2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Business And Management [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II  Great leadership begins with self-transformation and awakening the leader within.  Our world is fragile and can no longer sustain poor and unethical leadership.  Remaining a bystander is not an option for us anymore.  There is an urgent need for conscious and principled leaders who are driven by a set of universal values, a strong moral compass, and a deep desire to build a global society and a sustainable world.  This course provides students with a chance to examine their passion for change, formulate their vision and mission, and build leadership capacity to enable others to take action. Students in this course will have the opportunity to reflect, collaborate, and learn through individual and group activities including self-evaluation, cases, seminars, and team projects.  Dariush Khaleghi Fri Fri Sat Sat Sun Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Theresa Aragon and Lee Lyttle
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long, weekend-intensive, business and management program will assess business, management, and leadership in both the public and private sectors.  We will explore these in the context of contemporary technological advances and globalization and will examine organizations and governmental agencies within their economic, political, and social environment.  Organizational development and management strategies will be analyzed in terms of current and future utility and the delivery of the public good.  Traditional elements of management such as decision making, strategic planning, organizational behavior, human resources, and conflict management are incorporated throughout the program.  Application of theory and enhancement of critical thinking will occur through problem solving and case study analyses.  Assignments will place a heavy emphasis on developing analytical, verbal, written, and electronic communication skills through dialogue, seminars, critical essays, training modules, research papers, and formal presentations.  Managerial skills will be developed through scenario building, scripting, role-play, and case development among other techniques.Winter quarter will focus on strategic management theory, policy analysis, and developing the ability to plan and execute a strategic plan. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of basic finance, economic, and strategic management concepts.  Skill development objectives will include the ability to utilize analytical tools to assess a company’s or agency’s performance and to develop recommendations to ensure continued success in either sector. Spring quarter will focus on applying managerial skills and strategic management concepts and analytical tools in the workplace through internships.  Selected concepts in change management and managing people will be analyzed in terms of their utility in the workplace. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of change management and of managing people.  Skill development objectives will include the ability to critique and apply people and change management concepts in the public or private sector workplace.Students will be accepted in the program for winter quarter with signature approval of the faculty. Theresa Aragon Lee Lyttle Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Success in international business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in international trade, globalization, and intercultural communication. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of international business, communications, and finance. This course focuses on the international and community development aspect of business management, namely international trade, marketing, intercultural communication, globalization, and international organizations.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in economics, finance, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of government public policies, business cycles, and community development. This course focuses on the macro aspect of business economics and management, namely macroeconomics, fiscal and monetary policies, national accounting, money and banking systems, and business organizational development.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Thuy Vu
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Success in business and community development requires a certain level of proficiency in finance, economics, and management. This course provides basic knowledge and skill training for potential entrepreneurs and managers in the areas of business management, economics, and finance.  This course focuses on the micro aspect of business management, namely business planning, microeconomics, business finance, fund raising, and human resource management.Students in this course are expected to complete 10 hours of community service or in-service learning with a local business or community-based organization. Thuy Vu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Would you like to better understand the business world?  This program will provide the analysis and reasoning for the conduct and understanding of business and finance in today’s world. We will focus on contemporary business issues, as well as offer an introduction to strategy, personal finance and investing. We will examine the financial challenges faced by smaller businesses, entrepreneurs and individuals, and what it takes to be effective in our current economic environment. There will be workshops, lectures, films, guest speakers and student-led sessions. Readings from daily newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal, magazines such as the Economist and Kiplinger’s, and texts such as by Thomas Friedman and by Jim Collins will increase student familiarity with current business topics and help students develop the skills to organize and analyze business, economic and financial information. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will also be covered. Students will compete in an advanced business simulation in teams. The simulation will require substantial student research, including analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Students will emerge from the simulation with improved teamwork skills, as well as a greater understanding of financial statement analysis, competitive strategy, marketing, operations, and business economics.  Glenn Landram Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Allen Jenkins
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Business Foundations program provides a functional overview of all phases of business, including ownership, marketing, personnel, accounting, finance, managerial controls, leadership, and the relationship of business to the ethical, economic, and social environment in which it operates.  Business Foundations provides students a window on global business: how the global marketplace operates and how a country’s customs, politics, and ethnicity affect business. The program is designed for business and non-business degree seeking students, current and future entrepreneurs, or anyone who wants a practical foundation in business. Winter’s studies will focus on Financial and Managerial Accounting Fundamentals. As the program continues in the spring quarter, students will continue to study finance, do independent study, and learn through a four-credit internship.Each quarter's specific topics are designed as foundations for students with no prior academic business background. The instructor will strive to teach the program in an engaging manner, using a mix of uncluttered reading materials, conversational language, and humor to introduce students to the essentials of business and management without sacrificing rigor or content.  We will use a real-world focus to illustrate fundamental concepts and employ case studies of companies whose products and services are familiar.The intent of the program is to provide a theoretical framework for the realities of starting, managing, and growing a small to medium size business.  Our goal is for students to gain insight into the operational, legal, financial, ethical, and practical challenges associated with running a business.  We will explore how organizations are legally and financially defined, what is unique about them, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type.  The program uses seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions, assignments, self-study, and an internship to integrate classroom knowledge with current best practices, protocols, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's global, diverse economies. Allen Jenkins Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Andrew Buchman, Doreen Swetkis and Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is a tour of social forces that shape our arts communities, including cultural, organizational, managerial, financial and historical. By examining art, music and theatre worlds, we will discover structures that help foster vibrant artistic communities. We will meet business and nonprofit leaders (often artists themselves) who bring artists and art lovers together. Artistic entrepreneurs with business savvy, as we will see, often make the art world go 'round.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in making a living as an artist, musician or performer, operating in the nonprofit art world, or making a career in creative industries, and bridging the conventional gaps between creativity, business sense and social engagement. Each quarter's work will include an optional week of travel and study an art center in the United States: to New York City during the fall and Los Angeles during the winter. Students unable to travel to these cities can pursue related studies in Seattle and Portland.The program will combine studies of the arts, business and nonprofit administration and management through a rich mix of critical and creative projects, such as analyzing a local arts business or nonprofit organization. An artist who understands the principles of a well-run business and can deal effectively with contracts, grants and negotiations, we'll find, is likely to gain more artistic and professional freedom. Business people who understand and care about the arts, we'll discover, can build careers that include doing good as well as doing well. Organizations built around art forms can help support local cultures and create sustainable manufacturing ventures, too.The nonprofit arts community encompasses a broad range of artistic endeavors such as summer arts camps and festivals, art and music therapy, community theaters, arts foundations and after-school arts programs. For-profit and nonprofit organizations are different, and we want to make sure students gain knowledge of the vast range of ways they can make a living in and around the arts.By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to connect your own artistic and wage earning work, have an impact on organizations in communities you care about, acquire first-hand knowledge of a diversity of successful arts initiatives, and communicate effectively in the language of business and nonprofit administration. Andrew Buchman Doreen Swetkis Zoe Van Schyndel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rose Jang and David Shaw
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall In the fall of 2012, China’s 18th Communist Party Congress selected the current generation of Chinese political leaders, moving China into the next chapter of its 3,000-plus years of political history.Today, China’s economic power continues to grow, and its rise globally has drawn increasing attention. Many developing countries are viewing the China model as an alternative to the Western experience of economic growth and middle class prosperity. However, China is faced with many internal and external challenges. Challenges like these have repeatedly threatened China’s social stability in the past. In the extreme case, they might alter its current ideological foundations, potentially undercutting the premises of the China “success story.”This introductory China studies program will focus on China's present situation as a modern state and global power evolved from a lengthy and complicated cultural development over centuries. Within the time constraint of a quarter, we will examine China from selective angles and subject matters suggesting recurrent cultural patterns and distinct national characteristics. In the social sciences, we will touch on China’s geography, political structure and economic and business systems, including sustainability and environmental issues. From the humanities perspective, we will look at prominent examples of China’s religion, philosophy, arts and literature. All these issues are potentially interrelated, leading to a more coherent set of inquiries into the myth or reality of China’s current image of success.Students will be exposed to multiple topics and issues through weekly readings, lectures, discussions and workshops. They will also conduct a research project on a China-related topic of their own choice. This research project will provide them with opportunities to develop skills in research methods and academic writing. The program will introduce the fundamentals of Chinese language and linguistics through program studies but does not contain an independent Chinese language study component. Rose Jang David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
David Shaw
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This China studies program will take an in-depth look at modern China through the perspective of the social sciences, building on readings and issues discussed in the fall program However, any student with an interest in China or East Asian studies should be able to join the program in winter or spring quarter and succeed in their studies. Our overriding goals are to understand today's China as a vital global power, while critically exploring the lingering influence of its rich yet strife-torn cultural past on behavior and decisions made at the national, institutional and individual levels. Building on our shared texts and themes, students will do independent research individually or in small groups, becoming experts in a particular facet of Chinese business, economy. society and/or sustainability. Our work will also extend beyond uniquely Chinese experiences into topics on which the future of Asia, the global economy and our small planet depend, including the natural environment, paths to ecological, social and economic sustainability and strategies to redress economic inequalities and social dislocations. China's environmental history, its rural-urban dynamic and its economic development will also serve as core threads through both quarters of study. During winter quarter, we will study ancient Chinese texts (in translation), as well as popular and academic articles, books, films and documentaries on China, particularly those exploring and reinterpreting ancient themes. Chinese philosophy, comprised of the primary "Three Teachings" of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, will inform our study of Chinese culture. Sun Tzu's will introduce us to one of the world's oldest sources of strategic thought and Chinese concepts of leadership. Other topics likely to be covered include China’s trade and travel with the outside world, the Chinese diaspora, China's contact and interactions with foreign powers and its industrialization and political transformations from an imperial dynasty to a republic to a Communist state. Spring quarter we will focus on present-day China. We will examine China's current image as a dynamic economic powerhouse and “global factory” and as an enigmatic political player internationally. We will also look at its internal, problematic quests for domestic harmony, a well-functioning legal system and a truly civil society.In both quarters, we will meet in seminar, workshop and lecture settings. Weekly readings from books, popular media (newspapers, magazines) and academic journal articles should be expected for seminar and workshop. A peer-review approach will be taken in a Writing and Research Workshop to complement individual or small-group efforts on their research projects. Regular film and documentary viewings will build a closer familiarity with Chinese culture and society. Finally, in spring quarter, students will make an individual presentation on a book they have read and critically reviewed on their own. Another student completing the same reading will provide feedback on the presentation based on their reading of the book. This should expand the range of perspectives covered beyond the readings assigned to the entire class.Separate enrollment in Chinese language courses is strongly encouraged as a complement to this program. This program would also serve as good preparation for students who plan to travel to China via independent learning contracts or subsequent study abroad programs. David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Despite access to all sorts of information, people continue to be conned, swindled and cheated out of their hard-earned money. Is it really true anyone can be conned? How can we protect ourselves and our communities against cons who by their very nature make situations seem reasonable and socially compelling.This program is an overview of various schemes and trickery that fraudsters employ in the financial world and elsewhere. From the original Charles Ponzi and his schemes in the early 1900’s to the current day massive affinity fraud perpetrated by Bernie Madoff, we will look at the schemers and their victims. If an investment sounds too good to be true, it probably is—but the success of real-life swindlers shows how often this simple advice is ignored. We will explore what makes investors and others reach for the fool’s gold of seemingly foolproof and lucrative investment opportunities. We will also look at the psychology of fraudsters and try to determine what makes them operate outside the normal laws of society.The program is designed for students with a strong interest in finance and investments or those interested in what drives the most basic of human instincts, greed. Spotting a con requires us to think critically about situations and to find a balance between trusting and self-preservation. By the end of the program we expect you to be able to think creatively about ways to protect yourself and society from fraudsters. Zoe Van Schyndel Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Cynthia Kennedy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I This weekend-intensive program is designed for students who either are, or plan to be, in the position of managing their own work groups, heading up large companies, starting businesses that change society, managing the world's most important non-profits, or serving in government. The program will introduce basic language, concepts, tools, and problem-framing methodologies that are needed to develop management skills. We will focus on a variety of themes from motivating others, team-building, developing self-awareness, and communicating supportively to leadership, decision-making, understanding power and influence, and solving problems creatively. Cynthia Kennedy Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
David Phillips
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This interdisciplinary 16-credit program focuses on ecotourism, culture-based tourism and adventure travel. Ecotourism offers wildlife and nature experiences in protected habitats and pristine areas. Participative tourism is based on visits to traditional rural communities where travelers share in the daily lives of unique host cultures. Adventure travel involves endurance sports and high-skill challenges in natural settings. Ecotourism is often touted as a contributor to the conservation of ecosystems and wildlife habitats, and to economic development in rural communities. We explore the history, outcomes and future potential of ecotourism in different parts of the world.We study historic travel accounts and the literature of travel, changing modes of tourism, including solo travel and the global trend toward leisure travel. Creative writing and storytelling allow students to share their own travel experiences and goals. Travel media and journalism, books, films and the internet provide sources for discussion and writing, and topics for research.We study current theory of ecotourism, including policy and case studies, and acquire tools for critical analysis. Students study the ecotourism market, including planning, management, operations, and project outcomes. Sustainability criteria for ecotourism is a key topic. We study impacts of culturally-focused “participative” travel in developing countries, and the relationship of tourism to environmental changes. Students’ weekly essays, journals and narratives serve to elaborate on diverse topics and the learning process.The program includes a Spanish language component.  Students are encouraged to study the language for the full 16 credits (or to take another foreign language or elective course, as a 12-credit option).Students collaborate in groups or work individually to design and present models for ecotourism and adventure travel. Term projects can focus on business development, operations, outdoor safety and environmental education, travel writing, eco-lodge design, photography, travel films, internet and other media, applied research in tourism, or other related areas of interest.Guest speakers relate their experiences in the adventure travel and ecotourism businesses. Day-long outdoor experiences and multi-day class trips add an experiential component to the program, and films and videos round out our learning about ecotourism and adventure travel. David Phillips Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Kathy Kelly
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 13 Fall Systems theory offers a holistic approach to group development, along with a framework for identifying leverage points for improving group performance. Whether for senior managers in large businesses or agencies or for members of volunteer community organizations, systems thinking provides a vantage point to better understand group dynamics and useful tools to develop a group's capacity to work together effectively. Following an introduction to systems theory, students will explore key concepts when applied to cases in their own experiences and in cases presented in class. Resources include Peter Senge, Margaret Wheatley, Otto Scharmer, Linda Booth Sweeney, Ron Heifetz, and others. Kathy Kelly Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
John Filmer
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring There is no classroom! Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their own learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicable skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to develop themselves as leaders with a mission to serve the common good, this course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including cases, videos, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to develop themselves as leaders with a mission to serve the common good, this course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including cases, videos, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to create sustainable organizations, this course will lead students through an investigation of leadership concepts and practices using a simulation, including real life and interactive scenarios, virtual role plays, cases, class and group activities and discussions. Dariush Khaleghi Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Dariush Khaleghi
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall We are leading and managing in times of complexity, ambiguity, and change that require a new and more integrated approach to management development.  This course is part of a year-long sequence of courses focusing on leadership, human capital, and organizational management.  Designed to help students gain fundamental knowledge and competencies to create sustainable organizations, this first course teaches students critical concepts and skills in leadership development through activities including self-evaluation questionnaires, cases, class activities, and team projects. Dariush Khaleghi Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Bobbie McIntosh
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall The class is about the fundamental differences between social systems (like a business or supply chain) and natural systems (like the Hoh rainforest).  The social systems are created by humans.  There can be no "system" without the human actors who inhabit it and take the actions that bring it to life.  This class will help the student acquire a tool box of system tools that will help them take action and bring their work to life.  Natural capital is built by work arising from how we work, how we think, and the shapes of the systems as they fit into the dynamics of capitalism. Bobbie McIntosh Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jennifer Gerend and Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program focuses on Northwest communities from the perspective of public policy, land use and economics/personal finance. This program will be an eye opener for anyone who wonders why and how places develop. Where did that Walmart come from? Why did those trees get cut down for new homes? What will happen to that empty building? We will focus on the local decision making that shapes our built and natural environments while considering what types of development and redevelopment are more sustainable, both financially and environmentally.As the Northwest continues to grow, we will consider the voices of property owners, renters, business owners and other community members who often have divergent views on growth, preservation, conservation and property rights. These perspectives will aid our understanding of public places from urban and suburban cities to less connected subdivisions or rural developments. What do we want our public and private spaces to look like? How do communities plan for and accommodate growth? How are progressive policies developed and financed? Comparisons to other communities, cities, states and countries (Germany in particular) will be examined and discussed.Students will explore different communities' orientation to cars, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Architecture and urban design aspects will round out our analysis. Class sessions will include lectures, workshops, films and field trips to Port Townsend and Seattle. The fall quarter will focus on the public policy, land use planning and economics necessary for students to conduct their own significant project during winter quarter. Seminar texts will offer a theoretical background in these issues as well as a look at some contemporary communities in the news.During winter quarter, students will continue their theoretical learning while taking on an applied group project around community planning and economic development. Specifically, students will work in teams to prepare research or other solutions for selected urban and rural planning issues around Washington. These projects may involve group travel. With faculty support, students will hone their ability to work in teams and develop their presentation skills. Jennifer Gerend Glenn Landram Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Theresa Aragon
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 14Summer Session I This course is based on the premise that conflict is both inevitable and beneficial in successful organizations. We will provide a foundation for our work through a brief overview of conflict resolution theory and practice. We will examine interpersonal conflict, the role of organizational culture in conflict resolution and the impact of diversity on conflict. Learning objectives include developing an ability to identify, analyze and manage conflict.  Skill development in conflict management and resolution will be based on a collaborative approach involving team work, case analysis, role plays and theatric expression.   Theresa Aragon Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Glenn Landram
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full Personal finance and investing can sometimes be daunting to initiate. Yet long-term investing in the stock market can yield significant results with relatively low risk. We will examine the benefits of systematic investing and how to initiate a low-cost, long-term plan. We will work from the critically acclaimed by Burton G. Malkiel. This class is for the novice who would like to take charge of their own lifetime savings as well as those that have some understanding of finance and would like to learn more. We will also examine typical personal finance issues such as compounding, insurance, credit cards, student loans, the buy-vs.-lease auto decision and other personal finance areas as identified by students.  Emphasis will be on in-class exchanges with like-minded investors. Glenn Landram Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
David Muehleisen and Paul Przybylowicz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Do you want to produce food for yourself, your family and other families in your community? What does it take to grow food and feed yourself and others every day throughout the year? This three-quarter program (spring, summer and fall quarters) will explore the details of sustainable food production systems using three primary measures of sustainability—economic, environmental and social justice. While our primary focus will be on small-scale organic production, we will examine a variety of production systems. Our focus will be on the scientific knowledge, critical thinking and observation skills needed to grow food using ecologically informed methods, along with the management and business skills appropriate for small-scale production.We will be studying and working on the Evergreen Organic Farm through an entire growing season, seed propagation to harvest. The farm includes a small-scale direct market stand and CSA as well as a variety of other demonstration areas. All students will work on the farm every week to gain practical experiential learning. This program is rigorous both physically and academically and requires a willingness to work outside in adverse weather on a schedule determined by the needs of crops and animals raised on the farm.During spring quarter, we will focus on soil science, nutrient management, and crop botany. Additional topics will include introduction to animal husbandry, annual and perennial plant propagation, season extension, and the principles and practice of composting. In summer, the main topics will be disease and pest management, which include entomology, plant pathology and weed biology. In addition, water management, irrigation system design, maximizing market and value-added opportunities and regulatory issues will also be covered. Fall quarter's focus will be on production and business planning, crop physiology, storage techniques and cover crops.Additional topics covered throughout the program will include record keeping for organic production systems, alternative crop production systems, techniques for adding value to farm and garden products, hand tool use and maintenance, and farm equipment safety. We will also cover communication and conflict resolution skills needed to work effectively in small groups. We will explore topics through on-farm workshops, seminar discussions, lectures and laboratory exercises, and field trips. Expect weekly reading and writing assignments, extensive collaborative work, and a variety of hands-on projects. The final project in the fall will be a detailed farm and business plan which integrates all the topics covered in the program.If you are a student with a disability and would like to request accommodations, please contact the faculty or the office of Access Services (Library Bldg. Rm. 2153 , PH: 360.867.6348; TTY 360.867.6834) prior to the start of the quarter. If you require accessible transportation for field trips, please contact the faculty well in advance of the field trip dates to allow time to arrange this.Students planning to take this program who are receiving financial aid should contact financial aid early in fall quarter 2013 to develop a financial aid plan that includes summer quarter 2014. David Muehleisen Paul Przybylowicz Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sarah Williams
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long program provides an opportunity for students to work on a large, highly collaborative project that requires a multiplicity of skills and knowledge: documenting an Olympian patron of the arts. Students will form a learning community in order to work collectively and collaboratively on a feature-length documentary film about philanthropy and patronage of the arts. Each student will take on specific roles related to editing, marketing/PR, soundtrack composition, and interviewing/researching. However, in order to build new skills, all students will collaborate on every aspect of the project. Students will work together, share research results, and participate in regular critiques with faculty and staff. Collaborative work will include field trips, audio recording, cinematography, marketing, interviewing, and editing. Faculty and staff will support student work through regular meetings, critiques and problem-solving discussions. The peer learning community will collaboratively determine the direction and success of this project. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly meetings with the continuing student director/producer and bi-monthly meetings with faculty and staff in Media as well as Development and Alumni Programs. In addition, students will maintain an academic blog to document the progress of the on-going project . For Fall and Winter Quarters the students will produce a work-in-progress screening.  In the spring, the students will organize a campus-wide screening and prepare the film for festival submission. This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. Sarah Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Doreen Swetkis
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is intended for students who have completed work in community learning programs (such as ) and are prepared to complete an internship in a public or nonprofit agency. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested students must consult with the faculty about their proposed internship and/or course of study. Contracts that are completed before the beginning of spring quarter will be given priority.  All contracts must follow the college procedures for internships. While students are encouraged to seek out their own internship possibilities, we will work with campus resources and the faculty member's contacts to identify internship possibilities in public and nonprofit agencies.Students will hold 20-28 hour/week internships (depending upon amount of credits: 12-16 variable option) and will come together as a class on Fridays to study more about doing nonprofit work through seminars, lectures, guest speakers and/or films. There will be common readings and individual written assignments.  The faculty member will work with the interning agencies, making at least one site-visit to each agency during the quarter and meeting regularly with students outside of scheduled class times as needed.  Internships must be located in the Seattle/Portland I/5 corridor or on the Olympic Peninsula within a reasonable distance (i.e., Mason County).   Participation in the weekly class meeting is required – no internships located nationally or internationally will be sponsored. Doreen Swetkis Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steven Johnson
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring People are often placed in leadership positions and then find that they are in unfamiliar territory with no roadmap for success and even struggling with the requirements of the new role.  Acting under the premise that we manage resources and lead people, this course is designed to expose students to the nuts and bolts approaches of both leadership and management.  We will discuss and study the management processes needed while developing leadership skills.  Course work will be designed around each student's individual needs.  Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Kathy Kelly
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring   Kathy Kelly Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
John McNamara
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II John McNamara Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer