2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Computer Science [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Sheryl Shulman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full This class will focus on developing programming techniques in a variety of programming languages. Possible languages include C, C++, Java, Haskell, ML, and OCAML. This is an opportunity to explore languages in more depth, increase you expertise in programming, prepare for more advanced work, and increase the depth and breadth of your programming background. In connection with the practical programming component we will also read papers on programming language design, emphasizing recent language innovations such as generics, multi-paradigm languages, the introduction of lambda terms and their role, and higher-order programming. Computer Science Sheryl Shulman Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rik Smoody
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Computers are a driving force of our modern world and increasingly influence our lives. Mathematics and mathematical models lay at the foundation of modern computers; furthermore, we increasingly rely on mathematics as a language for understanding the natural world, such as complex climate models that predict major changes in weather patterns world wide over the next 50 years. Mathematics and computational thinking enable people as citizens to make good decisions on a wide range of issues from interpreting the evidence for climate change to understanding the potential impacts of technology; as such, they are an integral part of a liberal arts education. In this program, we will explore connections between mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences and graphic arts.We will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills to express, analyze and solve simple problems in the sciences and the arts and explore how to program interesting visual shapes using simple geometry. Class sessions include seminars, lectures, problem-solving workshops, programming labs, problem sets and seminars with writing assignments. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical and statistical thinking and expression along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, algorithms, programming and problem solving, with seminar readings about the role of mathematics in education, the sciences and society.This program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or before pursuing further work in the sciences or the arts. Rik Smoody Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Neal Nelson, Paul Pham, Sheryl Shulman and Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The goal of this program is for students to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work in support of other disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in the context of the liberal arts and compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.The program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture supporting high level languages and operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A technology and society theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology.We will explore these themes throughout the year through lectures, programming labs, workshops, and seminars.  computer science, education and mathematics. Neal Nelson Paul Pham Sheryl Shulman Richard Weiss Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ab Van Etten
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence. Ab Van Etten Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Paul Pham
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day S 14Spring What is computer science, who is it for, and can it combine with art, design, and engineering to help us be more free? What is the relationship of computation to human socialization, physical embodiment, psychology, play, intelligence, or gender? This program addresses these questions through four interrelated threads: (1) Massively Multi-language Computer Programming (MMCP), (2) Software Anthropology, (3) Arduino Robotics, and (4) Seminar and Speaker Series. Each thread has a concrete but open-ended goal, which students will pursue in small groups documented with an online journal.In MMCP, students will learn a programming language of their own choice in a self-directed way and help jointly develop software for an interactive online storybook to teach computer science. Each week, a student group will help prepare a lesson to teach the rest of the class. In Software Anthropology, students will study communities centered around technology including makerspaces, software companies, and schools. They will actively provoke social interaction with other Evergreen programs. The end goal of this thread will be organizing a sustainable Evergreen computer club. In Arduino Robotics, students will learn the basics of computer architecture and system design by using the Arduino electronics platform to control small robots. In the Seminar and Speaker Series, students will hear from a variety of Evergreen alums with careers in technology. In addition, they will help organize the logistics of the speakers' visit.One or more of the above threads will be shared with the programs "Computer Science Foundations" and "Student-Originated Software." Students wishing to prepare for "Computability and Language Theory" in 2014-2015 may take a 12-credit version of this program and the Discrete Math thread from "Computer Science Foundations." The final goal of the overall program is a single creative work to which all students will contribute. It will be part ethnography and part how-to manual to recreate a future program in a similar spirit.The program is designed to be self-bootstrapping, vastly exploratory, and evolving, with all students actively participating in ongoing activity planning. It is perfect for responsible, self-motivated students who can tolerate confusion, excitement, boredom, joy, and the gradual formation of new insights. No previous computer science background is required, only a strong desire to improve and not give up.Activities will include field studies, long hikes, movable feasts, guest lectures, studio time, seminar discussions, student presentations, lively group discussions, silent reading parties, watching films and TED talks, giving peer feedback and critiques, and meetings with the instructor.Possible texts include "Design Patterns" by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, and Vlissides; "The Design of Everyday Things" by Donald Norman; "Anathem" by Neal Stephenson; "Logicomix" by Apostolos Doxiadis, Christos H. Papadimitriou, Alecos Papadatos; "Thinking with Type" by Ellen Lupton; and "Artificial Knowing: Gender and the Thinking Machine" by Alison Adam. Paul Pham Mon Mon Tue Tue Tue Wed Thu Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate digitally generated waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, additive synthesis, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis algorithms.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of this class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, and contemporary research in music composition. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Richard Weiss and Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This program links together computer science and linguistics through the written forms and grammars of languages. First, we’ll consider writing: what do the world’s alphabets, syllabaries and pictographic writing systems tell us about the structure of human languages? Are some writing systems particularly appropriate for some languages, or is it possible to represent any language with any writing system? Ciphers deliberately conceal information without removing it. What does cryptography tell us about the nature of information?Second, we’ll look at the grammars of human and computer languages. The syntax of a computer language can be described precisely, while human languages have exceptions. Yet there have been many attempts to model human language with computers, and to create ways for computers to “read” and “listen” to human languages. To what extent have automatic translation programs and Internet search engines been successful? Why is it that humans can handle ambiguity, but computers have such a difficult time?Major topics of the programStudents will participate in lectures, seminar, labs and workshops on linguistics, programming and computation. They will be evaluated on quizzes, exams, papers and programs.  Richard Weiss Diego de Acosta Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Rip Heminway and Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Computer Science Intern develops skills in advanced topics of Computer Science through the coordination of the Operating Systems Lab (OSL). This intern develops advanced skills in operating systems, cluster computing, system administration and network topology design. The intern assists with lab coordination, hardware and software upgrades, creating instructional materials and lab documentation, and provides users with technical assistance computer science and technology. Rip Heminway Sheryl Shulman Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Richard Weiss and Arlen Speights
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Richard Weiss Arlen Speights Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Douglas Schuler
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring We are surrounded with problems that aren't going away; problems that cannot be solved by individuals acting alone. At the same time, a variety of powerful barriers often stand in the way of working together successfully. And all too frequently, the institutions that are supposed to help in these matters seem either oppositional or ineffectual.How can we develop and nurture the "civic intelligence" that will help ensure our actions produce the best outcomes? What sorts of creative and, often courageous, actions, events, policies, and institutions are people devising to help meet these challenges? And how can these add up to more widespread and enduring social change? As John Robinson of UBC's Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability stated, "If we can't imagine a better world, we won't get it."Social innovation helps us to create and ponder possible futures. Civic intelligence is an evolving, cross-disciplinary perspective that examines, proposes, initiates, and evaluates collective capacity for the common good. It builds on concepts from sociology and other social sciences but also intersects with most — or all — of the other disciplines including the hard sciences, education, cognitive science, the media, and the humanities. In this three quarter program we will focus our efforts — both reflective and action-oriented — on the theory and practice of social innovation and civic intelligence in which "ordinary" people begin to assume greater power and responsibility for creating a future that is more responsive to the needs of people and the planet. Throughout the program we will gain understanding and skills through collaborative projects, workshops, films, experiments, games, and group processes. All quarters will include theoretical readings and workshops. Spring quarter will also involve student projects with the goal of effecting real-world change.Students will help determine the topics for winter and spring, which may include deliberation, alternative economics, collective memory, cooperation, media, participatory design, inequality, or war and peace.Students registering for 12 credits will be working within CIRAL, the Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory, for 4 of their credits. CIRAL is designed to help support ongoing, student-led, collaborative projects. It is intended to foster sustained and engaged relationships with groups, organizations, movements, and institutions.  In addition to our regular meetings, these students will meet each Wednesday before class from 4:30 to 6:00.  Douglas Schuler Wed Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Neal Nelson, Judith Cushing, Richard Weiss and Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The successful completion of large software systems requires strong technical skills, good design and competent management. Unfortunately, unlike hardware, software systems have proven to be notoriously difficult to build on-time, in-budget, and reliable, despite the best efforts of many very smart people over the last 50 years. This is an upper-division program intended to help students gain the technical knowledge required to understand, analyze, modify and build complex software systems.We will concentrate on learning the organization and complexity of large software systems that we do understand, and gaining practical experience in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the art, science, collaboration and multi-disciplinary skills required to develop computing solutions in real-world application domains. The technical topics will be selected from data structures, algorithm analysis, operating systems, networks, information security, object oriented design and analysis, verification techniques, scientific visualization and modeling. The program seminar will focus on various technical topics in the software industry. Students will have an opportunity to engage in a substantial computing project through all the development phases of proposal, requirements, specification, design and implementation.This program is for advanced computer science students who satisfy the prerequisites. We also expect students to have the discipline, intellectual maturity and self motivation to identify their project topics, organize project teams and resources and complete advanced work independently. Neal Nelson Judith Cushing Richard Weiss Sheryl Shulman Mon Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Douglas Schuler
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring considerable Civic intelligence attempts to understand how "smart" a society is in addressing the issues before it and to think about – and initiate – practices that improve this capacity. It is a cross-cutting area of inquiry that includes the sciences – social and otherwise – as well as the humanities. Visual art, music, and stories, are as critical to our enterprise as the ability to analyze and theorize about social and environmental issues.Although there are many ways to engage in this research, all work will directly or indirectly support the work of the Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory (CIRAL). These opportunities will generally fall under the heading of "home office" or "field" work. The home office work will generally focus on developing the capacities of the CIRAL lab, including engaging in research, media work, or tech development that will support the community partnerships. The field work component will consist of direct collaboration outside the classroom, often on an ongoing basis. Students working within this learning opportunity will generally work with one or two of the clusters of topics and activities developed by previous and current students. The first content clusters that were developed were (1) CIRAL vs. homelessness; (2) environment and energy; and (3) food. In addition to a general home office focus cluster on institutionalizing CIRAL, another focused on media and online support.We are also hoping to support students who are interested in the development of online support for civic intelligence, particularly CIRAL. This includes the development of ongoing projects such as e-Liberate, a web-based tool that supports online meetings using Roberts Rules of Order, and Activist Mirror, a civic engagement game, as well as the requirements gathering and development of new capabilities for information interchange and collaboration.Normally students taking this option will have worked with Doug Schuler previously or are otherwise familiar with CIRAL and the idea of civic intelligence. Students who are interested in type of work and have not met those informal requirements are encouraged to take the program in 2013-14.Please go to the catalog view for additional information. Douglas Schuler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Douglas Schuler
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring considerable Civic intelligence attempts to understand how "smart" a society is in addressing the issues before it and to think about – and initiate – practices that improve this capacity. It is a cross-cutting area of inquiry that includes the sciences – social and otherwise – as well as the humanities. Visual art, music, and stories, are as critical to our enterprise as the ability to analyze and theorize about social and environmental issues.Although there are many ways to engage in this research, all work will directly or indirectly support the work of the Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory (CIRAL). These opportunities will generally fall under the heading of "home office" or "field" work. The home office work will generally focus on developing the capacities of the CIRAL lab, including engaging in research, media work, or tech development that will support the community partnerships. The field work component will consist of direct collaboration outside the classroom, often on an ongoing basis. Students working within this learning opportunity will generally work with one or two of the clusters of topics and activities developed by previous and current students. The first content clusters that were developed were (1) CIRAL vs. homelessness; (2) environment and energy; and (3) food. In addition to a general home office focus cluster on institutionalizing CIRAL, another focused on media and online support.We are also hoping to support students who are interested in the development of online support for civic intelligence, particularly CIRAL. This includes the development of ongoing projects such as e-Liberate, a web-based tool that supports online meetings using Roberts Rules of Order, and Activist Mirror, a civic engagement game, as well as the requirements gathering and development of new capabilities for information interchange and collaboration.Normally students taking this option will have worked with Doug Schuler previously or are otherwise familiar with CIRAL and the idea of civic intelligence. Students who are interested in type of work and have not met those informal requirements are encouraged to take the program in 2013-14. Douglas Schuler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Paula Schofield, Neil Switz, David McAvity, Andrew Brabban, Brian Walter, Richard Weiss, Abir Biswas, Michael Paros, Clyde Barlow, Judith Cushing, Dharshi Bopegedera, Rebecca Sunderman, EJ Zita, Donald Morisato, Clarissa Dirks, James Neitzel, Sheryl Shulman, Neal Nelson and Lydia McKinstry
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market.Faculty offering undergraduate research opportunities are listed below. Contact them directly if you are interested. (chemistry) works with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.. (geology, earth science) studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. (biotechnology) studies the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotes of industrial and agricultural importance. Students who commit at least a full year to a research project, enrolling for 4 to 16 credits each quarter, will learn a broad range of microbiology (both aerobic and anaerobic techniques), molecular (DNA analysis and cloning), and biochemical techniques (chemical and pathway analysis, protein isolation). Students will also have opportunities for internships at the USDA and elsewhere, and to present data at national and international conferences. (chemistry) would like to engage students in two projects. (1) Quantitative determination of metals in the stalactites formed in aging concrete using ICP-MS. Students who are interested in learning about the ICP-MS technique and using it for quantitative analysis will find this project interesting. (2) Science and education. We will work with local teachers to develop lab activities that enhance the science curriculum in local schools. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project. (computer science, ecology informatics) studies how scientists might better use information technology and visualization in their research, particularly in ecology and environmental studies. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or one of the sciences (e.g., ecology, biology, chemistry or physics), and who are motivated to explore how new computing paradigms can be harnessed to improve the individual and collaborative work of scientists. Such technologies include visualizations, plugins, object-oriented systems, new database technologies and "newer" languages that scientists themselves use such as python or R. (biology) aims to better understand the evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence, spread and containment of infectious disease by studying the coevolution of retroviruses and their primate hosts. Studying how host characteristics and ecological changes influence virus transmission in lemurs will enable us to address the complex spatial and temporal factors that impact emerging diseases. Students with a background in biology and chemistry will gain experience in molecular biology techniques, including tissue culture and the use of viral vectors. (organic chemistry) is interested in organic synthesis research, including asymmetric synthesis methodology, chemical reaction dynamics and small molecule synthesis. One specific study involves the design and synthesis of enzyme inhibitor molecules to be used as effective laboratory tools with which to study the mechanistic steps of programmed cell death (e.g., in cancer cells). Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience with the laboratory techniques of organic synthesis as well as the techniques of spectroscopy. (biology) is interested in the developmental biology of the embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process. (biochemistry) uses methods from organic and analytical chemistry to study biologically interesting molecules. A major focus of his current work is on fatty acids; in particular, finding spectroscopic and chromatographic methods to identify fatty acids in complex mixtures and to detect changes that occur in fats during processing or storage. This has relevance both for foods and in biodiesel production. The other major area of interest is in plant natural products, such as salicylates. Work is in process screening local plants for the presence of these molecules, which are important plant defense signals. Work is also supported in determining the nutritional value of indigenous plants. Students with a background and interest in organic, analytical or biochemistry could contribute to this work. (computer science) and (computer science) are interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Their areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing and hardware modeling languages. (biology, veterinary medicine) is interested in animal health and diseases that affect the animal agriculture industry. Currently funded research includes the development of bacteriophage therapy for dairy cattle uterine infections, calf salmonellosis and mastitis. A number of hands-on laboratory projects are available to students interested in pursuing careers in science. (organic, polymer, materials chemistry) is interested in the interdisciplinary fields of biodegradable plastics and biomedical polymers. Research in the field of biodegradable plastics is becoming increasingly important to replace current petroleum-derived materials and to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Modification of starch through copolymerization and use of bacterial polyesters show promise in this endeavor. Specific projects within biomedical polymers involve the synthesis of poly (lactic acid) copolymers that have potential for use in tissue engineering. Students with a background in chemistry and biology will gain experience in the synthesis and characterization of these novel polymer materials. Students will present their work at American Chemical Society (ACS) conferences. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Her areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing, and hardware modeling languages. (inorganic/materials chemistry, physical chemistry) is interested in the synthesis and property characterization of new bismuth-containing materials. These compounds have been characterized as electronic conductors, attractive activators for luminescent materials, second harmonic generators and oxidation catalysts for several organic compounds. Traditional solid-state synthesis methods will be utilized to prepare new complex bismuth oxides. Once synthesized, powder x-ray diffraction patterns will be obtained and material properties such as conductivity, melting point, biocidal tendency, coherent light production and magnetic behavior will be examined when appropriate. (mathematics) is interested in problems relating to graphs, combinatorial games and especially combinatorial games played on graphs. He would like to work with students who have a strong background in mathematics and/or computer science and who are interested in applying their skills to open-ended problems relating to graphs and/or games. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. (physics) studies the Sun and the Earth. What are the mechanisms of global warming? What can we expect in the future? What can we do about it right now? How do solar changes affect Earth over decades (e.g., Solar Max) to millennia? Why does the Sun shine a bit more brightly when it is more magnetically active, even though sunspots are dark? Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip every 11 years? Why is the temperature of the Sun’s outer atmosphere millions of degrees higher than that of its surface? Students can do research related to global warming in Zita's academic programs and in contracts, and have investigated the Sun by analyzing data from solar observatories and using theory and computer modeling. Serious students are encouraged to form research contracts and may thereafter be invited to join our research team. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Paula Schofield Neil Switz David McAvity Andrew Brabban Brian Walter Richard Weiss Abir Biswas Michael Paros Clyde Barlow Judith Cushing Dharshi Bopegedera Rebecca Sunderman EJ Zita Donald Morisato Clarissa Dirks James Neitzel Sheryl Shulman Neal Nelson Lydia McKinstry Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David McAvity
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. This independent learning opportunity allows advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. Students typically begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking that are valuable for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems in mathematical biology associated with population and evolutionary dynamics. Students working with him will help create computer simulations using agent-based modeling and cellular automata and analyzing non-linear models for the evolution of cooperative behavior in strategic multiplayer evolutionary games. Students should have a strong mathematics or computer science background. theoretical biology, computer science, mathematics. David McAvity Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Judith Cushing
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science, ecology informatics) studies how scientists might better use information technology and visualization in their research, particularly in ecology and environmental studies. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or one of the sciences (e.g., ecology, biology, chemistry or physics), and who are motivated to explore how new computing paradigms can be harnessed to improve the individual and collaborative work of scientists. Such technologies include visualizations, plugins, object-oriented systems, new database technologies and "newer" languages that scientists themselves use such as python or R. Judith Cushing Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Neal Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. His areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing and hardware modeling languages. Neal Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. Richard Weiss Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Her areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing, and hardware modeling languages. Sheryl Shulman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Arlen Speights and Richard Weiss
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Arlen Speights Richard Weiss Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer