor to understand how the mind functions and why it has come to work in the way that it has. We will study human psychology as modern empirical science has come to understand it, and we will combine that hybrid model with a consideration of the evolutionary path humans have traversed, as well as a deep investigation of those portions of evolutionary theory most relevant to hominid cognition, perception and behavior. Our program will seek to unify important conclusions from multiple schools of thought within psychology as we consider humans from a broadly cross-cultural perspective. We will range from the Jungian to the Cognitive, and from the modern !Kung people of the Kalahari to the ancient Maya of Central America. Our objective is to generate an integrative model of the human mind that can accommodate humans as individuals and as interdependent social beings.Winter materials will build on content covered in the fall. There will be educational value and intellectual reward for staying in the program both quarters. biology, psychology, health related studies, human and social services. Heesoon Jun Bret Weinstein Tue Tue Wed Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Anne Fischel and Ruth Hayes
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring   Anne Fischel Ruth Hayes Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Andrew Buchman and Ratna Roy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring We will focus on the dance and music culture of central eastern India, specifically the art-rich state of Orissa. While some music or dance background would be useful, it is not necessary. This is a culture and history offering, along with some practical hands-on experience in dance and music. We will immerse ourselves in both the history and sources of this ancient culture of dance and music, and its active contemporary scene. Our readings will include cutting-edge articles and book chapters exploring themes such as gender, colonial history and post-colonial theory and the economic ferment that is transforming many aspects of Indian society today. In seminars, we'll compare and contrast ancient and modern, Indian and American aesthetics, world views, values and attitudes. In workshops, we will explore the rich vocabularies of sound and movement that make Orissa's traditional performing arts so rewarding to study. The music workshop will focus on modal improvisation, performance, and composition, and study contemporary improvisational musicians influenced by South Asian aesthetics, like Vijay Iyer and John Coltrane, as well as traditionally trained musicians with multiple musical careers, such as Ravi Shankar.  The dance workshop will focus on classical Odissi dance, technique and repertoire.The first evidence of Orissa's dance and music culture is preserved in sculptures and images that are about 2,000 years old. The culture thrived for centuries before it declined under colonial rule in the 1800s, and began to revive in the 1950s and 60s after India became an independent nation-state. This revival still continues, and we will be a part of that effort. Dancers, musicians and scholars will work together and re-create the tradition for our own times. At the end of the quarter, we will present a performance incorporating music and dance from Orissa at various levels of skill so that most students can participate.Some previous training in dance or music would be useful, but is not expected. Students who don't wish to focus on music or dance performance can pursue a research option, in consultation with faculty. Andrew Buchman Ratna Roy Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
David Wolach
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring What does it mean to perform the text? What happens when genres collide? This creative writing program will bring together several terms often thought to be well-defined—including "poetry," "prose," "theater," "politics," and "essay"—and, through experiments in writing, reading, and collaborating, re-narrate their meanings and implications. Along the way we’ll investigate key concepts and texts in poets theater, guerilla poetry, and other forms of performance-based text, mining them to create our own individual and collaborative writings. During the quarter, our meetings will consist of weekly seminars, lectures, and "language labs"—times for brainstorming, rehearsing, and trying out language experiments. David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Julia Zay and Miranda Mellis
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day and Evening S 14Spring In this interdisciplinary foundational program in visual studies, literature, cultural theory, and creative and critical writing, we will practice observing, rendering, and reflecting on the ordinary and the everyday.  We’ll study texts, objects, ideas, art and films, aspiring to Henry David Thoreau’s lifelong goal: to be surprised by what we see, in “the bloom of the present moment.”  Slowing down to observe, render, and reflect on what tends to go unnoticed will galvanize curiosity and insights about our basic experiences of embodiment and raise new questions to pursue critically, ethically, and artfully.  We’ll write, read, make images, and perform thought experiments to heighten our awareness of practices often obscured by the habitual and overly-familiar aspects of daily life (for example, calendar time, e-mail correspondence, house-cleaning, eating, and even walking to get from point A to point B – what other kinds of walks might we take?).  