2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Communications [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Hirsh Diamant and Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students in this interdisciplinary program, which continues from Fall quarter, will learn how to cultivate a “sense of wonder” while building skills as writers, activists, artists, and interdisciplinary scholars.  Our work will combine theory and practice as we delve into the rich areas of literature, cultural studies, writing, creative arts, contemplative practice, natural history, and environmental/outdoor education.  We will explore how we develop roots to the natural world and explore themes related to natural history literature, the Pacific Northwest, and global multicultural traditions that have intimate connections to place, family, education, and artistic practice. At the core of our inquiry will be the questions:  What enlivens culture?  What motivates change?  Working from a rich, interdisciplinary perspective, we will study what it means to be rooted to place and how place connects us to a deep sense of purpose and meaning through word and image, language and tradition, stories and activism, and education and scholarship. Highlights of Winter quarter will include a three day Lunar New Year and Tai Ji celebration and Community Service work in areas of students’ interests.  Hirsh Diamant Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This 12-credit program, Advanced Writer's Workshop, is designed for 15 students who already have a foundation in writing fiction and/or creative non-fiction.  Through our writing, reading and review of film as a medium, we will examine and practice the craft of creating rich characters, vibrant scenes, and crisp dialogue.  During spring quarter, students will produce one memoir-based piece, a short story or novel chapter, and a “student choice” writing block.  We will concentrate on the craft of revision with each section of writing.  Students should also expect to spend significant additional time critiquing peer work outside the classroom. Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Yvonne Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Johnson Charles, Jr., Lower Elwha Klallam This program is intended for students wishing to analyze a modern day dilemma: American Indians have standing in their land, cultural protocols, and legal relationships with the U.S. Government; the State of Washington wants/needs to repair a bridge and provide jobs; and local community people plan to develop a waterfront. Students will use the text , related print/non-print documents, the case study and interview WSDOT employees and Lower Elwha Klallam tribal members to formulate cross-cultural communication models. Students will build an academic foundation in law and public policy as they move from theory to praxis using the following texts: , , and . We are interested in providing an environment of collaboration in which faculty and learners will ask essential questions, identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics. Learners will be exposed to research methods, the politics of ethnographic research, interview techniques, writing workshops, and educational technology. Students will effectively use Bloom’s Taxonomy, develop essential questions, and commit to Paul’s 35 Elements of Critical Thinking. Students will also use the expectations of an Evergreen graduate and the five foci as a guide to their development.  Students will have the opportunity to improve their skills in self- and group-motivation as well as communication (including dialogue, email, resources on the Web and our moodle site).Students (in groups) will propose, undertake and evaluate a three-week ethnographic interview project to understand how student groups have formed on campus and the politics of their existence. Students will present their academic project during week ten. Yvonne Peterson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Success in international business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in international trade, globalization, and intercultural communication. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of international business, communications, and finance. This course focuses on the international and community development aspect of business management, namely international trade, marketing, intercultural communication, globalization, and international organizations.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in finance, economics, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of business management, economics, and finance.  This course focuses on the micro aspect of business management, namely business planning, microeconomics, business finance, fund raising, and human resource management.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
David Cramton
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 14Summer Session I What makes a beautiful image?  What images best tell a story?  What separates phone vids from ? We will watch films, seminar around films, and create our own moving images.  We will cover the art, technology and technique of the moving image.  We will study how lighting, composition, and camera placement all affect and reflect the story, characters and landscapes that we capture.  We will spend a significant amount of time working with cameras and watching our own creations as a group, plus a few field trips to Seattle and/or Portland to look at the tools and resources used by professional image creators. David Cramton Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lori Blewett
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This course will introduce students to core concepts and theoretical frameworks that enhance our ability to analyze and successfully manage conflict.  It will include skill building and communication practice aimed at expanding our conflict negotiation repertoire and our capacity for collaborative problem-solving. Lori Blewett Mon Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Nancy Anderson, Frances V. Rains and Lori Blewett
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program will introduce the scope and tools of communication, social science, and public health.  Public health and prevention are often the invisible part of health policy.  Those who are healthy or whose diseases have been prevented never know what they missed.  Yet we know that all people are not equally likely to have long and healthy lives.  Understanding the factors associated with health and wellness, including the effects of class, race, and ethnicity, was the focus of fall quarter.  In addition we considered ways that communication between health providers and people who use health services can affect health outcomes, particularly in cross-cultural and cross-class contexts. Our work during fall quarter equipped us for winter and spring quarters, when we will focus on the specific challenges to health and wellbeing that Native American people in the Salish Sea region face, in terms of cultural as well as physical survival.During winter and spring quarters, the Grays Harbor program will focus on the Peoples of the Salish Sea (Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Georgia Straits).  Central elements of the winter and spring portions of the program will include the colonization of Native peoples of the Salish Sea that accompanied European settlement, Indigenous resistance, rights and cultural renewal, a critique of current policies and practices that have not promoted the achievement of social or health equity, and the public health and social policies that may intervene to improve overall health and wellness in the surrounding communities.  We will explore the intersection of place, culture, and health and how these factors reflect inequity in access to—and degradation of—resources in and around the Salish Sea.  We will examine these themes through multiple lenses including political ecology, public health, history, and Native studies. Our readings will include current case studies, empirical research, and counter-narratives.The overarching questions that will carry us through these two quarters include how European settlement has affected the wellbeing of the Salish peoples, the interaction through time and space between Native and non-Native peoples, and the effects of these interactions on health, wellbeing, and sustainability of these communities.  We will also examine ways in which lessons from history and current vulnerabilities can help us create a viable and equitable future that will heal and honor the Salish Sea and all its people. During spring quarter the program plans to visit the Elwha River and learn about the history of the Elwha River ecosystem as a case study and example of social injustice.  We will study the effects of the Elwha Dam as well as the expected effects of dam removal on the Elwha ecosystem, tribal sovereignty, and overall health and wellness of the Elwha Klallam people.Throughout the year, learning will take place through writing, readings, seminars, lectures, films, art, and guest speakers.  Students will improve their research skills through document review, observations, critical analysis, and written assignments. Verbal skills will be improved through small group and whole class seminar discussions and through individual final project presentations.  Nancy Anderson Frances V. Rains Lori Blewett Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter program explores the fascinating world of languages. What do you know when you know a language? How do you get that knowledge? Are there properties that all languages share? How do languages change over time? Why are half of the world's languages now under threat of extinction? How are communities held together or torn apart by the languages they speak?We will consider these questions and others through the lens of linguistics. Topics to be examined for winter include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, language change, the history of English and English dialects, key issues facing multilingual communities and language planning. In spring, topics will include: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, first language acquisition, language and gender and linguistic politeness. We will look at well-known languages and lesser-known languages and discover why they matter in our lives today. Through the course of the program students will learn a variety of conceptual and empirical techniques, from analyzing speech sounds to interpreting the rationale behind current language policy.This program will be an intensive examination of topics requiring a significant amount of reading as well as regular problem sets and essays.Students interested in taking a language course alongside this program can arrange to take this program for 12 credits.  Diego de Acosta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Heesoon Jun and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter The human mind is perhaps the most fascinating, and least understood, product of Darwinian evolution. In this program we will endeavor to understand how the mind functions and why it has come to work in the way that it has. We will study human psychology as modern empirical science has come to understand it, and we will combine that hybrid model with a consideration of the evolutionary path humans have traversed, as well as a deep investigation of those portions of evolutionary theory most relevant to hominid cognition, perception and behavior. Our program will seek to unify important conclusions from multiple schools of thought within psychology as we consider humans from a broadly cross-cultural perspective. We will range from the Jungian to the Cognitive, and from the modern !Kung people of the Kalahari to the ancient Maya of Central America. Our objective is to generate an integrative model of the human mind that can accommodate humans as individuals and as interdependent social beings.Winter materials will build on content covered in the fall. There will be educational value and intellectual reward for staying in the program both quarters. biology, psychology, health related studies, human and social services. Heesoon Jun Bret Weinstein Tue Tue Wed Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Anne Fischel and Ruth Hayes
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring   Anne Fischel Ruth Hayes Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Lawrence Mosqueda and Michael Vavrus
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring In this program students will investigate how political events are constructed and reported in the media, compared to actual political and economic realities. By media we mean mainstream periodicals, television, radio and films and emerging social media. We also include the growth of Internet blogs, websites, independent media and other media outlets in the 21st century. We will take a historical approach that focuses on U.S. history from the colonial era to contemporary globalization. We will compare corporate media concentration of ownership to community-controlled media and social media. We will examine how issues surrounding race, class and gender are perceived by the media and subsequently by the public. During winter quarter, students will receive a theoretical and historical grounding in the political economy of the media. We will explore the question of who owns the media and what difference this makes to how stories are reported, framed, sourced or just ignored. Films, lectures and readings, along with text-based seminars, will compose the primary structures used by this learning community. Students will regularly engage in a critical reading of and other media outlets. Also during the winter quarter, students will create a research proposal that includes an annotated bibliography. Research projects may either be traditional research papers or equivalent projects determined in collaboration with the faculty, such as an independent media blog or website. During spring quarter, students will devote approximately half of the program time to completing their proposed projects and presenting the results of their research. The remaining program time will focus more in-depth on program themes as we examine contemporary issues through a variety of sources. Lawrence Mosqueda Michael Vavrus Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Lori Blewett
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I This two-week intensive course focuses on the fundamentals of public speaking. It is aimed at improving speaking confidence and skill regardless of one’s current level of experience.  Students will learn to control speech anxiety, compose well-organized presentations, and produce dynamic performances.  We will draw on contemporary and traditional rhetorical theories in relation to persuasive and informative speaking goals.  All students will receive individualized feedback and coaching in order to enhance their ability to speak effectively in the classroom, workplace, or public arena. The course provides communication credit for selected Master In Teaching endorsement areas. Lori Blewett Tue Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lori Blewett
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening W 14Winter   Lori Blewett Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Ready Camera One investigates the politics of representation. Therefore, students who choose to enroll should be vitally and sincerely interested in the issues and ideas concerning the representation of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in the mass media. Ready Camera One’s focus on gender and identity in American television will be explored in a research project called INTO FOCUS that will combine media research, critical writing, a visual essay, and an oral presentation.This program is also designed for students interested in exploring visual literacy, television production, performance, and media criticism. Students will be introduced to both media deconstruction and media production skills through a series of lecture/screenings as well as workshops and design problems that focus primarily on collaborative multi-camera studio production. In addition to a series of studio exercises, students will complete a collaborative final project that combines media analysis, research, performance and production about broadcast content and ideology.We will take a critical, performative and historical approach as we examine and even emulate the production style and lessons from the early history of 20th century live television as well as more contemporary models. Students will be expected to perform in front of as well as behind the camera and will explore the logistics and aesthetics of multi-camera direction and design. Activities will include training in the CCAM, a multi-camera TV studio facility, instruction in basic performance and writing for television, and an immersive production schedule that requires a professional attitude including perfect attendance and timeliness.No prior media production experience is required. However, Ready Camera One is also an excellent opportunity for students who do have experience in the performing arts or media arts to explore intensive studio production and collaboration. Sally Cloninger Tue Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Naima Lowe
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II In a world increasingly made up of screens, it is important to know how to make and re-make images that matter. Students from all disciplines and skill levels are invited to take this course where we will learn how films and videos use editing to make meaning. In this hands on course students will be introduced to the fundamentals of digital video editing through a combination of screenings, class discussions, readings, exercises and projects. We'll look at examples of films and videos that take pre-existing footage and transform the meaning through "remixing" and transforming the original. We'll also look at some classical film and video editing techniques to better understand how these "rules of the trade" can be borrowed, transformed and broken in order to get our ideas across. Students will gain competency in a range of editing techniques appropriate for documentary, narrative and experimental video forms, and will learn to critically and formally analyze films and videos in order to better understand how editing (as well as other formal elements) come together in films to create meaning.This course welcomes students of all skill levels.  Naima Lowe Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Douglas Schuler
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring We are surrounded with problems that aren't going away; problems that cannot be solved by individuals acting alone. At the same time, a variety of powerful barriers often stand in the way of working together successfully. And all too frequently, the institutions that are supposed to help in these matters seem either oppositional or ineffectual.How can we develop and nurture the "civic intelligence" that will help ensure our actions produce the best outcomes? What sorts of creative and, often courageous, actions, events, policies, and institutions are people devising to help meet these challenges? And how can these add up to more widespread and enduring social change? As John Robinson of UBC's Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability stated, "If we can't imagine a better world, we won't get it."Social innovation helps us to create and ponder possible futures. Civic intelligence is an evolving, cross-disciplinary perspective that examines, proposes, initiates, and evaluates collective capacity for the common good. It builds on concepts from sociology and other social sciences but also intersects with most — or all — of the other disciplines including the hard sciences, education, cognitive science, the media, and the humanities. In this three quarter program we will focus our efforts — both reflective and action-oriented — on the theory and practice of social innovation and civic intelligence in which "ordinary" people begin to assume greater power and responsibility for creating a future that is more responsive to the needs of people and the planet. Throughout the program we will gain understanding and skills through collaborative projects, workshops, films, experiments, games, and group processes. All quarters will include theoretical readings and workshops. Spring quarter will also involve student projects with the goal of effecting real-world change.Students will help determine the topics for winter and spring, which may include deliberation, alternative economics, collective memory, cooperation, media, participatory design, inequality, or war and peace.Students registering for 12 credits will be working within CIRAL, the Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory, for 4 of their credits. CIRAL is designed to help support ongoing, student-led, collaborative projects. It is intended to foster sustained and engaged relationships with groups, organizations, movements, and institutions.  In addition to our regular meetings, these students will meet each Wednesday before class from 4:30 to 6:00.  Douglas Schuler Wed Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Julia Zay and Amjad Faur
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This is an art foundations program invested in opening up the dense histories and meanings of photographic images in their many forms, from still to moving and back again--and the unsettled places between. We explore what it means both to know and to make an image– photographic, moving, and time-based. We will pay equal attention to the history, theory and practice of the photographic image, both still and moving, in the context of visual studies--a field that yokes a broad study of the visual arts with social and cultural history and theory--art history, film/cinema history, and philosophy. Through a critical engagement with still and moving photographic images as well as related forms of visual art, we will map a broad contextual territory and challenge received notions of the boundaries between forms, genres, and mediums.Photography can never be thought of as simply a medium, technology or practice but a convergence of material, history, culture and power. In the Fall, we will start with the unfolding of the Western enlightenment, from the 16th to the 19th century, when optical technologies radically reorganized the senses and methods of knowledge production, posing new questions about temporal, spatial and visual relationships to artists and scientists alike.  We will then move more deeply into the 19th and first half of the 20th century, when photography emerged into an art world dominated by painting, a visual culture organized around print technologies, and societies in the throes of rapid industrialization. Photography initially emerged not out of art contexts but out of the institutions of science and industry, so we will consider, in particular, the ways it was used to produce social categories, shaping dominant discourses of gender, class and criminality. For example, we’ll look at the language of portraiture so central to the emergence of both a middle class and the language of criminal and medical photography. Our materials and techniques will first be limited to those from the 19th century (proto-photography, early processes, hand-built cameras). In winter, we move from the 19th to the long 20th century and the emergence of cinema. We will look at the way early cinema was organized around a fascination with duration, spectacle, and experimentation and on the relationship between photography and cinema, stillness and movement. We will continue to work in still photography, broadening our range of techniques, and add a small amount of 16mm filmmaking to the mix as we explore the larger social and historical contexts and philosophical questions surrounding the relationship between still and moving photographic images. In our creative and intellectual work, we’ll ask many questions about the phenomenon, concept and experience of time--for example, how is a four minute exposure in a still photograph both similar to and different from a four minute continuous shot of film or video of the same subject?In all our work we will focus on building essential skills in practices of attention--learning how to slow down our modes of seeing, experiencing and working. In our photographic practice, this will mean moving away from the pursuit of “finished” images and towards experimental processes and conceptual problem solving. In our work with texts and images, this will mean developing our ability to read and view closely and write with precision and patience. Class sessions will include lectures/screenings, workshops, seminar, critical reading and writing, and critique. In addition to working individually, students can expect to collaborate regularly with their peers on a variety of assignments and larger projects. All along the way we will intentionally examine how our investments in collaboration animate our intellectual and creative work. We will spend significant time in critique to help each other see, describe, evaluate and improve our creative and critical work.  Julia Zay Amjad Faur Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Eirik Steinhoff
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This one-quarter critical and creative reading and writing program is designed for advanced students embarked on the composition of long-range and wide-ranging writing projects oriented toward or against or beyond the emergent occasions that surround us. Intensive independent writing and reading will be complemented by weekly seminars, small-group workshops, and weekly and semi-weekly lectures ( the Critical and Cultural Lecture Series and the Art Lecture series); occasional screenings and a local field-trip are possible as well. “Language is fossil poetry,” Emerson declares. And indeed the radical sense of each term in this program’s subtitle offers substantial orientation for the various directions we might take: in the sense of “decision” or “choice”; in the sense of “making” (not only in what is called “poetry,” but also in other kinds of composition, whether in prose or verse, for the page or the stage or the screen); in the sense of “making visible”; in the sense of “action” or “doing.” All of which is to say that in addition to Emerson’s etymological enthusiasms we will be mindful withal of Wittgenstein’s no less fruitful suggestion that “the meaning of a word is its use.” An expanded engagement with the question Montaigne had emblazoned on the rafters of his study — — will guide us in our individual and collective inquiry: What do I know? And what do I do? How do I know and how do I do? How do we do? How do we know? How can we do things with words to find out? How might our writing become an instrument for conducting rigorous ethical and epistemological investigations designed to reconnect us, by means of our study (however elaborate or playful or recondite), back to the world we live in right now? Eirik Steinhoff Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sarah Williams
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program provides an opportunity for students to work on a large, highly collaborative project that requires a multiplicity of skills and knowledge: documenting an Olympian patron of the arts. Students will form a learning community in order to work collectively and collaboratively on a feature-length documentary film about philanthropy and patronage of the arts. Each student will take on specific roles related to editing, marketing/PR, soundtrack composition, and interviewing/researching. However, in order to build new skills, all students will collaborate on every aspect of the project. Students will work together, share research results, and participate in regular critiques with faculty and staff. Collaborative work will include field trips, audio recording, cinematography, marketing, interviewing, and editing. Faculty and staff will support student work through regular meetings, critiques and problem-solving discussions. The peer learning community will collaboratively determine the direction and success of this project. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly meetings with the continuing student director/producer and bi-monthly meetings with faculty and staff in Media as well as Development and Alumni Programs. In addition, students will maintain an academic blog to document the progress of the on-going project . For Fall and Winter Quarters the students will produce a work-in-progress screening.  In the spring, the students will organize a campus-wide screening and prepare the film for festival submission. This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. Sarah Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Working as a multidisciplinary project team, this year-long program has a mission. Students will engage in hands-on work to enhance the fledgling ethnobotanical garden at the Evergreen “House of Welcome” Longhouse by refining and caring for existing habitat and theme areas. Through this work, we will create a valuable educational resource and contribute to multiple communities including Evergreen, local K-12 schools, local First Nations, and a growing global collective of ethnobotanical gardens that promote environmental, medical, and cultural diversity and sustainability.During winter quarter, students will focus on the garden's "story" through continued work on existing signage, a book draft, and/or other interpretive materials such as a web page. Students will work independently on skill development, research, and project planning or implementation in their selected areas of interest and garden areas. Students will also be active during the winter transplant season and will prepare procurement and planting plans for the spring season.During spring quarter, students will plant and care for the garden, wrapping up all of the work they have begun. They will complete interpretive materials, create and implement educational activities, and participate in the Longhouse Cleansing Ceremony.Since this unique program is grounded in community-service learning, topics in various subject areas – including field botany, community-based herbalism, horticulture, and Indigenous studies – are woven into the fabric of student learning when most appropriate to overall objectives, and are introduced through readings, lectures, workshops, assignments, and projects.The program cultivates community by nurturing each member's contributions and growth, and acknowledges the broader context of sustainability, especially with regard to food and medicine.  Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marla Elliott and Marcella Benson-Quaziena
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring You are the most powerful and versatile tool you have. Do you know who you are and what you stand for?  Is that who you want to be? How can you use your presence as an instrument of change? How do you know what you evoke/provoke in others?  How do you move in the world with awareness of your authentic self? The ability to communicate and influence is crucial to our effectiveness as we move through many systems.  This program is designed for students who want to develop skills of self-knowledge and “use of self” as an instrument of social change. Marla Elliott Marcella Benson-Quaziena Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Gilda Sheppard and Carl Waluconis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full This program will explore the role that movement, visual art, music, and media can play in problem solving and in the resolution of internalized fear, conflicts, or blocks.  Through a variety of hands-on activities, field trips, readings, films/video, and guest speakers, students will discover sources of imagery, sound, and movement as tools to awaken their creative problem solving from two perspectives—as creator and viewer.  Students interested in human services, social sciences, media, humanities and education will find this course engaging. This course does not require any prerequisite art classes or training. Gilda Sheppard Carl Waluconis Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lori Blewett and Karen Hogan
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This program explores biological, social, and political dimensions of food. We’ll consider the basic biological composition and processes of our bodies, and learn why some foods are necessary and others are bad for us. These biological questions will be studied in relation to cultural and political constructions of food including discourses of consumption, identity, and sustainability. We’ll explore some recent hot topics related to food, including diet and obesity, GMO food labeling, crop genetic diversity, and food sovereignty.  We’re especially interested in public rhetoric on these subjects – how scientific facts and ideas are represented and misrepresented in public debate, how food consumption and related social identities are influenced by media, and how food activism is challenging trends in corporate food production.  We’ll examine a variety of media sources, including journalism, online sources, and films.  Lori Blewett Karen Hogan Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Peter Bacho
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day Su 14Summer Full This class will focus on enhancing writing skills needed for communicating with academic and popular audiences. During the first session, students will study the art of composition, with an emphasis on improving writing projects typically associated with the effective dissemination of community resource materials, manuals, position papers, etc. Students will study the art of effective and accurate editing. Regarding the latter, students will edit an unedited version of a journal entry that is part of a novel – written by the Instructor – and published by the University of Hawai’i Press.During the second session, students will shift their focus to creative writing. They will create a credible protagonist, do a variety of effective creative writing exercises, and hold weekly readings of their work. Peter Bacho Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sara Huntington
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter You write alone but you always write for others: readers matter. Here, you will keep company with great authors and your peers as you master the rhetorical tools needed to write persuasively, compellingly, and beautifully. We will proceed from Annie Dillard’s advice that if you like sentences, then you can become a writer because you have a place to start—not to mention a passion for what makes writing lively and pleasurable. Storytelling will feature prominently in our common work, especially descriptive practices that move prose toward shape and meaning. In other words, we will learn how to show, rather than just tell, a story.We will begin with a review of sentence structure focusing on subjects and verbs, clauses and phrases. With the aim of achieving clarity, students will study editing techniques, especially ways to rewrite overly abstract prose. Working with samples of professional writing, students will learn how to use agent-action analysis, how to start and end sentences and paragraphs, and how to coordinate and balance the parts of longer sentences. Rather than focusing on writing rules, we will approach style as the range of choices available in different rhetorical contexts. Students will also revise a piece of their own writing to identify patterns and problems in their craft. After these trial runs, they will begin original composition in a genre, mode, or vein of their choosing.Readings include three types of texts: those about the practice and theory of rhetoric, from Plato and Aristotle to Stanley Fish and Barbara Tufte; those that exemplify beauty, eloquence and force, from Philip Roth and Cormac McCarthy to Darwin and Watson and Crick; and those that fail to persuade, from examples of academic discourse to the ghastly delights of purple prose. Students will search for an author who will teach them how the commitment of close reading fuses with the practice of good writing. Students must reach for the development of aesthetic standards that should inform any piece of writing that’s worth reading and that merits any meaningful critical response.Our work will be collaborative and social. The class blends lectures, student presentations, workshops, and seminar periods. Students will present their work regularly for critique (generally in small sections), and they will enjoy the difficult work of responding to their peers with concrete suggestions. Students from all disciplines are welcome, especially since effective writing and rhetoric is a fundamental part of a good liberal arts education. Sara Huntington Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall