2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Community Studies [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Paul McCreary, Linda Gaffney, Carl Waluconis, Frances Solomon, Suzanne Simons, Arlen Speights, Barbara Laners, Peter Bacho, Jose Gomez, Gilda Sheppard and Tyrus Smith
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year’s program takes a holistic approach to systemic change at the community level. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy. We will focus on individual- and community-building practices based on literacy in humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, media and technology. A major emphasis of this program will be the examination of how citizens effectively advocate and engage in activism to address pressing social, legal, economic and ecological problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding, action and leadership in their areas of interest.During fall quarter, students will study historical notions of leadership and strategies employed to achieve social change through activism and advocacy in institutional and non-institutional settings. Students will reflect on their personal experiences and the world around them in order to understand how they may apply the insights, knowledge and skills to promote civic engagement and foster change.Winter's work will be based upon the foundations built in fall quarter. Students will identify, develop and explore models of advocacy and activism that have led to systemic change. They will enhance their knowledge of contemporary social movements, political interest groups, and scientific and legal advocacy. Students will work actively toward the application of this knowledge by developing collaborative action research projects.In spring quarter, students will join theory with practice, utilizing a variety of expansive methods, from writing to media, in order to demonstrate and communicate their perceptions and findings to a wider audience. They will present their collaborative research projects to the public. The information presented will be directed toward benefiting individual and community capacity as well as communicating a wider understanding of their findings to enhance their own lives, the lives of those in their community and the world that we all share. Paul McCreary Linda Gaffney Carl Waluconis Frances Solomon Suzanne Simons Arlen Speights Barbara Laners Peter Bacho Jose Gomez Gilda Sheppard Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dylan Fischer, Abir Biswas, Lin Nelson, Erik Thuesen, Alison Styring and Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market. studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords. studies plant ecology and physiology in the Intermountain West and southwest Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, genes to ecosystems approaches, plant physiology, carbon balance, species interactions, community analysis and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (academic.evergreen.edu/projects/EEON). See more about his lab's work at: academic.evergreen.edu/f/fischerd/E3.htm. studies and is involved with advocacy efforts on the linkages between environment, health, community and social justice. Students can become involved in researching environmental health in Northwest communities and Washington policy on phasing out persistent, bio-accumulative toxins. One major project students can work on is the impact of the Asarco smelter in Tacoma, examining public policy and regional health. studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics, natural history collections and bird research in the EEON. Bioacoustic research includes editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from Bornean rainforests. Work with the natural history collections includes bird specimen preparation and specimen-based research, including specimens from Evergreen's Natural History Collections and other collections in the region. Work with EEON includes observational and acoustic surveys of permanent ecological monitoring plots in The Evergreen State College campus forest. conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology. Dylan Fischer Abir Biswas Lin Nelson Erik Thuesen Alison Styring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Rob Cole
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Sustainability - what does it mean? Sustainability for whom? Consumption, social stratification, increased indebtedness, and environmental destruction are existing hallmarks of ‘civilization.’ Many of our current cultural, social and economic systems are unsustainable. This program will explore different visions of sustainability that offer alternatives to the dominant industrial/corporate model. We will examine approaches taken by different groups of people, in differing circumstances, to forge a more just, equitable and sustainable future that doesn’t outstrip the regenerative capacity of our ecosystem.In particular, we will compare and contrast two major approaches to sustainability; that of The Natural Step, and that of ‘transition communities.’ We will explore how these visions address equity and justice in the face of climate change, social stratification and ecosystem degradation. We will examine metrics and indicators of sustainability, and various measures of the regenerative capacity of the planet. We will survey a wide array of actions individuals and groups can take to foster a future that is more sustainable and more equitable and just for both human and other species.Through workshops, readings, films, personal audits and seminar discussions, students will engage a variety of sustainability concepts and approaches. They will learn skills useful in assessing actions that foster sustainability, and they will explore the habits of mind so essential to taking action in the twenty-first century.  