By activating our perceptual abilities to make visible and thinkable these quotidian structures, we will in turn consider the ways the everyday constitutes not only our private lives, but also our public and social worlds. We will study a range of philosophical, poetic, filmic, visual, and fictional texts that theorize and enact the constitution of dailiness. In all our work we will focus on cultivating practices of attention—skills essential to creative and critical engagement – while furthering our abilities to read and view closely, attend to historical and cultural context, and write – academically and creatively – with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures, screenings, workshops and seminar. Students can expect to both work individually and collaborate with peers on assignments. Finally, we'll expand our critical and creative lexicons by intersecting with two campus arts and humanities forums: the Critical and Cultural Theory lecture series on Monday evenings and the Art Lecture series on Wednesday mornings. Julia Zay Miranda Mellis Mon Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Trevor Speller and Abir Biswas
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This introductory program is dedicated to understanding the back and forth between the physical environment and the written word. How do texts shape what we are able to see in the physical environment? How does one's understanding of the physical environment shape ways of writing and understanding the world? How do we describe it? What do we read into it?In 1815, William Smith produced the first geological map of Great Britain. His investigations were a product of a new way of seeing his physical world. Rather than assuming the earth to be a stable object which remained unchanged since Noah’s flood, Smith drew on his observations, and began to see the earth as a dynamic physical entity. His discoveries came in a time when Enlightenment thinkers were questioning the order of the world, the role of religion and the value of science and industry. The modern science of geology can thus be said to have arisen from a new way of seeing: William Smith was able to read and write about the Earth not only through observations, but because of the set of cultural changes that changed his frame of mind. Importantly, Smith's observations came at a time when poets, novelists and political philosophers were beginning to actively investigate the influence of the natural world on humans and human behavior.We will consider the frames through which we read and write our physical world, through an introduction to foundational concepts in geology and literary study. We will consider how geologists investigate and describe the physical world, and examine concepts including geologic time, plate tectonics, earth materials and the evolution of life. We will consider how writers investigate and describe the natural world in the works of 18th- and 19th-century literature, as well as contemporary literature about the Pacific Northwest. We will read works of poetry, fiction, political philosophy and travel writing. Program texts may include works by John McPhee, Simon Winchester, William Wordsworth, Daniel Defoe and others.Students should expect to participate in lecture, lab and seminar, write critical papers and take examinations. There will also be field trips to locations of geological interest as well as cultural venues. Trevor Speller Abir Biswas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Hirsh Diamant and Cindy Beck
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program will explore how the human body was imagined by Eastern and Western cultures and how we can re-imagine the body to achieve better health and a greater sense of well-being.  In particular we will study organs and body systems, look at the ways the body was imagined in Western scientific illustration and in alchemical images, Chinese diagrams, and Tibetan paintings.  We will look at major organs and body systems from physical, physiological, and spiritual perspectives, practice medical illustration, and explore new ways of understanding and representing the interdependent work of a healthy body.  Our study will also include an introduction to energy systems and alternative medicine.Credits will be awarded in medical illustration, cultural studies, and anatomy. Hirsh Diamant Cindy Beck Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Myra Downing
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Myra Downing Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Mary DuPuis
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Mary DuPuis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tracey Hosselkus
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Tracey Hosselkus Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Colleen Almojuela
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Colleen Almojuela Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dorothy Flaherty
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Dorothy Flaherty Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Renee Swan-Waite
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Renee Swan-Waite Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Suzanne Simons and Ann Storey
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter Sacred Intersections focuses on a thousand-year period of Christian and Islamic art, art history, poetry, and mysticism. As the program continues in Winter quarter, we will turn our attention to a time of, roughly, the 12 through the 14 centuries. This was a period that built on the creativity, spirituality, and change of the previous era and took the arts to new heights through creative and cultural fusion. We will study the motivating ideas and issues of the age: the mystical poetic traditions of the Persian empire (present-day Iran and central Asia) and their influence on contemporary poetry; the awe-inspiring forms of Gothic architecture, and the poetry of the Beguine mystics (of present-day Germany).  The idea that both mystic and artist were “seers”—seeing beyond the physical into the transcendent and metaphysical—impelled them into visionary realms. We will examine poets such as Rumi and Hafez and other charismatic figures.  We will study illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, sculpture, and sacred architecture of European and Byzantine Christendom and Islamic empires stretching from Spain to Central Asia.  Art workshops will enable students to move from theory to practice. Class time will be divided among the following activities: faculty lectures, art workshops, seminars, writing, films and a possible field trip to a local mosque. This program is preparatory for further study and/or careers in the visual arts, education, museum studies, religion, communication, international relations, history, and writing. Suzanne Simons Ann Storey Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Tom Womeldorff, Catalina Ocampo and Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter The recent history of Latin America can be described as a struggle for self-determination, from the wars of independence to the present-day unequal footing in the world economic system. Taking Mexico as a case study, we will explore how questions of self-determination have shaped Latin America and the lives of the various communities that constitute the region. We will focus, in particular, on the different roles that culture, politics, and economics have played in struggles for self-determination and investigate the tensions and symbioses between them. We will ask ourselves: What roles do culture and economics play as tools of self-determination? How can culture facilitate processes of self-determination at moments when political or economic self-determination is not possible? What are the limitations on the use of culture when one has limited political and economic self-determination? What role do third parties play in struggles for self-determination and how do we situate ourselves with regards to various processes of self-determination in Latin America?Our study of various groups and communities within Mexico and across its borders to the north and to the south will illuminate the country’s diversity, while also highlighting the connections between personal, national, and regional politics in Latin America. We will explore how self-determination is manifested in relationships of class, gender and ethnicity and study the specific ways in which struggles for self-determination have emerged in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on various historical moments and issues including nation-building efforts and conflicts with the United States in the nineteenth century; issues of violence and class during the Mexican Revolution; contradictory uses of Indigenismo; popular movements and state repression in the 1960s and 70s; the emergence of the Zapatista movement; the economic impact of NAFTA; and questions of economic development and cultural identity during recent migrations to the United States.Throughout the quarter, we will engage historical and contemporary realities in Mexico using multiple frameworks from the humanities and the social sciences. In the process, we will introduce literary and cultural theory, as well as economic theories of capitalist development. Students will gain an in-depth ability to interpret literary texts in their social contexts, and to use economic models to understand specific aspects of Latin American societies. This program will involve frequent writing assignments and develop skills in visual analysis. Tom Womeldorff Catalina Ocampo Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Amy Cook, Catalina Ocampo and Chico Herbison
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring —Alicia Imperiale, “Seminal Space: Getting Under the Digital Skin” Organ, membrane, boundary and border. Canvas, map, metaphor and trope. Skin is the identity that all animals present to the world. It has multiple physiological functions and takes a wide variety of forms, from the simple epidermis of a sea anemone to the complex light show of a squid or the intricate system of spines that protects a porcupine. In human culture, skin functions as a marker of “race”/ethnicity, age and gender; provides a canvas on which to create very personal forms of art and cultural narratives; and, in the 21st century, has become a critical site of interface between the “real” and the virtual.In this introductory program we will look at skin through the lenses of biology, culture and art. The biology of skin includes its visual and olfactory role in communication, its structure and physiology and its role in defense of the body from both microbes and large predators. Our exploration of skin in/as culture and art will include encounters with the mythology of “race,” body modification (piercing, tattooing and plastic surgery) and the posthuman meanings of skin (in cyberspace and in the world of cyborgs, androids and prosthetics).Program activities will include lectures; labs in which we will examine the microscopic structure of skin and learn about the various structures that arise from it, including scales, feathers and hair; seminars on a selection of texts (books, films and other texts) that look at skin from a variety of different perspectives; and workshops in which students will explore skin through their own creative writing. Students will have the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of biology and humanities in an interdisciplinary setting, as well as sharpen their critical thinking and reading and college writing skills. biology and the humanities. Amy Cook Catalina Ocampo Chico Herbison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jon Davies
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program will explore the role that sport plays in contemporary North American culture. It is a social phenomenon that provides opportunities for identity formation and personal development as well as for learning values about work, play, entertainment, and family. Sport is one of many arenas that reflect our society’s contestation surrounding race, class, gender, and sexual orientation.The program will examine sport from multiple perspectives and genres. Through a close reading of sports literature, including informational texts, stories, poetry, film, journalism, and other media, we will explore the following social theories that offer various frameworks in which to study sport in society: Functionalist theory, conflict theory, interactionist theory, critical theory, and feminist theory.Functionalist theory seeks to answer questions such as: How does sport fit into social life and contribute to social stability and efficiency? How does sport participation teach people important norms in society? Conflict theory seeks to answer questions such as: How does sport reflect class relations? How is sport used to maintain the interests of those with power and wealth in society? How does the profit motive distort sport and sport experiences? Interactionist theory seeks to answer questions such as: How do people become involved in sports, become defined as athletes, derive meaning from participation, and make transitions out of sports into the rest of their lives? Critical theory seeks to answer questions such as: How are power relations reproduced and/or resisted in and through sports? Whose voices are/are not represented in the narratives and images that constitute sports? Feminist theory seeks to answer questions such as: How are sports gendered activities, and how do they reproduce dominant ideas about gender in society? What are the strategies for resisting and transforming sport forms that privilege men?Above all, sport offers a way to engage larger social issues in contemporary American culture. Some would argue sport personifies the American Dream through personal stories of sports champions, both in their accomplishments and in the barriers that they overcome. Sports champions and sports teams also produced sports fans, people who are fanatically loyal to those athletes and teams they cherish.The primary objective in the program is for students to develop a greater sensitivity to the world of sport and the philosophical and sociological relationship between that world and contemporary society. Students will have opportunities to write personal narrative and critical analysis and produce in-depth research on a particular, self-selected sport sociology topic.  Jon Davies Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Julia Zay and Amjad Faur
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This is an art foundations program invested in opening up the dense histories and meanings of photographic images in their many forms, from still to moving and back again--and the unsettled places between. We explore what it means both to know and to make an image– photographic, moving, and time-based. We will pay equal attention to the history, theory and practice of the photographic image, both still and moving, in the context of visual studies--a field that yokes a broad study of the visual arts with social and cultural history and theory--art history, film/cinema history, and philosophy. Through a critical engagement with still and moving photographic images as well as related forms of visual art, we will map a broad contextual territory and challenge received notions of the boundaries between forms, genres, and mediums.Photography can never be thought of as simply a medium, technology or practice but a convergence of material, history, culture and power. In the Fall, we will start with the unfolding of the Western enlightenment, from the 16th to the 19th century, when optical technologies radically reorganized the senses and methods of knowledge production, posing new questions about temporal, spatial and visual relationships to artists and scientists alike.  We will then move more deeply into the 19th and first half of the 20th century, when photography emerged into an art world dominated by painting, a visual culture organized around print technologies, and societies in the throes of rapid industrialization. Photography initially emerged not out of art contexts but out of the institutions of science and industry, so we will consider, in particular, the ways it was used to produce social categories, shaping dominant discourses of gender, class and criminality. For example, we’ll look at the language of portraiture so central to the emergence of both a middle class and the language of criminal and medical photography. Our materials and techniques will first be limited to those from the 19th century (proto-photography, early processes, hand-built cameras). In winter, we move from the 19th to the long 20th century and the emergence of cinema. We will look at the way early cinema was organized around a fascination with duration, spectacle, and experimentation and on the relationship between photography and cinema, stillness and movement. We will continue to work in still photography, broadening our range of techniques, and add a small amount of 16mm filmmaking to the mix as we explore the larger social and historical contexts and philosophical questions surrounding the relationship between still and moving photographic images. In our creative and intellectual work, we’ll ask many questions about the phenomenon, concept and experience of time--for example, how is a four minute exposure in a still photograph both similar to and different from a four minute continuous shot of film or video of the same subject?In all our work we will focus on building essential skills in practices of attention--learning how to slow down our modes of seeing, experiencing and working. In our photographic practice, this will mean moving away from the pursuit of “finished” images and towards experimental processes and conceptual problem solving. In our work with texts and images, this will mean developing our ability to read and view closely and write with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures/screenings, workshops, seminar, critical reading and writing, and critique. In addition to working individually, students can expect to collaborate regularly with their peers on a variety of assignments and larger projects. All along the way we will intentionally examine how our investments in collaboration animate our intellectual and creative work. We will spend significant time in critique to help each other see, describe, evaluate and improve our creative and critical work.  Julia Zay Amjad Faur Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Greg Mullins
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Many students wish to pursue a senior project involving substantive independent research and writing. This program is designed for students whose achievements have propelled them to intermediate or advanced levels of inquiry in the humanities or in cultural studies, and who are in their junior year or the very beginning of their senior year. By completing this program in spring quarter, students will position themselves to pursue an advanced research/writing project in the following year. Over the ten weeks of spring quarter we will read a sequence of texts in common; we will analyze them not only for content but also for methodology. We will study what kinds of sources, evidence, interpretive paradigms and arguments are demanded by humanities fields such as history, literature and philosophy, and by interdisciplinary fields such as queer studies, American studies, women’s studies and cultural studies.By better understanding what makes research publishable, students will gain a keen appreciation for the methods and rhetorical strategies that they will need to master in order to pursue their own independent studies. Students will research and write about a topic of their choice, with the goal of laying a solid foundation for a senior thesis or project. Writing assignments include: an abstract, a work plan, two response papers, an annotated bibliography, a review of a scholarly journal, description of research methods and a research prospectus. Greg Mullins Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sarah Williams and Martha Rosemeyer
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring J.W. Goethe Like the role of bees and seeds in the evolution of agriculture, beads—which often are seeds, shells, wax or bone—have an inside and an outside that commute.  Seeds, beads and bees are interpenetrating, reciprocal creations. They form assemblages with centers and their use over time can be a measure of the fertility of mind, spirit and body. This SOS will support students in bead-like studies of biodynamic processes in conjunction with an internship, creative practice or field research project. Whether defined in relationship to agricultural, artistic or somatic practices, biodynamic processes are characterized by interconnected, recursive and iterative movements that form holistic patterns. Thus, students will be guided to reflect on their learning itself as a biodynamic process.  To what extent is the subject and object of a liberal arts education mutually causative?  In what ways might thinking be enlivened if informed by a consciousness of temporal rhythms (e.g., respiration) and cosmic forces such as tides and sunlight?This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. In addition to classroom work, each student will create an individual course of academic learning including an internship (e.g., at a local organic farm), creative practice (e.g., nature writing), or field research project (e.g., discovering the differences—and why they matter—between commercial and biodynamic beekeeping). Collaboration, including shared field-trip opportunities, with the Ecological Agriculture and Practice of Sustainable Agriculture programs will be available. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly group meetings, an annotated bibliography and maintenance of a field journal to document independent project learning. In addition to this independent project component, students will engage in weekly readings and written responses, seminar discussions and a final presentation. Unless exceptions are designed into students' projects and agreed upon in advance, all students will be required to attend and actively participate in this one day of weekly class activities, as well as individual self-assessment meetings with the faculty at mid-quarter and the end of the quarter. Interested students should browse the following authors and texts to explore their ability to think and act biodynamically within an intentional learning community: , edited by David Seamon and Arthur Zajonc; by Wolf Storl; by Charles Ridley; by Catherine Cole; by Gary Snyder; by Robert Bringhurst; by Ruth Ozeki; and : by Rudolf Steiner Sarah Williams Martha Rosemeyer Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Crowley
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Day Su 14Summer Full This interdisciplinary study-abroad program offers an introduction to Chinese culture through the lenses of language and social and political systems. Students will experience Taiwan, the Republic of China, one of the four Asian Tigers up close. We will travel to the city of Taipei, (the capital of the Republic of China), Tainan (a historical gem), and Kaohsiung (the largest harbor in Taiwan), to learn about the modern Chinese business and cultural centers in a modern democratic republic. Students will have the opportunity to witness modern, traditional, urban, suburban and rural life in this land and discover how Chinese traditional culture coexists with a modern westernized society. The program includes academic study at two of the Chinese universities in Taiwan. There will be language study, day trips, and guided study tours to museums, including the National Palace of Museum and historical sites. Students can also explore the blossoming artistic and cultural scenes on this beautiful tropical island. China is one of the world’s oldest and richest continuous cultures. It is one of largest trading partners of the United States, while Taiwan, with its Chinese roots, focuses investment in latest information technology, advanced sustainable agriculture and ecological development, which made it an international trading powerhouse with impressive foreign exchange reserve. Students can examine the contemporary Chinese culture in Taiwan and how it exerts its influence to the world by working with its Chinese counterpart on the mainland. We will also have a closer look into Chinese ethnic culture, religion, and its people. During the first session of the summer, all students will travel with the class for a three week study trip. After the study trip, students will return to Evergreen campus to continue their studies in the second session using on-line resources and communication for continuous Chinese studies. Portfolios including video and/or blog documentary can be developed from the study trip. Enroll for eight credits for first session only or 12 credits for the full summer session.  Students enrolled for 12 credits will continue to meet on campus during second session to work on video or photo journals documenting the trip and reflect on the learning through seminars, readings, and film discussions on related topics and issues. For more information please contact the faculty or see  Lin Crowley Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rose Jang and Mingxia Li
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring Classical Chinese drama, as a literary genre, evolved from a long tradition of poetry writing and storytelling. In Chinese theatre, lyrics combine with dance, music, singing, acrobatics and martial arts. For centuries, the poetic and presentational style of Chinese drama and theatre has helped nurture and highlight the fantastic and imaginative side of Chinese culture: the magical beings and their boundless power in folk tales; dreams, fantasies, mysticism and otherworldliness of the Daoist realm of existence, and roaming spirits and ghosts of the underworld: these ever-popular Chinese archetypes have been repeatedly invoked and embodied in poetry and on stage. Many of these fantastic images and stories will form the core of our program study; they will also be absorbed and chained together into a final musical performance piece with a coherent plot and overriding theme—a symbolic, stylized production in the form and spirit of Chinese fantasy for the Western audience.The program will engage students in serious study of Chinese poetry and dramatic literature with a creative push.  The program will also serve as an ideal training ground for students who are interested in acting, performance, singing, music performance and composition, kinetic and vocal training in physical theatre, and skill building and implementation in technical theatre including set, lighting, costume, sound and stage management.  As the final performance is a meant to be an original and experimental piece bridging Chinese drama and Western theatrical sensitivities, and the performance style will reply on an innovative fusion of music and lyrics as well as creative collaboration between singing, movement and musical accompaniment on many different levels, the faculty of the program is seriously recruiting music students ready to engage in creative music composition and performance (including electronic music) to join the program.In winter quarter, we will study select dramas and stories of fantastic imagination from the Chinese tradition which bear direct relevance to our final performance piece.  We will study their literary and creative qualities in general program meetings and workshops.  We will also work through sequential theatre exercises in workshop and performance projects to bring these literary qualities into staging possibilities and physical realizations.  A weekly music workshop will also be offered to prepare students for the unique musical creation and implementation for the final performance.In spring, we will focus on rehearsals and technical theatre work in order to mount a full-fledged theatrical production bringing all the previous experimentations and innovations together into a fantastic and coherent production. This end-of-program public presentation will put to the test our collective understanding of Chinese mythology, poetry and drama, and help us convey this understanding in a complex form of the theatre of fantasy. Rose Jang Mingxia Li Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Western psychology has so far failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understanding—our everyday mind and our immediate awareness of being—with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, Western psychology has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology's neglect of the living mind--both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities--has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Asia, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.In contrast to Western psychology, Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer and instead studies consciousness as a living reality which shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.Learning mainly from lectures, readings, videos, workshops, seminar discussions, individual and group research projects and field trips, in fall quarter we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional Western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. In winter quarter, we will then investigate the Eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most Western interpretations of Eastern thought—the attempt to fit Eastern ideas and practices into unexamined Western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between Eastern and Western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns. psychology, counseling, social work, education, Asian-American studies, Asian studies and religious studies. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lori Blewett and Karen Hogan
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This program explores biological, social, and political dimensions of food. We’ll consider the basic biological composition and processes of our bodies, and learn why some foods are necessary and others are bad for us. These biological questions will be studied in relation to cultural and political constructions of food including discourses of consumption, identity, and sustainability. We’ll explore some recent hot topics related to food, including diet and obesity, GMO food labeling, crop genetic diversity, and food sovereignty.  We’re especially interested in public rhetoric on these subjects – how scientific facts and ideas are represented and misrepresented in public debate, how food consumption and related social identities are influenced by media, and how food activism is challenging trends in corporate food production.  We’ll examine a variety of media sources, including journalism, online sources, and films.  Lori Blewett Karen Hogan Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Joseph Tougas and unassigned
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I Evergreen Faculty Joe Tougas and Makah master carver Alex McCarty will lead this first in a two course series on wooden mask carving, focusing on the local cultural perspectives of mask making.  Students will explore regional Northwest Native styles and form-line design, and masks from other world traditions as inspiration to their own mask concepts and designs. Students will carve their own masks, each one unique to the individual's identity, culture and/or personal creative expression, using both contemporary and traditional Northwest coast carving tools. This first course in the series will include developing original designs and basic mask carving skills. Joseph Tougas unassigned Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Joseph Tougas and unassigned
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II Evergreen Faculty Joe Tougas and Makah master carver Alex McCarty will lead this second in a two course series on wooden mask carving, focusing on the local cultural perspectives of mask making.  Students will explore regional Northwest Native styles and form-line design, and masks from other world traditions as inspiration to their own mask concepts and designs. Students will carve their own masks, each one unique to the individual's identity, culture and/or personal creative expression, using both contemporary and traditional Northwest coast carving tools. This second course in the series will focus on more advanced carving and finishing skills. It is expected that people who enroll for this second course will either have taken the first course or have some background in woodcarving.  Students who have questions about the preparation needed to be successful in this second course are encouraged to contact the faculty before enrolling.   Joseph Tougas unassigned Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
David Wolach
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter This course challenges students to write the world that does not yet exist. Or, as poet and theorist of radical black performance Fred Moten does, we will try to engage in writing that "investigates new ways for people to get together and do stuff in the open, in secret." Each week we’ll work individually and collaboratively on writing experiments—prose, poetry, essay—that critique and advance beyond our own assumptions about what is socially possible or probable and that do so by paying careful attention to the rhythms of current crises. As a basis for this creative production, we will engage critically with writers whose work exists at the point where the border between politics and art ruptures. In sound, in sight, and through a kind of "improvisatory ensemble" (as Moten puts it) we will resist what too often gets counted as the inevitable outcome of a political economy that treats people as objects that just happen to speak. What is inevitable about the future, and what is it about controlled acts of creative improvisation that helps us not just "guess at" but hear our future’s past? David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter