2012-13 Catalog

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2012-13 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Olympia


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Chico Herbison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I This course will explore U.S. popular culture of the 1960s through five of the decade’s seminal albums: The Beach Boys’ , James Brown’s , Bob Dylan’s , Jimi Hendrix’s , and . Our texts will include each album’s counterpart from the book series. The final project will be a similar close reading of another 1960s album. Students interested in expanding their final projects into a major piece of music writing—à la the series—can develop individual learning contracts for additional credit during second session. Chico Herbison Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Vavrus and Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Despite claims that the U.S. is "post-racial," why does "race," nevertheless, continue to retain significance in our contemporary era? And more specifically, just what is "race"?To address these question and others, this program explores the origins and manifestations of the contested concept of race, including the role of teh U.S. judicial system and law enforcement. We further investigate the ways in which one's racial identification can result in differential social, economic and political treatment and how social movements emerged to challenge racial inequality. To understand this phenomena, we analyze the racialized history of the United States in relation to dominant discourses of popular culture, science, psychology, health care, law, citizenship, education and personal/public identity.Central to this program is a study of historical connections between European colonialism prior to U.S. independence as a nation and the expansion of U.S. political and military dominance globally since independence and into the 21st century. In this context students are provided opportunities to investigate how the bodies of various populations have been racialized. Students will examine related contemporary concepts such as racism, prejudice, discrimination, gender, class, affirmative action, white privilege and color blindness. Students will consider current research and racialized commentaries that surround debates on genetics vs. culture (i.e., nature vs. nurture).Students will engage the concept of race through readings, dialogue in seminars, films, and academic writing that integrate program materials. A goal of the program is for students to recognize contemporary expressions of race by what we hear, see and read as well as absences and silences that we find. These expressions include contemporary news accounts and popular culture artifacts (e.g., music, television, cinema, on-line media). As part of this inquiry, we will examine the presidency of Barack Obama in relation to discourses on race. As a learning community we will work together to make sense of these expressions and link them to their historical origins.Students will also have an opportunity to examine the social formation of their own racial identities through their own personal narratives. Current approaches from social psychology will be foundational in this aspect of the program. Related to this is consideration as to what it can mean to be an anti-racist in a 21st century racialized society.A visits to a local cultural museum is tentatively planned as part of this program. medicine/health, education, government, law, history, political science, cultural studies, sociology and media studies. Michael Vavrus Artee Young Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 13Spring This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall Emily Lardner Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall This course focuses on the ways writers make arguments in a variety of contexts. Our initial shared topic will be climate change, which we will explore from various disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Within that topic, we will examine and practice strategies for taking positions, considering objections, and using evidence. No science background is necessary. In addition to writing an argument related to our shared topic, each student will select a topic of their own for a second project. Emily Lardner Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Bret Weinstein
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Bret Weinstein Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Terry Ford
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Full Adolescent literature differs from children's literature to meet the developmental needs of middle and high school ages.  Participants will learn about adolescent literature in an historical perspective, young adult development in reading, and genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique a variety of genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts. Terry Ford Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sheryl Shulman
  SOS JR–SRJunior - Senior 4, 8, 12 04 08 12 Day Su 13Summer Full Advanced Programming Topics is a variable credit summer program (4, 8, or 12 credits) for advanced work in computer science. This class is organized around a research paper reading seminar with associated semi-independent projects. The project portion is an opportunity for individuals to delve more deeply into specific topics. The seminar portion will focus on developing the skills necessary for reading current literature in computer science as well as exploring the content of those papers. At the end of the summer, students will write a final paper using a standard format with the following sections: abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, references, and figures. Students will learn to accurately describe the procedures that were followed and the results that were obtained. Students must also place their results in perspective by relating them to the existing state of knowledge and by interpreting their significance for future study.A selection of possible project topics include:These topics offer the opportunity for a more in-depth study of topics offered during the regular academic year or to work on material that is not covered by our regularly offered curriculum. Papers for the paper reading seminar will be chosen collaboratively.Freshmen and sophomores with a background in computing may register with faculty signature.  Contact faculty for information. Sheryl Shulman Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Dylan Fischer, Abir Biswas, Lin Nelson, Erik Thuesen, Alison Styring and Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market. studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.  studies plant ecology and physiology in the Intermountain West and southwest Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, genes to ecosystems approaches, plant physiology, carbon balance, species interactions, community analysis and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (academic.evergreen.edu/projects/EEON). See more about his lab's work at: academic.evergreen.edu/f/fischerd/E3.htm.  studies and is involved with advocacy efforts on the linkages between environment, health, community and social justice. Students can become involved in researching environmental health in Northwest communities and Washington policy on phasing out persistent, bio-accumulative toxins. One major project students can work on is the impact of the Asarco smelter in Tacoma, examining public policy and regional health. studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics, natural history collections and bird research in the EEON. Bioacoustic research includes editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from Bornean rainforests. Work with the natural history collections includes bird specimen preparation and specimen-based research, including specimens from Evergreen's Natural History Collections and other collections in the region. Work with EEON includes observational and acoustic surveys of permanent ecological monitoring plots in The Evergreen State College campus forest.  conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology. Dylan Fischer Abir Biswas Lin Nelson Erik Thuesen Alison Styring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Alison Styring
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dylan Fischer
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring plant ecology and physiology, field ecology, restoration ecology Dylan Fischer Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Erik Thuesen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Erik Thuesen Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lin Nelson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Abir Biswas and Clarissa Dirks
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This program is designed for students who have a strong background in biology or geology and would like to do advanced work around either topic as it applies to arid ecosystems in the Southwestern U.S. or Eastern Washington State, though there may be opportunities for students to contrast arid systems with more temperate forest ecosystems in Western Washington State. There will be an emphasis on student- and faculty-derived research projects throughout and students will meet regularly with faculty to discuss progress and receive feedback. Students with prior backgrounds or analytical experience in biology and/or geology, seeking to join the program in the spring to conduct field- and/or lab-based research projects are encouraged to contact the faculty early. Students will need to develop their research proposals in the first 2 weeks of the quarter while studying the primary literature. Students will then be conducting their proposed field work and/or laboratory work in weeks 3-6. Students will spend the rest of the quarter completing their analyses in preparation for presenting their work at the end of the program. The expectations and workload will be based on advanced work for upper division credit. In part, the content and themes of this program will be merged with another ongoing program offered by the faculty. Students continuing from that program will have developed group research proposals that will be the basis of their spring research project component. The work of those students is not advanced and the expectations are different. These two groups will meet together only for certain lectures or other activities whereby both will learn more about the faculty research projects and arid/southwest ecosystems. Advanced research students could potentially join the Grand Canyon river trip to conduct research studying Southwestern ecosystems but would need to contact the faculty as soon as possible (prior to Spring quarter registration). Students could also conduct comparative field work in arid or temperate ecosystems in Washington State that will be the basis of their quarter-long research project. Abir Biswas Clarissa Dirks Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Alison Styring
Signature Required: Summer
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Full Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Alison Styring
Signature Required: Summer
  Research JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Full Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 13Spring This 12-credit workshop is designed for 15 students who already have a foundation in writing fiction and/or creative non-fiction.  Through our writing, reading, and review of film as a medium, we will examine and practice the craft of creating rich characters, vibrant scenes, and crisp dialogue.  During spring quarter, students will produce one memoir-based piece, a short story or novel chapter, and a "student choice" writing block.  We will concentrate on the craft of revision with each section of writing.  This is an evening/weekend based program that will meet every Wednesday evening and five full Saturdays, with shorter Monday evening meetings for critique groups and workshops where students share drafts and assist one another with writing.  Students should also expect to spend additional time critiquing peer work outside the classroom. Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Carrie Margolin and Michael Buse
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter From Frankenstein to Freddy. From Groucho to Leno. For over 100 years, audiences have screamed in terror or roared with laughter at what Hollywood has presented.This program will look at the changes in what scares us, and what makes us laugh, over the course of American cultural history from the inception of filmmaking to present day. We will examine the psychology of fear, the psychology of humor, and the language and craft of filmmaking and other media used to convey these human emotions. We will focus on fear during fall quarter. Audiences in 1910 were terrified by . was a heart-pounder in 1925. Mass panic ensued in 1938 from the radio production of . What were the cultural and historical factors that made these so fear-inducing? Today, we need much more than monsters or aliens to give us goosebumps. It takes twisted psychological demons and graphic violence to startle and thrill. How has society changed in its response to what is considered scary? In winter quarter, we will switch to humor studies. As early as 1914, comedians such as Charlie Chaplin and the Keystone Kops provided merriment. Slapstick reigned supreme from the 1920s through the 1960s with the antics of The Three Stooges. Comedy branched out with the "Borscht Belt" stand-up comedians during that same era. Comedy continues into present day, from sit-coms to , with the acceptance of increasingly "off-color" and "dark" humor. The program format may include lectures, workshops, films, seminars, guest presentations and group and individual projects. We will focus on clarity in oral and written communication, critical thinking skills, and the ability to work across significant differences. psychology, education and media studies. Carrie Margolin Michael Buse Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Artee Young
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter The goal of the program is to introduce students to a significant canon of American Literature that expands students' understanding of the literary contributions of Americans of African descent. Students will also gain knowledge of various genres contextualized in an historical continuum. The program is grounded in an inquiry based approach and places the development of the literary canon in its evolving historical context. In the face of laws prohibiting African Americans from reading or writing, what was the motivation of early writers of African descent to create stories based on their experiences in the Americas as well as their imaginations? What impact did evolving historical, social and economic circumstances have on the development of African American Literature? What is the current place and direction of the African American literary canon? This program surveys the literary, historical, cultural, aesthetic, religious, social, philosophical and economic dimensions of literature by Americans of African descent. Through a thematic and chronological study of genres, canonical and lesser-known authors, this program explores the dimensions of the Vernacular Tradition and Slave Narratives from the 1760’s to the literary authors of the present. From Sejour to Phillis Wheatley to Toni Morrison to Grandmaster Flash, a bounty of writers, poets, preachers, essayists, and rappers will be included in our journey through a veritable gold mine of African American Literature.In our review of the Vernacular Tradition, themes of freedom, transformation and transcendence will be central to our readings and discussions. As our focus turns to the Reconstruction Period, we will focus on themes presented and influenced by lynching, segregation, migration, and the women’s suffrage movement. Themes in the Harlem Renaissance Period reflect the thoughts of the “New Negro” as well as those writers of African descent who were associated with the Negritude Movement, writers of African descent from around the world. Between the years 1940 and 1960, writers expanded conventional literary boundaries and are best described as moving into a period of Realism, Naturalism and Modernism. This period intersects with the Great Migration when approximately five and half million African Americans migrated from the south to the north, and it is during this time that themes of migration, desegregation and social change abound in the literature. The Period from 1960-1970 has been referred to as The Black Arts Movement, and the literature produced reflects the social movements occurring in this country as well as abroad. The Viet Nam War and various other social upheavals including the civil rights movement, Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam, Black Power and the New Left dominated thematic content in all genres that will be studied in this program. Literature since 1970 has taken a reflective view of past contributions of African American writers and has expanded on the concept of blackness, moving away from a single blackness to ask the question, as McKay and Gates articulate: “What in fact does blackness mean?”In addition to the text, students will also read and include in their discussions material gathered from various online sources as well as handouts that will be distributed in class.The program will include a variety of learning modes: lectures, discussion groups, films and videos, research teams, and production teams. Students will select a theme or author and produce an annotated bibliography to include an introduction of approximately 3 to 5 pages. Moreover, students will be placed in groups to develop and present a reader’s theatre production of an author’s works or a reader’s theatre presentation to include the literature of several authors. This can be a live presentation or a video, or a series of visual arts representations of the student’s work. Book: Artee Young Mon Wed Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 12 Fall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 13Winter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 12 Fall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Janelle Campoverde
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 13Winter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Andrew Buchman, Chico Herbison and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Afrofuturism is an emergent literary and cultural aesthetic embraced by artists who have imagined alternative futures, while often grappling with aspects of race, gender and ethnicity. Rone Shavers and Charles Joseph offered a critical working definition of the genre, first named by Mark Dery around 1995, as follows: "Afro-Futurism...combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy and magic realism with non-Occidental (non-Western) cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of people of color, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past." Artists often listed in an emerging Afrofuturist pantheon include authors Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler; visual artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Renée Cox; and musicians Parliament-Funkadelic (including George Clinton and Bootsy Collins), Sun Ra, DJ Spooky (Paul D. Miller), and Janelle Monáe.After laying the groundwork for explorations of the work of these and other artists, we will ask students to help us address these and other avenues for explorations of Afrofuturism, including race and digital culture; the role of technology in cultural formations; notions of Utopia, Dystopia, and the "post-historical" in Afrofuturistic literature; non-Occidental (non-Western) cosmologies and their uses in Afrofuturistic texts; trauma theory and its role in Afrofuturistic literary and cultural production; Afrofuturism's relationship to digital and/or urban music (i.e., drum and bass, garage, hip-hop, house, jungle, neo-soul, funk, dub, techno, trip hop, etc.); Black identity in Western literature, in light of Afrofuturism's general interrogation of identity and identity politics; Afrofuturism and its relation to previous race-based art movements and aesthetics (e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts Movement, the New Black Aesthetic, etc.); Black Music as a source of Afrofuturistic discourse and/or liberation; the black superhero as Afrofuturistic rebel, and the black comic book as a "paraliterary" source of contemporary folklore; Afrofuturism from the perspective of film studies and/or video culture; and/or the social and cultural implications of a theory of Afrofuturism.Because the artworks we will be dealing with will be both exciting, provocative and fine, we think that students will find this hard intellectual work deeply rewarding, sometimes in unexpected ways. We expect to learn from students, and to share an intellectual adventure in an emerging, engrossing artistic terrain. While research writing and criticism will be emphasized, students will also be encouraged to pursue optional creative writing and music projects, for possible presentation to the entire program. the humanities or the arts, especially creative writing and music. Andrew Buchman Chico Herbison Joye Hardiman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Michael Paros and Steven Scheuerell
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter "The question of all questions for humanity, the problem which lies behind all others and is more interesting than any of them, is that of the determination of man's place in nature and his relation to the cosmos." - T.H. HuxleyCrop agriculture and animal production dominate human-managed ecosystems. Both provide forms of human sustenance yet simultaneously disrupt natural ecological functions. Tensions often exist between nature conservationists and agricultural communities. How do we balance biodiversity conservation and modern agricultural production? Is it possible to have both? Should public policy emphasize agricultural intensification to spare land for wildlife areas and keep conservation areas separate from human production activities? Can our planet afford to preserve culturally and biologically diverse agricultural systems? Are traditional agricultural practices vital to our sustainable future?Faculty and students will challenge and develop their own personal ethical framework in an attempt to address the many questions that arise when we alter natural systems through agriculture. This will be accomplished through experiential field trips, reading, writing, scientific analysis and open discussion. Students will visit a variety of Washington and Oregon farming operations and conservation areas that illustrate the agricultural and environmental ethical dilemmas that society currently faces. Multiple perspectives from land stakeholders will be presented. Fall quarter will focus on the fundamental principles of conservation biology and ethical theory, while familiarizing students with basic agronomic practices. In winter quarter, students will develop a personal land ethic while analyzing tensions between agriculture and conservation specific to a particular locale.This program will interest students who are open-minded and want to think critically about the agricultural sciences, conservation biology, and ethics. Michael Paros Steven Scheuerell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Brian Walter and Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world.  Mathematical models allow predictions, more or less, of complex natural systems, and modern computing has both magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions.  Computer science, the constructive branch of mathematics, relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and it also facilitates the construction of mathematical models.In this program, we will explore connections between mathematics, computer science, and the natural sciences, and develop mathematical abstractions and the skills needed to express, analyze, and solve problems arising in the sciences.  The regular work of the program will include seminars, lectures, problem solving workshops, programming labs, problem sets, and seminar papers.  The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical thinking and expression along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms, computer programming, and problem solving, with seminar readings about the role of mathematics in modern education and in society.This program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or before pursuing further work in the sciences. Brian Walter Sara Sunshine Campbell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 12 Fall Algebraic Thinking develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and data analysis.  Collaborative learning is emphasized. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Peter Dorman
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring There is widespread discontent with the way capitalism is working in the U.S. and globally, but is there an alternative?  Can capitalism be replaced by a fundamentally different economic system, or is it only possible to make reforms within it?  This program examines this question in light of economic theory, historical experience and the results of noncapitalist experiments taking place today.  Its approach is open-minded, and students with a range of backgrounds and perspectives are welcome.  Although this is an all-level program, it is essential that students have prior exposure to economics, since much of the debate draws on economic concepts.  The program will also consider the politics and culture of noncapitalist alternatives.  Major activities will include extensive reading covering the historical roots of utopian thought, theories of noncapitalist economic arrangements, experiences with attempts to create them, proposals for ideas that have not yet been tried, and fiction in which alternatives to capitalism play an important part; we will explore these ideas in seminars, workshops, films, a research project, student governance and field trips to see local economic alternatives first-hand. Peter Dorman Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marla Elliott and Joli Sandoz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 13Spring Music, history, and thinking about God and the human condition will center this 12-credit, one-quarter program exploring interweavings of experience and thought. Our focus will be the Second Great Awakening in the U.S. (1780-1850), a religious revival movement that helped energize the shift as the U.S. turned from political, economic, and intellectual dependence on Europe to becoming a country in its own right. We’ll also consider how religious trends begun before 1850 continue to shape our lives in the 21st century.Program lenses will include the founding of shape note singing (a uniquely American form of Christian sacred music), spiritual experiences as reported in art and autobiographical writings, camp meetings, and Christian theology presented through sermons and church rituals. Possible additional topics include relevant fiction from the time, and the founding and continuation of one or more of the churches begun or settled in the U.S. after 1770 (African Methodist Episcopal Church, Shakers, Seventh Day Adventist Church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and others).Participants will attend a shape note All-Day Singing as well as a workshop and concert of traditional music from the republic of Georgia and will work together to organize and host the Fourth Annual Olympia All-Day Singing. Three additional visits to places of worship will be required. Reading, writing, singing and collaborative work will be important sites of instruction and attention as we draw from history, music, psychology, literature, and theology to inform our explorations. Credit may be awarded in music, history, literature, and religious studies. Marla Elliott Joli Sandoz Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stacey Davis, Samuel Schrager and Eric Stein
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring . -Ralph Ellison To educated Europeans around 1800 the new republic called The United States of America was founded on an incredible idea drawn from 18th century Enlightenment discourse: that human beings could govern themselves. The fraught implications of this democratic ideal have played out ever since. They loom large in the promise of a new start that drew 35,000,000 immigrants between the 1840s and the close of unrestricted immigration in the 1920s, and millions more who have continued to come; in the institutions that supported 19th century slavery, 20th century Jim Crow segregation, and subsequent Civil Rights movements; in the aspirations, past and present, of women and other lower-status groups. The meanings of American democracy, contested at home, have also been much scrutinized abroad. While American power has often been feared or resisted, other peoples often invoke or adapt democratic ideals to serve their own needs.This program will explore these complex relationships between the world-in-America and America-in-the-world. How, we will ask, are our identities as Americans shaped by ethnic, religious, gendered, class and place-based experiences--for example, by the cultural hybridizations and the real (and imagined) ties to home cultures endemic in American society? How do diverse Americans wrestle with democratic values in their ordinary lives? We will also consider some of the contemporary manifestations of American presence and power in various locations abroad. Using an anthropological lens, we will reflect on people's often ambivalent readings of tourists and soldiers, American aid organizations and NGOs, Hollywood mediascapes, and American commodities. How, we will ask, ought we to understand American representations of foreign "others" in travel writing, cinema, or museum display, and how have Americans themselves been represented as "others" in relationship to the larger world?Our program will provide strong contexts for students to study and work closely with faculty in the fields of history, anthropology, folklore, literature and creative non-fiction. In the fall and the first half of winter we will focus on in-depth readings of texts and training in the crafts of ethnography, writing and academic research in preparation for major independent research and senior theses. Students will undertake these projects on a topic of their choice, from mid-winter to mid-spring, either in the U.S. or abroad, in ongoing dialogue with peers and faculty. In the last half of spring the program will reconvene to review students' written work in light of the leading issues of our inquiry. There will be three main kinds of research projects.  can be conducted locally, or elsewhere, on topics involving cultures, identities, community or place; they will have an emphasis on creative non-fiction writing, and optional opportunity for internships.  can explore a historical, art historical, literary, or sociological topic, using primary or secondary resources.  will combine service learning with research on an aspect of American culture or on values and practices in another society. Service opportunities include include health, education, youth, agriculture, community development, women's empowerment and human rights. Thailand will be a featured destination, with faculty providing language training and in-country instruction and support.  While students can choose any location with faculty approval, there will be additional opportunities for students in Guatemala and Western Europe. Stacey Davis Samuel Schrager Eric Stein Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Jose Gomez
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter American Indians have a relationship with the federal government unlike that of any other ethnic or political group in the United States. They have consistently organized at all levels to renew and defend their rights to self-governance and nationhood. In this two-quarter program, we will consider the various ways in which sovereignty has been understood and contested, taking as our broad starting points the competing contexts of Indigenous knowledge systems and the U.S. Constitution.Recognizing that sovereignty must be placed within local, historical, cultural and global contexts, our theoretical readings and discussion will move from nation building in America to Native forms of nationalism, and emphasize the politics of indigeneity in an international context. We will examine the historical background and basic doctrines of federal Indian law, including the history of federal Indian policy, the foundations of tribal sovereignty, and federal roles in Indian affairs. Students will learn about Indigenous governments and the areas in which they exercise authority. We will examine the sources and limitations of federal power over indigenous peoples and tribes, state and federal constraints on tribal authority, and definitions of citizenship. We will also consider how contemporary Indigenous nations and communities capitalize on economic, political and intellectual resources.In the fall quarter, students will gain an understanding of the legal nature of the relationship between American Indians and the United States. Beginning with the American Constitution and the era of the early republic, the federal-Indian relationship will be discussed in terms of settler colonialism. Students will examine the ways that Indigenous communities have persisted and revitalized, developing intellectual traditions and structures based on their relationships to one another and to the land. Moving beyond the United States, we will consider the politics of indigeneity in Canada, New Zealand and Australia.Winter quarter will focus on topical issues that have emerged in the 20th and 21st centuries, including attempts to appeal to international law, treaty rights and co-management, sustainable landscapes and communities, Indigenous cultural representation, and the media. In major projects in the fall and winter quarters, students will work on a contemporary issue within Washington state that is of particular interest to local Indigenous nations. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real Indian law cases decided recently by the federal courts and will present oral arguments before a mock court. Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions. Throughout the quarter, students will learn to write appellate briefs based on real cases currently winding through the federal courts. This appellate advocacy project will culminate in oral arguments before the Evergreen Supreme Court. Native American studies, law, public policy, and tribal government and policy. Kristina Ackley Jose Gomez Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Anne Ellsworth
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 12 Fall In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  Students from this section may continue in ASL II and ASL III in the 5:30-7:30 p.m. class in winter and spring quarters. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Anne Ellsworth
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day W 13Winter S 13Spring In this two-quarter sequence of courses, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  In spring, students will focus on broadening their vocabularies and conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication.  There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area.  Opportunities to study ASL III and IV are usually available in summer quarter. Entry into the  spring quarter requires proficiency equivalent to the successful completion of American Sign Language I.  Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Anne Ellsworth
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring In this year-long sequence of courses, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  As the year progresses, students will focus on broadening their vocabularies and conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication.  There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area. Entry into the winter and spring quarters requires proficiency equivalent to the successful completion of American Sign Language I (for winter) or American Sign Language II (for spring).  Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anne Ellsworth
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 13Summer Full In ASL III, students will focus on broadening their vocabulary and conversation skills while using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphases on the non-manual aspect of communication and classifier development. There is a continued study of deaf culture.In ASL IV, students will continue the study of the grammar of ASL, the functional application of ASL, classifiers, locatives, and vocabulary. The course will include an introduction to ASL idioms, multiple-meaning words in both ASL and English, and conceptual/contextual signing. Students will also work with ASL literature in an in-depth study.Students in both ASL III and ASL IV meet together for the first class and then develop meeting times for the rest of the quarter to support both courses. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Cindy Beck
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend F 12 Fall W 13Winter Students will study the anatomy and physiology of the human body using a systems approach.  Students will also explore the interrelationship of health and disease in the human body by studying common pathological conditions.  Each system will be covered utilizing a traditional lecture and laboratory format.  At the conclusion of each system, students will demonstrate their knowledge through exams and research projects.Credits in this class meet some requirements for the MiT program as well as prerequisites for many graduate programs in health sciences. wellness, health, and health-related fields Cindy Beck Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ulrike Krotscheck and Nancy Bishop
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter The origins of humanism and the humanities are deeply rooted in the history and culture of the ancient Mediterranean. Contemporary society, for better and for worse, draws significantly from many aspects of this common history. This program introduces students to the foundations of humanistic investigation through the study of ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria. Our main goal will be to study art, architecture, literature, and other known aspects of the ancient world with the goal of understanding what it meant to be human in that place and time.  Although the peoples of the ancient world lived in dramatically different circumstances than we do, the social, political, and philosophical questions they faced—as well as the answers they developed—resonate with the challenges of contemporary life.  Our work will help us to understand and appreciate why this is so.We will study the texts and monuments of Greco-Roman antiquity, seeking to understand the works of its foremost thinkers and artists, from the Bronze Age to the height of the Roman Empire. Our inquiry will help us establish a strong foundation in the literary and artistic artifacts that have long shaped our own cultural legacy, and broaden our historical perspective on this vibrant, ever-changing, often violent part of the world. Through the disciplines of archaeology, art history, literary analysis, and history, we will survey ancient Greece and Italy in a comprehensive manner. We will encounter the accomplishments of Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Virgil, Tacitus, Praxiteles, the architects of the Parthenon and the Pantheon, and others, not merely as relics to be appreciated but as vital, continually compelling invitations to think and feel our way into new points of view on both the modern and the ancient world. We will also investigate the less visible aspects of ancient life: religion, myth, death ritual, recreation, and the role of women and slaves.  Our aim is to gain a more comprehensive picture of this part of our history.Students will interpret textual and visual material in discussion and writing. As interpretive composition is crucial to our approach, we will provide many opportunities for writing and revising, with frequent faculty and peer review. Writing and writing workshops will be an integral part of the learning experience and students should expect to spend a large amount of time improving their writing.This program is intended for the lower-division/new student who is looking not only for a solid foundation in art history, classical literature, and the history of the ancient Mediterranean, but also to those seeking an intensive reading- and writing based experience that will prepare them for upper-level work in the humanities and social sciences.  Ulrike Krotscheck Nancy Bishop Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Cindy Beck
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 13Spring Approaches to Healing is a guest lecture series designed to help students explore the theory and practice of the many types of healing arts that our regional wealth of outstanding practitioners provide. Throughout the quarter, students will be asked to look at broad health care questions and policy as well as personal healing practices, stress management, and the importance of thoughtful critical analysis at all levels of approaches and outcomes. Guest speakers representing body work, complementary medicine, Chinese medicine, bacteriophages as antibiotics, and plant medicine will be featured. Students will also spend time each week outside of class exploring new activities that could contribute to their own health, as well as reading current literature to help expand their understanding of health and wellness. Cindy Beck Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steven Niva
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I This program is designed to introduce students to both written Arabic and basic conversational Arabic in order to provide the foundations for further study in the Arabic language.  Students will learn how to read and write Arabic script, basic grammar, and practice conversational Arabic used in everyday encounters.  They will also watch films, listen to music, and discuss cultural topics related to language learning.  This program prepares students for language based area studies programs. Steven Niva Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rebecca Chamberlain
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 13Winter How are poems brought to life? How are they crafted? How do poets invoke the senses, emotions, and imagination? How do poems transform individuals, as well as culture and society? This course will explore both traditional and modern poets and poetic forms.  We will tap into word play—images, sounds, patterns, and rhythms—as we write and study poems. Our explorations will include narrative, lyric, and contemporary poetic forms; and we will draw on examples from a variety of cultures, historical time-periods, and traditions.Activities will be designed for both beginning and advanced students, and will encourage both collaborative and self-motivated learning. We will develop a basic understanding of both theory and practice as we survey the historic, cultural, and artistic context of the poetic tradition. Participants will be involved in a number of workshops and improvisational activities to develop and revise poems and writings, will meet local poets, and will cultivate an understanding of different poets, genres, and traditions. Rebecca Chamberlain Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Gail Tremblay
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session II This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Mary Dean
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Olivier Soustelle
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6 04 06 Evening Su 13Summer Session II Olivier Soustelle Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ann Storey
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening F 12 Fall The Arts and Crafts movement was a utopian crusade that arose in reaction to the rational, materialist spirit of the Industrial Revolution and the Enlightenment.  It encouraged a reversion to age-old traditions of integrated working conditions, spiritual renewal, and reverence for nature.  We will examine the history of the movement while we also explore how its ideals are still relevant today.  Art projects, such as mosaics and printmaking, will be integrated to help us to understand and express program themes in an experiential way.  The main areas of focus will be art history and art. Ann Storey Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Julia Zay, Shaw Osha (Flores) and Kathleen Eamon
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter - In this program, we want to think about art, and we want to think about work, but we want to think about them in a historically-specific sense.  We will be talking about art and work as practices and discourses specific to “modernity,” and we will talk about modernity as marked by the emergence of art and work as distinct from the rest of social life.  And we will ask what it means to live, work, and make art right now. Two broad disciplines, visual studies and philosophy, will orient us, and we will also look to the spirit of the (1919-1933) and its struggle to define a modernist art school curriculum as a way of making these questions concrete.  We will work our own intellectual and theoretical capacities right alongside our skills and techniques in visual and time-based art.  We will come to understand what it takes to have both intellectual and artistic , as well as how to produce our own intellectual and artistic .  In terms of coverage, the program will offer foundational work in visual and cultural studies, art and media practice, as well as 18 -20 century European philosophy.  We will study history in order to understand our own moment better.  We will begin our study with important texts that respond to the gradual rise of industry as the dominant mode of production, and we will continue our examination into the eras that follow.  We will trace the emergence of two tendencies that stand in some tension with one another: the idea of “work” undergoes some disenchantment with the rise of large-scale industry, but it also takes on a romantic aspect with the possibility of greater egalitarianism.  “Art,” and its work, is also simultaneously both debased and exalted, thought of as both epitome and critic of commodity culture, a space apart from and the ironic fulfillment of the market economy. Following our study of the we will look to the rise of conceptualism in art in the 1960s and 70s and contemporary forms and institutions of art that are grappling with the question of art as labor and artists as workers under current economic pressures. All of these case studies will support our study of how the meaning and value of art has become invested in the everyday and uses labor as an organizing principle of the aesthetic. We will pursue our themes by thinking, looking, and making.  In fall we will set our foundation by studying major philosophical and artistic movements and texts, basic skills in visual and time-based art, but also by developing our skills in reading, discussing, and writing about challenging texts in philosophy, cultural theory, and art history.  In winter quarter, we will build on our foundation. One of our central aims will be to reconcile our own utopian aspirations, inspired by the struggles of the , by developing “schools” of our own.  Each of our schools will be responsible for designing a curriculum around a specific discipline and for making collaborative “work” across those disciplines. We will study a range of theorists, artists, objects and practices. Authors include: G. W. F. Hegel, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel de Certeau, Judith Butler, Linda Nochlin, Julia Bryan-Wilson, and Miwon Kwon. Artists include: Joseph Albers, Walter Gropius and others affiliated with the Fluxus-affiliated artists, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Mika Rottenberg, Chantal Akerman, Charles Burnett, the Maysles Brothers, Fritz Lang and John Sayles. We will also read from a variety of sources in art and media history and theory, and social theory. Program work will include research, writing (both formal academic writing as well as writing experiments), and the making of visual and media art. humanities, visual studies, gender studies, cultural studies, education and communications. Julia Zay Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Julia Zay, Miranda Mellis and Shaw Osha (Flores)
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring The private, individual artist’s studio emerges out of an historically constructed ideal of art as an expression of the artist’s inner life. In the last fifty years, with the advent of institutional critique; relational aesthetics; dematerialization; installation art; earthworks; conceptualism; and performance art, there has been an increasing turn outward, away from the interiority of the artist and the studio and towards outdoor, social, public, and collaborative aesthetic engagements. This program will investigate the artist’s specific sites, including work spaces and exhibition spaces, and interrogate art’s relationship to site. By what powers and strategies do site specific artworks illuminate, localize, and focalize the politics of time and the poetics of space? The boundaries of studio walls shift and dissolve as artists move their practice into everyday life, turning commons into public studios, making visible the artist's process, and turning ordinary places into conspicuous locations that confront us with the tensions and mutabilities of public properties and local materialities, histories, temporalities, edifices, and processes.In our research-based art practice, we will work inside and outside traditional exhibition sites, as we repurpose place and engage in study, critique, historical research, commemoration, and ritualization. We’ll explore how location shapes our projects and experiment with breaking conventions; for instance, if convention demands that form follow content, what are the results of letting content follow form? If the material attributes of our projects normally dictate the kinds of spaces we work in, what kinds of works might result if we let the spaces we find and activate with our attention determine our materials and inform our forms? We will engage the above and other questions through readings in art history and theory to analyze a variety of artworks, both individual and collaborative, in terms of their relation to site. The program is structured to include critical and creative writing; critique; seminar; and lecture. Students should be prepared to read, write and make art in equal proportions. There will be a field trip May 17-19 to Portland to attend , an international conference on art and social practice whose theme this year is on publics, contexts, and institutions in relation to contemporary socially engaged art, education, and institutional practice. Julia Zay Miranda Mellis Shaw Osha (Flores) Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sarah Williams and Donald Foran
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring "Poetry is good for neural development." You can buy a T-shirt that says so. This program will engage you experientially in understanding how and why the recycling of neurons informs poetry's transformative power. We'll explore how reading can be understood from an evolutionary perspective as an exaptation in which the ability to interpret animal tracks and bird flight was co-opted for the ciphering of lines and circles as letters and words. This exploration will include the scientific writing of Stanislas Dehaene as well as the poetry of Susan Howe, who in "Pythagorian Silence" writes: "age of earth and us all chattering/a sentence or character/ suddenly/steps out to seek for truth fails/falls into a stream of ink Sequence/trails off/ ... flocks of words flying together tense/as an order/cast off to crows." We'll recite, analyze, discuss, perform, and write poems about the mind's reflexivity.Our goal is a mindful recycling of neurons, one in which the neuroscience of poetry reveals a continuity with the neurology of our ancestors. Thus, we'll reflect on our experiences of flocks of words and tracks of letters as binding mechanisms for neural integration and ecological adaptation. Indeed, Frederick Turner refers to poetry as a "neural lyre." Urban spoken-word poets and indigenous healers produce what Eliot describes as "music heard so deeply it is not heard at all/ And you are the music while the music lasts." We're equally interested in how poetry can have the opposite effect on consciousness. We'll engage in contemplative practices to learn more about experiences of neural disintegration, such as the thumps and jolts of modern life. As Seamus Heaney put it, poetry is "a thump to the TV set to restore the picture" and "a jolt to the fibrillating heart." Throughout the year we'll be exploring the emergence of a new meta-field of scholarship in which poetry and neuroscience interact, remaking and renewing the meaning and impact of the poetic as words become flesh ... and vice-versa. Emily Dickinson's poetic rendering of this polarity provides one model of the neuro-phenomenological: "I felt a cleaving in my mind/As if my brain had split/I tried to match it, seam by seam/But could not make it fit. The thought behind, I strove to join/Unto the thought before/But Sequence ravelled out of sound/Like balls upon a floor." We'll experiment with this process of "sequence ravelling out of sound" as a transformation of a new archaic.Fall quarter's immersion in the scholarship of this meta-field will include group research projects: ethnographic studies of poetic jolts. When, where and from whom or from what do we hear poetry? Can we sense it in our own reading and writing? Our fall quarter nature retreat to the Hoh Rain Forest and the beaches of the Olympic Peninsula will introduce practices we'll use throughout the year for experiencing the reciprocity between specific forms of poetry and states of consciousness. During winter quarter we’ll experience and articulate specific forms of consciousness and language in relation to a particular passion. One of us might want to explore Gerard Manley Hopkins’ love of bluebells and windhovers in relationship to his poetry, or create a poetic world around a passion for sport or to experience how fantasy sports are a poetic world. One of us might immerse herself in the biodynamic rhythms of chocolate sustainably farmed, or listen for the resonance between silence and sound in YoYo Ma’s performance of Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G. The methodology of our field study will aspire to that of 18 C poet and civil engineer, Novalis for whom "knowledge and creation were united in a wondrous mutual tie.” Writing in response to our field studies will take the form of reciprocal creations such as in Melissa Kwasny’s . Spring quarter work will combine theory and practice. Students will engage in peer group community-based service projects that use poetry to "jolt fibrillating hearts.” Writing projects will accompany this work in order to illuminate the relationship between the growth of dendrites and the flourishing of both neurons and community. There will be a weekly film and poetry series that inspires "poetic jolts" and demonstrates their meaning for communal life. Throughout the year students will keep a creative journal, a field notebook, participate in poetry writing and recitation, and compile an anthology of program work. Sarah Williams Donald Foran Mon Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Thu Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rebecca Chamberlain and Richard Miles
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening S 13Spring This interdisciplinary program will combine science and humanities, as we learn beginning to intermediate astronomy through lectures, discussions, interactive workshops, and observation. We will use naked eyes, binoculars, and telescopes. We will learn about the evolution and structure of our universe and celestial bodies. How are stars born and why do they shine? How do stars die, and how can they contribute to new life? How do we know there is dark matter? How do we know that the universe is expanding - and even accelerating? What evidence is there for the Big Bang? We will study roles of science and of storytelling in human searches for understanding and meaning.How have people across cultures and throughout history understood, modeled, and ordered the universe they perceive? From sacred stories to physics-based astronomy, we will explore a variety of cosmological concepts in science, literature, mythology, philosophy, history and/or archaeoastronomy. We will use scientific methods and other inquiry-based learning strategies that engage the imagination. Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of astronomy, and they will refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. We will develop skills and appreciation for the ways we find our place in the universe through stories and science, imagination and intellect, qualitative and quantitative processes. Finally we will ask, how does our understanding of astronomy and cosmologies influence our understanding of sustainability and the quality of life on Earth?We will work together as a learning community, in large and small groups. We will read and discuss science texts and do quantitative workshops and homework. Students will build and take home astronomical tools such as spectrometers and position finders. Students will analyze literary works related to astronomy and cosmology, and will develop an original piece of writing, either fiction or non-fiction. We will also share star stories from different cultures. Student teams will meet for pre-seminar discussions and assignments and will write short essays and responses to peers' essays. Research teams will explore questions of personal interest through observations, readings and calculations; and students will share their findings through presentations to classmates and the community. Students are invited to help organize observation field trips to eastern Washington or other regions with clearer skies. Rebecca Chamberlain Richard Miles Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Evening Su 13Summer Session II The program combines interdisciplinary study of science and humanities with fieldwork. We will explore a variety of cosmological concepts from mythology, literature, philosophy, and history, to an introduction to astronomy, archeo-astronomy, and theories about the origins of the universe. We will employ scientific methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry based learning and engage the imagination. This class is focused on field work, and activities are designed for amateur astronomers and those interested in inquiry-based science education, as well as those interested in exploring literary, philosophical, cultural, and historical cosmological traditions.Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories under the night sky to working in a computer lab to create educational planetarium programs.  Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. Students will develop skills an appreciation for the ways we uncover our place in the universe through scientific theories and cultural stories, imagination and intellect, qualitative and quantitative processes, and "hands on" observation.We will visit Pine Mountain Observatory, and participate in field studies at the Oregon Star Party, which include workshops with mentors, scientists, storytellers, and astronomers. We will develop a variety of techniques to enhance our observation skills including use of star-maps and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, how to operate 8” and 10” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects, and how to use binoculars and other tools.  We will be camping and doing field work in the high desert for a week. Rebecca Chamberlain Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Zenaida Vergara and Aaron Kruse
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long sequence of courses introduces the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Winter continues this work while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb, and digital effects processing.  In spring, additional topics will include sound design for film with sync sound production for dialogue, Foley, sound effects, and music composition. There will also be an interview-style production meant for radio broadcast.  In each quarter, students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time. Zenaida Vergara Aaron Kruse Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Terry Setter and Cynthia Kennedy
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring -Joseph Campbell Joseph Campbell points out that our greatest challenge is how to live a humane existence in inhuman times. Awakening the Dreamer, Pursuing the Dream will focus on the individual's relationship to personal and cultural values, society, leadership and the creative process. This program is intended for students who seek to explore and refine their core values in a context where they can act upon them with increasing awareness and integrity.The program faculty recognize that the social, ecological and psychological challenges of every era have required people to live their lives in the face of significant challenges and it is now widely recognized that crisis often precedes positive transformation. Therefore, this program will begin by focusing on how people in the past have worked to create a meaningful relationship between themselves and the world around them. We will explore movement, stories, and images of various creative practices and spiritual traditions from ancient to modern times to discover their relevance in our own lives. As students gain knowledge and skills, they will develop their own multifaceted approaches to clarifying their identity, then prioritizing and pursuing their dreams.Throughout the year, the program will work with multiple forms of intelligence, somatic practices and integrative expressive arts approaches to learning. Students will explore the practices of music, movement (such as dance or yoga), writing, drawing and theater in order to cultivate the senses as well as the imagination and powers of expression. These practices will help us understand the deeper aspects of the human experience, which are the source of self-leadership, intentional living and positive change. Students will also investigate the relationship between inner transformation and social change through engagement in community service. Students will read mythology, literature and poetry while exploring ideas that continue to shape contemporary culture. We will also look to indigenous cultures to deepen our appreciation of often-overlooked wisdom and values. We will seek to develop a broader understanding of contemporary culture as a stepping stone to thinking critically about how today's dreams can become tomorrow's reality. the liberal arts, expressive arts, psychology, sociology, and cultural studies. Terry Setter Cynthia Kennedy Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 12 Fall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.Both sections (A and B) are taught at the same level, they differ only in schedule. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 13Winter In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.Both sections (A and B) are taught at the same level, they differ only in schedule. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day F 12 Fall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.Both sections (A and B) are taught at the same level, they differ only in schedule. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day W 13Winter In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.Both sections (A and B) are taught at the same level, they differ only in schedule. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Amaia Martiartu
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Full Experience life in Mondragon, home of the largest worker-owned industrial cooperative system in the world. Learn about Basque, the ancient unknown language, . Get to know one of the most important self-determination conflicts in Europe. Experience this old country's farming sustainability practices in modern times. And all this in a country with one of the most welcoming people in Europe accompanied with a native Basque Evergreen professor. This program aims to give students first-hand experience of Basque culture through a three-week living experience in the Basque Country. Students will develop understanding of Basque society and culture through various classes and field trips and daily contact with Basque people. The emphasis is on direct first-hand experience.The program will take place in the Mondragón area and will consist of three academic components: Basque and optional Spanish language classes, socio-cultural workshops and field trips around the Basque Country, and an individual research project. Amaia Martiartu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Kate Crowe
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session II We will camp on Serendipity Farm which is nestled at the foot of Mt. Walker and read our poetry around a campfire.  This poetry class is open to beginning, intermediate, and seasoned poets.  Students will research and present on a Beat writer of their choice as well as write poetry inspired by various voices of the Beats.  They will work collaboratively and independently to present their respective Beat writer in an engaging manner to the group.  Students can expect to accelerate their poetry writing as well as gain a greater understanding of why the Beat poets influenced history and literary culture. Kate Crowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Steven Niva and Amjad Faur
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring We often think of political action as public protest, in which activists directly confront opponents and demand change. By contrast, this program will explore alternative forms of political action that take place through “interventions” in public space which seek to disrupt or reconfigure symbolic or physical relations of power through direct or indirect action. This program will focus on "interventionist" traditions and practices that draw from avant-garde artistic and political movements, such as Dada and the Situationists, as well as political artists working after post-modernism.  Examples of the latter type have recently made their mark in the Global Justice movements in the 1990s and the anti-war and Occupy movements of the last decade.  We will look at art work, performance art, culture jamming and pranks, tactical biopolitics and creating counter-publics, among other interventions undertaken by artist/activists and collectives such as Pussy Riot, The Yes Men, Critical Arts Ensemble and Reclaim the Streets, among others. A large portion of the program will hinge on the investigation of contemporary Middle Eastern artists and their dynamic roles in socio-political interventions and protest.  We will look at how artists and creative actors in this region and abroad engage and respond to the legacies of European colonial rule as well as their relationships to formalism, authenticity/identity, conceptualism and the “art market”.  The program will seek to critically understand how and why these traditions seek to go “beyond” traditional forms of art and protest to intervene within culture and the politics of everyday life, and assess their potential within increasingly commodified and militarized political spaces.Students will engage these topics through lectures, seminar discussion, group projects and guest speakers engaged in new forms of political/art practice.  Students will be expected to undertake serious theoretical reading and to engage in critical thinking.  They will also be given the opportunity to imagine and construct their own campaigns and tactical interventions in political fields of their choice. Steven Niva Amjad Faur Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Erik Thuesen
Signature Required: Fall 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter In the 19th century, well-known European scientists such as Darwin, d'Orbigny and Bonpland traveled in Argentina and brought their knowledge of the flora and fauna back to Europe. The marine, desert and alpine environments of the Southern Cone harbor flora and fauna very different from similar environments in North America. In this two-quarter program, we carry out intensive natural history studies of the unique organisms and ecosystems of Argentina, focusing on those of Patagonia.After an introductory week in Olympia at the start of fall quarter, the study abroad portion of the program will commence with a 4-week intensive study of Spanish language in Buenos Aires to prepare us for our travels and studies in Argentina during fall and winter quarters. We will begin to study the flora and fauna of the Southern Cone through preliminary readings, lectures and class work in Buenos Aires. We will take a short trip to the sub-tropical province of Misiones during October, then move to the coastal and mountain regions of Patagonia in November. We will study the natural history of Patagonia, beginning with field studies on the Atlantic coast and then moving to the Andean Lakes District, taking advantage of the progressively warmer weather of the austral spring.Students will conduct formal field exercises and keep field notebooks detailing their work and observations. We will read primary literature articles related to the biodiversity of Argentina and augment our field studies with seminars.During winter quarter (summer in the southern hemisphere), students will reinforce their language skills with two weeks of intensive Spanish studies in Patagonia, examine montane and steppe habitats, then work in small groups on focused projects examining biodiversity topics. It will be possible to conduct more focused studies on specific ecosystems or organisms, including those in more southern parts of Patagonia, at this time of the year. Clear project goals, reading lists, timelines, etc., will be developed during fall quarter in order to insure successful projects in winter quarter. Examples of individual/small-group projects include: comparisons of plant/animal biodiversity between coastal, desert and alpine zones; comparative studies of the impacts of ecotourism activities on biodiversity; or examining community composition of intertidal habitats along a gradient from north to south, among others. Erik Thuesen Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Carolyn Prouty and Wenhong Wang
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Carolyn Prouty Wenhong Wang Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Amy Cook and Gerardo Chin-Leo
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Boundaries between habitats (ecotones) and extreme environments (temperature, pressure and salinity) often contain diverse and productive ecosystems. This program will explore the physics and chemistry of these environments and examine the organism adaptations and ecological interactions that determine their unique biodiversity and productivity. In addition, we will examine the ecotones and extreme environments created by the expansion of human development into natural ecosystems. An understanding of the structure and function of ecotones and extreme environments can contribute to conservation biology efforts such as the design of parks and reserves and allow us to better understand how human-dominated landscapes influence natural landscapes.Through lectures, workshops and field activities, students will learn how to identify local plants and animals and will learn about the composition and ecology of several common habitats in the Pacific Northwest including coniferous forest, freshwater stream and nearshore marine. Students will examine the ecotones between these communities by identifying the resident organisms, and describing the physical characteristics of the ecotones and the dynamics of biogeochemical cycles that cross community boundaries. Taking advantage of the Evergreen campus and nearby areas as natural laboratories, we will focus on the following ecotones: intertidal zones, the boundary between freshwater aquatic systems and terrestrial systems, the transition zone between marine and freshwater (estuaries) and the ecotones associated with human-dominated landscapes. In addition, we will examine the ecology of extreme environments such as hydrothermal vents and hypersaline lagoons and the physiological adaptations that organisms have made to live in these environments.The program will provide students with the opportunity to broaden their understanding of biology and ecology, develop skills in several of the major techniques used in field ecology and improve their writing, quantitative and communication skills. Amy Cook Gerardo Chin-Leo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Jennifer Calkins
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 13Spring What are the structures of biological systems from cells to populations?  How do biological systems store, replicate, and share information?  The theory of evolution provides the best framework through which we can answer questions such as these regarding the diversity of biological systems.  In this program, we will use evolutionary theory to help us explore biological patterns ranging from the structure of a cell to the organization of populations to patterns of evolutoin over time and processes ranging from the replication of genetic information to the generation of energy.  In the context of our study we will investigate the diversity of biological systems, its origin, and its current threats.  More specifically, we will study aspects of the structure and information of biological systems and will ask how the theory of evolution can explain the patterns and processes at these levels.  This course will prepare students for further study in biology and will provide them with the biological literacy necessary to engage complex issues from cloning to conservation with knowledge and understanding.  The course will include lectures and small-group seminar discussions as well as lab, computational, and field-based projects.  Readings will include portions of a basic biology text, peer-reviewed research papers, and readings from popular science.  Students will be responsible for keeping a journal, doing the readings, participating in group discussions and projects, and completing weekly assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation, their assignments, and their performance on two exams. Jennifer Calkins Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Bob Haft
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I Black and White Photoraphy: “Summerwork” is an intensive, hands-on program for students of all skill levels wishing to learn the basics of the 35mm camera (or larger format), darkroom techniques, aesthetics, and a short history of photography. A final project involves production of a book of photographs; each student will receive a copy at quarter’s end. Emphasis is placed on learning to see as an artist does, taking risks with one’s work, and being open to new ideas. Bob Haft Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Walter Grodzik, Ariel Goldberger and Robert Esposito
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring In this program students will study the voice, the body, and objects as sources of expression through the use of vocal and movement exercises, the recitation of poetry and other forms of literature, and performance. The class will explore creativity and imagination as expressed by the human voice, the body, and animated objects.  How does the human voice respond to the emotional self, the physiology of the body, and the imagination?  What are the contributing factors in how we use our voices, bodies, and objects to express ourselves in our daily lives and during performance?  How can voices, bodies, and animated objects become more expressive and responsive to our inner selves?  How do they contribute to the creation of artistic images and performances?This program will consist of multiple voice, object, and movement workshops. We will begin with exercises that increase focus, and enhance vocal color and strength.  Movement workshops will focus on developing physical awareness and creativity.  Animated Object labs will introduce students to experiments with body, voice, and objects in performance.  We will learn the fundamentals of expressing sensory, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral experience by attending to space, time, body, breath, voice, artistic discipline and effort. In all these workshops, students will present group and individually created original compositions based on poetic and non-traditional texts.  Integration and critique seminars will offer opportunities for exchange of ideas.Regular attendance, timeliness, and enthusiastic participation in workshops will be fundamental and extremely important in this program.  This program is suitable for students at all levels with a sincere interest in developing greater vocal range, physical variety and strength, as well as a more flexible, and emotionally rich, range of expression. These interdisciplinary public presentation skills are useful in fields such as law, management, performing arts, and teaching. Walter Grodzik Ariel Goldberger Robert Esposito Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Andrew Buchman, Qi Chen, Paul McMillin and David Shaw
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall During the 1930s, the capitalist world economy experienced a prolonged and severe economic depression. International trade fell by more than 50%. Unemployment in the U.S. rose to 25%. In this program, we'll explore the economic circumstances of the Great Depression, the social movements engendered and empowered in the U.S. during those years, and the music and theatre that those tough times inspired. These studies will shed light on our own era of economic crisis and increasingly radicalized political culture.We intend to look at competing theories of booms and busts, crises and crashes. We’ll review basic concepts of classical economics that proved inadequate to the situation, and look at some new economic ideas (Berle and Means, Keynes, Coase) that the Great Depression helped spawn. We'll look at ecological disasters like the Dust Bowl, and grand technological experiments with vast environmental consequences like the Grand Coulee Dam. These stories offer cautionary lessons to our own times around issues of sustainability.We'll examine political responses of the 1930s, including national initiatives, workers’ movements, Marxist critiques, and the rise of fascist and anti-fascist movements. Readings will include works by contemporary journalists, activists, revolutionaries, and documentarians who produced creative and insightful analyses of their age. We plan to trace the increasing influence of mass media and propaganda , and will investigate songs, films, shows, and photographs. Students will do close listening to pieces of music, analyzing them as one might a poem or painting. The music of Woody Guthrie and the photography of Dorothea Lange will be in the mix. Students should expect to become well-informed about the economic and political developments of the 1930s. They should be prepared to draw conclusions about the causes of economic crisis and the political, social, and aesthetic responses to crisis, and defend those conclusions in vigorous discussions with their classmates. This program will also prepare students for the winter quarter program, . Andrew Buchman Qi Chen Paul McMillin David Shaw Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Bill Bruner, Qi Chen and David Shaw
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Over the past few years, the world economy has gone through a gut-wrenching recession from which it may now--at least at this writing--be recovering. Our objective in this program is to understand the current condition of the economy--with particular emphasis on the U.S. economy--in the context of economic cycles that have been a part of economic history for centuries. We will develop conceptual frameworks for explaining these cycles and apply these frameworks to analysis of current economic conditions. We will be concerned especially with the policy tools that might be used to smooth the ups and downs of the economy. Our studies will include introductions to macroeconomics, economic policy, economic indicators and economic history. No prior study of economics is required, but it won't hurt, either. Students who enroll in this program must be prepared to read about current economic and business conditions on a daily basis in several different publications, both electronic and print-based. This might include the traditional-- or --government publications from such agencies as the Federal Reserve or the Department of Labor and a variety of web-based publications. Students should expect to become well informed about the economy and political developments, and of the implications for economic and financial decisions being made in the sector and by individuals and households. They should be prepared to draw conclusions about economic policies and defend those conclusions in vigorous discussions with their classmates. The final project for the program will be an economic forecast for the U.S. economy for 2013 and beyond, including implications for individuals, households, existing businesses and new ventures (for-profit or not). Bill Bruner Qi Chen David Shaw Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Frederica Bowcutt
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter This program investigates people's relationships with plants for food, fiber, medicine and aesthetics. We will examine economic botany including agriculture, forestry, herbology and horticulture. We will also work through a botany textbook learning about plant anatomy, morphology and systematics. Lectures based on the textbook readings will be supplemented with laboratory work. Students will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of major groups of plants such as mosses, ferns, conifers and flowering plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and in the field. To support their work in the field and lab, students will learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal. Students will write a major research paper on a plant of their choosing. Through a series of workshops, they will learn to search the scientific literature, manage bibliographic data, and interpret and synthesize information, including primary sources. Frederica Bowcutt Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Trevor Speller
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II This program will offer a broad survey of British literature from the years 1000 to the present. We will read poetry, novels, nonfiction, and drama from all major time periods. Major authors may include Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Aphra Behn, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, T.S. Eliot, and Kazuo Ishiguro. As we read, we will pay attention to how these books and authors make sense of changing linguistic, religious, and political issues.Students will be expected to write papers, complete quizzes and assignments, and engage in collaborative work. We will also see plays and films.In the past, this course has been useful for students who need specific requirements to enter teaching programs. Students with these concerns are encouraged to contact the instructor. Trevor Speller Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ryo Imamura
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session II Western psychology’s neglect of the living mind, both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities, has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Buddhism which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.  We will investigate the study of mind that has developed within the Buddhist tradition through lectures, readings, videos, workshops, and field trips.  Students registering for 12 credits will attend a meditation retreat and complete a research paper on meditation. Ryo Imamura Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Thuy Vu, Bobbie McIntosh and Hirsh Diamant
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Weekend F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Good training in business management and cultural competence is an essential requirement for the development of successful and sustainable enterprises. This program will focus on the interconnections between business, economy, and culture, with a specific application to trade, cultural exchange, and community development along the Silk Roads. For centuries, the ancient Silk Roads moved ideas and goods between the great civilizations of Asia, Pacific Rim, the Middle East, and the New World. From the time of Marco Polo and Genghis Khan to Yo Yo Ma, the Silk Roads have connected empires and fostered the development of music, art, religion, and commerce. In this program we will study contemporary and historical Silk Roads to envision sustainable commerce of Silk Roads in the future. We will develop learning, skills, and practical knowledge that are necessary to provide a strong foundation and vision for understanding the business and economic development potential of selected cultures along the Silk Roads. We will examine how developing commerce of Pacific Rim can impact the economic future of Washington State. We will learn about international trade, socially responsible enterprises, and intercultural communication. We will learn about the use of money and alternative business financing models. The program will be foundational for forming business pathways to move toward greater cultural, economic, and environmental sustainability.In fall quarter, we will learn the skills necessary for understanding the historical, cultural, and economic significance of Silk Roads and for creating a sustainable business plan. Part of our study in fall quarter will include learning about community resources, business economics, and social/business enterprises along the Silk Roads. In winter quarter we will learn about intercultural communication, alternative business financing models, leadership, and application of business skills in non-profit and corporate enterprises. In spring quarter some students will have an opportunity to travel in China with faculty member Hirsh Diamant and study business, economy, culture, and education there. (Various credit options will be available for the spring travel.) Students continuing with the program on the Olympia campus will concentrate on intercultural leadership, international trade, marketing, and developing sustainable applications of their business plans.This 12-credit program will include a core of 8 credits plus 4 credits awarded for in-program modules that will focus on either Chinese language, cultural studies, sustainable businesses, or community leadership development. Thuy Vu Bobbie McIntosh Hirsh Diamant Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Theresa Aragon
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Weekend F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long, weekend-intensive, business and management program will assess business, management, and leadership in the context of contemporary technological advances and globalization. Organizations will be examined within their economic, political, and social environment. Organizational development and management strategies will be analyzed in terms of current and future utility. Traditional elements of management such as decision making, strategic planning, organizational behavior, human resources, and conflict management are incorporated throughout the program. Application of theory and enhancement of critical thinking will occur through problem solving and case study analyses. Assignments will place a heavy emphasis on developing analytical, verbal, written, and electronic communication skills through dialogue, seminars, critical essays, training modules, research papers, and formal presentations. Managerial skills will be developed through scenario building, scripting, role-play, and case development among other techniques.Fall quarter will focus on managerial self-assessment, interpersonal management skills, leadership, strategic management, and conflict management. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of leadership and global leaders, development of interpersonal managerial skills and team building skills, and strategic planning. Winter quarter will focus on strategic management theory and organizational development. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of basic finance, economic concepts, and strategic management as well as human resource management. Spring quarter will focus on change management and application of strategic management in the workplace. Learning objectives will include developing an understanding of general change management concepts, skill development in managing self and skill enhancement in applying analytical strategic management tools. Theresa Aragon Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Allen Jenkins
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This program is an introduction to management, leadership, and the basic concepts of entrepreneurship (starting, financing, growing, and running a successful business). It provides theoretical and practical frameworks for the realities of starting and running a business in a global economy.  Topics include business structure, financial management, financing operations, growth and leadership, business practices and protocol, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's world.  The program will explore how organizations are defined, legally and financially, and advantages and disadvantages of each type.  Using seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions, and assigned tasks, we will focus on strategic planning, organizational development, forecasting, budgeting, startup funding, and financial management.  Students will build the foundations for a solid understanding of how businesses work and how to manage and lead.  These foundations are essential for developing the confidence, objectivity, and vision necessary to make effective decisions both as an individual and as a leader. In fall, the program covers basic concepts and practices of entrepreneurship small business management, and leadership.  Winter covers financial and managerial accounting, financial statement analysis, and internal control systems and the significant roles they have in making sound business decisions, and in the management of a business.  Students will learn how to use QuickBooks accounting software.   In spring, the program continues its quantitative focus covering financial statement and ratio analyses to access company performance and to find the real cost of raising money (cost of capital) in the debt equity (stock) markets. This program promotes financial intelligence and quantitative reasoning using case studies as a way to "look through" nicely ordered numbers for clues to potential problems and to interpret and convey financial data clearly, concisely, and accurately. Excel is used for assignments, so the complexities of calculation will not be an impediment to learning and will allow students to concentrate on analytical thinking. business, management, marketing, entrepreneurship Allen Jenkins Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Natividad Valdez
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 13Summer Session I Students will learn about the legal system including sources of law, the framework of the U.S. court system, and legal considerations with the current economy. The class will explore intellectual property (trade secrets/patents) in business, the employer-employee relationship, contracts, and how to apply current law to popular conflicts. The course will also review antitrust laws/considerations and retirement plans. Natividad Valdez Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Glenn Landram
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 13Spring Would you like to better understand the business world’s set of numbers? This program will provide the quantitative reasoning for the conduct and understanding of business and finance in today’s world. We will focus on contemporary business issues, as well as offer an introduction to personal finance and investing. This program also includes four credits of basic undergraduate statistics, which will serve as a foundation for further work in advanced social sciences including graduate programs (e.g., an MBA or MPA) requiring statistics. But fear not: this material is useful, practical and very doable. We will examine the financial challenges faced by smaller businesses, entrepreneurs and individuals, and what it takes to be effective in our current economic environment. There will be workshops, lectures, films, guest speakers and student-led sessions. Readings from daily newspapers such as the , magazines such as the and , and texts such as by Thomas Friedman will increase student familiarity with current business topics and help students develop the skills to organize and analyze business, economic and financial information. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will also be covered. Glenn Landram Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session II The first part of the curriculum will include approximating areas, the definite integral as a limit, anti-differentiation, the product/quotient/chain rules, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, and a wide variety of applications of the integral. The program will end with various topics including Taylor polynomials, infinite series, power series, improper integrals, vectors, and multivariable calculus. Students will write exams, do homework, work collaboratively in class, and present their results to their peers. Allen Mauney Tue Thu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long sequence of courses will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  In particular we will cover applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization and of integration including area, arc length, volume, and distribution functions. We will gain a deep understanding of the analytical geometry of lines, surfaces, and vectors in multi-dimensional space and engage in a rigorous treatment of sequences and series.  Throughout the year, we will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Linda Moon Stumpff
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend F 12 Fall This course offers opportunities to select apply and design case studies for use in the public arena.  A broad range of topics to include environmental, social, cultural, financial and managerial issues is encouraged for student research.  Class members will construct and de-construct cases as they participate in active case studies.  Examples are drawn from Evergreen’s Enduring Legacies Project, theKennedySchool, SUNY Cases and other case collections. Students will identify topics for case writing and develop structures for writing cases for application in areas like decision-making, environmental education, conflict-management or leadership issues.  Class activities include reading an estimated 6-8 books, cases and articles, a literature review, a 4-5 page paper on cases, and an initial draft of a case written on a student-selected case topic. Linda Moon Stumpff Fri Sat Sun Fall Fall
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 13Winter In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 13Spring In this class students will sharpen their observation skills by rendering the human form using a live model. Topics discussed will include the ethics of using the human form in art, determining if a figure is needed in a work, and the implications of using a partial or whole body. Skills covered include construction of armatures, sculpting around an armature with solid clay, hollowing and reconstruction, and techniques for sculpting problematic areas like heads, hands, and feet. A variety of surface options will also be covered including fired and room temperature glaze. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall In this all-levels studio course, students will learn how to build three-dimensional ceramic sculptures using pinching, coil-building, slab-building, extruding, and basic wheel-throwing.  Students will explore how ceramic sculptors enhance the meaning of their work through the integration of content with formal elements, materials, surface, mounting, scale, location, timing, and lighting. The course will include both individual and collaborative projects to be temporarily installed or performed on campus. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Aisha Harrison
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6 04 06 Evening Su 13Summer Session I In this all level, boot camp style, throwing intensive, students will gain confidence and skill in creating functional objects on the potter's wheel. Students will embellish these objects with textures, glazes, slips, oxides, and stains. Students will be presented with a series of design challenges to be resolved based on each student’s ability and creativity. The class will incorporate many resources drawing on the rich history of ceramic functional objects including: lectures, articles, drawing, research, discussions, critique, and a field trip to the Seattle Asian Art Museum.Advanced or highly motivated students may register for 6 credits to do additional independent work. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer and Daryl Morgan
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long program will examine traditional Japanese culture, aesthetics, and classical architecture through a consideration of , the Way of Tea.  As a part of their study, students will learn to participate in tea preparation and drinking and will construct a tea house.  During spring quarter, as the culminating event of the program, students will hold , a tea gathering, in the tea house they have constructed. The Japanese tea ceremony was developed during the 15th century and consists simply of tea preparation and drinking in a minimalist setting composed especially for the purpose.  And yet is much more than simple tea drinking.  It is a ritual that embodies many of the most important aspects of Japanese philosophy and aesthetics and employs iconic representations of traditional Japanese art, literature, architecture, and craft. All students will participate in our core exploration of classical Japanese culture and aesthetics but will also be offered two options for more focused inquiry.  Students may choose either an emphasis on Japanese language or an emphasis on traditional Japanese architecture and building practice.  Separate CRNs are available for each of these emphases.  Fall: 10283 (Language) and 10284 (Wood).  Winter: 20224 (Language) and 20225 (Wood).  Spring: 30201 (Language) and 30202 (Wood). Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Daryl Morgan Mon Tue Wed Thu Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Peter Pessiki
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening W 13Winter Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate general chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background.  Learning experiences will focus on inorganic molecules, acids and bases, and energy.  Each learning experience will consist of a mix of lectures, workshops, presentations, labs, and discussions.  All students will be given the opportunity to make physical measurements, handle chemicals and glassware, perform chemical reactions, and learn how to put a calculator to use.  Peter Pessiki Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Peter Pessiki
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 13Spring Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate organic chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. The learning experience may consist of lectures, workshops and labs. All students will be given the opportunity to make and break chemical bonds, handle glassware and chemicals and perform chemical reactions. Peter Pessiki Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Peter Pessiki
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 13Spring Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate organic chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. The learning experience may consist of lectures, workshops and labs. All students will be given the opportunity to make and break chemical bonds, handle glassware and chemicals and perform chemical reactions. Peter Pessiki Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Paula Schofield and Lydia McKinstry
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter This upper-division chemistry program will develop and interrelate concepts in experimental (laboratory) organic chemistry and biochemistry. It will cover the chemistry material that is usually offered in Molecule to Organism. Throughout both quarters we will integrate topics in both subjects to gain an understanding of the structure-property relationship of synthetic and natural organic compounds. We will also examine the key chemical reactions of industrial processes as well as those reactions that are important to the metabolic processes of living systems.There will be a significant laboratory component--students can expect to spend at least a full day in lab each week, maintain laboratory notebooks, write formal laboratory reports and give formal presentations of their work. Students will work collaboratively on laboratory and library research projects incorporating the theories and techniques of chemical synthesis and instrumental methods of chemical analysis. All laboratory work and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem-solving groups. We also hope to attend a chemistry conference.This is an intensive program. The subjects are complex, and the sophisticated understanding we expect to develop will require devoted attention and many hours of scheduled lab work each week. Each student will be expected to develop a sufficient basis of advanced conceptual knowledge and practical skills necessary for pursuing work in a chemistry-based discipline. chemistry, biochemistry, industrial or pharmaceutical research, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, naturopathy, optometry and pharmacy. Paula Schofield Lydia McKinstry Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session II To understand children’s literature, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address literary and informational texts for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature in a variety of genres, and non-fiction texts across a range of subjects. Jon Davies Tue Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lin Crowley
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with little or no prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Students enrolling in this course will be joined by some students from the evening/weekend program .  If you are interested in traveling to China in spring, please be sure to contact Hirsh Diamant from that program (and consider joining the program, if interested). Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Rose Jang
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This program will take a journey through modern Chinese history by way of reading and viewing Chinese stories in fiction and film. The fiction of modern China found its first and most resounding voice in Lu Xun's short story, "The Diary of a Madman," in 1918, five years after the first independent screenplay was filmed in Shanghai, China. Since then, Chinese stories in the hands of many ingenious artists have enlivened life and documented modernization. Writers such as Ding Ling, Lao She, Mo Yan, Han Shaogong and Wang Anyi traced the joy, pain, suffering, dignity as well as everyday experiences of modern Chinese people, whose lives spanned some of the most turbulent and atrocious chapters of human history. Film directors Yuan Muzhi, Fei Mu, Zhang Yimou, Tian Zhuangzhuang, Jia Zhangke and Li Yu, leading the way for continuously emerging new-wave film makers, retold Chinese stories through the unique lenses and distinct aesthetics of each film generation.We will alternate between selective works of fiction and film, analyzing each work and genre independently as well as comparing them in aesthetic and thematic terms. Faculty will provide related historical and cultural information through lecture and additional readings. Students are required to analyze literary forms and film aesthetics and to explore their contents through reading, writing and seminar discussions. In addition to weekly papers in response to individual works, they will compose a final essay relating the artistic works of modern China to their historical and cultural contexts. Rose Jang Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Thomas Rainey and Geoffrey Cunningham
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su 13Summer Session II This program will explore, in detail, the causes, course, consequences, and legacy of the American Civil War and of the Reconstruction that followed. The Civil War and Reconstruction together caused the the greatest domestic crisis in the history of the United States of America. Indeed, the Civil War and Reconstruction were not only defing moments in American history but were also of world historical significance. Participants will consider and carefully study the war and its consequences as portrayed, mythologized, remembered, and interpreted in history texts, fictional accounts, personal memoirs, and films. The program will focus on the politics of two democracies at war, crucial battles and their consequences, questions of political and military leadership, the political and military significances of the Emancipation Proclomation, the reasons why the North ultimately prevailed over the South, and the failures of Reconstruction to protect the promised civil, social, and economic rights of the recently emancipated slaves.   Thomas Rainey Geoffrey Cunningham Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Stephen Beck and Thomas Rainey
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 13Spring This inter-disciplinary, coordinated studies program will explore, in considerable detail, the classical world of ancient Greece and Rome. It will focus on the history, literature, philosophy, and culture of these two vitally connected and overlapping classical civilizations. We will also consider how ancient Greece and Rome created the foundations of Western civilization. Our readings will be drawn from such writers as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, Suetonious, Plutarch, Seneca, and Aurelius. Stephen Beck Thomas Rainey Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Greg Mullins
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I From the silent films of the 1920s to the French New Wave, in this course you will study classics of world cinema. We will watch films by directors such as Wiene, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, De Sica, Godard, and Kurosawa. We will focus on styles, movements, influences, and historical contexts. Please visit for more information. Greg Mullins Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Rob Cole
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter We will explore the causes of global climate change and study the many actions and social behaviors that we can take to minimize human contributions to it. We will examine the scientific evidence for global warming and the efforts to discredit that evidence. We will study the role of multinational corporations in global climate change and how they influence governmental policies and public opinion. We will focus on how to respond to global warming in a fashion that works toward sustainability and equity in the ecosystems that support life on the planet. We will pay particular attention to issues of justice between humans, and how humans interact with other species.In order to understand actions we can take, this program will explore sustainable lifestyle strategies as well as how to resist corporate influence on consumer consumption. We will study the approaches of biomimicry, sustainable architecture, equitable distribution of food and shelter, minimal-impact industrial processes, local food production, less toxic methods of producing, and a variety of low-impact lifestyles. We will examine the methods advocated by visionary groups like Second Nature, Climate Solutions, and Cradle-to-Cradle. We will study current federal energy policy and it connection to climate change, as well as the more proactive policies adopted by hundreds of cities. Students will complete a series of audits of their personal consumption and carbon-generation patterns. We will study methods of computing carbon dioxide budgets including carbon sequestration methods, the intricacies of carbon capping and offsetting strategies, and opportunities to reduce net carbon dioxide production. Students can expect to do research on emerging technologies and strategies that move us to carbon neutrality while fostering sustainability and justice.In addition to exploring how we can all lessen our impact on global climate change and move toward equity, students can expect to sharpen their critical reasoning, writing and speaking skills, as well as their ability to work with quantitative methods and to interpret quantitative data from a variety of sources.Students will be expected to make at least two small-group presentations on a climate solution of their own choosing, and complete a term research paper on a topic of their choice. Rob Cole Mon Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
George Freeman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the field of human services.Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology, quantitative and qualitative research methods, and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. We will use the first three weeks to co-design as a community meaningful and thoughtful assignments geared to support the group as well as individual goals. Mid quarter is comprised of independent and small group work outside the classroom setting. We return for the last two weeks to review, revise and present the culmination of the quarter's work. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism, and humanistic psychology as well as the field of transpersonal psychology. Students will also be placed in area internships. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of couples therapy, family and group therapy, and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their 15 hour/week internships started winter quarter through spring quarter. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. psychology. George Freeman Mon Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Mark Harrison
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 13Summer Session I For more than 25 years, Joel and Ethan Coen, aka The Coen Brothers, have been among the most revered, controversial, and influential filmmakers of modern cinema.  Their subjects are uniquely American.  Their idiosyncratic filmmaking style ranges from original films to screen adaptations of diverse sources.  They have recast classic genres, such as film noir, screwball comedy and the Western (to name a few) within a post-modern perspective.  This program will explore the influences on and the art and legacy of the Coen Brothers.  This is a partial online program.  Students will need access to a comprehensive source for DVD rentals (such as Netflix, Amazon.com, Deep Discount, etc.) and will be using Moodle for required online seminars. Mark Harrison Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
John Schaub
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I This algebra-based physics course introduces fundamental topics in physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, and conservation laws. We will focus on both conceptual understanding and problem solving. We will also do one lab each week. The course will provide a solid foundation for those working toward careers in medicine, engineering, or the physical sciences. Students who need a full year of college physics will be able to continue their study in the second session through contracts. John Schaub Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sheryl Shulman, Aaron Skomra and Neal Nelson
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Computers are such an omnipresent and useful tool that it might seem like they can do anything. Through studying topics in advanced computer science, this program will explore what computers can do, how we get them to do it, and what computers can't do. It is designed for advanced computer science students and students with an interest in both mathematics and computer science. Topics covered will include formal computer languages, systems of formal logic, computability theory, and programming language design and implementation. Students will also study a functional programming language, , learn the theoretical basis of programming languages and do an in-depth comparison of the properties and capabilities of languages in the four primary programming paradigms: functional, logic, imperative and object-oriented. Program seminars will explore selected advanced topics in logic, language theory and computability. Topics will be organized around three interwoven themes. The theme will cover the theoretical basis of language definitions, concluding with a study of what is computable. The theme will cover traditional logic systems and their limits, concluding with some non-traditional logic systems and their applications to computer science. In the theme we will study both the theoretical basis and practical implementation of programming language definitions by comparing the implementations of the four programming language paradigms. Students will have an opportunity to conclude the program with a major project, such as a definition and implementation of a small programming language. Sheryl Shulman Aaron Skomra Neal Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Sheryl Shulman, Aaron Skomra and Neal Nelson
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter The goal of this program is to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in a liberal arts computer science curriculum. In both quarters the program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to operating systems. The theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem solving skills needed for computer scientists. The theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology. computer science and mathematics, including computer programming, discrete mathematics, algorithms, data structures, computer architecture, and topics in technology and society. Sheryl Shulman Aaron Skomra Neal Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Richard Weiss, Aaron Skomra and Judith Cushing
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This project-oriented program for intermediate and advanced computer science students will weave together the theory and practice of two cross-cutting topics in computer science, pattern analysis and modeling, in the context of eScience.  The overriding question of the program is how pattern analysis and modeling, broadly defined, might advance the natural and physical sciences, particularly in the areas of environmental science and climate change studies.    The program will meet four days a week for lectures, seminar, workshops, and labs.  Particularly in seminar, students will share responsibility for presenting and discussing concepts from the readings and lectures.  One seminar group will focus on applying computation, visualization, data mining, and statistics to problems faced by scientists.  Another group will apply statistics to machine learning and network analysis, and a third will focus on another area, to be determined by faculty and student expertise and interest.  This program will include a guest lecture series that focuses on (how computers are used in) modeling environmental systems.  In addition to seminar, the program has two disciplinary components and a project.  The disciplinary foci will be 1) the theory and practice of statistics, and 2) data mining, machine learning and pattern recognition.  Students will also be expected to apply the computing discipline of their choice to a research paper, or a programming or statistics project, and present their work. To facilitate projects, faculty will organize small research groups that meet twice weekly (once with a faculty advisor) to discuss progress. Projects will begin with a proposal and bibliography, and should be either small enough in scope to be completed in one quarter or a self-contained part of a larger project.  Possible CS subdisciplines in which faculty will encourage project work include data mining, machine learning, database systems, data visualization (especially visual analytics), networking, security, algorithmic complexity, and formal languages. This program aims to give students from , , and opportunities to continue work begun in those programs. Students who have taken will be expected to complete more advanced work. Richard Weiss Aaron Skomra Judith Cushing Mon Tue Wed Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Linda Moon Stumpff
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend W 13Winter Increasingly, public administrators confront emerging and existing forms of local and indigenous governance.  The place and voice of such governments within nations has grown with the recognition of human rights and with political and economic growth of these nations within   The U.N. has issued new statements on the rights of such governments that place emphasis on new areas such as entrepreurship, access to resources and new forms of partnership like co-management, co-operation and direct collaboration in the implementation of programs.  We will explore and critique various new institutions, de-centralized bodies and forms of governance on the national and international scenes to develop new and innovative models for working in partnership with local and indigenous governments. Linda Moon Stumpff Fri Sat Sun Winter Winter
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Su 13Summer Session I This class is for people new to ballet and movement for adept dancers.  We will strengthen and explore the core body muscular system with an hour of floor barre followed by standing barre and center work.  This class is excellent for those with injuries and low back issues as the exercises are very theraputic in nature—great for people who want greater flexibilty, core strength and balance.  Ballet slippers are required; dress prepared to move. Jehrin Alexandria Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day S 13Spring As K-12 classrooms continue to reflect the country's increasingly diverse population, what daily actions can we do to collectively challenge racism in our communities, schools and colleges? Can we generate an antiracist theoretical framework that rejects inaccurate notions of human difference, values diverse forms of knowledge, and questions institutional inequalities? In this program, we will pursue answers to these questions by examining, through an understanding of history, antiracist theory and educational research, how we can improve our efforts to support a more equitable school system.We will begin by analyzing a working definition of racism that frames intentional, as well as unintentional, normalized acts of inequality over time. We will challenge depictions in the literature and the media that promote the essentialization of diverse groups. Through an analysis of case study research, we will also explore the lived experiences of diverse learners whose identities are often impacted by assumptions and disparities found in communities and school settings. In order to deconstruct such assumptions, students will engage in reflective writing, research and media analysis over the course of the program.In addition, we will investigate specific everyday actions local activists and educators generate to confront inequalities. By using qualitative research methods, such as field experience, participant observation, interviews and document analysis, we will collect and report our findings that document how specific antiracist strategies can be created to both affirm and help students achieve academically within their respective institutional structures.Lastly, we will demonstrate our understanding of everyday antiracist practices by conducting multimedia presentations that merge theory, field work and practice. Possible themes that may emerge through our own antiracist study may include examining students' funds of knowledge and designing teaching and learning strategies to support intra-group interactions. multicultural education, cultural studies, language and literature. Grace Huerta Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Spring Spring
Arun Chandra
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring How can musical compositions express the complexity of their times?  Western European music has had a long development of simultaneous complexity, from the introduction during Medieval times of independent voice leading, to the multi-voiced complexity of Gyorgi Ligeti's  "micro-polyphony" in the 1960s.  "Polyphony" is the opposite of  “homophony”, in which musical lines are not independent of one another, but hierarchically bound to one another, harmonically and metrically, as in a "Barbershop Quartet".Polyphony has analogues in human and animal behavior. From the 1930s through the 1970s, the anthropologist Gregory Bateson studied the cultures of the South Pacific, the behaviors of alcoholics in San Francisco, and the language of dolphins.  From these (and many other areas of study) he created analyses that addressed the complexity of their subject matters, without simplifying them.  In this program, we will be reading analyses by Bateson, while creating compositions in sound that mirror and address the complexities that Bateson writes about, via the musical techniques of polyphony and voice-misleading.We will also investigate and learn how to use Max/MSP, one of the mostpopular software packages for the creation of music compositions, in an attempt to create acoustic events that might begin to match the complexity of our own times, using polyphony, and studying the ideas of counterpoint as shown in the compositions of J. S. Bach, Arnold Schoenberg, Gyorgi Ligeti, and contemporary composers. 
There will be regular listening sessions, musical projects, and writing assignments using the Bateson essays as models.  The program will attend concerts of music in Seattle and Portland and give a public concert of our final compositions. Arun Chandra Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I In this program, we will explore ways in which various types of gardens can contribute to community and health. Each week, as we visit a medicinal, edible, community, or ethnobotanical garden or urban farm, we will interview gardeners, consider themes related to sustainability, identify plants, learn herbal and horticultural techniques, and develop nature drawing and journaling skills. We will have the opportunity to expand upon these topics through reading, lectures, discussions, and workshops as well as through independent community, garden, and herbal projects and research. This program is suitable for students interested in environmental education, community development, health studies, plant studies, sustainability, ethnobotany, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Robert Esposito
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall This focused, one-quarter, movement-based program, involves progressive study in modern dance composition, theory, and technique. Prior dance experience at the beginner/intermediate level is advised.Activities will include regular classes in Laban-based Nikolais/Louis dance technique, theory, improvisation, composition, and seminar. Students will engage in vigorous physical activity based in basic anatomy and dance kinesiology, using a Pilates-based floor barre. Mind-body (somatic) work will be based on Feldenkrais’ “Awareness Through Movement” and theories of Gestalt psychology. Regular work in dance improvisation and composition will emphasize the personal and group dynamics of power-freedom-belonging-fun. Students will learn basic craft principles of composition: the formal design of space, time, shape and motion, drawing content from their own life experience and past interdisciplinary study to create original dance theatre work. Compositions will be performed weekly in performance forums that include faculty and student-centered critique and analysis.Theory, texts, and seminar will review the history, development, and methodology of dance and movement as somatic therapy, draw distinctions between art and psychology; and explore the creative process in therapy and the therapeutic efficacy of dance and other art forms. Seminar will draw on texts in psychology, art history, linguistics, poetics, and neurophysiology to develop skills in critical analysis and discourse, as well as situating texts, art and performance in their historical and sociocultural contexts. Writing will balance creative and analytical forms and research styles. The program culminates with a Week 10 showing of selected student work. dance and theatre. Robert Esposito Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Rita Pougiales
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I The processes of economic and political globalization reshape and undermine the lives of people and communities throughout the world. Some anthropologists have turned their attention to the effects of globalization on traditional and modern cultures, attempting to bring to light the full complexities and consequences of these transnational practices. For example, Joao Biehl develops an argument linking global economic activity in Brazil to what he calls the development of "zones of social abandonment" in most urban settings. Anthropologists conduct their studies through critical ethnographic research, gathering data, over long periods of time, as both "participant" and "observer" of those they are studying. Doing ethnographic research is simultaneously analytical and deeply embodied. This program includes an examination of and application of ethnographic research methods and methodologies, a study of varied theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists today to interpret and find meaning in data, and an opportunity to conduct an ethnographic project of interest. Students will read and explore a range of ethnographic studies that reveal what an anthropologist—whom Ruth Behar calls a "vulnerable observer"—can uncover about the lives of people today, and advocate on their behalf. Rita Pougiales Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sandra Yannone
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day S 13Spring This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course. Sandra Yannone Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Anne Fischel and John Baldridge
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening S 13Spring How do communities remain resilient in the face of oppression, exploitation, disempowerment, and the shock of what Naomi Klein has termed "disaster capitalism"? How do people come together--and hold together--in challenging times? Conversely, how do people organize to resist and transform their societies' embedded inequities? How do groups create, nurture and develop networks of mutual aid, cooperation and solidarity that uphold principles of justice and sustainability?We will consider a range of communities seeking answers to these questions, in theory and in practice, to create and maintain cultures of solidarity. Key themes include: alternative economic models, such as producer and consumer cooperatives; the role of bottom-up, non-authoritarian education models in building durable, multigenerational lines of communication; challenges faced by indigenous, migrant, working class and other constituencies, including language, cultural and media literacy; and critical analysis of the concepts of sustainability, justice, culture and solidarity. Students will engage with communities in places as nearby as Olympia and Shelton and as far afield as Venezuela, Argentina, and the Basque region of Spain. We aim to learn how answers to theoretical questions can drive constructive practices in the real world.This program offers a full-time and a half-time option. The central program components outlined above will be offered as part of the Evening & Weekend Studies curriculum, for 8 credits, for all students in the program.Students enrolled in the full-time (16-credit option) will participate in additional daytime sessions. They will build on the central curriculum with projects that engage directly with local communities. Though we anticipate that some students will join the program to extend their work in the fall/winter program Local Knowledge, the full-time option is open to all registrants. Opportunities will be available to begin new projects or internships, or to join projects-in-progress from fall and winter quarters.Credits for all students may include: political economy, labor studies, social movement studies, community studies, geography, sociology, ethnic studies, and education. Additional credits for full-time students may include: media production, art as social practice, participatory research, media analysis, or credits tailored to students' community projects. Anne Fischel John Baldridge Tue Tue Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Amy Cook and Kabby Mitchell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter S 13Spring Dance is a complex mix of human physiology, emotion and culture. The term "dance" has also been used by animal behaviorists to describe movements animals do as part of courtship and other social interactions. In this program we will explore dance from these various perspectives. Students will develop the skills necessary to dance and will gain a better understanding of what is behind the movements--both in terms of anatomy and physiology and in terms of what dance means to us as humans. We will examine and perform dance, not simply within categories like ballet or modern, but from a broader perspective of movement and culture.In winter we will examine the anatomical and physiological basis of dance and other demanding activities. Through labs, lectures and workshops we will look at the structure of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems and how these function both independently and together to allow us to do anything from walking across the street to performing the complex movements of dance. These ideas will be reinforced in dance workshops and students will be encouraged to learn through paying attention to what is happening in their own bodies. Students will begin to develop an understanding of the dance community and how it fits into a larger social and community context.In spring we will continue our examination of the physiology of dance and integrate energy, metabolism, balance and coordination with cultural studies. Students will continue to develop and hone their movement and dance skills in workshops and work towards a final performance in which they will be asked to show what they have learned in the program and bring together the major program themes. We will also look at the activities that animal behaviorists call dance and compare them to dance in humans. What are animals trying to communicate in their dances? Is there any evidence of individuality or creativity in animal dance? Students will be encouraged to think deeply about what dance is and whether it is unique to humans.This program is for anyone who has an interest in dance, human biology and culture and students do not need to have a background in either dance or science to succeed in the program. In taking an interdisciplinary approach to dance we hope to attract both students who have a long-term interest in dance as a career and students who have never before thought about learning to dance but are interested in human physiology and culture and would like to be involved in a creative approach to learning the major concepts of these fields. Amy Cook Kabby Mitchell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Rebecca Sunderman and Kabby Mitchell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall In this program we will investigate the basic languages of dance and chemistry. We will explore properties in chemistry connected to movement (conductivity, molecular vibrations, energy, reactivity, and solubility) and study how chemicals both construct and move within the human body. Students will become in tune with their bodies through movement workshops and scientific studies of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and body chemistry. In teams students will construct choreography of chemical processes. Some time will also be spent unpacking issues of privilege, stereotypes, and accessibility in both the fields of dance and chemistry.We will explore these topics through seminar assignments, exams/quizzes, reflection writing, laboratory experiments, movement workshops, and a group choreography assignment. No previous experience in dance or chemistry is required. This program will be participating in the new academic statement initiative. Rebecca Sunderman Kabby Mitchell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Ulrike Krotscheck
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 13Spring This program examines the material remains of past civilizations, including architecture, art, mortuary remains, and written sources. Our investigation takes us, virtually, to every corner of the globe and to many different periods in history, from the Mediterranean to Easter Island, and from the Neolithic Middle East to Colonial America. Primarily, we explore how the remains of past civilizations provide archaeologists and historians with clues that unlock the secrets of ancient societies. Students will gain a broad understanding of global prehistory and history, the rise and fall of civilizations, and human impact on the environment throughout history. We will examine how humans lived (the development of urbanism), how they organized their societies (experiments in politics), what they ate (hunter-gatherer to agriculture), how they worshiped (religion and myth), how they treated others (warfare and sacrifice), and how they explained the inexplicables of human existence (such as the afterlife).In addition, we will learn about the history of archaeological investigation and discuss archaeological methods and fieldwork techniques. These include different types of site formation processes (wet sites, dry sites, cold sites) as well as different excavation techniques, such as the differences between terrestrial and underwater archaeology. We will discuss how archaeologists and historians "date" the remains that they find using both "relative" and "absolute" dating techniques. Students will learn about the scientific methods used to find out detailed information about ancient peoples, such as what their diet was or how they dealt with injury and disease. Finally, we'll discuss the meaning of archaeology and the presentation of the past to different modern populations around the world. Students will have the opportunity to participate weekly in the work of a local archaeological lab and survey project.  We may also take an overnight field trip to the Makah Cultural Museum on the Olympic Peninsula, is schedule allows.  In addition, we will research archaeological sites around the globe using digital resources and we will learn to write site reports and draft archaeological artifacts and site plans. A research paper tailored to each student's specific interest will be the capstone of this program at the end of the quarter. This program assumes no prior knowledge of archaeology, and will be of interest to any student wishing to learn more about the ancient world, history, or who is interested in pursuing archaeological fieldwork in the future. humanities, social science, history, archaeology, and sociology. Ulrike Krotscheck Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Cynthia Kennedy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I This weekend-intensive program is designed for students who either are, or plan to be, in the position of managing their own work groups, heading up large companies, starting businesses that change society, managing the world's most important non-profits, or serving in government. The program will introduce basic language, concepts, tools, and problem-framing methodologies that are needed to develop management skills. The first half of the program focuses on motivating others, team-building, developing self-awareness, and communicating supportively. The second half of the program focuses on leadership, decision-making, understanding power and influence, and solving problems creatively. Cynthia Kennedy Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Richard McKinnon
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall Humans are born with a wealth of information about how the world is structured, ready to develop that knowledge through experience with the environment.  In this course, we'll investigate what babies know from birth and how that knowledge unfolds into mature systems such as vision, language, morality, and character.  We will compare theories that emphasize the contribution of innate knowledge with those that emphasize the role of the environment. Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jehrin Alexandria
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Day and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I This class is an in-depth study of movement and its role in the organization of the human brain as well as a look at contemporary works in the field of energy psychology.  We will explore the emotional issues that can occur when such organization is not complete and various techniques to address them.  Students will learn to recognize normal neurological organization by studying specific developmental milestones as well as recognize gaps and abnormalities in brain development and how they impact growth, learning, and psychological well-being.  This class will be deeply experiential as well as theoretical.  Please wear comfortable clothing as there is basic movement in some classes. Jehrin Alexandria Thu Fri Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Julianne Unsel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring How do the personal identities and everyday lives of a people come together to shape the social and political worlds of a nation like the United States? How do national social and political worlds, in turn, shape individual identities and lives? Where do these worlds and identities come from? What forces contribute to them? How do we shape, and how are we shaped by, the worlds we find ourselves in today?We will explore these and related questions with an emphasis on three elements fundamental to shaping daily life in the American present and past – sex, race and family structure. Our program will adopt the centermost goal of all historical study – to understand the lives and events that have come before us so that we may better live our own lives within the social and political worlds we are responsible to today.We will inquire how popular and scientific notions of sexual and racial difference and desire have shaped social life and politics in the U.S., from settlement to the present. We will examine how these compound notions have shaped American history, how history has shaped them, and how both have bounded collective and individual articulations of sexual and racial identity, difference and desire.In fall quarter, we will study the diverse array of family structures, sexual practices, and economic relationships that developed in the U.S. from settlement to the end of slavery. In winter, we will examine the great changes in these institutions from the closing of the western frontier through the end of the world wars. In spring, we will place our own lives in proximate context with a close examination of the true revolutions in social life and scientific understanding of the past fifty years.In all three quarters, we will read in several disciplines, including U.S. social and political history, history of western medicine, history of sexuality, feminist and LBGTQ theory, and the psychology of desire. Weekly classes will include reading and discussion seminars, history lectures, student panel presentations, library study periods, and occasional documentary and new classic Hollywood feature film screenings.All program assignments will help us grow in both the art and craft of clear communication and well-supported argumentation. They will include critical reading, college writing, research in peer-reviewed literature, black and white film photography, and public outreach and speaking. Fall/winter photography components will use classic 35mm cameras to explore portraiture as a medium for self-identification and expression. Spring internship opportunities will bring our program themes to social outreach agencies and groups in our local community.This program will offer appropriate support to all students ready to do advanced work. All activities will support student peer-to-peer teaching, personal responsibility for learning and achievement, contemplative study habits, and intensive skills development. Transfer students are welcome. the arts, social sciences, education, psychology, and health professions. Julianne Unsel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I This course will focus on learning to use the computer to create and manipulate waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize and compose with waveforms while learning about their mathematical premises.  Students will create short compositions using FM, AM, granular, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis techniques.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of the class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, to find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, along with readings in synthesis techniques and programming.  Students of all levels of experience are welcome. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I Discrete mathematics can be loosely organized into four areas: sets, functions and relations, combinatorics and probability, and graph theory.  This course will cover parts of each of these areas including logic, mathematical writing and introduction to proofs, introductory work with sets and Boolean Algebra, counting and probability, graphs, and trees.  The classroom will be student-centered with a strong emphasis on collaborative learning.  Students will be expected to engage in a rigourous study of the mathematics and participate fully in reflective practices centered on teaching and learning.  This discrete mathematics course is designed for students who have an interest in mathematical reasoning and for those who are preparing for further study in mathematics, computer science, and math education.  You are encouraged to have successfully completed at least one college-level math class in preparation for this course. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Martin Beagle and Trisha Towanda
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Biodiversity. What is it and why does it matter? How is it measured? How is it threatened? Should we do anything about it? Around the world, people are working to develop strategies to protect Earth’s biodiversity at all levels: from the molecular codes within our cells to ecosystems that can span entire continents. Over the course of two quarters, we will undertake a systematic study of biology in order to understand and address these questions.In fall quarter, students will investigate the foundations of biology: cellular and molecular biology, genetics, physiology, evolution, and their context through the study of different biomes. We will develop an understanding of the quantitative and scientific methods used in biology as well address current issues in biology via seminar and workshop. Laboratory sessions will focus on acquiring proficiency in the techniques and instrumentation commonly used in the study of biology. Field studies will offer opportunities to experience and quantify biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest.Studies in winter quarter will continue studies of general biology and further integrate the fundamental principles of biodiversity through evolution, conservation biology, and ecology as we examine the diversity of life on our planet. We will study the flow of energy and the fluxes and pools of elements within ecosystems, while considering the diversity of organisms involved and their functional roles.Students will achieve a broad and balanced understanding of general biology through a variety of activities: workshops, seminars, lectures, labs and fieldwork, as well as student presentations. Students will apply biological concepts to explore the importance of diversity at genetic, species and ecosystem levels. Successful completion of this program will prepare students for upper-division work in the natural sciences, biology, conservation biology, environmental studies, and teaching and health professions. Upper-division science credit will not be available in this program. Upon successfully completing this program, students seeking the equivalent of can take the full-time program spring quarter to prepare for further study in natural sciences. Martin Beagle Trisha Towanda Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II How do documentaries tell stories? How do they tell the truth? Why do we believe in the truth that they tell? How do we create compelling documentaries that examine complex issues about the world we live in? Students will learn to use a variety of creative and critical strategies to make their own short video documentaries including video production, video editing, and documentary writing/scripting techniques. Students will read several critical texts about the history and theory of documentary filmmaking, and screen a wide variety of documentary films from the US and abroad. Naima Lowe Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Stephen Buxbaum
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall Using case studies about infrastructure, affordable housing, and environmental projects and activities, this course explores how public programs, projects, and services are conceived, approved, funded, and financed. Students will learn about how resource allocation decisions are made, how public value is determined, and how levels of government work with and sometimes against each other as they take action to meet public needs. Stephen Buxbaum Mon Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Eddy Brown
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter In what situations, milieux, and other kinds of settings do characters find or put themselves? How and why did they get there? How do they then behave? What habits, values, self-identity paradigms, world views, conscious and unconscious needs, goals and fears drive them and affect or determine their actions and decisions? The answers to these key questions help authors to create compelling, rounded characters in realistic settings, dramatized through vivid, engaging scenes with meaningful subtexts, in stories that are surprising yet convincing. With that in mind, this class will explore these and other narrative design elements in service of students constructing their own short fiction prose narratives.Students will also be given the guidance and tools for analyzing existing literary texts. Along with reading, discussing and writing about selected published materials, students will consider and practice spontaneous and experimental modes of story development, as well as apply some established cinematic and classical dramatic paradigms for story structure and development.Typical program activities will include writing exercises, story drafting, self-editing, small- and large-group peer activities including writing critiques, and weekly seminars on assigned readings. The major project will be a short story that has undergone revision through several drafts.In general, students will explore and practice story crafting, writing as a process, fiction genres, and literary analysis, and are expected to be active, consistently engaged members of a learning community.Interested students should enter the program with sound, college-level writing skills, and ideally, having successfully completed a college-level creative writing class. Eddy Brown Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Gerardo Chin-Leo and Lucia Harrison
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter S 13Spring This program will examine marine environments and life (The Sea) from the perspectives of science and visual arts. This program is designed for beginning students in either discipline. The Sea accounts for a major portion of the biomass and diversity of life and plays a major role in global cycles. The Sea also is a source of inspiration for artists, and artwork provides insights into the relationships of humans to this environment. Currently, The Sea faces major crises caused by human activities such as habitat degradation and natural resource over-exploitation. Science and art can contribute to effective solutions to these major environmental problems by providing an understanding of natural phenomena and insights into how nature is perceived and valued by humans. We will examine how both visual artists and marine scientists use close observation to study The Sea and produce images to communicate the results of their work. We will also study how scientific findings can provide a foundation for expressive art and how art can effectively convey the implications of scientific findings to how humans relate with nature.Activities will develop concepts and skills of marine science and visual art and examine how each discipline informs the other. Lectures will teach concepts in marine science and aesthetics and develop a basic scientific and visual arts vocabulary. Labs and field trips to local Puget Sound beaches, the San Juan Islands and Olympic Peninsula will provide opportunities to experience The Sea and to apply the concepts/skills learned in class. Weekly workshops on drawing and watercolor painting will provide technical skills for keeping illustrated field journals and strategies for developing observations into polished expressive thematic drawings. Seminars will explore how scientific and artistic activities contribute to solving environmental issues. For example, we will study how the understanding of human relationships with The Sea can be combined with knowledge of the science underlying marine phenomena to promote effective political change (artists and scientists as activists). Other themes that explore the interaction of science and art will include the Sea as: a source of food, a metaphor for human experience, a place of work or medium of transportation, and a subject of inquiry. Most assignments will integrate science and art.In winter quarter, we will focus on marine habitats including estuaries such as the Nisqually River estuary, the inter-tidal zone and the deep sea. Spring quarter will focus on the diversity and adaptations of marine life. Both quarters will include week-long overnight field trips. This program will include an outreach component where students will contribute to environmental education by developing and presenting science and art curriculum to local schoolchildren. visual arts, education, marine science, biology and ecology. Gerardo Chin-Leo Lucia Harrison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Shaw Osha (Flores)
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I This intensive drawing program runs for two weeks.  Open to all levels, this immersive drawing class will address the importance of drawing as the basis of understanding one's experience in the world and as a language integral to all visual art. Primarily, we will study the figure as a structure in space and mark making as a process of investigation. There will be some reading and writing as well as critiques. The Drawing Marathon will push artists to a new level of working. Shaw Osha (Flores) Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Baumann
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 13Spring Designed for intermediate to advanced drawing students, this course will focus on contemporary applications of traditional drawing practices.  Building upon observational drawing skills, students will work with invented compositions and alternative materials, investigating mark making, collage methods, and color theory.  Class time will be devoted to presentations, critiques, demonstrations, and in-class exercises.  Students will be expected to work outside of designated class time to complete their work. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 13Winter This course focuses on the traditional life-drawing practices of observing and drawing the human figure from live models.  Students will use a variety of media ranging from graphite to gouache as they learn to correctly anatomically render the human form.  Homework assignments will supplement in-class instruction and visual presentations.  Several readings will also be given throughout the quarter.  While previous drawing experience is not required, it is recommended. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Judith Baumann
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing.  Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume, and composition.  Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand-drawn imagery.  Students will work toward the development of an informed, personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists.  Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time.  Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work.  A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Clarissa Dirks and Abir Biswas
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Geologic changes throughout Earth's history have strongly influenced the evolution and development of all life on earth. This year-long interdisciplinary program in biology and geology will examine the development of our planet and the cycles and transformations of matter and energy in living and nonliving systems. Students will gain an understanding of biological and physical Earth processes on a variety of scales. We will study basic concepts in earth science such as geologic time, plate tectonics, earth materials, nutrient cycling, and climate change. Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, organismal and ecosystem levels, emphasizing the strong connections between biological and geological processes.Fall quarter will introduce students to fundamental principles in geology and biology by studying early Earth history and evolution. In winter quarter, we will investigate systems that highlight how earth processes support life. In spring quarter, students will use this background to engage in projects. Field trips will be an integral part of this program, allowing students to experience the natural world using skills they learned. Each quarter, program activities will include: lectures, small group problem-solving workshops, laboratories, field trips and seminars. There will be opportunities for small groups of students to conduct hands-on scientific investigations, particularly in the field. Students will learn to describe their work through scientific writing and presentations.This program is designed for students who want to take their first year of college science using an interdisciplinary framework. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a solid working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, and with the ability to reason critically and solve problems. Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological and physical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problems.Boating down the Colorado River though the Grand Canyon while conducting field work is a great way to learn about geological and ecological processes. All students in the program will participate in field work though only a select few (approximately 14 students) will be able to participate in the Grand Canyon river trip. For the river trip, students will be selected through an application and interview process. The expense of this trip is often prohibitive ($1,700 plus airfare to and from Las Vegas); however, alternative less expensive options for independent projects will be available so that all students gain hands-on research experience in the field.   Clarissa Dirks Abir Biswas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dennis Hibbert
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 12 Fall Ice, air, water, land, and green growing things—these interact to shape our world's climates. We will study these interactions and how they have changed over time as we follow flows of energy, carbon, and water through the climate system. We will address present changes in climate related to our own activities, the consequences of these changes that we now cannot avoid, and our options for modifying them and for adapting to the world we are bringing about. Dennis Hibbert Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 13Spring In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend F 12 Fall Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Michael Paros
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This academically rigorous field-based course will provide students with the fundamental tools to manage livestock and grasslands by exploring the ecological relationships between ruminants and the land. We will begin the quarter learning about the physiology of grasses and their response to grazing and fire. Practical forage identification, morphology and production will be taught. Ruminant nutrition, foraging behavior, and digestive physiology will be covered as a precursor to learning about the practical aspects of establishing, assessing and managing livestock rotational grazing operations. We will divide our time equally between intensive grazing and extensive rangeland systems. Classroom lectures, workshops and guest speakers will be paired with weekly field trips to dairy, beef, sheep and goat grazing farms. There will be an overnight trip to Eastern Washington where students can practice their skills in rangeland monitoring. Other special topics that will be covered in the program include: co-evolutionary relationships between ruminants and grasses, targeted and multi-species grazing, prairie ecology and restoration, controversies in public land grazing, and perennial grain development. animal agriculture, ecology, conservation, rangeland management, animal physiology and behavior. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Tomas Mosquera
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 13Winter Presented in a non-technical and logical manner, this introductory course will introduce you to the essentials of economic theory and policy. We will explore the fundamentals of economic theory and practice and extend these concepts to real-world applications. This course will help you acquire an understanding of micro- and macro-economic terminology, concepts, and principles. Furthermore, this course will help you realize the important role that economics plays in our lives and will help you gain a greater understanding of economic policy as well as how decisions influence the success or failure of a business. Tomas Mosquera Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Leslie Flemmer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall We all possess skills, talents, and abilities that help us negotiate our educational, cultural, social, and linguistic networks. Some of us may be familiar with these "cultural artifacts" and their use in our daily, lived experiences; or they may remain unrealized and untapped as a tool for knowledge construction. Funds of knowledge is defined by researchers Luis Moll, Cathy Amanti, Deborah Neff, and Norma Gonzalez "to refer to the historically accumulated and culturally developed bodies of knowledge and skills essential for household or individual functioning and well-being."This course will explore how Funds of Knowledge used as a method of teaching can provide schools, teachers, and members of the community with opportunities to learn more about their students and their families in new and distinct ways. Students with an interest in education can begin to examine how their own households contain rich cultural, historical, and cognitive resources that should be used in classrooms to provide culturally relevant and responsive lessons that tap students’ prior knowledge. Leslie Flemmer Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Leslie Flemmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening W 13Winter S 13Spring In what ways does the contested space of public classrooms, schools, and educational policies disrupt our understanding of free, universal, and compulsory education? What challenges and opportunities does teaching in a democratic society provide? This two-quarter program focuses on the interplay of social contexts that ground education, teaching, and learning through analysis of contemporary educational policies, practices, and theories. We will examine the interrelationships of daily classroom realities, philosophical positions, and cultural practices. Further, our exploration of the history of schooling and current reform movements in public schools may inform how we can meet an increasingly diverse student population (i.e., cultural, linguistic, and economic). Essential questions around multiculturalism, identity, construction of knowledge, and issues of power will be discussed as will more specific issues such as tracking, standardized testing, dropouts, and student-centered learning.  Through reading, writing, discussion, reflection, film analysis, problem based research, and the practice of teaching, students will answer questions about education, explore their experiences, and begin to develop a philosophy of education.Winter quarter will focus on the historical and philosophical antecedents that inform our current practices as well as reform movements that ask our society to rethink and reimagine our compulsory educational system. Students will develop a philosophy of education which will inform practices of teaching they will explore in the spring.Spring quarter, students will explore pedagogical practices of teaching from funds of knowledge to critical pedagogy. In conjunction with their philosophy, students will create an experience of teaching in which they will develop a day in the life of their ultimate school setting as reflective and critical educational practitioners. Leslie Flemmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Larry Dzieza
  Course GR ONLYGraduate Only 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer The course will focus on understanding the role and management of technology in the public sector. Information technology is increasingly "how organizations get things done" but using IT effectively has special challenges in the public sector. These challenges include how organizations, built for stability not speed, are adapting to the rapid pace of technological change, succeeding within a risk-averse political climate, and satisfying stakeholder's and the public's high-expectations for low-cost, convenience, transparency, and protection of privacy. Finally, we will consider the contribution a new generation of workers may bring to increasing public participation and transforming service delivery.  Larry Dzieza Fri Sat Sun Graduate GR Summer Summer
Paul Pickett
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 2 02 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I Participate in a week of sustainability field studies in Central America. Students will be working to support local efforts to improve the living conditions of both the people and wildlife of Jiquilisco Bay, an important mangrove ecosystem on the Pacific coast of El Salvador. Students will help researchers catch turtles in the bay to study and participate in a beach walk looking for nesting turtles. We will also take boat rides on the bay looking for wildlife, visit local towns, and immerse ourselves in the culture, and visit community development projects. Paul Pickett Mon Tue Wed Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Brian Walter, Susan Fiksdal and Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter What can a poll tell us about the outcome of an election? Do test scores really indicate whether a public school is "good"? What do gas prices have to do with social equity? Why are food labels a social justice issue?Quantitative literacy is a powerful tool that allows one not only to understand complex real-world phenomena but also to effect change. Educator and social justice advocate Eric Gutstein says that reading the world with mathematics means "to use mathematics to understand relations of power, resource inequities, and disparate opportunities between different social groups and to understand explicit discrimination based on race, class, gender, language, and other differences."In this program, we will "read the world with mathematics" as we consider issues of social justice, focusing particularly on how quantitative as well as qualitative approaches can deepen our understanding. The program work will develop students' knowledge of mathematics and examine issues of inequity using quantitative tools. In addition, students will work on persuasive writing and develop a historical understanding of current social structures. Our goal for our students is to expand their sense of social agency, their capacity to understand issues related to equity, and their ability to take action and work toward social change.In fall, we will study presidential and congressional national elections in the United States. We'll look at quantitative approaches to polling and the electoral process, including study of the electoral college system, and qualitative approaches to campaign advertising and political speeches. We'll examine the changing role of media, such as radio, television, the Internet and social media, by studying past presidential campaigns and how they've impacted today's campaigns. This work will include workshops in statistics and other quantitative approaches; workshops in discourse analysis of ads, blogs and social media websites; writing workshops; lectures; films and other media; book seminars; synthesis seminars; and a final project including quantitative and qualitative analysis of some aspect of the 2012 national elections.In winter quarter, we will investigate common experiences students have with mathematical work by studying the U.S. education system and mathematics education in particular. Civil rights activist Bob Moses has said that mathematics education in our public schools is a civil rights issue. Economic access depends on mathematical literacy, yet many students are marginalized by the middle-class curriculum and teaching practices of our public schools. Our exploration of this issue will inform our learning as we develop our own mathematical literacy.There are no mathematics requirements for this program. It is designed specifically to accommodate students who are uncertain of their mathematical skills, or who have had negative experiences with mathematics in the past. It is an introduction to college-level mathematics in the areas of statistics, probability, discrete mathematics, geometry and algebra. The program will also provide opportunities for students who wish to advance their mathematical understanding beyond the introductory level in these areas. Brian Walter Susan Fiksdal Sara Sunshine Campbell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
John Filmer
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter S 13Spring Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. Strong, competent management leads to strong successful organizations. This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, economic development and basic business principles. Critical reasoning will be taught to facilitate an understanding of economics and its application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment.Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. As an effective leader/manager you must develop the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting your organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material separate the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager from the pedestrian administrator. Winter quarter will focus on these basic skills in preparation for advanced work including projects and research. Students will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. Students will be actively involved in research and project work which may provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects and case studies. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. Spring quarter will be a continuation of winter quarter enriched with possible topics in leadership, business planning, communication, case studies, financial analysis, marketing, global business, the national economy and spread sheet techniques.  Topics will largely be tailored to the needs of the classs and students may also take some of their credits in internships or special projects.Evergreen's management graduates enjoy a reputation for integrity and for being bold and creative in their approaches to problem solving, mindful of the public interest and attentive to their responsibilities toward the environment and their employees, volunteers, customers, stockholders, stakeholders, and neighbors. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Your competence as a manager is in the balance. business, non-profit management, and economics. John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Zoe Van Schyndel and Brenda Hood
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Why do some organizations succeed while others fail? One answer to this question lies in the decisions and strategies organizations select. Others may be found by examining an organization's ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political, environmental, and economic realities. Strong, competent leadership results in strong, successful organizations. This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit entrepreneurial business development through the study of basic business principles, sources of innovation, systems analysis, leadership decision-making, social responsibility, and ethics.We will explore the multidimensional aspects of “Power” in business entrepreneurship: to create innovative organizations that address the needs of today and tomorrow; to be the drivers of social, economic, and political change; and to utilize resources of the natural world essential to the development and exponential growth of society. We will engage in a critical analysis of historic and contemporary cases to examine the synergies of energy technology and entrepreneurship (whale oil, coal, oil, and alternative energy sources), as well as mini-cases to examine other examples of natural resource utilization and entrepreneurship (such as fisheries and forestry).You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating organizations in an ever-changing environment. Business management is a highly interdisciplinary profession, in which  knowledge of the liberal arts and humanities, or of technological advances, may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics, or the latest management theory. As an effective leader/manager you must develop the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting your organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material define far-thinking and effective organizational leaders. Fall quarter will focus on basic business principles, understanding the business lifecycle and entrepreneurship within the larger context of systems dynamics, and on case studies in energy and natural resources. In early October, we begin with a team-building adventure—sailing in the San Juan Islands on the Zodiac. Zodiac trip dates will be October 2-4, 2012 and include one night camping and one night aboard ship.  Winter quarter will continue building on these concepts and incorporate critical discussions around ethics and “good business.” Cases will explore concepts of dependence and change, power and politics through such topics as coal, oil, and other natural resource utilization and exploitation. Outside speakers representing a spectrum of organizations from the for-profit and non-profit arenas will be included throughout both quarters to provide a diversity of perspective and experiences.Class work throughout the academic year will include lectures, book seminars, projects, films, workshops, case studies, guest presentations, group and individual assignments, and field trips. By the end of the program, students will be expected to demonstrate competence in current business practices and concepts in innovation and entrepreneurship, environmental impact, sustainability, and distributive justice as ethical and social concerns.  Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. business, entrepreneurship, and leadership. Zoe Van Schyndel Brenda Hood Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Brenda Hood
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter What does it mean to be a successful entrepreneur? What does authentic success look like to the individual, to the organization, to the larger community, and to the economy? These logical questions arise after realizing traditional small business approaches which attempt to achieve excessive profits often fail socially, ethically and economically. Today's creative entrepreneurs may realize, far too late, they are doing something they really don't want with their lives, and to the world, in pursuit of some idealized vision of independence and wealth. How might we reconsider entrepreneurial success and economic progress in terms of having a purpose and quality of life: meaningful work within an empowering organizational culture that sustains us financially, community well-being, a healthy environment, and supportive, collaborative relationships?This program will build on the skills learned in fall quarter’s Entrepreneurship and Power program. The fall program focused on basic business principles, the process of how to start a business, understanding the business lifecycle, business finances, organizational behavior, marketing, and entrepreneurship within the larger context of systems dynamics. The winter program builds on this foundation to incorporate critical discussions around entrepreneurship with a purpose: social responsibility, economic development, principled leadership, and “good business.” Case analyses will investigate business ethics and strategic management. We will apply these concepts and skills toward building a dream business that identifies and explores key aspects of feasibility analysis, business planning, and strategic planning.The program will be foundational for forming business pathways to move toward greater cultural, economic, and environmental sustainability. Throughout the program we will ask: how might entrepreneurs innovate, challenge and transform their cultures and their environments as well as themselves? One of the goals of this program is to develop a set of competencies that will address this need, in an increasingly challenging economic and business climate, as we also engage in developing a well-rounded liberal arts education. You will be introduced to the tools, skills, and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating organizations in an ever-changing environment. You will develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills in the liberal arts, as we promote and implement concepts of social change, life-long learning, and personal and community enrichment. Class work will includes lectures, book seminars, projects, films, workshops, field trips, case studies, guest presentations, and group and individual assignments. By the end of the program, students will be expected to demonstrate competence in current business practices and concepts in innovation and entrepreneurship, economic development, environmental impact, sustainability, leadership decision-making, and distributive justice as ethical and social concerns. Expect to read a lot, study hard, and be challenged to think and communicate clearly, logically, and often. Brenda Hood Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Andrew Brabban, Clyde Barlow and Kenneth Tabbutt
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." For scientists, beauty may be at the scale of the landscape, the organism, or the atomic level. In order to describe a system, scientists are required to collect quantitative data. This is a rigorous program that will focus on investigations in geology and biology supported with analytical chemistry. Instrumental techniques and chemical analysis skills will be developed in an advanced laboratory. The expectation is that students will learn how to conduct accurate chemical, ecological and hydrogeological measurements in order to define baseline assessments of natural ecosystems and determine environmental function and/or contamination. Quantitative analysis, quality control procedures, research design and technical writing will be emphasized.During fall and winter quarters, topics in physical geology, geochemistry, microbiology, molecular biology, freshwater ecology, genetics, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, GIS, and instrumental methods of chemical analysis will be addressed. Students will participate in group projects studying aqueous chemistry, hydrology, and the roles of biological organisms in the nutrient cycling processes of local watersheds. Analytical procedures based on EPA, USGS and other guidelines will be utilized to measure major and trace anion and cation concentrations. Molecular methods and biochemical assays will complement more classical procedures in determining biodiversity and the role of specific organisms within an ecosystem. Computers and statistical methods will be used extensively for data analysis and simulation and GIS will be used as a tool to assess spatial data. The program will start with a two-week field trip to Yellowstone National Park that will introduce students to regional geology of the Columbia River Plateau, Snake River, Rocky Mountains and the Yellowstone Hotspot. Issues of water quality, hydrothermal systems, extremophilic organisms and ecosystem diversity will also be studied during the trip.Spring quarter will be devoted to extensive project work continuing from fall and winter. There will be a 5-day field trip to eastern Washington. Presentation of project results in both oral and written form will conclude the year. geology, hydrology, chemistry, microbiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, ecology, chemical instrumentation, environmental analysis and environmental fieldwork. Andrew Brabban Clyde Barlow Kenneth Tabbutt Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Ted Whitesell
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 13Summer Full  –  ecological restoration, sustainable agriculture, conservation, resource management, environmental health, climate impacts analysis, environmental justice, environmental advocacy, environmental education, and much more! Ted Whitesell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Martha Henderson
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 2, 4 02 04 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer As the largest island in the Caribbean, with the highest percentage of environmental scientists and engineers and a long-standing commitment to policies that promote environmental protection and sustainable development, Cuba is uniquely positioned to provide leadership in enlightened environmental policy and practice in our shared ecosystem. The rationale and potential for mutual collaboration between US and Cuban environmentalists in this vital and shared ecosystem is considerable.This course will be joining for its biannual research program on environmental protection and sustainable development in Cuba, which includes an opportunity for interchange with participants in the IX International Conference on Environment and Development hosted by the .  Trip dates are 7/5/13-7/14/13. Course requires separate registration in April through Eco Cuba Network; please contact Gail Wootan at wootang@evergreen.edu if interested in this course.For more information about the research program, please see . For more information on the conference in Cuba and conference schedule: Students may choose to take this course for two credits or four credits. Two credit students will be required to complete reading assignments and virtual meetings in June prior to leaving for Cuba. Two credit students are required to submit their field notebooks with a reflective essay by July 29. Four credit students are required to complete reading assignments, short paper assignment and all virtual class meeting times prior to leaving for Cuba. Upon returning from Cuba, four credit students are required to submit a 15 page paper based on field and archival work by July 29. All students are required to write a short autobiography and short essay on their trip expectations. They must also submit a resume. Students will ‘meet’ in the virtual classroom. A Moodle site will be set up for virtual class meetings.The cost of the Eco Cuba Network program, including flight from Cancun, Mexico is $2600.  Students are responsible for purchasing airfare to Cancun. Students may also choose to arrive early or stay late for personal travel.  If enough students are interested, a service project after 7/14/13 may be organized.NOTE: Students interested in this course must register through Eco Cuba Network separately sometime in April.  Please contact Gail Wootan, Assistant Director of the Graduate Program on the Environment, at wootang@evergreen.edu if interested in this course. Martha Henderson Summer Summer
Jose Gomez
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Equality is an ancient ideal, yet at best the United States has embraced it ambivalently throughout its history. Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal," yet he owned slaves; the framers claimed to cherish equality, yet they chose not to enshrine it in the Constitution. Even the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of equal protection did not prevent the states from passing Jim Crow laws to maintain white supremacy or the Supreme Court from ruling that the amendment did not mean what it said. Women were denied the right to vote until the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. The struggle to secure equal rights for all Americans continues to this very day.We will begin by taking a critical look at the early cases in which the Supreme Court eviscerated the ideal of equality by circumventing the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments. Then we will study the many cases in the 20th and 21st centuries that have chipped away at Jim Crow and inequality. These involve struggles for equal rights in education, employment, public accommodations, housing, voting and university admissions. We will also examine the modern cases that have gone beyond race to fight discrimination based on sex, age, disability, indigence, alienage, wealth and sexual orientation.Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real equal protection cases and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, to hear arguments, and to render decisions. Students should expect rigorous study; the principal text will be a law school casebook. Jose Gomez Mon Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stacey Davis
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 04 06 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II Stacey Davis Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Frances V. Rains
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Native American women have been erased from history.  It is not that they did not exist; it is that they were , omitted from history lessons.  At the same time, stereotypes such as "squaw" and "princess" have plagued Native women since 1492.  Ironically, the history of Native women has reflected a different reality with a long tradition of standing strong for justice.  Native women have stood to protect: the lands and the natural world, their cultures, languages, the health of their families, and Tribal Sovereignty.  But few learn about these Native women, who consistently defied the stereotypes, to work for the betterment of their peoples and nations. Drawing upon the experiences and writings of such women, we will explore the ways in which leadership is articulated in many Native American communities. We will critique how feminist theory has both served and ignored Native women. Through case studies, autobiography, literature and films, we will analyze how Native women have argued for sovereignty and developed agendas that privilege community over individuality. We will explore the activism of 20th century Native women leaders, particularly in the areas of the environment, the family system and the law. This program will implement decolonizing methodologies to give voice to some of these women, while deconstructing the stereotypes, in order to honor and provide a different way of knowing about these courageous Native American women, past and present.  As well, as a lower division program, campus services will be introduced and emphasized across the quarter. Students will develop skills as writers, researchers and potential advocates by studying scholarly and imaginative works and conducting research. Through extensive reading and writing, dialogue, art, films and possible guest speakers, we will investigate important aspects of the life and times of some of these Native American women across the centuries.   Frances V. Rains Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall
Marla Elliott
Signature Required: Fall 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening F 12 Fall The Evergreen Singers is a two-credit class and a performing chorus.  In fall 2012 and winter 2013, enrollment will be limited to 16 auditioned singers in addition to students in the 16-credit program .   In fall, the Evergreen Singers will rehearse and perform music spanning the whole history of musical theatre and opera. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Marla Elliott
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening S 13Spring The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  Spring repertoire will focus on early American composers. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Rachel Hastings and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day S 13Spring Human language is amongst the most complex phenomena ever to arise through Darwinian selection. The human body and brain have been heavily modified at a genetic level to allow language acquisition, processing and speech, yet the evidence is overwhelming that languages evolve and are passed on through a process that is entirely cultural. This has allowed individual languages to change rapidly as populations have spread, diverged and fused over space and time.The evolution of human language has made our species unique. Once we as individuals acquire language in childhood, massive stores of cultural content can be efficiently transmitted into our developing brains—information that ranges from the factual to the emotional, from the narrative to the instructive. We download our human programming from the living members of our tribes.Controversies abound about the origins of this language capacity in humans, the relationship between human language and the communication systems of other animals, and the relationship between language and culture. In this program we will study a variety of possible responses to these and other issues relating to the evolution of language. A major focus of our work will be to develop and use critical and analytical thinking in order to propose our own hypotheses in response to linguistic and biological data.Our study will encompass the two principal meanings of "language evolution": the evolutionary origins of language in humans, and the cultural change in language(s) over time leading to families of languages which are descended from common ancestor languages. These two lines of inquiry will require us to study evolutionary processes more generally. We will discuss ways in which genetic evolution and cultural evolution interact and we will consider theories of linguistic change. We will focus on the multiple evolutionary emergence points of written language, and investigate the cultural diffusion of this trait between populations.We will read, have lecture, and have detailed seminar and workshop discussions. Students will be expected to generate and defend hypotheses and predictions in a supportive and rigorous environment. We will spend time looking at nature and listening to spoken language to obtain primary data. The program work and assignments will be geared towards generating deep predictive insight. It is best suited to self-motivated students with a deep commitment to comprehending that which is knowable, but unknown. Rachel Hastings Bret Weinstein Freshmen FR Spring Spring
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I The Experience Japan program is an intensive, in-country introduction to the language, culture, and society of contemporary Japan. During the three-week program, students will take Japanese language classes and will attend lectures on Japanese culture and society at the Department of Comparative Cultural Studies at Tamagawa University in Tokyo. The coursework includes field trips to sites selected for their historic, cultural, or contemporary importance. The program's estimated cost is based on Tamagawa University's on-campus housing fee. Participants have the option of living with Japanese families for an additional cost. Admission is open to all Evergreen students regardless of language ability.Interested students should contact faculty via email (ulmert[at]evergreen.edu) and pay a deposit by April 19, 2013. Explanatory meetings will be held in Sem2 B3123 from 3-5pm on Wednesday, April 10 and Thursday, April 11. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Christopher Ertman and Rob Healy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I Interested in how people communicate in groups? The various ways groups solve problems? Do you enjoy challenges with elements of risk and supporting others in these situations? This training will give you the skills to facilitate group activities on a challenge course. All the facilitation skills—leadership, communication, planning, and group management—needed to lead group activities on a high and low ropes challenge course will be covered. All sessions will involve participation, lecture, discussion, and practical hands on application.The CCP1 (Challenge Course Practitioner Level 1) course will teach and instruct all facilitators by the standards and guidelines of the ACCT (Association of Challenge Course Technology).  Each class session will focus on different aspects involved within the daily operations of a challenge and ropes course.  Participants can expect to learn the history of experiential education; program and curriculum development for both large and small groups; technical skills for high, low, and portable low elements; group facilitation skills with emphasis on sequencing, frontloading, and debriefing of groups; equipment inspection; and more.This hands-on class will include lectures, workshops, and challenge activities both indoors and outside on the campus challenge course. Students will be expected to lead class members and give constructive feedback to peers. Mastery of the material will be assessed through both written and experiential tests that simulate actual scenarios.This site-specific training allows participants the option of volunteering or becoming an Evergreen State College Challenge Course Facilitator Level 1. Christopher Ertman Rob Healy Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Gail Tremblay
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter This program is designed to introduce students to movements in contemporary fiber arts and to techniques that will allow them to create works of art using a wide variety of materials and processes. Over twenty weeks, students will study techniques for weaving, warp dyeing for ikat weaving, felting, embroidery, needle arts and basketry. Students will weave a sampler on the four-harness loom and design and make three pieces of artwork each, as well as one collaborative project with other students each quarter. Projects must use or incorporate at least three different techniques we are studying. There will be lectures and films about the history of 20th-century fiber art. All students are expected to produce a research paper with illustrations and footnotes each quarter as well as a 10-minute slide presentation about the work of a contemporary fiber artist. Gail Tremblay Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Dylan Fischer and Alison Styring
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This program will focus on intensive group and individual field research on current topics in ecological science. These topics will include forest structure, ecosystem ecology, effects of forest management, ecological restoration, riparian ecology, fire history, bird abundance and monitoring, insect-plant interactions, and disturbance ecology. Students will be expected to intensively use the primary literature and student-driven field research to address observations about ecological composition, structure and function. Multiple independent and group research projects will form the core of our work in local forests of the south Puget lowlands, national forests, national parks, state forests and other relevant natural settings. Students are expected to "hit the ground running" and should develop research projects for the entire quarter within the first several weeks of the program.Through a series of short, intensive field exercises, students will hone their skills in observation, developing testable hypotheses, and designing ways to test those hypotheses. We will also explore field techniques and approaches in ecology, and especially approaches related to measuring plant and avian biodiversity. Students will have the option to participate in field trips to sites in the Pacific Northwest and the Southwest (U.S.). Research projects will be formally presented by groups and individuals at the end of the quarter. Finally, student research manuscripts will be created throughout the quarter utilizing a series of intensive multi-day paper-writing workshops. We will emphasize identification of original field research problems in forest habitats, experimentation, data analyses, oral presentation of findings, and writing in scientific journal format. Dylan Fischer Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ruth Hayes and Devon Damonte
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I In direct animation, a century-old camera-less form, artists use painting, scratching and myriad techniques not recommended by manufacturers to animate on motion picture film. It is an analog art that offers experiential escape from increasingly digital visual cultures. In this intensive hands-on class students will practice numerous methods of direct animation, have opportunities to invent their own techniques and create lots of footage in a short time, while studying genre masters like Len Lye, Norman McLaren, and Barbel Neubauer. For final presentations students will explore analog and digital methods for presenting their work in a grand, celebratory projection performance extravaganza. Ruth Hayes Devon Damonte Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Donald Morisato and Martha Rosemeyer
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring What should we eat? What is the link between diet and health? How do we define "organic" and "local" food? How are our agricultural practices linked to issues of sustainability?This program will take a primarily scientific approach to food and cooking. The topics will span a broad range of scale, from ecological agriculture to molecular structure, including sustainable production, the coevolution of humans and food, the connection between food and medicine, as well as the transformation of food through the processes of cooking and fermentation. Throughout history, food and cooking have not only been essential for human sustenance, but have played a central role in the economic and cultural life of civilizations. This interdisciplinary exploration of food will take a broad ecological systems approach as it examines the biology and chemistry of food, while also incorporating political, historical and anthropological perspectives.Students will directly apply major concepts learned in lectures to experiments in the laboratory and kitchen. Field trips will provide opportunities for observing food production and processing in the local community. Program themes will be reinforced in problem-solving workshop sessions and seminar discussions focused on topics addressed by such authors as Michael Pollan, Harold McGee, Gary Paul Nabhan, Sidney Mintz and Sandor Katz.In fall quarter, we will introduce the concept of food systems, and analyze conventional and sustainable agricultural practices. We will examine the botany of vegetables, fruits, seed grains and legumes that constitute most of the global food supply. In parallel, we will study the genetic principles of plant and animal breeding, and the role of evolution in the selection of plant and animal species used as food by different human populations. We will consider concepts in molecular biology that will allow us to understand and assess genetically modified crops.In winter quarter, we shift our attention to cooking and nutrition. We will explore the biochemistry of food, beginning with basic chemical concepts, before moving on to the structure of proteins, carbohydrates and fats. We will study meat, milk, eggs, vegetables and cereal doughs, and examine what happens at a biochemical level during the process of cooking and baking. We will explore how our bodies digest and recover nutrients, and consider the physiological roles of vitamins and antioxidants, as well as the complex relationship between diet, disease and genetics. Finally, we will study the physiology of taste and smell, critical for the appreciation of food.In spring quarter, we will examine the relationship between food and microbes, from several different perspectives. We will produce specific fermented foods, while studying the underlying biochemical reactions. We will also consider topics in microbiology as they relate to food safety and food preservation, and focus on specific interactions between particular microbes and the human immune system. Donald Morisato Martha Rosemeyer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Susan Preciso and Mark Harrison
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend S 13Spring Across time and cultures, humankind has struggled with moral taboos that obstruct the pursuit of knowledge deemed inappropriate or dangerous. While institutions have often dictated what is acceptable for us to know, the arts, literature, and mythology have been the chief mechanisms through which we have been able to explain or justify this fundamental human conflict. For example, in the creation story of Genesis and Milton’s we encounter one of western culture’s most enduring mythic structures. Faust and Frankenstein speak to a more modern dilemma about acquisition and use of knowledge. In this program we will explore this complex subject through visual art, music, poetry, and literature. Roger Shattuck’s will provide one analysis of the stories, but we’ll read other critical approaches as well. Students will be expected to read critically and well, take excellent reading notes, and write occasional critical essays on assigned topics. They will participate in seminar, lecture, workshop, and a field trip. Credits may be awarded in world literature and cultural studies. Susan Preciso Mark Harrison Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jeanne Hahn
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall This program will examine the movement of the North American colonies in their separation from Britain to the emergence of the United States through the election of 1800. It will investigate the conflict; the social, racial and class divisions; and the distinctly different visions of the proper social, economic and political system that should predominate in the new nation.  Much conflict surrounded the separation of the settler colonies from Britain, including a transatlantic revolutionary movement, development of slave-based plantations and the birth of capitalism. Capitalism was not a foregone conclusion. We will study this process and pay close attention to the Articles of Confederation and the framing of the Constitution; in addition, we will investigate the federalist and anti-federalist debates surrounding the new framework, its ratification, and the political-economic relations accompanying the move from one governing structure to the other. This program will require close and careful reading, engaged seminar participation, and considered, well-grounded writing. Jeanne Hahn Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Marcella Benson-Quaziena
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend F 12 Fall This quarter long program will take on a broad base study of well-being, addressing the mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual dimensions. The program will examine the diverse ways individuals within cultural communities define well-being as well as the connection between well-being and our "shadow" side. We will provide an environment to assist students to further develop competencies in the disciplines of psychology, community and health, and spiritual practice. During the quarter we will devote time to critical analysis, experiential inquiry, writing skills, and computer proficiencies. We will address the questions: What contributes to satisfying, engaging, and meaningful living; and What conditions allow people and communities to flourish?Notes: community development, human services, sociology, social work, health and wellness, health related fields and social psychology. Marcella Benson-Quaziena Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I To prepare for a reading endorsement or to understand more about literacy development, participants will engage in readings and workshops that address the major theories of language and learning regarding the development of best instructional practices for literacy instruction. In addition, the course will explore the relationship of first and second language acquisition to learning, as well as how oral language supports print literacy development. Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for a teaching endorsement in reading. Jon Davies Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Bill Arney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Simone Weil Curtis White Sherry Turkle, one of the most astute analysts of the effects of digital culture on everyday life, wrote recently that our reliance on our gadgets leads to this sense of self: “...in order to feel more, and to feel more like ourselves, we connect.  But in our rush to connect, we flee from solitude, our ability to be separate and gather ourselves.  Lacking the capacity for solitude, we turn to other people but don't experience them as they are.  It is as though we use them, need them as spare parts to support our increasingly fragile selves" (Turkle, "The Flight from Conversation," , April 21, 2012).  Fragile selves?  Fleeing solitude?  Using others as props for our impoverished lives?  Is this the new form of freedom to which we are confined? Together we will ask, if we are free, how do we live good lives?  Among other things, how should we treat others?  Our springboard is the work of Martin Buber (1878-1965).  Because we are free, Buber said, we simply have to what to do in our relationships with others.  But one has to decide with one’s whole being: passionately, intentionally, forcefully decide how to respond to the present situation in its existential uniqueness.  And one has to decide without relying on rules, historical precedence, laws, ethics, moral codes or principles.  Buber went further: not to decide on one’s responsibility in this moment—to live in a state of decisionlessness—leaves one open to being managed, conditioned, controlled; in decisionlessness, one is not free and cannot act or live well. Buber’s early studies of mysticism taught him that one must focus on one's own inner life to be able to respond well to others.  But the aim of a person beginning with his own self is “the intention of establishing a living mutual relation between himself and them.”  The aim is “genuine dialogue,” living life in and through what Buber called “I-You” (or “I-Thou”) relationships instead of more conventional “I-It” relationship where other people become only characters and props in the script of my life.  We will learn what Buber meant by “the life of dialogue” and trace his influences on education, psychotherapy, ethics, and international relations.  We supplement Buber's work with other material on mysticism and on relationships with other humans and the natural world.In addition to our common work and contemplative practices, including dream workshops, students will pursue, individually or in groups, an independent study that matters. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Greg Mullins and Trevor Griffey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Where is home, and what would it be like to be free?According to cultural critic Robin DG Kelley, these burning questions about love and belonging, and not mere experiences of oppression, lay at the heart of the radical imagination. “Once we strip radical social movements down to their bare essence and understand the collective desires of people in motion,” he says, “freedom and love lay at the very heart of the matter.”Taking Kelley’s insight as our starting point, this program will use the study of history and literature to explore the intersections between three revolutionary social movements of the 1960s: the black freedom movement, the women’s liberation movement, and the sexual liberation movement.Our focus in fall will be themes of home and exile, freedom and slavery, and the role of love in imagining the kind of world we want to live in. We will revisit the history of the black freedom movement to imagine what civil rights movement history might look like if told as the struggle for a new world instead of the struggle for political rights. We will visit Washington DC on a field trip during the first week of November to study the politics of remembering the civil rights movement, including the iconic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in August, 1963.Our inquiry into the black freedom movement will serve as a model for how we then move on to explore the literature and histories of the women’s liberation and gay and lesbian sexual liberation movements during winter quarter. Instead of studying them as mere demands for political rights, we will study ways in which their demands for liberation opened up a space for revolutionary politics, and how activists’ radical imagination for what liberation would mean inspired the cultural revolutions of the 1960s. history, literature, and fields related to social and cultural analysis such as education, human services, government, policy, etc. Greg Mullins Trevor Griffey Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Bill Arney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter What is the aim of education? Self-awareness? Self expression? The good life? An above-average job in a congenial community? Culture? Collaborative and responsible participation in our diverse society? Creative disobedience? To become a life-long student? "The creation of possessions for all time, the creation of beauty and the discovery of significant truths, as well as the performance of good acts"? Before you answer, remember: You're college students, so (Friedrich Nietzsche) We'll not hurry. We will take our time with good responses to our question. The answer you decide on could change your life.The program will include an independent study of considerable significance, undertaken individually or in a group, and contemplative practices. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Bill Arney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring What is power and how should one live in it? Early in his career, Michel Foucault (1926-1984) described power's various practices of division: the separation of the sane from the insane, the pathological from the normal, the law-abiding citizen from the criminal. Later he described modern structures of power, a micro-physics of power, that induce people to become self managers: "He who is subjected to a field of visibility, and who knows it, assumes responsibility for the constraints of power; he makes them play spontaneously upon himself; he inscribes in himself the power relation in which he simultaneously plays both roles; he becomes the principle of his own subjection." Foucault even argued that the self and the soul are creations of power. Near the end of his life, he articulated a new project: "seeking to give new impetus, as far and wide as possible, to the undefined work of freedom." He re-imagined the possibility of self-fashioning, of the care of the self, of an art of living.We'll follow Foucault's course and see where it leads us. Readings by Foucault will include , the three volumes of , , , and . Students, alone or in groups, will complete independent work that will be more admirable than convincing. Contemplative practices, of course. None specified. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students work on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Classes use immersion style learning and are conducted primarily in French. Students develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn to develop conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun, creative activities with music, poetry, videos, role play, and use of Internet sites.  Winter quarter themes focus on poetry and fables, regional French traditions, cuisine, and contemporary issues in France.  Spring quarter focuses on themes from the Francophone world along with continued grammatical study.  Students learn from viewing films from Francophone countries and reading a small book of legends and tales from these countries.  Through oral reading and discussions in French, students expand skills in vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and situational role-plays based on the legends.  Throughout the year, students use the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.In fall, students may sign up for either a Monday/Wednesday section (Section A) or a Tuesday/Thursday section (Section B).  In winter and spring, all students will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Judith Gabriele Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Marianne Bailey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II This course is appropriate for beginners and for low and high intermediate students who wish to improve oral proficiency.  All instruction is in French.  Be prepared to work hard both in class and outside class and to learn more French than you might imagine possible in a short five weeks. Marianne Bailey Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Judith Gabriele
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long sequence of courses in French is designed to reinforce, practice, and build upon previous skills. All classes are conducted in French. They are fast paced, interactive, and focus on continued review of grammatical structures, conversational skills with native speakers, discussion of short videos, music, poetry, Francophone themes, and Internet news clips. Students are expected to use French in discussions, increase their reading and writing skills through study of selected literary excerpts. Winter quarter focuses on theater, reading plays and performances of short scenes from them. In spring, students work with a selection of films and a short novel. Through focus on in-depth discussions of French identity, history, and culture, students learn to analyze, compare, and write about aspects of film increasing their acquaintance with media vocabulary. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Noelle Machnicki and Lalita Calabria
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Fungi. What are they? Where are they and what roles do they play in terrestrial ecosystems? How do they get their energy? How do they grow? What do they taste like? How do they interact with other organisms? During this two-quarter long program we will answer these and other questions about fungi. Fall quarter will cover the fundamentals of fungal and lichen biology, fungal and lichen diversity, physiology, and systematics. Students will learn to describe and identify fungi and lichens using chemical and microscopic techniques, along with a wide variety of taxonomic keys. Students will participate in a quarter-long project to curate their own collections of herbarium-quality lichen and mushroom specimens. Several multi-day field trips and day trips will provide students with an opportunity for collecting specimens and studying the natural history of western Washington. During winter quarter, we will explore fungi and lichens through the lens of forest ecology. Forest ecosystems rest on a foundation of fungi, and students will learn about the pivotal roles fungi and lichen play as mutualists to plants and animals, as nutrient cyclers, disease-causing agents, and indicators of environmental quality. Lab work will focus on advanced methods and examining taxonomically-challenging groups of lichens and fungi. Students will also learn about museum curation by organizing and accessioning the class lichen and mushroom collection for submission into the Evergreen herbarium. Students will engage in a two-quarter-long group research project relating to fungi. Research topics may include ecology or taxonomy-focused lab and field studies, cultivation or herbarium research. During fall quarter, students will participate in research and writing seminars and quantitative skills workshops to inform their research.  Each group will prepare a concise research proposal including a thorough literature review and a pilot study exploring the most appropriate data collection and analysis methods for answering their research questions. During winter quarter, students will conduct research experiments in the field and/or lab, analyze their data and write a research paper outlining their results. Noelle Machnicki Lalita Calabria Mon Mon Tue Thu Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
David Shaw
Signature Required: Summer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I This program will examine the art and science of marketing services, as reflected in the theories, models, and techniques employed in the marketing discipline today.The focus of this program is on marketing as a contemporary, real-world practice, including the analytical tools and techniques used by professionals in the field. The added wrinkle in this iteration of the program will be applying these tools to organizations and industries where the product provided is based more on services provided than on physical goods. While the classic marketing literature takes primarily a goods-based perspective, modern applications and theories are increasingly focused on services, given their increasing importance in the economy nationally and globally.  Our study will include a review of the literature on researching consumers, employees (service providers) and markets, as well as multiple case studies of real-world organizations providing services (for-profit, non-profit).  We will then move on to focus on segmentation, targeting, and differentiation strategies for organizations, with an overview of topics related to product, distribution, communications, and pricing issues.While the program can be taken safely as an introductory course, the readings and assignments will be comparable to a second year marketing course, e.g., marketing management. David Shaw Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II The Gateways Academic Mentoring Program (AMP) offers Evergreen students the opportunity to work one-on-one with incarcerated young men at Green Hill, a medium/maximum-security institution. Weekly learning will be guided by the theory and practice of popular education, and subjects covered will vary based on the educational interests of both Evergreen students and incarcerated students. This course is ideal for students who participated in the 12-13 Gateways program, who are seeking admission to the 13-14 Gateways program, or who have worked with AMP in the past. Students who have not worked with Gateways programs should contact the instructor, who will facilitate their orientation to AMP. Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Savvina Chowdhury
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This program is part of the Gateways for Incarcerated Youth program. A fundamental principle of Gateways is that every person has talents given to them at birth; it is our job to encourage each other to search out and find our passions and gifts. Our work is guided by ideas of popular education. We recognize and value the knowledge and experience of each participant. The program works to strengthen notions of self and community through cultural awareness and empowerment. In connecting and building with people from other cultures and class backgrounds, each person becomes empowered to share their knowledge, creativity, values and goals.This program offers Evergreen students the opportunity to be peer learners with incarcerated young men in a maximum-security institution. Students will address issues of diversity, equality and critical thinking, along with other issues that are chosen by the young men who are incarcerated. At the same time, the Evergreen students will deepen their understanding of the theory and practice of popular education. Students in this program will have the opportunity to reflect on how they themselves learn as well as how others learn, as they gain experience in the facilitation of discussions and workshops. Students will work on designing, implementing and assessing the workshops. In the process of collectively shaping the Gateways seminar, students will also learn how to organize productive meetings and work through conflict.Each week the Evergreen students will visit the Green Hill Juvenile Correctional Facility in Chehalis, Washington.  Through the workshops we will explore various aspects of political economy in order to understand ourselves and others as an important part of analyzing contemporary society and building egalitarian relationships. In preparation for the workshop, each week the Evergreen students will meet to organize the workshop’s activities. We will also take time each week to reflect on the previous workshop to assess how it worked and draw lessons for the next one. Throughout our work we will read, share and learn about various kinds of relative advantage ("privilege"), while also exploring cultural diversity and continually working to foster a space committed to equality.In fall quarter, we will study some of the root causes of inequality to understand better the relationship between poor and working class people–especially poor and working class people of color–and the prison system. In winter and spring quarters, we will continue to deepen our understanding of political economy and popular education. Building on our experiences, reflections and studies, each quarter students will take increasing responsibility for designing, implementing, and assessing the program, workshops and seminars. This program requires that all participants be ready to fully commit themselves to our common work and show a willingness to help build a community of learners. Students should expect to spend approximately 11 hours per week in class on campus and 5 hours per week off campus (including time at, and travel to and from, the institutions). juvenile justice, education, political economy, community work and social work. Savvina Chowdhury Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Toska Olson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Around the world, people's sex, gender and bodies have been socially constructed in ways that have had profound impacts on power and interpersonal dynamics. This program is a sociological and anthropological exploration of gender, masculinity, femininity and power. We will examine questions such as: How do expectations of masculine and feminine behavior manifest themselves worldwide in social institutions like work, families, schools and the media? How do social theorists explain the current state of gender stratification? How does gender intersect with issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and social class identity? One major component of our inquiry will be an investigation of how people move, adorn and utilize their bodies to shape and reflect gender and sexuality. We will examine topics such as prostitution, body modification, standards of beauty and reproduction.We will study cross-cultural variation in gendered experiences and opportunities within several different social institutions. Lectures, sociological fieldwork exercises, and seminar readings will provide students with common knowledge about gender theory and gendered experiences in the United States and elsewhere. Students' collaborative research presentations will provide the class with information about gender in cultures other than their own.This program involves extensive student-initiated research and puts a heavy emphasis on public speaking and advanced group work. Students will learn how to conduct cross-cultural library research on gender, and will produce a research paper that represents a culmination of their best college writing and thinking abilities. Students are invited to register for this program if they are excited about working closely in a small group and conducting a large-scale independent research project. Students should be prepared to spend at least 20 hours per week in the library conducting research for these projects.Credit may be awarded in areas such as sociology of sex, gender, and bodies; cultural studies; anthropology of sex, gender, and bodies; student-originated studies; and collaborative research and presentation. Toska Olson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Toska Olson and Susan Fiksdal
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter What are the signals we learn and display to perform our gender? How do different cultures create and maintain gender differences? This program will explore these questions and others through the lenses of sociolinguistics and sociology. We will examine the ways that masculinities and femininities are socially constructed through language and other symbolic interactions within the context of a variety of social situations. We will investigate the privileges displayed through gendered performances and examine how people reproduce, contest, or redefine the categories that come to define their identities.A major component of our studies will involve weekly fieldwork exercises that scrutinize the social construction process occurring around us. Using a variety of concepts and methodologies from sociolinguistics and sociology, we will examine sources including informal conversations, advertisements, children's toys and books, and several forms of media. Students should be prepared to read a variety of texts including journal articles, academic texts, ethnographies and short fiction. In a final project, students will write a detailed research proposal based on the work we have done. Toska Olson Susan Fiksdal Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Lalita Calabria
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, history of the earth, the fossil record, genetic inheritance, cell division, evolution by natural selection, evolutionary forces, population dynamics, biodiversity, biomolecules, cellular and molecular biology, gene regulation, and a general overview of energetics and metabolic processes. The lab component will reinforce concepts and ideas explored in lectures, readings, and workshops. This biology course is excellent preparation for students interested in taking more advanced life science courses or for future work in the areas of environmental science. Lalita Calabria Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lydia McKinstry and Paula Schofield
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This one-quarter program will offer an intensive introduction to the concepts and methods of college-level general chemistry. We will use an organizing theme that is based on the cycles and transformations of matter and energy at a variety of scales in both living and nonliving systems. Use of quantitative methods will be emphasized in all areas of the program, gaining additional insights into these processes. Students will undertake assignments focused on interpreting and integrating all of the topics covered. Our work will emphasize critical thinking and quantitative reasoning, as well as the development of proficient writing and speaking skills.Program activities will include lectures, small-group problem-solving workshops, laboratories and field trips. Students can expect to spend at least a full day in lab each week, maintain laboratory notebooks, write formal laboratory reports and give formal presentations of their work. Group work will also include reading and discussion of topics of current or historical significance in chemistry. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort on the part of the student. Overall, we expect students to end the program with the ability to reason critically, solve problems, and have hands-on experience with general chemistry.This program provides the equivalent of of a year-long course in general chemistry and will give students the chemistry prerequisite needed to pursue upper division work in chemistry, biochemistry and environmental science. Lydia McKinstry Paula Schofield Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Peter Pessiki
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This year-long program in general chemistry provides prerequisites for many studies in science, health, and medicine as well as basic laboratory science for students seeking a well-rounded liberal arts education.Emphasis in fall quarter will be placed on calculations involving conversions, molar quantities, and thermodynamics.  Understanding atoms in terms of subatomic particles, chemical reactivity of inorganic compounds, and the gas laws will also be covered. We will end with an in-depth investigation of atomic structure and periodicity.  In the laboratory, students will routinely utilize a variety of scientific glassware and equipment and be taught how to handle chemicals safely.  Students will also learn to be observant of chemical changes and to make precise physical measurements.  Relevant scientific literature is introduced and often used to retrieve needed physical data.Winter quarter will start with a thorough investigation of how atoms unite to form molecules with a focus on covalent bonding.  Next we will focus on the role of intermolecular forces in liquids and solids.  This will be followed by chemical kinetics and an in-depth investigation of equilibrium.  We will end the quarter with an introduction to acid-base chemistry.  Labs will include titrations, crystal growth, pH titrations, and absorption spectroscopy.  An introduction to chemical instrumentation will be incorporated into lab exercises, and students will be required to utilize chemical drawing programs.Spring quarter will continue with acid-base chemistry, pH, and polyprotic acids.  Next we will look at buffers and complex ion equilibria.  We then will cover entropy and free energy followed by an introduction to electrochemistry and electrochemical cells.  Our final few weeks will be spent investigating a wide range of topics including transition metals and the crystal field model, nuclear chemistry, and other selected topics.  The lab portion of the class will include buffer making, electrochemical measurements, and the use of ion exchange columns.  In addition, students will be expected to partake in the on-campus Science Carnival as well as attend a locally held science conference. science, medicine Peter Pessiki Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Rebecca Sunderman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I We will begin the study of general chemistry by exploring the structure of the atom and the nature of the chemical bond and then proceed towards an understanding of molecular geometry. This will lead us to discussions of the periodic table, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, and properties of gases. Time permitting other topics such as thermochemistry and kinetics may be explored. Issues of chemistry and society will also be discussed and incooporated.In the laboratory we will work to develop the skills needed to be successful in a chemistry lab. In particular we will focus on measurements, solutions, and possibly some spectroscopy. Rebecca Sunderman Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Neal Nelson
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 13Summer Session I This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ralph Murphy and Zoe Van Schyndel
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Ralph Murphy Zoe Van Schyndel Tue Tue Wed Thu Fri Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marianne Hoepli
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Komm und lern Deutsch! This year-long sequence of courses for beginning German students will cover basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and conversation.  Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating, and writing standard high German.  Students will also learn about culture, traditions, and customs of the German people, new and old.  Through involvement in children’s stories, music, and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions.  By the end of the year, students will improve their oral skills to the point of discussing short films and modern short stories and learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé, or a job application. Classes will use a communicative method and will move quickly toward being conducted primarily in German. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Laurance Geri and Peter Dorman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter In this program we will explore the interconnections between global finance, energy systems, and climate change.  We will seek to understand the causes of the 2008 financial collapse, the complexity of energy systems and their relationship to changes in the climate, and the range of actions that would stabilize the national and global economies and reduce the risks associated with a warmer planet.The program will include an introduction to micro and macro economics, the study of energy systems, and the science of climate change.  We will consider how international organizations influence national and global policies in the financial, energy and environmental spheres. Using these frameworks we will study the linkages between these phenomena and the actions we can take to speed the global energy transition and create a more stable and just international system.Program activities will include lectures, workshops, guest speakers, seminars on books and papers, films and possibly field trips.   Credit may be awarded in micro and macro economics, international political economy, energy policy, and energy and climate change.  Laurance Geri Peter Dorman Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Trevor Speller and Anthony Tindill
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter In 1748, Horace Walpole purchased an estate in London. Over the next thirty years he converted that estate into a Gothic castle and planned "ruins." In 1765, Walpole wrote a novel widely regarded as the first true work of Gothic fiction. In an age of reason, Walpole's focus on the supernatural, feudal ruins and high passion pulled a medieval past into the order of the day, transforming it to meet the desires of a modern public both in print and in stone. From its beginnings, Gothic fiction shared a common link and a common bond with architecture. For generations before Walpole, the architecture of the Gothic period was the equivalent of history books and literature. Architectural historian Jonathan Glancey writes, "The Architecture of the great medieval Gothic cathedrals is one of the glories of European civilization. Here was an attempt to lift everyday life up to the heavens--to touch the face of God--using the highest stone vaults, the highest towers, the most glorious steeples permitted by contemporary technology...it led to some of the most inspiring and daring buildings of all time." Though not written in actual words, Gothic architecture is written in structural form and religious allegory.We will ask ourselves:We will investigate examples of Gothic literature and architecture in Europe and the Americas from the twelfth century to the present, as well as the history, theory and interrelationship of these artistic modes. Students will be asked to attend lectures and seminars, write papers, take examinations, and develop work in studio that may include drawing, model-building and writing. In addition, students will visit examples of Gothic architecture in concert with their readings. Architectural texts may include: by Roland Recht, by John Fichen, and by Nicola Coldstream. Fictional texts may include texts from the medieval period to the present, including , and stories by Edgar Allen Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Angela Carter and Joyce Carol Oates. literary studies and architecture. Trevor Speller Anthony Tindill Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II This goal of this course is to provide students with theoretical and pragmatic knowledge about how government and democratic systems function in the United States.  The approach to this body of information focuses on national, state, and local branches of government.  Themes include, but are not limited to, federalism, states' rights, and citizens' participatory governance and rights.  In addition to the text, students are required to read assigned U. S. Supreme Court and Washington State cases.  Students are also required to write short papers and to journal on the reading assignments in order to be prepared to participate in class discussions.  Students will work in groups to complete a final project.Credit may be awarded in civics and government and contribute to minimum coursework expectations for various teaching endorsements. Artee Young Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 13Summer Session I Standard written English has enough irregularities to make any careful writer or teacher nervous.  Given that it's impossible to memorize everything, what's a writer or teacher to do?  Which strategies for working on conventions of written English are most productive for you as a writer?  Which ones will engage any writers you find yourself working with?  This course is based on the premise that learning grammar happens best in the context of meaningful writing.  Expect to write, and think about writing, and develop both your grammatical vocabulary and your grammatical skills, all with the aim of becoming a more effective writer.  Class time will spent in workshops, and the on-line learning component will be used for trying out new strategies.  All writers welcome. Emily Lardner Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend W 13Winter This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend F 12 Fall This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Don Chalmers
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend S 13Spring This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sylvie McGee
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening Su 13Summer Full Use hands-on practice to learn to write successful grants! We will start with an introduction to grants and their place in the development of nonprofit organizations and learn the sound planning skills needed for strong proposals. Students will write a grant for a nonprofit organization, getting feedback on each section as it is developed. A list of organizations seeking grant writing assistance will be provided**. Using interactive learning and assigned tasks, we will focus on planning, research, evaluation techniques, budgeting and how to effectively communicate issues and needs in a clear and concise manner. This is a single course that meets for the full session.**NOTE: If you have a non-profit or government agency you wish to write for, you MUST contact me in advance of the first day of class, so that I can send a form to be filled out by the agency and review their readiness. Sylvie McGee Tue Wed Summer Summer
Steve Blakeslee
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 13Spring Over the past 30 years, the graphic novel has won numerous readers with its bold topics, innovative forms, and vivid artwork. We will explore the origins, development, and unique workings of sequential narratives, from the socially conscious woodcut novels of the 1930s (e.g., Lynd Ward’s ) to the mid-century adventures of Hergé’s to the bizarre but compelling world of Jim Woodring’s . Our overall goal is to develop an informed and critical perspective on the comics medium. Steve Blakeslee Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jennifer Gerend and Anthony Tindill
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 13Spring In this program we consider the beloved urban spaces where people come to stroll, browse shops and restaurants, push a child in a stroller or walk a dog. In these places we meet friends, hold community festivals and more solemn events. Some spaces are always bustling, while others are largely avoided. Design plays a major part. What regulations guide the design of a space, and who is involved in the design process? How can communities participate? How are historically significant sites considered, and what is “worthy” of preservation? We will explore urban design principles and their application (or lack thereof) in communities throughout the Northwest and on our own campus.Students will gain an introduction to the fields of architecture, urban planning and historic preservation through the shared focus on urban design. We will read influential texts, examine images, and visit places with a critical eye on the individual components that comprise an urban setting.We will engage in careful readings of the texts, seminar discussion, case studies, writing assignments, and field trips. In studio workshop time, students will have an opportunity to explore design thinking and urban design principles in a theoretical design project. Jennifer Gerend Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Bob Haft
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring The legacy of the Greek and Italian cultures in the Western world---from the Minoan world to that of the Italian Renaissance---continues to hold considerable sway over contemporary cultures. The great writings and powerful visual arts that were produced in Greece and Italy established standards of excellence which succeeding generations have both struggled against and paid homage to up to the present day. In this program, we will study the texts and monuments of two of the most dynamic and seminal cultures in European history: Classical Greece and Renaissance Italy. We will read and discuss writings from the periods we study (such as Homer's , Aeschylus' and Dante's as well as contemporary offerings (such as Mary Renault's ). Throughout the program we will learn about modern rediscoveries and re-interpretations of these periods, culminating in our own journey to Greece and Italy. Fall quarter ("Naissance"), we will investigate the rise of the Greek , or city-state, from the ashes of the Bronze Age Aegean civilizations, as well as that of the Etruscans, in what is now Tuscany. In addition to reading primary source materials, we will study the architecture, sculpture and painted pottery that was produced, and we will all learn the rudiments of drawing. Winter quarter ("Renaissance"), our focus will be on the Roman appropriation of Greek art and thought and the later Florentine rediscovery and interpretation of the Classical past. We'll study how 15th-century Italians used the ideas they found in classical literature and learning as the basis for revolutions both in artistic practices and the conception of humanity. We will also learn the basics of black and white photography.During the spring ("Odyssey"), we will travel to Greece and Italy for six weeks, visiting, studying and holding seminars in sites and cities synonymous with the Classical world and the Renaissance. The first three weeks will be in Greece, where we will start in Crete, focusing our attention on the Minoan Civilization. Next, we will travel through mainland Greece, visiting numerous sites including Athens, Corinth, Olympia and Delphi. The last three weeks will be spent in Italy, using Florence as our main base but making side trips to nearby sites and cities, such as Fiesole and Siena. Bob Haft Tue Wed Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Karen Hogan and Emily Lardner
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend W 13Winter S 13Spring Humans have always been interested in plants and our lives are interwoven with plants in myriad ways. This program is intended for students with an interest in plants, including students who are starting to notice plants for the first time. Through a mix of readings, workshops, field trips, and projects, we will investigate three major questions: •  •  •  The overarching goal for this two quarter program is to help students develop their capacities as civic botanists. Winter quarter will focus primarily on developing an understanding of plant biology and ecology, and exploring several approaches to writing about nature in general and plants in particular. Spring quarter will focus on "civic botany"–the role plants play within human communities. We will focus particularly on urban agriculture, stormwater management, and the role of parks and open spaces. Students will keep field journals, assist with community agriculture projects, and develop a practice of writing that supports effective civic engagement.  Karen Hogan Emily Lardner Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Mary Dean
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 13Spring We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access, and treatment will be reviewed. The books and  aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine", "Sick Around the World," and "Sick Around America". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Trevor Griffey
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session I Conservatism has dominated United States politics for the last 30 years, and yet the study of conservatism tends to exist at the margins of college history and political science courses. This program seeks to remedy that problem by providing students of all political persuasions with an opportunity to critically examine the history and philosophy of conservatism in the United States.Some of the questions that the class will explore are:The program will approach these questions from an historical perspective by exploring how three distinct strands of conservatism evolved after World War I: social/religious conservatism, economic conservatism, and foreign policy conservatism. It will then explore how contemporary conservative media outlets try to unite these distinct strands of conservatism together while differentiating them from liberalism. It is recommended that students who enroll in the program have prior background in U.S. history and/or politics courses. Trevor Griffey Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Susan Cummings
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Cindy Beck
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 6, 12 06 12 Evening Su 13Summer Full Students will study the anatomy and physiology of the human body using a systems approach while exploring the interrelationship of health and disease in the human body. Each body system will be covered utilizing a traditional lecture and laboratory format.  This course meets prerequisites for nursing and graduate programs in health sciences. health and medicine Cindy Beck Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Vavrus
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 13Summer Full This course focuses on geography as a cultural encounter. We will study patterns and processes that have shaped human interaction with various environments. The course encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of geography. Central guiding questions we will be addressing in this course:This survey of human geography introduces broad concepts that are the focus of contemporary studies in geography. These concepts includeThis course is designed as a hybrid-online class and will use a combination of in-class and on-line meetings. The schedule may vary for different groups of students to accommodate various summer commitments. Michael Vavrus Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Theresa Aragon
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 13Summer Session I This program is designed to provide a detailed overview of the main areas of human resource management.  The program will provide an overview of major human resource functions including recruitment, training, planning, and performance management as well as the major employment discrimination laws including sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage/hour, and the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA).  The program also includes a focus on the law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and unfair labor practices and union representation elections, with an emphasis on the right to engage in union activities free from interference, restraint, coercion, or discrimination and the duty to bargain in good faith. The learning objectives of the program will be met through reading of assigned texts, written briefings, case analysis, quizzes, study questions, class discussion, application of laws to “real” work situations, collective bargaining simulation, term papers and a formal presentation of a term project. Theresa Aragon Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Nancy Koppelman and Joseph Tougas
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter History is unkind. This program will consider the possibilities for human rights in light of the tragedies of history.The phrase "human rights" suggests high moral principles and political ideals. It champions the dignity of all persons who have ever lived based solely on their humanity. It calls forth an image of a world better than the one we are in now--a world in which ideals have become realities and people can hold high moral principles with complete integrity. But humanity existed long before human rights.Historians show that in any particular historical moment, people can think and act only with the conceptual tools they have. Structural realities can cause people to harm one another because they do not have the ability or desire to challenge or resist them. As a result, violence, racism, anti-Semitism and sexism are central to our history. For most people who have ever lived, there was no hope for their human rights. What are we to make of these tragic features of history?What if Hegel is right, and "history is the slaughter-bench of happiness"? Are suffering and injustice the costs of making progress toward a better world? When and how does moral idealism help or hinder aims of "social justice"? If we can find out, how might that knowledge shape efforts to make a better world in our own time?Before human rights, suffering was thought to be caused by mysterious forces - divine or human. For example, when John Adams defended British soldiers who fired into an angry mob during the Boston Massacre of 1770, he noted that there are "state-quakes in the moral and political world" akin to earthquakes in the physical world. Our program will examine a range of "state-quakes," and particularly those that shaped the lot of Native peoples, the Puritans, American slaves and their owners, and generations of women, immigrants, and people devoted to the life of the mind. We will learn about the philosophical history of human rights from its precursors in the ancient world through the Enlightenment. We will consider the rise of the nation-state in the 19th and 20th centuries, tensions between political liberalism and pluralism, and the emergence of 21st century internationalism which seems to eclipse mutual obligations tethering citizens to states. Writing will focus on employing the skills of close analysis and developing sound arguments informed by our texts. Students will write lengthy term papers that could serve as writing samples in graduate school applications.Students who have completed substantial studies in the humanities and social sciences and who are prepared for advanced level work are warmly invited to join this program. Nancy Koppelman Joseph Tougas Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring Students in Hybrid Music will work with advanced techniques in electronic music.  The primary goal of the coursework is the creation of original pieces of music.  In the fall, areas of exploration will include analog and digital synthesis, sequencing, and multi-channel sound.  Winter quarter will focus on algorithmic composition, interactivity, and live electronics.  In the spring, students will develop independent compositional projects. Ben Kamen Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lisa Sweet, Miranda Mellis and Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter Iconoclasm is about more than just destroying or defacing an existing image--it also creates its own symbolic content. This program addresses iconoclasm as both a contemporary and a historical phenomenon, asking questions such as: What perceptions and convictions inspire people to attack, deface or destroy images? What is achieved by burning a Quran or toppling a statue of a government leader?This program is designed for students with interest in aesthetic philosophy and printmaking. Over the course of 20 weeks, we will explore several case studies of the destruction of images--from religious objects to 'canonized' works of art in museums, from iconoclasm borne of religious conviction, to more familiar forms associated with political dissent. We will also cover image-breaking as an artistic strategy. Our collective project will be to gain clarity on the impulses, expressions and consequences of iconoclasms.Fall quarter will provide students with a framework for understanding the history and thinking embedded in instances of iconoclasm. Students will be introduced to texts and concepts through lecture and seminar, and will begin to process ideas addressing image destruction more intentionally through writing and revising critical essays. In order to heighten an understanding of concepts as well as developing new skills and habits of thought, students will learn basic intaglio printmaking techniques, providing a hands-on context in which to understand both the power of images and some consequences of iconoclasm. They will also practice storytelling with attention to the social and historical stakes of the fraught categories of truth and fiction, ethics and aesthetics. Exploratory, craft-oriented writing exercises will be assigned on a regular basis (with accompanying readings) in order to provide participants with a sense of the possibilities of form and content. Winter quarter will represent a deeper examination of events in which iconoclastic impulses go by other names: censorship, sacrilege, art history or art-making. During this second half of the program, students will also develop culminating projects synthesizing and advancing program concepts.Though we will be looking at works of art in a historical context, this is not a traditional art history class, nor does it offer a chronological survey of Western art. About 40% of students' time will be devoted to artistic practice and 60% to rigorous reading, writing and discussion. Students should be prepared to articulate the content of their artistic work, and to use creative modes of thinking to actively engage the theoretical materials presented in the program. Lisa Sweet Miranda Mellis Elizabeth Williamson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Nancy Koppelman, Trevor Speller and Charles Pailthorp
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring What is character but the determination of incident? What is incident but the illustration of character? - How do we determine what to do when faced with hard choices? Is our own happiness uppermost in our minds, or is something else--loyalty to a friend, say, or religious principles? How can we live with integrity in the face of temptation or tragedy? These ethical questions demand that we think carefully about character. Character comprises not only our distinctive qualities, but also our disposition to act in certain ways, for good or ill. Indeed, our word "ethical" derives from the Greek word for character, , which, like our word, can refer to a literary figure (a character) or to an individual's qualities and dispositions. In this program, we study works of philosophy, history, drama and fiction that illuminate our understanding of character. We explore how character affects, and is affected by, desire, deliberation, action and suffering. We read literary and historical accounts that illustrate the character of people or a people. These accounts may portray profound moral dilemmas or day-to-day trials woven into the fabric of human experience. Texts in ethical philosophy will broaden our notions of character, particularly in relation to external goods, habit, happiness, friendship and duties. They provide powerful interpretive tools and a refined vocabulary for grappling with questions raised by our other texts. Authors will include Plato, Aristotle, Sophocles, Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edith Wharton, among others.This program suits students who are prepared not only to think critically, but to investigate their own beliefs and submit them to rigorous scrutiny: that is, to practice ethical thinking as well as study it. Writing will be central to that practice, and students will write long and short essays submitted to peer and faculty review. Nancy Koppelman Trevor Speller Charles Pailthorp Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stacey Davis
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 04 06 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II Students will work independently, studying the social, political, gender, and intellectual trajectories of the French Revolution from 1789 through the Terror and the Napoleonic Empire.  To understand the origins of the Revolution, students will read philosophy and political theory from Enlightenment authors like Voltaire, Rousseau, and Montesquieu.  Students will share a reading list in common and have the option to meet periodically for book discussions as a group and with the faculty member.  Since this is an independent readings course, students enrolled at different credit levels will read different texts and write different numbers of essays.  Students enrolled for more than 4 credits will complete a library research paper on one aspect of the Enlightenment or the French Revolution. Stacey Davis Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Therese Saliba
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects of their own specific interest. Students interested in the fields of international feminism and gender studies, Middle East Studies, or literature, particularly multicultural and postcolonial literature, are encouraged to propose an independent research project via the ILC online form. In addition, I am available to work with students doing travel abroad in the Middle East, working with women's organization in the Global South, or engaged in internships with community-based organizations in the Puget Sound area. Therese Saliba Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jennifer Calkins
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day, Evening and Weekend S 13Spring This individual study opportunity will facilitate independent student molecular genomic lab and evolutionary ecological field work with animal species. Students may also have the opportunity to integrate creative writing and multimedia work into their studies. With faculty guidance, students will engage in integrative projects investigating the evolution of focal taxa by incorporating methods such as sequencing, bioinformatic analysis, niche analysis and vertebrate field ecology. All participants will also work as a cohesive lab group, meeting regularly to share and trouble-shoot projects and read and discuss research papers. They will also have the opportunity to interact with faculty, students and postdocs from other colleges such as the UW and Occidental College in Los Angeles. Jennifer Calkins Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steven Hendricks
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure.  Students proposing well-conceived projects in bookbinding, artists' books, and letterpress printing are invited to contact the faculty.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Steven Hendricks Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Grace Huerta
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects of their own specific interest. Students interested in the fields of educational policy, multicultural literature, ESL K-12 education and percussion studies are encouraged to propose an independent research project via the ILC online form. Grace Huerta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Erik Thuesen
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This is an opportunity for advanced students to create their own course of study and research in environmental studies. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The faculty sponsor will support students to carry out studies in environmental fieldwork, ecology, zoology and marine science. Students wishing to conduct laboratory-based projects or carry out extensive fieldwork should have the appropriate skills needed to complete the project. Erik Thuesen Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Samuel Schrager
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Students can undertake individual study contracts in ethnographic fieldwork and writing. The research can include interviewing and participant-observation in a community, place, organization, group, or culture. The writing, based on the research, can take the form of creative non-fiction or ethnography. The project can be carried out locally, elsewhere in the U.S., or as part of study abroad, and can also be done in conjunction with an internship. Fields of study supported by this contract include anthropology, sociology, folklore, history, education, American studies, community studies, cultural studies, gender studies, religious studies, journalism, and non-fiction writing. Senior thesis work welcome.     the humanities, social sciences, community work, education, and writing Samuel Schrager Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Andrew Buchman
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Please send me a preliminary proposal via email and I'll help you shape it.  I often recommend projects that combine some research (on an artist or style) with some creative work (a thematic portfolio or series of songs), with some technical practice (on an instrument or in a medium or style). Internships and travel/study projects are also welcome.  I'm especially interested in students who work in more than one artistic discipline intensively; for instance, music and visual art.  Drafting academic statements and investigating careers--vital parts of designing your own education--can also be credit-bearing activities. Andrew Buchman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Gail Tremblay
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This is an opportunity for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of each quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a connection with others who have mastered a particular skill or asked a similar or related question, and 4) an outcome that matters. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case by case basis. the arts, art history, literature and creative writing, especially poetry, and the humanities. Gail Tremblay Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Abir Biswas
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring In the fields of geology, geochemistry, earth science, hydrology, GIS and biogeochemistry, Abir Biswas offers opportunities for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a time-line with expected deadlines, and 4) proposed deliverables. Areas of study other than those listed will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Abir Biswas Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Robert Smurr
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the fields of European history or cultural studies should present a well conceived contract proposal to Rob Smurr.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Robert Smurr Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Stacey Davis
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Students can complete individual study contracts in history, especially European, North African and/or American history; European cultural or art historical studies; gender studies as long as there is some historical component to the work; or issues in politics, society, religion, culture and/or immigration in contemporary Europe. History contracts can include work in historiography (theories of history) and historical methodology. Senior thesis work welcome. history, European cultural studies, gender studies, and art history. Stacey Davis Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Arun Chandra
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Contract FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This is an opportunity for individual instruction on a musical instrument with a qualified instructor from the Olympia area. I can help you find an appropriate instructor, assuming one is available. It usually takes one and a half to two weeks to find a teacher and arrange lessons with them. For this reason, all contracts must be set up before the first week of classes.Each student will be expected to bear the cost of the individual lessons. Lessons will most likely occur off-campus, at the instructor's discretion.Each student will be expected to have one lesson a week, of a duration to be determined by the student and the instructor. At the end of the quarter, each student will be expected to perform one or two pieces (demonstrating what they have learned) in a collective, public recital on the Evergreen campus. From observing the performance, I will add my evaluation to the instructor's evaluation.The level of the instruction (beginner, intermediate, advanced) is dependent on the entry level of the student. Intermediate and advanced students will be given preference. Arun Chandra Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend W 13Winter S 13Spring Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty wecomes internships and contracts in the areas of environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community (as a result of work begun in fall 2010 and winter 2011 "Problems to Issues to Policies;" to those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  American studies, art, communications, community studies, cultural studies, environmental field studies, gender and women's health, history, law and government and public policy leadership Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in Native American Studies should contact the faculty by email at ackleyk@evergreen.edu. Kristina Ackley Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Ratna Roy
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring I am interested in working with students who wish to do independent work in the Performing Arts and the Humanities. I am broadly interested in the intersections between the social and the creative worlds, as my own creative work has explicitly dealt with this intersection. As well, since my Ph.D. is in African-American Literature, I am deeply interested in minority arts, be they defined by race, gender or sexual orientation, and whether they be in writing, or in the visual or performing arts.As an artist, I have concentrated in the world of choreography, in particular, in Orissi dance from India. A strong influence on my work has been the ancient mythologies of the Indian sub-continent, and the contemporary realities of neo-colonialism and its consequences. Students interested in working with me should submit an on-line Independent Study form, available at: Click on "Online Contract Process", create a contract, then submit it to me for my review. Ratna Roy Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Ratna Roy
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter I am interested in working with students who wish to do independent work in the Performing Arts and the Humanities. I am broadly interested in the intersections between the social and the creative worlds, as my own creative work has explicitly dealt with this intersection. As well, since my Ph.D. is in African-American Literature, I am deeply interested in minority arts, be they defined by race, gender or sexual orientation, and whether they be in writing, or in the visual or performing arts.As an artist, I have concentrated in the world of choreography, in particular, in Orissi dance from India. A strong influence on my work has been the ancient mythologies of the Indian sub-continent, and the contemporary realities of neo-colonialism and its consequences. Students interested in working with me should submit an on-line Independent Study form, available at: .  Click on "Online Contract Process", create a contract, then submit it to me for my review. Ratna Roy Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Ratna Roy
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall I am interested in working with students who wish to do independent work in the Performing Arts and the Humanities. I am broadly interested in the intersections between the social and the creative worlds, as my own creative work has explicitly dealt with this intersection. As well, since my Ph.D. is in African-American Literature, I am deeply interested in minority arts, be they defined by race, gender or sexual orientation, and whether they be in writing, or in the visual or performing arts.As an artist, I have concentrated in the world of choreography, in particular, in Orissi dance from India. A strong influence on my work has been the ancient mythologies of the Indian sub-continent, and the contemporary realities of neo-colonialism and its consequences. Students interested in working with me should submit an on-line Independent Study form, available at: Click on "Online Contract Process", create a contract, then submit it to me for my review. Ratna Roy Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Leonard Schwartz
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall  contract proposals in the area of poetics for the winter quarter. This could include literary studies of modernist figures or examinations of avant-garde movements. It could also involve projects in literary theory, continental philosophy, or theories of language. Leonard Schwartz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Peter Dorman
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Peter Dorman will sponsor independent learning contracts that draw on economics and political economy, particularly in an international context.  Proposals do not have to be restricted to economics-related questions, but should touch on them in some way.  Introductory economics is best learned in a classroom setting, but the faculty is open to contracts in any area of advanced economics, political economy or econometrics. Peter Dorman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Jeanne Hahn
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring Individual study offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research.  Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students (or a cluster group) must consult with Jeanne about their proposed projects.  The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract.  She will sponsor student research and reading in political economy, US history (especially the "founding period"), various topics in globalization, historical capitalism, and contemporary India.  She will also sponsor travel abroad contracts that focus on the above subjects. Jeanne Hahn Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Mukti Khanna
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This opportunity allows students to create their own course of study in the form of an Individual Learning Contract or Internship. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups of students design projects or internships and meet regularly with faculty to reflect on their work. Students pursuing individual studies or internships in psychology, integrative health, mind-body medicine, service learning, expressive arts therapy and cultural studies are invited to submit contracts through the online learning contract system to khannam@evergreen.edu. While this opportunity is oriented towards sophomores-seniors, freshmen contracts will be considered if they are part of a group project or applying for an internship. psychology, the health professions, human services and education. Mukti Khanna Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Walter Grodzik
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Individual study offers individual and groups of students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Individual and groups of students interested in a self-directed project, research or internships in Queer Studies or the Performing and Visual Arts should contact the faculty by email at Walter Grodzik Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Patricia Krafcik
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in exploring topics among the faculty sponsor's areas of knowledge (Russian/Slavic literatures and folklore, Christianity studies, and music) are invited to contact the faculty with proposals for individual learning contracts.  Patricia Krafcik Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Laura Citrin
Signature Required: Winter 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combination of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects of their own specific interest. Students interested in social psychological research, particularly on topics related to gender, social norms, the body, emotions, moralization and conformity, or reproductive issues, are encouraged to propose an independent research project via the ILC online form. Laura Citrin Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Laurance Geri
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall Individual Study presents students the opportunity to design and undertake intermediate and advanced study, creative practice and research.  The faculty is willing to sponor contracts in the fields of public policy, energy policy, international affairs, international organizations, non-profit management, fund-raising, public administration, organizational change, public administration, and cultural studies--Japan, Italy, Latin America. Laurance Geri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
John Filmer
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 13Spring This is not a course! There is no classroom!Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicable skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marianne Bailey and Leonard Schwartz
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter In this program we will study the function of myth, the concept of art as ritual and the critique of language and representation in vanguard poetry, theater and opera. We are interested in the work of the artist as creator of new, unexpected artistic languages which attempt to communicate that which is inexpressible, that which lies behind and beyond ordinary words. We will consider how it is that a poet's words can say more than they mean, or that a symbol, as philosopher Paul Ricoeur writes, points toward a meaning otherwise inaccessible. The poets, dramatists, philosophers and theorists whom we will study never relent in their fascination with reconceiving their means of expression, and act with the reckless abandon of the free spirit described by Nietzsche in his essay "On Truth and Lie in an Extramoral Sense". Two of the major figures under study in our work will be the composer Richard Wagner and the poet and theoretician of the theater, Antonin Artaud, both of whom dreamed of a work of art that would contain word, image, music, flesh and movement in a single medium; both realized ritualized spectacles, in opera and in theater, capable of the transformation of their participants. We will read extensively from Artaud's work, considering his poetry, his essays comprising Theater and its Double, as well as his records of personal quests to places which he considered privileged, in which the Marvelous or the divine was written on the face of the land. We will view and listen to both Strauss's and Wagner's  . Wagner's "Total Art" or "Gesamtkunst" realized the 19th Century artists' dream of a perfect language, in which music, words, gestures and scenic symbols spoke as one single language. The philosophizing of Friedrich Nietzsche, embedded in the creative power of myth, will also be crucial for us in terms of conceptualizing the life-giving presence of myth in creative expression and the nature of language itself, as both problematic and world generating. Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy also takes us back to the Greeks, their masterpieces of theater as communal ritual, their metaphor of the artist as "entheos" imbued with the god, and their art as arising from the whispering of a muse, or an Orpheus. During fall quarter, our reading will include as well the Dark Romantic and Symbolist poets of the later 19th Century, their reconception of art, and their aesthetic and philosophical groundwork for 20th Century Modernism. In addition to our work on Artaud, Wagner and Nietzsche during both quarters, readings will be drawn from Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé and Rilke in the European poetic tradition. During winter quarter, we will study Aimé Césaire, as well as Aioné and Kamau Brathwaite, contemporary Caribbean poets. We will read Robert Duncan, Barbara Guest, Alice Notley, Fanny Howe, Nathaniel Mackey and others from the contemporary American poetic tradition growing out of the Black Mountain School. We will study composers Strauss and Berg in the Modern Western operatic tradition, and daring theatrical creators such as Peter Weiss and Peter Brooks. Other theoreticians to be considered during both fall and winter might include Rene Girard's , Blanchot’s , Bataille’s , Sigmund Freud's , and Robert Duncan's All students will read, write and analyze poetic, philosophical and critical texts, will discuss key theorists in aesthetics, and will choose between weekly workshop/seminars on either creative writing or on the key philosophical writings of Friedrich Nietzsche. Over the two quarters of this program, students will develop and complete a major personal project. This substantial body of work students will develop over the first weeks of the quarter, and carry through over two quarters; this offers serious creative writers and dramatists, and students of theory, philosophy and literary interpretation the opportunity to undertake a collection of poetry, a play or performance/spectacle, an interpretive work on Nietzschean philosophy, or a research-based project on your choice of themes and artists in our curriculum.This upper-division program demands a serious commitment of time and effort; the works which we will study are demanding, and the reading and writing will be significant. the humanities. Marianne Bailey Leonard Schwartz Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Jamyang Tsultrim
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Weekend Su 13Summer Session I This class explores similarities and differences between Eastern and Western psychology and examines possibilities for creating an integrated approach to help to alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics. Through the integrated practice of clinical East-West counseling skills such as intentional listening/reflection, personal practice/role-play, and cultivation of insight and positive emotions, students will develop knowledge and aptitude to differentiate and apply effective counseling methods in the helping professions. Jamyang Tsultrim Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jennifer Calkins
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 13Winter Ecology, evolutionary biology Jennifer Calkins Mon Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Ben Kamen
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 13Summer Session II In this program students will develop techniques for creating interactive works of sound and video art.  Students will explore interactive and generative methods for controlling sound and video in Max/MSP/Jitter, a visual programming environment. In addition, students will use the Arduino micro-controller platform to create interfaces between the digital and real worlds.  Creative projects, guided by reading and collaborative activities, will the be primary goal of the technical work. Ben Kamen Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ben Kamen
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring In this year long sequence, students will explore the creative use of the music technology labs.  Original compositions will be the primary goal of the course work, with clear technical learning objectives for each assignment.  Reading and listening will provide a historical and theoretical context for the creative work.  Fall quarter will focus on the operation of mixers, tape machines, and analog synthesizers, looking to the work of early electroacoustic composers for inspiration.  In the winter, students will begin working with the computer as a compositional tool, creating sound collages and compositions using MIDI to control hardware and software instruments. The spring quarter will focus on electronic music in performance and the development of independent projects.   Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Timothy Marron
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day F 12 Fall In this course, students will study the criminal justice system while learning about specific issues related to Evergreen and its police department.  The course will provide an introduction to the resources available at Evergreen and explore ways to improve campus climate and safety.  Evergreen police officers and other experts will provide information about various issues ranging from sexual assault and domestic violence to patrol procedures and constitutional law. Timothy Marron Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Benjamin Simon, Rachel Hastings and Dharshi Bopegedera
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 12 Fall W 13Winter S 13Spring This program is a rigorous introduction to important knowledge and skills students need to continue in the natural sciences and environmental sciences. We will cover key concepts in general chemistry, general biology, and pre-calculus mathematics. Students who have completed pre-calculus will have the option of pursuing work in introductory calculus.The integration of biology, chemistry and mathematics will assist us in asking and answering questions that lie in the intersections of these fields. Such topics include the chemical structure of DNA, the mathematical modeling of biological population growth, and the equations governing chemical equilibria and kinetics. Our laboratory work in biology and chemistry will also allow us to observe phenomena, collect data, and gain first-hand insight into the complex relationship between mathematical models and experimental results.Program activities will include lectures, laboratories, workshops, scientific writing and student presentations. Disciplines will be integrated throughout the year so students can understand the natural world from multiple perspectives.During fall, we will focus on skill building in the laboratory and acquiring the basic tools in chemistry, biology and mathematics. By winter quarter, students will increase their ability to integrate disciplines, moving between established models and experimental data to ask and seek answers to their own questions.The student presentations will require students to actively participate in conversations on current topics in science. Students will engage library research, writing and oral presentations to communicate their knowledge of these topics to others. A spring quarter component will be a library or laboratory research project and presentation of their findings at the college's annual Science Carnival. This opportunity will allow students to use their knowledge of science to teach schoolchildren (in K-12) in order to improve their own understanding of science.This program is designed for students who want a foundation in science using an interdisciplinary framework. It will require a serious commitment of time and effort. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a solid working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, and with the ability to reason critically and solve problems. Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological, chemical and mathematical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problems.Upon completion of the program, students will have completed one year of general chemistry with laboratory, general biology with laboratory and two quarters of mathematics (precalculus and possibly calculus for students who are prepared). Benjamin Simon Rachel Hastings Dharshi Bopegedera Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Nancy Anderson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su 13Summer Session I The program will provide an introduction to the scope and tools of public health.  Students will work individually and in groups to understand milestones in the history of public health, the basic tools of public health research, and the challenges to successful health promotion projects. The learning community will work in small groups to identify a significant public health problem, develop a health promotion/ intervention, and consider methodology for evaluation of impact.  The program