Rob Cole Mon Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Amaia Martiartu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring The Basque Country is an ancient country the size of the Puget Sound region that sits between France and Spain. In this class we will explore Basque history, culture, and socio political movements including the Basque conflict. We will immerse ourselves in the prehistoric Basque language (Euskera) and learn about Mondragon, the largest worker owned industrial cooperative system in the world. Music, literature, art and gastronomy will be experienced and discussed in the class led by a native Basque from Mondragon. Amaia Martiartu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Yvonne Peterson, Michelle Aguilar-Wells and Gary Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How does a group of indigenous people from different countries: (1) create an activity to reclaim ancient knowledge? (2) develop communication strategies in the 21 century to build a foundation to support gatherings numbering in the thousands? (3) relate tribal governance/rights to state agreements and understandings? (4) appraise economic impacts on local/regional economies when a Tribe hosts a canoe journey destination? and, (5) how does one move to allyship with indigenous people and begin preparation for the historic journey from coastal villages of Northwest Washington to Bella Bella in British Columbia, Canada? Evergreen has a history of providing community service coordinated with the Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to Tribes during the canoe journeys. This program expands the venture by researching the canoe journey movement, understanding Treaty rights and sovereignty, economic justice, cultural preservation, and the social economic, political and cultural issues for present day Tribes participating in the 2014 canoe journey to Bella Bella. As a learning community, we’ll pose essential questions and research the contemporary phenomenon of the tribal canoe journeys to get acquainted with Tribes and Canoe Families and the historic cultural protocol to understand Native cultural revitalization in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia.Upper-division students will have the option to engage in service learning volunteer projects and program internships during winter and spring quarters. All students will participate in orientation(s) to the program theme and issues, historic and political frameworks, and work respectfully with communities and organizations. Participation in this program means practicing accountability to the learning community and to other communities, interacting as a respectful guest with other cultures, and engaging in constant communication with co-learners. Yvonne Peterson Michelle Aguilar-Wells Gary Peterson Mon Tue Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Joli Sandoz and Gillies Malnarich
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Placing yourself in the changing world is a worldchanging act," writes Edward C. Wolff, researcher and specialist in the natural history of global change.  In Building Resilient Communities we will learn the integrative skills needed to influence and adapt to change as we consider selected social and ecological paradoxes facing us and future generations. Program participants will have multiple opportunities to develop the habits of mind of analytic, creative, and resilient thinkers who take the time to formulate problems before seeking solutions and who work with others to create life-affirming choices.  Clear and thoughtful writing and opportunities to develop personal perspectives on cultivating a culture of resilience and community-building across significant differences will be essential components of our work together. Throughout the program, we will place ourselves in the swirl and mix of complex problems. Program participants will discover hidden dimensions of the "familiar" as we rely on close observation and current qualitative and quantitative research to help us first envision and then move toward communities in which all people thrive. Research in winter quarter will deepen our understanding of the challenges facing local communities and how government, non-profit organizations, and the "public" engage with them. Spring work will focus on dynamic community-building, including planning, decision-making, and collaborative action. Students in spring will also work through a complex problem of their choice, integrating theory and practice. In all program efforts, we will be especially attentive to the following lines of inquiry and their implications: how best to address inequities and complexity within community-building efforts, how to gather and use public information to serve the common good, and how to steer present change into a sustainable future. Joli Sandoz Gillies Malnarich Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Jennifer Gerend and Steven Niva
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Does the way we live—in suburbs, malls and automobiles—shape the foreign policy conducted in our name? Can we change our foreign policy by living differently?Our program will explore these questions through the prism of American foreign policy in the Middle East. The program will examine how the suburbanized and automobile dependent culture of the United States after World War II was made possible by American involvement in the Middle East to secure access to cheap and plentiful oil, particularly through our close alliances with oil-rich regimes. This ongoing involvement has been central to the rise of anti-American sentiment and the resultant wars in the Middle East during the past decade. While some have called for a new foreign policy which supports democracy, this program will also explore the question of whether a new domestic policy—one focused on shifting our way of living from suburbia to more walkable, dense and sustainable ways of urban living--may also be a necessary element of a new foreign policy. How do we create ways to live that reduce our dependency on access to non-renewable resources and support for repressive regional governments? What do sustainable and walkable cities look like? Should urban planning be a key element of foreign policy? Where do these decisions get made, and how can residents help shape their communities?Students will be introduced to the history and practice of U.S. foreign in the Middle East as well as central issues in the history and theory of U.S. urban planning and development. We will read texts, watch films and hear guest speakers who will address these issues, as well as write papers and engage in discussion and debates. Jennifer Gerend Steven Niva Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Lin Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This program is an exploration of how to do Community-Based Research (CBR) and develop meaningful documentation in relation to community needs and challenges. Our focus will be on the social and environmental justice issues that are part of community life and that become the focus of the work of community-based organizations and social movements. A key feature of this two-quarter program will be grounded approaches with community groups. We’ll be working actively with Evergreen’s Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to learn about the pressing needs in our region and to shape and sharpen our research skills and approaches. Some of the groups we will likely connect with include Parents Organized for Welfare and Economic Rights (POWER), People for Puget Sound (on environment and sustainability), Fertile Ground (community sustainability), Garden-Raised Bounty (community agriculture and food justice), Stonewall Youth (on the rights of youth and the LGBTQ community) and Teen Council of Planned Parenthood, among others.Central to our work, especially in winter quarter, will be an examination of the history, philosophy, debates and strategic modes of CBR—which is also called “participatory research,” “popular education” and “action research.” Readings and resources will draw from academics who work with communities in initiating or supporting research; at the same time, we’ll learn from community organizations about research they launch and how they work with faculty, staff and students in colleges and universities. CBR as a social movement in the U.S. and internationally will be the grounding for our efforts. Our reading will be drawn from the growing literature on CBR: key ideas and frameworks, cross-cultural and cross-national approaches, methods and skills, and vivid case material. We will sustain a persistent examination of ethics, community rights and co-learning and collaboration. Winter quarter will focus on exploring the literature and resources, learning with area organizations, posing and launching projects. Spring quarter will shift to more of a community base, with substantial fieldwork, community documentation and participation, project review and planning for future applications.Some important skills that will be developed include project design and development, interviewing and questionnaire design, researching public/government documents, participant-observation and creative approaches to documentation and presentation. We’ll be working to link our projects with compelling social, political and ecological issues and to place our work in regional to international contexts. There will be a strong focus on “give back” to the community and working with and contributing to the resource base of the CCBLA. Students will come away from the program with ideas, experiences and skills that should be helpful to them if they’re interested in future work in social justice, community organizing, environmental protection and environmental justice, public health, fieldwork, social analysis and documentation. Lin Nelson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Karen Gaul, Rita Pougiales and Julie Russo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In , the historian William Leach writes, “Whoever has the power to project a vision of the good life and make it prevail has the most decisive power of all.” Since the early 20th century, the pleasures of consumption have dominated prevailing visions of the good life in the United States. Innovations in mass production and mass media went hand in hand to link pleasure and prosperity with acquiring the latest commodities. Leisure has also been central to those pleasures, often in the form of tourism, fashion and entertainment, as people consume not only goods but experiences and ideas about what it means to be successful and happy. This program is an inquiry into these features of American consumer culture, particularly the values of convenience and authenticity that characterize the objects and desires it produces and exchanges.Students in this program will study the history and logic of U.S. consumer culture. We will consider the forces that have shaped each of us into consumers in this capitalist society, from representation and ideology to material and technological development. Sustainability will be a critical lens for our inquiry, as we consider the raw materials, labor and waste streams inherent in goods and in cultural experiences. Life cycle analysis of objects—from their origins in nature to their presence on retail shelves, personal spaces, garbage bins and landfills—will help us build a broader context for understanding the materiality with which we all engage every day.Our historical arc will be sweeping: from hunter-gatherers nearly two million years ago, to the origins of animal and plant domestication, to the formation of colonial settlements which created unprecedented challenges and opportunities, to the modern era. We will explore the patterns of resource use, social inequality and relative sustainability. We will examine how habits of conservation, thrift and re-use that were endemic to pre-modern societies transformed in tandem with the unprecedented energies of industrialization. We will investigate the theory and economics of post-industrial capitalism to better understand the impact of new media and technologies on the ways we produce and consume in the present day. We will also examine how curiosity about foreign and mysterious cultures in the context of globalization paved the way for tourism in which cultural authenticity is a central attraction. We will study the relationship between consumption and sustainability, pursuit of the good life through self-help and imported cultural practices such as yoga and meditation, between entertainment industries and communication networks, advertising and buying habits, spending money and self-worth. These contexts will enable us to destabilize and interrogate notions of what feels "normal" in the ways we engage as consumers today, including as consumers of knowledge in increasingly digitized institutions of higher education.Students will have the opportunity to examine ingrained routines of daily life, become conscious of the origins and meanings of their own habits and desires, and thereby become critical thinkers and actors in consumer culture. Our activities will include reading, writing papers and participating in seminar discussions on program topics, learning ethnographic research methods, experimenting with multimodal and collaborative work, viewing relevant films and participating in field trips. In fall quarter, we will build foundational skills and introduce key concepts and themes; winter quarter students will begin to develop their own research agenda; and in spring quarter, they can apply theory to practice in research and/or community-based projects. Spring quarter readings emphasize responses to consumer culture through alternative practices and collectives. Texts on on intentional communities include by Juliet Schor, by Karen Litfin, , and . Texts on virtual communities include by Fred Turner, by Lawrence Lessig, and selections from the anthology Digital Labor. These and related topics comprise an 8 credit academic block taught on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Students enrolling for 16 credits should be prepared to engage in substantial independent learning or work in the community (faculty can structure or guide this piece for new students). One option is a media production intensive that includes a series of technical workshops and a collaborative project. Program learning activities include: seminar responses and essay assignments, field trips, digital media workshops, yoga and awareness practices. Field trips may include Procession of the Species, visits to Fertile Ground, NW Ecobuilders Guild, the Arbutus School, and intentional communities in the PNW, and/or a tour of tiny homes. Karen Gaul Rita Pougiales Julie Russo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I In this 8-credit summer program, we will explore ways in which various types of gardens can contribute to community and health. We will spend much of our time outdoors, visiting medicinal, ethnobotanical, reservation-based, and urban food forest gardens, and engaging in hands-on and community-service learning experiences.  We will also consider themes related to sustainability, identify plants, learn herbal, and horticultural techniques, and develop nature drawing, and journaling skills. We will deepen our understanding through readings, lecture/discussions, and seminars as well as projects and research. This program is suitable for students interested in environmental education, community development, health studies, plant studies, sustainability, ethnobotany, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rita Pougiales
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I The processes of economic and political globalization reshape and undermine the lives of people and communities throughout the world. Some anthropologists have turned their attention to the effects of globalization on traditional and modern societies, attempting to bring to light the full complexities and consequences of these transnational practices. For example, Joao Biehl develops an argument linking global economic activity in Brazil to what he calls the development of "zones of social abandonment" in most urban settings. Anthropologists conduct their studies through research, which involves gathering data, over long periods of time, as both "participant" and "observer" of those they are studying. Doing ethnographic research is simultaneously analytical and deeply embodied. This program includes an examination of ethnographic research methods and methodologies, a study of varied theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists today to interpret and find meaning in data, and an opportunity to design an ethnographic project of interest. Students will read and explore a range of ethnographic studies that reveal what an anthropologist—whom Ruth Behar calls a "vulnerable observer"—can uncover about the lives of people today, and advocate on their behalf. Rita Pougiales Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Paul Pickett
  Course FR–GRFreshmen - Graduate 2, 4 02 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I The United Nations has declared the access to affordable, clean water to be a human right. Yet around the world billions of people cannot exercise this right. In addition, people in the developing world often face challenges of drought, floods, and degradation of aquatic ecosystem services. This class explores the challenges of water in developing countries, emerging issues, and potential solutions. Issues to be explored include Integrated Water Resource Management, governance, privatization, gender equality, social justice, climate change, water security, and appropriate technology.Graduate students (4 credits) and undergraduate students (2 credits) will explore these topics during the first session. Undergraduate and graduate students will participate in the weekly classroom sessions, read from weekly assignments, and do a research project which will include a final paper and presentation. Graduate students will also write weekly assignments on the readings, and will do a more in-depth, graduate-level research topic with a more extensive final paper. , has worked in water resources engineering for over three decades. His career focus has been on water quality, hydrology, water supply, watershed functions, and climate change. He received a Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources from the University of California at Davis in 1984, and a Masters of Engineering in Environmental Civil Engineering from U.C. Davis in 1989. Since 1988 he’s worked for the Washington Department of Ecology as an environmental engineer. From 2001 through 2012 he served as an elected Commissioner for the Thurston Public Utility District, a water utility with about 3,000 customers in five counties. He has taught at Evergreen since 2009, and also occasionally writes feature articles for local publications. He lives with his wife on acreage in rural Thurston County, along with cats, chickens, blueberries, fruit trees, noxious weeds, and mud. Paul Pickett Summer Summer
Kathy Kelly
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Systems theory offers a holistic approach to group development, along with a framework for identifying leverage points for improving group performance. Whether for senior managers in large businesses or agencies or for members of volunteer community organizations, systems thinking provides a vantage point to better understand group dynamics and useful tools to develop a group's capacity to work together effectively. Following an introduction to systems theory, students will explore key concepts when applied to cases in their own experiences and in cases presented in class. Resources include Peter Senge, Margaret Wheatley, Otto Scharmer, Linda Booth Sweeney, Ron Heifetz, and others. Kathy Kelly Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Nancy Anderson, Frances V. Rains and Lori Blewett
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program will introduce the scope and tools of communication, social science, and public health.  Public health and prevention are often the invisible part of health policy.  Those who are healthy or whose diseases have been prevented never know what they missed.  Yet we know that all people are not equally likely to have long and healthy lives.  Understanding the factors associated with health and wellness, including the effects of class, race, and ethnicity, was the focus of fall quarter.  In addition we considered ways that communication between health providers and people who use health services can affect health outcomes, particularly in cross-cultural and cross-class contexts. Our work during fall quarter equipped us for winter and spring quarters, when we will focus on the specific challenges to health and wellbeing that Native American people in the Salish Sea region face, in terms of cultural as well as physical survival.During winter and spring quarters, the Grays Harbor program will focus on the Peoples of the Salish Sea (Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Georgia Straits).  Central elements of the winter and spring portions of the program will include the colonization of Native peoples of the Salish Sea that accompanied European settlement, Indigenous resistance, rights and cultural renewal, a critique of current policies and practices that have not promoted the achievement of social or health equity, and the public health and social policies that may intervene to improve overall health and wellness in the surrounding communities.  We will explore the intersection of place, culture, and health and how these factors reflect inequity in access to—and degradation of—resources in and around the Salish Sea.  We will examine these themes through multiple lenses including political ecology, public health, history, and Native studies. Our readings will include current case studies, empirical research, and counter-narratives.The overarching questions that will carry us through these two quarters include how European settlement has affected the wellbeing of the Salish peoples, the interaction through time and space between Native and non-Native peoples, and the effects of these interactions on health, wellbeing, and sustainability of these communities.  We will also examine ways in which lessons from history and current vulnerabilities can help us create a viable and equitable future that will heal and honor the Salish Sea and all its people. During spring quarter the program plans to visit the Elwha River and learn about the history of the Elwha River ecosystem as a case study and example of social injustice.  We will study the effects of the Elwha Dam as well as the expected effects of dam removal on the Elwha ecosystem, tribal sovereignty, and overall health and wellness of the Elwha Klallam people.Throughout the year, learning will take place through writing, readings, seminars, lectures, films, art, and guest speakers.  Students will improve their research skills through document review, observations, critical analysis, and written assignments. Verbal skills will be improved through small group and whole class seminar discussions and through individual final project presentations.  Nancy Anderson Frances V. Rains Lori Blewett Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Julianne Unsel and Artee Young
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring As currently measured by the United Nations' Human Development Index, the United States has one of the highest standards of living in the world. Average life expectancies, educational levels, and annual incomes place even poor Americans among the most privileged people on earth. Even so, there are gross inequalities inside the U.S. Factors of personal identity, including race, class, and gender, predict with uncanny precision the range of life choices available to any given individual. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Cities are rife with violence, the political system is polarized and corrupt, and personal lives of rich and poor are marked by addiction, excess, apathy, and want. This program questions how this has happened: How do the personal identities and everyday lives of a people come together to shape social, economic, and political conditions in a nation like the United States? How do such conditions, in turn, shape individual identities and lives? What institutions have framed and enforced these conditions over time? What institutions currently sustain them? How do diverse Americans understand and react to these conditions? What can we do to make things better now?  To find answers, we will focus on two institutions fundamental to personal identity and social control in the American present and past – law and commerce. We will examine how property law and the criminal justice system in particular have shaped American history, how history has shaped them, and how both have managed personal identities through social control.In fall quarter, we will study the diverse array of social, economic, and political relationships that developed in the U.S. from settlement to the end of slavery. In winter, we will examine changes in relationships from the closing of the western frontier through the present. In spring, we will place our own lives in proximate context with exploration of contemporary theories of personal identity and social control. In all quarters, we will make a visual study of "the outlaw" as a trope both romanticized and reviled in American folklore and popular culture. We will also place U.S. economic development into a general global context. Interdisciplinary readings will include legal studies, legal history, social and economic history, critical race studies, visual studies, and feminist theory. Classes will include discussion seminars, writing workshops, lectures, student panel presentations, library study periods, and occasional film screenings.Program assignments will help us grow in the art and craft of clear communication and well-supported argumentation. They will include critical reading, academic writing, research in peer-reviewed literature, and public outreach and speaking. A digital photography component will explore "the outlaw" through visual expression. In spring, internship opportunities and individualized learning plans will bring program themes to social outreach agencies and groups in our local community.This program will offer appropriate support to all students ready to do advanced work. Activities will support student peer-to-peer teaching, personal responsibility for learning and achievement, contemplative study habits, and intensive skills development. Transfer students are welcome. Julianne Unsel Artee Young Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Jennifer Gerend and Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program focuses on Northwest communities from the perspective of public policy, land use and economics/personal finance. This program will be an eye opener for anyone who wonders why and how places develop. Where did that Walmart come from? Why did those trees get cut down for new homes? What will happen to that empty building? We will focus on the local decision making that shapes our built and natural environments while considering what types of development and redevelopment are more sustainable, both financially and environmentally.As the Northwest continues to grow, we will consider the voices of property owners, renters, business owners and other community members who often have divergent views on growth, preservation, conservation and property rights. These perspectives will aid our understanding of public places from urban and suburban cities to less connected subdivisions or rural developments. What do we want our public and private spaces to look like? How do communities plan for and accommodate growth? How are progressive policies developed and financed? Comparisons to other communities, cities, states and countries (Germany in particular) will be examined and discussed.Students will explore different communities' orientation to cars, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Architecture and urban design aspects will round out our analysis. Class sessions will include lectures, workshops, films and field trips to Port Townsend and Seattle. The fall quarter will focus on the public policy, land use planning and economics necessary for students to conduct their own significant project during winter quarter. Seminar texts will offer a theoretical background in these issues as well as a look at some contemporary communities in the news.During winter quarter, students will continue their theoretical learning while taking on an applied group project around community planning and economic development. Specifically, students will work in teams to prepare research or other solutions for selected urban and rural planning issues around Washington. These projects may involve group travel. With faculty support, students will hone their ability to work in teams and develop their presentation skills. Jennifer Gerend Glenn Landram Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Lawrence Mosqueda and Michael Vavrus
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring In this program students will investigate how political events are constructed and reported in the media, compared to actual political and economic realities. By media we mean mainstream periodicals, television, radio and films and emerging social media. We also include the growth of Internet blogs, websites, independent media and other media outlets in the 21st century. We will take a historical approach that focuses on U.S. history from the colonial era to contemporary globalization. We will compare corporate media concentration of ownership to community-controlled media and social media. We will examine how issues surrounding race, class and gender are perceived by the media and subsequently by the public. During winter quarter, students will receive a theoretical and historical grounding in the political economy of the media. We will explore the question of who owns the media and what difference this makes to how stories are reported, framed, sourced or just ignored. Films, lectures and readings, along with text-based seminars, will compose the primary structures used by this learning community. Students will regularly engage in a critical reading of and other media outlets. Also during the winter quarter, students will create a research proposal that includes an annotated bibliography. Research projects may either be traditional research papers or equivalent projects determined in collaboration with the faculty, such as an independent media blog or website. During spring quarter, students will devote approximately half of the program time to completing their proposed projects and presenting the results of their research. The remaining program time will focus more in-depth on program themes as we examine contemporary issues through a variety of sources. Lawrence Mosqueda Michael Vavrus Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Myra Downing
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Myra Downing Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Mary DuPuis
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Mary DuPuis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tracey Hosselkus
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Tracey Hosselkus Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Colleen Almojuela
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Colleen Almojuela Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dorothy Flaherty
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Dorothy Flaherty Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Renee Swan-Waite
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Renee Swan-Waite Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Douglas Schuler
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring We are surrounded with problems that aren't going away; problems that cannot be solved by individuals acting alone. At the same time, a variety of powerful barriers often stand in the way of working together successfully. And all too frequently, the institutions that are supposed to help in these matters seem either oppositional or ineffectual.How can we develop and nurture the "civic intelligence" that will help ensure our actions produce the best outcomes? What sorts of creative and, often courageous, actions, events, policies, and institutions are people devising to help meet these challenges? And how can these add up to more widespread and enduring social change? As John Robinson of UBC's Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability stated, "If we can't imagine a better world, we won't get it."Social innovation helps us to create and ponder possible futures. Civic intelligence is an evolving, cross-disciplinary perspective that examines, proposes, initiates, and evaluates collective capacity for the common good. It builds on concepts from sociology and other social sciences but also intersects with most — or all — of the other disciplines including the hard sciences, education, cognitive science, the media, and the humanities. In this three quarter program we will focus our efforts — both reflective and action-oriented — on the theory and practice of social innovation and civic intelligence in which "ordinary" people begin to assume greater power and responsibility for creating a future that is more responsive to the needs of people and the planet. Throughout the program we will gain understanding and skills through collaborative projects, workshops, films, experiments, games, and group processes. All quarters will include theoretical readings and workshops. Spring quarter will also involve student projects with the goal of effecting real-world change.Students will help determine the topics for winter and spring, which may include deliberation, alternative economics, collective memory, cooperation, media, participatory design, inequality, or war and peace.Students registering for 12 credits will be working within CIRAL, the Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory, for 4 of their credits. CIRAL is designed to help support ongoing, student-led, collaborative projects. It is intended to foster sustained and engaged relationships with groups, organizations, movements, and institutions.  In addition to our regular meetings, these students will meet each Wednesday before class from 4:30 to 6:00.  Douglas Schuler Wed Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Doreen Swetkis
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who have completed work in community learning programs (such as ) and are prepared to complete an internship in a public or nonprofit agency. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested students must consult with the faculty about their proposed internship and/or course of study. Contracts that are completed before the beginning of spring quarter will be given priority.  All contracts must follow the college procedures for internships. While students are encouraged to seek out their own internship possibilities, we will work with campus resources and the faculty member's contacts to identify internship possibilities in public and nonprofit agencies.Students will hold 20-28 hour/week internships (depending upon amount of credits: 12-16 variable option) and will come together as a class on Fridays to study more about doing nonprofit work through seminars, lectures, guest speakers and/or films. There will be common readings and individual written assignments.  The faculty member will work with the interning agencies, making at least one site-visit to each agency during the quarter and meeting regularly with students outside of scheduled class times as needed.  Internships must be located in the Seattle/Portland I/5 corridor or on the Olympic Peninsula within a reasonable distance (i.e., Mason County).   Participation in the weekly class meeting is required – no internships located nationally or internationally will be sponsored. Doreen Swetkis Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Mukti Khanna and Heesoon Jun
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who want to deepen their work in psychology through integrating theory and practice, in a setting that combines student-designed and faculty-designed study and projects. The faculty-designed component of the program will train students in the American Psychological Association ethics code that can be applied to working with diverse populations and internship sites. Students will also receive training in writing APA style social science papers and working with social science library data bases. Students will have the option of attending the Western Psychological Association meeting, which is the western regional arm of the American Psychological Association, that will be held in Portland, Oregon, April 24- 27, 2014. Attending this professional conference is one of the best ways to explore the range of work and research that is emerging in the field of psychology nationally.The student-designed component of the program may be a six-credit (15 hour a week) internship or independent study project related to psychology or health. Students will meet with faculty weekly to study more about psychological ethics, psychological writing and community work. Mukti Khanna Heesoon Jun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Kathy Kelly
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring   Kathy Kelly Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Working as a multidisciplinary project team, this year-long program has a mission. Students will engage in hands-on work to enhance the fledgling ethnobotanical garden at the Evergreen “House of Welcome” Longhouse by refining and caring for existing habitat and theme areas. Through this work, we will create a valuable educational resource and contribute to multiple communities including Evergreen, local K-12 schools, local First Nations, and a growing global collective of ethnobotanical gardens that promote environmental, medical, and cultural diversity and sustainability.During winter quarter, students will focus on the garden's "story" through continued work on existing signage, a book draft, and/or other interpretive materials such as a web page. Students will work independently on skill development, research, and project planning or implementation in their selected areas of interest and garden areas. Students will also be active during the winter transplant season and will prepare procurement and planting plans for the spring season.During spring quarter, students will plant and care for the garden, wrapping up all of the work they have begun. They will complete interpretive materials, create and implement educational activities, and participate in the Longhouse Cleansing Ceremony.Since this unique program is grounded in community-service learning, topics in various subject areas – including field botany, community-based herbalism, horticulture, and Indigenous studies – are woven into the fabric of student learning when most appropriate to overall objectives, and are introduced through readings, lectures, workshops, assignments, and projects.The program cultivates community by nurturing each member's contributions and growth, and acknowledges the broader context of sustainability, especially with regard to food and medicine.  Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Western psychology has so far failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understanding—our everyday mind and our immediate awareness of being—with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, Western psychology has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology's neglect of the living mind--both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities--has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Asia, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.In contrast to Western psychology, Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer and instead studies consciousness as a living reality which shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.Learning mainly from lectures, readings, videos, workshops, seminar discussions, individual and group research projects and field trips, in fall quarter we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional Western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. In winter quarter, we will then investigate the Eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most Western interpretations of Eastern thought—the attempt to fit Eastern ideas and practices into unexamined Western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between Eastern and Western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns. psychology, counseling, social work, education, Asian-American studies, Asian studies and religious studies. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Douglas Schuler
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring considerable Civic intelligence attempts to understand how "smart" a society is in addressing the issues before it and to think about – and initiate – practices that improve this capacity. It is a cross-cutting area of inquiry that includes the sciences – social and otherwise – as well as the humanities. Visual art, music, and stories, are as critical to our enterprise as the ability to analyze and theorize about social and environmental issues.Although there are many ways to engage in this research, all work will directly or indirectly support the work of the Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory (CIRAL). These opportunities will generally fall under the heading of "home office" or "field" work. The home office work will generally focus on developing the capacities of the CIRAL lab, including engaging in research, media work, or tech development that will support the community partnerships. The field work component will consist of direct collaboration outside the classroom, often on an ongoing basis. Students working within this learning opportunity will generally work with one or two of the clusters of topics and activities developed by previous and current students. The first content clusters that were developed were (1) CIRAL vs. homelessness; (2) environment and energy; and (3) food. In addition to a general home office focus cluster on institutionalizing CIRAL, another focused on media and online support.We are also hoping to support students who are interested in the development of online support for civic intelligence, particularly CIRAL. This includes the development of ongoing projects such as e-Liberate, a web-based tool that supports online meetings using Roberts Rules of Order, and Activist Mirror, a civic engagement game, as well as the requirements gathering and development of new capabilities for information interchange and collaboration.Normally students taking this option will have worked with Doug Schuler previously or are otherwise familiar with CIRAL and the idea of civic intelligence. Students who are interested in type of work and have not met those informal requirements are encouraged to take the program in 2013-14.Please go to the catalog view for additional information. Douglas Schuler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Douglas Schuler
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring considerable Civic intelligence attempts to understand how "smart" a society is in addressing the issues before it and to think about – and initiate – practices that improve this capacity. It is a cross-cutting area of inquiry that includes the sciences – social and otherwise – as well as the humanities. Visual art, music, and stories, are as critical to our enterprise as the ability to analyze and theorize about social and environmental issues.Although there are many ways to engage in this research, all work will directly or indirectly support the work of the Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory (CIRAL). These opportunities will generally fall under the heading of "home office" or "field" work. The home office work will generally focus on developing the capacities of the CIRAL lab, including engaging in research, media work, or tech development that will support the community partnerships. The field work component will consist of direct collaboration outside the classroom, often on an ongoing basis. Students working within this learning opportunity will generally work with one or two of the clusters of topics and activities developed by previous and current students. The first content clusters that were developed were (1) CIRAL vs. homelessness; (2) environment and energy; and (3) food. In addition to a general home office focus cluster on institutionalizing CIRAL, another focused on media and online support.We are also hoping to support students who are interested in the development of online support for civic intelligence, particularly CIRAL. This includes the development of ongoing projects such as e-Liberate, a web-based tool that supports online meetings using Roberts Rules of Order, and Activist Mirror, a civic engagement game, as well as the requirements gathering and development of new capabilities for information interchange and collaboration.Normally students taking this option will have worked with Doug Schuler previously or are otherwise familiar with CIRAL and the idea of civic intelligence. Students who are interested in type of work and have not met those informal requirements are encouraged to take the program in 2013-14. Douglas Schuler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring