2011-12 Catalog

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Summer 2012 Index A-Z

Summer Information Second Session Begins July 30th
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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When Su1 Su2 Description Preparatory Faculty Days of Week Multiple Standings Start Quarters
3D Printing

Arlen Speights

computer science visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 Explore the basics of 3D modeling with real physical results in plastic. We'll take part in the assembly of a RepRap 3D printer, learn to generate digital models in Sketchup, and produce plastic objects from them. We'll also devote time to study the ecological implications of plastics in daily life along with the economic implications of desktop manufacture. Arlen Speights Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
A History of "Race": Colonial Era to the Obama Presidency

Michael Vavrus

African American studies American studies history law and public policy political science 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day This program will explore the origins and manifestations of the contested concept "race." We will investigate the broad question as to how considerations of one's race result in differential social, economic, and political treatment. To do this, we will analyze a racialized history of the United States in relation to dominant discourses of popular culture, science, psychology, health care, law, citizenship, education, and personal/public identity.By making historical connections between European colonialism and the expansion of U.S. political and military dominance in an era of globalization, students will have opportunities to investigate how the bodies of various populations have been racialized. Students will examine related contemporary concepts such as racism, prejudice, discrimination, gender, class, affirmative action, white privilege, and color blindness. Students will consider current research and racialized commentaries that surround debates on genetics vs. culture (i.e., nature vs. nurture).Students will engage race through readings, dialogue in seminars, films, and academic writing that integrate program materials. A goal of the program is for students to recognize contemporary expressions of race by what we hear, see, and read as well as absences and silences that we find. These expressions include contemporary news accounts and popular culture artifacts (e.g., music, television, cinema, magazines). As part of this inquiry, we will examine the presidential candidacy of Barack Obama in relation to discourses on race. As a learning community we will work together to make sense of these expressions and link them to their historical origins.  We may also visit local museums to understand how issues of racial identity have been experienced in the Pacific Northwest.Students will also have an opportunity to examine the social formation of their own racial identities through their own personal narratives. Current approaches from social psychology will be foundational in this aspect of the program. Related to this is consideration as to what it can mean to be an anti-racist in a 21st century racialized society.  history, law, sociology, political economy, social work, education and psychology. Michael Vavrus Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
A New Birth of Freedom: A History of the American Civil War

Geoffrey Cunningham

American studies history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening Su1Summer 1 This course will explore the American Civil War as a struggle to create, as Lincoln said, "a new birth of freedom."  We will study the causes, consequences, course and legacy of secession, slavery, Emancipation, and Reconstruction.  Participants will evaluate the war as it is described, portrayed, interpreted, mythologized, and remembered in a variety of historical texts, personal accounts, and films.  The course will conclude by examining the promise and failure of Reconstruction, and its subsequent impact on race and the meaning of liberty in America. Geoffrey Cunningham Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Abnormal Psychology

Susan Cummings

psychology 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined as well and the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Academic Writing as Argument (A)

Emily Lardner

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend This course focuses on the ways writers make arguments in a variety of contexts. Our initial shared topic will be climate change, which we will explore from various disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Within that topic, we will examine and practice strategies for taking positions, considering objections, and using evidence. No science background is necessary. In addition to writing an argument related to our shared topic, each student will select a topic of their own for a second project. Emily Lardner Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Academic Writing as Argument (B)

Emily Lardner

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend This course focuses on the ways writers make arguments in a variety of contexts. Our initial shared topic will be climate change, which we will explore from various disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Within that topic, we will examine and practice strategies for taking positions, considering objections, and using evidence. No science background is necessary. In addition to writing an argument related to our shared topic, each student will select a topic of their own for a second project. Emily Lardner Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Activist Art: Comics cancelled

Amaia Martiartu

visual arts writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 Through drawing, writing, and discussion, this course will study comics as a tool for political and social activism (not superheroes). The class will learn and practice basic skills for script writing and drawing and will develop students' creativity through applied projects. Amaia Martiartu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Adaptation: Evolutionary Patterns in Biological Space-Time

Bret Weinstein

biology consciousness studies environmental studies natural history philosophy of science zoology 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day Nearly all of the complexity in the observable universe is due to one process: Selection-natural, sexual and otherwise. And though the basics of evolutionary selection can be summarized in a single phrase ("survival of the fittest"), the details are surprising in the extreme, raising profound questions at every juncture. Why, for example, has a simple, shared drive to increase 'reproductive success' taken aardvarks and spruce trees in such different directions? And why would a peahen choose to burden her sons with a giant handicap to their movement by mating with a male carrying genes for massive tail? We will take a broad approach to selection, studying what is known, but focusing on that which remains mysterious. The adaptive interplay between genetic, epigenetic (regulatory) and cultural traits will be of particular interest. We will also place special emphasis on understanding the tension between selection exerted by mates, and that exerted by environmental factors. Fall quarter will be spent constructing a basic toolkit for evolutionary analysis: What is an adaptation and how can it be recognized? How can we infer function? What is the relationship between a trait's short and long-term adaptive value? We will scrutinize structures; behaviors and patterns found in the wild, and refine our ability to understand them through the language of game theory. During the winter quarter, we will focus on pushing our model of selection to its limits, and beyond, by applying it to the most complex and surprising adaptive patterns in nature, with a special emphasis on adaptive patterns manifest in We will read, have lecture, and detailed discussions. Discussions will be central to our work. Students will be expected to generate and defend hypotheses and predictions in a supportive and rigorous environment. We will go out and look at nature directly when conditions are right. Each quarter, we will take a multi-day field trip to observe thought-provoking patterns in unfamiliar environments. There will be assignments, but the program will be primarily about generating deep predictive insight, not about producing a large volume of work. It is best suited to self-motivated students with a deep commitment to comprehending that which is knowable, but unknown. biology, medicine, psychology, and public policy. This program will focus on how to think, not what to think. As such, it will be useful to in any career in which critical thinking is important. Bret Weinstein Junior JR Senior SR
Adolescent Literature

Terry Ford

education literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 Adolescent literature differs from children's literature to meet the developmental needs of middle and high school ages.  Participants will learn about adolescent literature in an historical perspective, young adult development in reading, and genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique a variety of genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts. Terry Ford Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Advanced Recording and Production I, II

Robert Schwenkler

media arts music 

Signature Required: Fall Winter 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening This continuing course is designed to support students who are interested in recording music for various media and contexts.  Making use of the college's 16-track recording facility, students will be taken on a path through contemporary practice in studio recording.  Studio technology and artistry, song and mix composition, and fundamentals of audio electronics will all be covered.  There will be a focus on both magnetic tape and analog mixing as well as computer-based digital recording and mixing.  Processing fundamentals such as equalization, compression, and reverb will be treated alongside an overview of the many other signal processing options available in the modern recording studio.  Audio electronics will be covered as it relates to general studio signal flow, troubleshooting, and DIY equipment construction. Time will be spent in the studios creating recorded pieces including pieces for the annual Evergreen Student Album project.  Critical listening activities will accompany this process, using student work as well as work from outside sources.  Both the techniques and the artistry of recording, mixing, and song composition will be examined and developed via the process of creation, analysis, and discussion.  Work in the digital realm will focus on use of Pro Tools software and plugin effects while analog work will be based around the college’s 24-channel mixing console, 16-track tape machine, and a variety of outboard processing equipment. Robert Schwenkler Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
African Language: Pulaar (Fulani/Peul)

Amadou Ba

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su2Summer 2 This class is an introduction to the Pulaar language spoken in northern Senegal. The class will focus on both language and the Fulbe tradition and culture. Students will learn greetings, introductions, family relationship, and the expressions for basic needs, as well as how to get by linguistically and culturally in cultural situations. Students will study standard Pulaar grammar, vocabulary, and spelling. Pulaar is a language of West Africa spoken by the Fulbe people of Senegal, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Chad. Pulaar is one of the most widely spread languages in Africa. This class is appropriate for students who are interested in studying linguistics, learning a new language, and traveling to West Africa. Amadou Ba Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
After the Ice the World Changed

Dennis Hibbert

geology natural history 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend There are so many people — and environmental problems — because we control our food supply. Population growth accelerated as the last ice age waned and agriculture emerged separately in the Middle East, East Asia, southern Mexico, and the Amazon basin. We will study the world at that time and the evidence for agriculture's beginnings, drawing on archaeology, geology, palaeobotany, geochemistry, and climatology. We will then watch the project we began come to be today's world. Dennis Hibbert Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Against All Odds: The Black Woman's Experience

Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman

African American studies American studies cultural studies dance gender and women's studies history literature music 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day How did Black women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary Seattle. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history and popular culture to investigate these womens' lives and cultural contexts.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skill and insight by: creating an annotated bibliography; giving a final performance based on the life of a chosen black woman; and an end-of-the-quarter "lessons learned presentation" demonstrating how our collective studies applied to each individual student's life and legacy. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Algebraic Thinking

Miranda Elliott Rader

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Algebraic Thinking develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and data analysis.  Collaborative learning is emphasized. Miranda Elliott Rader Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Algebraic Thinking

Miranda Elliott Rader

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Algebraic Thinking develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and data analysis.  Collaborative learning is emphasized. Miranda Elliott Rader Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
American Families: Historical and Sociological Perspectives on Close Relationships

Stephanie Coontz

American studies cultural studies gender and women's studies history sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day In the second half of the program we discuss the origins of 20th-century marriage and parenting norms and explore the dramatic shifts that have occurred in family formation and relationship norms over the past 50 years. Students will also do individual projects that will culminate in presentations at the end of the quarter. These will cover topics such as the causes and consequences of divorce, the changing dynamics of cohabitation, singlehood and marriage, the emergence of new sexual norms, legal issues connected with changing family structures and practices, the rise of biracial and multiracial families, and debates over same-sex marriage and parenting. Many of our topics will be controversial. We seek not simple answers but intelligent questions to inform our study. Students are expected to consider several different points of view, to fairly evaluate arguments with which they disagree, and to explore the possible contradictions or exceptions to their own positions. You should expect to back up your position with concrete examples and logical argumentation, and be prepared to be challenged to defend your positions. We are not simply sharing feelings or exchanging points of view but rigorously testing different interpretations and theories against each other. Because this is a demanding and intensive program, student should not attempt to work more than 15 hours a week. sociology, history, family studies, research, social work, teaching, family law and counseling. Stephanie Coontz Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
American Sign Language I (B)

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  Students from this section may continue in ASL II and ASL III in the 5:30-7:30 p.m. class in winter and spring quarters. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
American Sign Language I, II

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day In this two-quarter sequence of courses, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  In spring, students will focus on broadening their vocabularies and conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication.  There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area.  Opportunities to study ASL III and IV are usually available in summer quarter. Entry into the  spring quarter requires proficiency equivalent to the successful completion of American Sign Language I.  Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
American Sign Language I, II, III

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening In this year-long sequence of courses, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign, and ASL grammar.  Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee and to attend the Deaf Club.  As the year progresses, students will focus on broadening their vocabularies and conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication.  There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area. Entry into the winter and spring quarters requires proficiency equivalent to the successful completion of American Sign Language I (for winter) or American Sign Language II (for spring).  Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
American Sign Language III

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In ASL III, students will focus on broadening their vocabulary and conversation skills while using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphases on the non-manual aspect of communication and classifier development. There is a continued study of deaf culture. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
American Sign Language IV

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In ASL IV, students will continue the study of the grammar of ASL, the functional application of ASL, classifiers, locatives, and vocabulary. The course will include an introduction to ASL idioms, multiple-meaning words in both ASL and English, and conceptual/contextual signing. Students will also work with ASL literature in an in-depth study. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
An Educated Society

Stephanie Kozick and Leslie Flemmer

education history literature outdoor leadership and education psychology writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This is an inquiry-based program structured as a collaborative effort to engage authentic questions about the process of learning. What is an educated society and what does it mean to become educated within a society? Whose ways of knowing count in such educational pursuits assumed to ultimately achieve happiness and personal fulfillment? Can one be considered “educated” if one lacks educational credentials, cultural knowledge of the arts, political awareness, or social and economic connections? And, to what end and in what means must we even consider these questions? In this program, we will inquire about the role that educators, artists, authors, and the environment play in guiding us toward a more vibrant and holistic outlook. This comprehensive inquiry requires an interdisciplinary curriculum designed to employ dialogue and the arts in an examination of what is meant by the term “education.” The program will include student-centered learning activities of readings, discussions, talks, film, and expressive projects.Students who are curious about paths to knowledge, the field of education, social justice, and cultural and historical considerations can join us in a wide-ranging examination of our diverse society. Students can expect to work collaboratively to think, learn, and interpret how individuals form, interact in, and become participants in an educated society while engaging topics that include critical pedagogy, arts and humanities, and the construction of knowledge through social networks and cultural practices. Motivated, open-minded students willing to work with others in critical discussions of readings, to experiment with the arts and writing projects, and to closely observe the contributions of others will gain new perspectives about what matters when contemplating an educated society. At quarter’s end, students will be able to identify their own and others efforts to understand what it means to be educated. Some of the authors who will have contributed to that understanding are: Virginia Woolf, Paolo Freire, William Ayers, James Baldwin, John Dewey, Terry Tempest Williams, Sherman Alexi, Gerald Durrell, and Maxine Green. Stephanie Kozick Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Analytical Activism: Doing What Matters cancelled

Gillies Malnarich and Emily Lardner

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend This program has been restructured and re-titled as .  Students can no longer register for the program listed here, but if you are interested in this program, please register for . --Benjamin BarberThe most important tool for creating a better world is a disciplined mind—the power to think well about something that matters.  The goal of this inquiry-based, two-quarter program is to explore good thinking across historical, cultural, and contemporary contexts in order to develop better analytical, reflective, and creative skills ourselves.In , our investigation of what people are doing right now to turn good thinking into better public policies and practices will be guided by these questions: What are the big ideas that inspire and shape our lives, and what are their origins?  How do texts—ranging from declarations to poems, budgets to standardized forms—organize social relations including relations of ruling?  How do ordinary people, in the context of huge power inequities, educate themselves and organize for social change?Students will be introduced to disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to these questions using key concepts, practices, and habits of mind from history, sociology, literature, and composition.  Students will be expected to do individual work that becomes the foundation for high quality, challenging collaborative learning.  Class sessions will include workshops, seminars, in-class reading and writing, presentations, and project work.  In addition to developing disciplinary grounding in history, sociology, literature, and composition, students will develop the habits of mind of skilled integrative thinkers while working on interdisciplinary projects to address contemporary issues.We intend to use moodle to post resources, and we also will use moodle to organize small writing groups where students can share drafts between class sessions. education, law, community development, journalism education, community development, journalism Gillies Malnarich Emily Lardner Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Animal Morphology, Motion, and Mind

Ruth Hayes, Kevin Francis and Amy Cook

biology media arts philosophy visual arts zoology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Humans have a complex, intricate, and paradoxical relationship with other species. We are animals and we define ourselves against them. We celebrate our kinship with animals and use them as laboratory specimens. We create animal characters and infuse them with human qualities. We befriend animals and we eat them. In this program, we will integrate perspectives from the arts, sciences and humanities to explore such seeming contradictions in our understanding, representation and treatment of animals. In fall quarter, we will study animal form, function and evolution.  Students will practice observational approaches to learning about animals, including drawing, laboratory dissection and field study. They will also study animal morphology, comparative anatomy, and biomechanics as a foundation for animating the locomotion of different kinds of animals. Students will explore evolutionary biology as a framework for understanding the biological parallels between humans and animals. Finally, we will examine how artists and writers have represented animals in images, stories and films. In winter quarter, we will shift our focus to human and animal neurobiology, cognition, emotion, and behaviour. As we study these topics, we will investigate how scientists and artists anthropomorphize animals in their work and explore the implications of this practice. Consider the scientist who empathizes with a chimpanzee's elation or an elephant's sadness or a dog's pain. Does this empathy provide valuable insight into the experience of another species or simply reveal the ability to project one's own sentimental fancies onto another creature? And how do we test these intuitions? Or consider animators who create films populated with animal characters. Why do they select particular species to represent specific human qualities? And how do these fictional representations of animals affect how we treat real animals? In each of these cases, we risk putting ourselves in dialog with anthropomorphized versions of animals without recognizing the full extent of our own narcissism. During both quarters, students will participate in lectures, seminars, labs and writing workshops. They will learn how to analyze several types of media, including books and films, and will be expected to develop and improve their writing through a variety of assignments. This program will also encourage students to reflect on their own assumptions and attitudes about other species. During fall quarter, art workshops will emphasize the development of basic skills in drawing and animation. During winter quarter, students will continue developing these skills and will also explore their own scientific and/or creative approaches to representing animals. art, animation, science and education. Ruth Hayes Kevin Francis Amy Cook Mon Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Animal Others in Image and Text

Ruth Hayes and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)

media arts media studies moving image visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Images of animals are the oldest known artworks; they are also some of the first images that children in western culture see and learn to recognize.  From 35,000 year old cave paintings to Disney animations, from the fables of Aesop to the many thousands of animal videos uploaded to and viewed on YouTube, images and stories of the animals with whom we have evolved weave in and through western culture. The images proliferate as our experiences with actual animals become increasingly rare.Students will study how we see, understand and represent animals in an effort to learn about human relationships with animals as “other” and as mirrors of ourselves.  They will engage in analyzing and deconstructing a variety of visual and written representations of animals to discover what these images and texts communicate about humans and their cultures, about the relationships between human and animals, and about animals themselves.  Through a series of creative and technical assignments, students will interrogate their own consumption and creation of animal imagery and their own relationships with individual animals.  As they execute these assignments, students will build skills in observation, research, critical thinking, conceptual design, writing, drawing and animation. Ruth Hayes Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Applied Biology and Chemistry

Paula Schofield and Andrew Brabban

biology chemistry 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day The aim of this program is to apply fundamental knowledge and theories of biology and chemistry to practical, real world situations. The application of biology and chemistry has huge impacts on our society, particularly influencing our economy and quality of life. Cutting edge techniques and processes are continually being developed by biologists and chemists to produce the medicines, chemicals and materials we use daily. Products include pharmaceuticals - from synthetic drugs to gene therapies - used to prevent disease and cure illness; biocompatible materials for use in the medical field; fossil-fuel derived synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, rubbers etc.); and modern "green" or "sustainable" materials that include biodegradable polymers. These products are widely used by the general public, as well as in a wide array of industries and professions: agriculture, sports, health-care, law enforcement, the military, automotive, food, etc. In this program we will focus on the practical applications of modern biology and chemistry, studying both small and large molecules, natural and synthetic. Based predominantly in the laboratory, students will learn the theoretical principles and relevant lab and instrumentation techniques needed to synthesize, isolate and analyze small molecules and macromolecules. We will examine small biological molecules as well as organic molecules, moving to important biological macromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, biodegradable polymers, green materials). Theory and techniques of molecular cloning, protein biochemistry, biocatalysis, and transgenics will be emphasized, as well as synthesis and characterization of relevant organic molecules, polymers and green materials. Seminars on technical literature and student presentations will be significant components of the program.  We will also discuss the professional biologist's and chemist's relationship with industry, government and universities, and examine employment opportunities for biologists and chemists. Students will be evaluated based on their laboratory techniques, laboratory reports, class presentations, and homework assignments. biotechnology, biology, chemistry, polymer and material science, health science, education and medicine. Paula Schofield Andrew Brabban Mon Tue Wed Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Approaches to Healing

Cindy Beck and Wenhong Wang

consciousness studies health physiology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Approaches to Healing is a guest lecture series designed to help students explore the theory and practice of the many types of healing arts that our regional wealth of outstanding practitioners provide.  Throughout the quarter, students will be asked to look at broad health care questions and policy, as well as personal healing practices, stress management, and the importance of thoughtful critical analysis at all levels of approaches and outcomes.  Guest speakers representing body work, complementary medicine, Chinese medicine, bacteriophages as antibiotics, and plant medicine will be featured.  Students will also spend time each week outside of class exploring new activities that could contribute to their own health, as well as reading current literature to help expand their understanding of health and wellness.This course meets in conjunction with the program .  (You may enroll either in for 8 credits or for 2 credits, but you may not enroll in both.) Cindy Beck Wenhong Wang Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Arabic, Beginning I, II, III

Joe Fahoum

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening In this year-long sequence, students will learn to read and write in both classical and modern Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries.  (All Muslims are instructed to pray in Arabic.)  By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level.  The objectives are to continually increase vocabulary; to learn suffixes, pronouns, and verbs for personalization; to learn to conjugate verbs; and to recognize proper and inverted sentences as well as those starting with infinitive verbs and indefinite nouns.  Students are required to master verbs tenses, superlatives, sentence analyzing, and subject-verb agreement as well as all other areas of grammar.  Students will also learn some songs, short poems, and stories while studying Arabic culture and learning some conversational Arabic.  Joe Fahoum Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Arabic For Beginners

Steven Niva

cultural studies international studies language studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 This course will introduce students to both written Arabic and basic conversational Arabic in order to provide the foundations for further study in the Arabic language. Students will learn Arabic script and basic grammar rules, expand their vocabulary, and practice conversational Arabic used in everyday encounters. They will also watch films, listen to music, and discuss cultural topics related to language use. This course prepares students for language-based area programs, and for first year Arabic language requirements. Steven Niva Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
The Architecture of Human Movement

Stephanie Kozick and Robert Esposito

dance history literature somatic studies writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This program is intended for students who are eager to pursue academic and personal explorations of human development.  This program will feature inquiry into the richness, density, and complexity of human awareness, development, and relationship by integrating a theoretical and practical study of human development with movement and dance Students will gain a vocabulary for specific ways of talking about human development and movement, which will involve a study of key influences: Kegan’s ideas about the problems and process of human development, Piaget’s developmental expressions of physical knowledge, Laban analysis, and Alwin Nikolais’ formal analysis of space, shape, time, and motion.  The concept of "motion" will be addressed as the refinement or qualification of “movement” into an infinity of potential aesthetic expressions. The ways in which we develop as human beings involves a set of areas that include cognitive development, social/emotional development, language development, and physical development.  The latter, physical development is an especially fascinating topic. The movement study in this program will be situated historically in the 20th-century.  Rudolph Laban, along with many European artists and intelligentsia were influenced by Eastern thought, as well as by advanced science and technology.  Historical events such as the World Wars spurred an aesthetic and intellectual diaspora leading to postmodern concepts of integrative thinking and holism in environmental and human affairs. These historical movements mark a pivotal transformational period toward the development of viable, holistic networks of integrative theory and technologies designed to inform and create a human community that respects uniqueness and diversity in service of sustainable living. Studio work will offer a practical mode of human movement study that will develop students’ personal somatic understanding.  It will also involve group work by engaging the practice of Laban’s “movement choirs,” an expressive way of exploring human development through motion.  Studio work will be placed in the context of living in a world of others that requires free exploration and creative play: fun with intent.  This program's curricular activities will take an interdisciplinary approach that includes reading and discussing scholarly material, critiquing films, group and individual movement explorations, writing, and academic workshops. human development, movement, and dance related fields. Stephanie Kozick Robert Esposito Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Arrested Development cancelled

Peter Dorman

agriculture economics environmental studies international studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Despite decades of policies and promises, billions of people around the world still live in poverty or near-poverty. How did this situation come about? Why does it persist? In this program we will examine the problem of uneven, incomplete and even failed development – recognizing that the concept of "development" itself is contested. The origins of global inequality in European expansion and the creation of a world economy will be considered, as well as the efforts to resist these forces. We will look at the main economic theories surrounding development and the international organizations that try to put them into practice. We will also look at dissenting ideas and at new initiatives now emerging at local, national and international levels. The program will be transdisciplinary, combining economics, history, politics and post-colonial cultural analysis. economics, political economy, international relations, international rights work, and development assistance. Peter Dorman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art and Awareness: Art Practices and Collaborations in the 21st Century

Evan Blackwell

aesthetics art history sustainability studies visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program will investigate the social impact of art and explore what it means to be a “successful” artist working in the 21st century. How does the artist respond to current events, politics, social structures, ecological issues and existing paradigms in order to create a healthier community? How can the artist conduct meaningful dialogue about our cultural model? How can artists create awareness, and how can art effect social change?Our focus will examine the development of post-1960’s visual, installation, video, performance and ecological art, and its effects on the art world and the broader culture. We will study a variety of artists intent on making a difference in the world. We will look beyond art galleries, museums and collectors' homes and investigate ways in which art and art practices are supported and integrated into public places. This program will research artist collaborations, collectives and communities in order to understand how artists accomplish projects beyond the fixed studio space. We will take a collaborative approach to many of the studio projects and workshops to create work that goes beyond what a single individual could normally accomplish.Constructing with readily available materials not limited to traditional "fine art" mediums, we will gain skills in 2-D and 3-D design and construction methods, and link art making processes and materials to our ideas. These projects might culminate in site-specific installations, actions, performances, or objects - or take a less material-based approach using digital means and the World Wide Web.Weekly writing assignments, lectures, seminars, studio visits, and studio workshops will build a broader understanding of what art is and what it can do for the world. Students must be as committed their reading, writing and research as they are to their own art-making. This program requires a strong work ethic and self-discipline, and students will be expected to work intensively in the studios on campus. Evan Blackwell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art, Culture, and Education

Hirsh Diamant

cultural studies education visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Human societies and cultures express their values in education and art.  Art is the earliest and most enduring expression of humanity.  For community and the individual, art can be a practice of education and self-cultivation.  In today's global community it is important to understand art and values of other cultures and by so doing to awaken art within oneself while learning to understand the "other."All children naturally understand the importance of art and are creating art constantly in their play.  All children are artists and all can paint, play, sing, and dance.  Children also have an instinctive sense of right and wrong.  In the modern, industrial world these natural abilities often become suppressed and lost.  Modern educators need to be confident in their own artistic abilities and grounded in their own moral core; they need to be trained in communication across cultures and able to support children's healthy development.The students in this half-time, interdisciplinary program will immerse themselves in study and practice of art and in cultural experiences that are vastly different from the Western dominant culture by studying Native American, Muslim, Hebrew, and Chinese cultures.  Students will make art, study myths and world religions as they have been shaped by cultures and landscapes of the past, and examine cultural and ethical norms.  Students will also examine cultural influences and pressures of today's global society and will investigate the importance of preserving and developing cultural, artistic, and ethical traditions.  Students will engage in traditional academic study such as reading, writing, and seminars and will also engage in art making, meditation, community events, and the practice of Tai Ji.  Students will learn about child and human development, will learn about alternative education systems, and will cultivate their own spiritual, meditative, ethical, and artistic life.  In addition to classroom study, students will participate in retreats and will go on field trips to explore educational, art, and cultural resources in the community.In winter quarter students will be able to work on community service projects, in schools, and on Native American reservations. arts, education, cultural studies Hirsh Diamant Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art for Art Therapists

Gail Tremblay

health visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Art History I: Temples and Tombs

Nancy Bishop

art history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Art History I is an exploration of the surviving art and artifacts of the most ancient Western civilizations: the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. The European middle ages will also be covered. In addition to a text, students will critically read primary source documents to facilitate their understanding of the cultures, religions, and the role of visual art. Students will be tested over material and, as part of a team, make a presentation to the class. Nancy Bishop Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art History II: Order and Chaos

Nancy Bishop

art history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend The second half of this overview of Western art examines the major movements from the Renaissance on. Tension between strong oppositional forces drive a stylistic evolution from the calm order of the structured perfection of the Van Eycks and Leonardo to the diversity of our post modern and deconstructivist world in the 21st century. Nancy Bishop Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art of Helping

Mary Dean

sociology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Art of Leadership

Dariush Khaleghi

business and management consciousness studies leadership studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su2Summer 2 The Art of Leadership is a highly interactive course, encouraging personal reflection and deep learning to help students explore their own leadership qualities.  This course provides a multi-disciplinary approach to learning by blending behavior theory with business principles to provide practical applications to learn critical topics in leadership.  This course is centered on personalized learning opportunities where students are encouraged to develop their full potential and become the leader they always desired to be.  This course also introduces a set of comprehensive exercises and engaging self-assessment tools to allow students learn more about themselves and their capacity to lead.  The course teaches concepts, principles, and skills of leadership in a way that is appropriate for both new and experienced leaders, as well as anyone who must influence others to achieve common goals and objectives. Dariush Khaleghi Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Art of Mosaic

Ann Storey

art history history visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening This interdisciplinary class will explore the art and art history of mosaics.  An ancient art that combines practicality with beauty, the mosaic medium is currently having a renaissance as contemporary artists explore its use in architectural design and outdoor sites.  In studying the history of mosaic, we will concentrate on three eras when the medium flourished: the Classical and Byzantine periods, the Arts and Crafts Movement and Art Nouveau era, and the contemporary art period.  Students will be guided in a process for making both two-dimensional and three-dimensional mosaic artworks.  They will also have writing projects, research assignments, and workshops to help them to write and talk about art more analytically.  Art project ideas will grow out of studying the history of mosaics.  Critique/analysis sessions will emphasize using design principles to make more compelling artworks. visual arts, art history, museum studies, education, design Ann Storey Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Art of Writing Poetry

Gail Tremblay

literature writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Poets use language to create an experience for the reader by using images, metaphors, similes, rhythm and sound like musicians use notes, sound and rhythm to tempt audiences to feel deeply what can be known about the roots of the human condition.  In this program, students will read poetry by a wide variety of writers, study poetic form and explore a variety of strategies for writing poetry. They will read by John Frederick Nims and David Mason and will be required to write at least two poems each week and to present those poems for discussion in a writers' workshop.  Students will also be required to attend poetry readings, and to study poetry publications and strategies for publishing their work in a variety of magazines, journals and online sites. They will also have the opportunity to study chapbook and book length collections of poems and to discuss how poets choose and arrange poems to prepare them for submission to a press. creative writing, editing, and teaching English. Gail Tremblay Mon Mon Tue Tue Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Art Since 1500

Olivier Soustelle

art history cultural studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6 4, 6 Day Su2Summer 2 This class surveys world art history since 1500 from the Renaissance to the 20th century.  We will focus on paintings, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in Europe, North America, and Asia.  Credit possible in either art history or world cultures/civilizations. Students enrolled for 6 credits will complete a library research paper on an artist or art movement of their choice. This is a companion class to "Europe Since 1500." Olivier Soustelle Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Arts In New York

Ariel Goldberger

architecture community studies consciousness studies cultural studies dance field studies language studies literature media studies moving image music queer studies somatic studies theater visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening This program will immerse students in studying the intense and lively cultural life of New York City, the most active arts production center in the United States, and perhaps the world. Sessions will meet weekly in different cultural institutions to participate in art events as active audience members, to develop an educated and critical appreciation of the richness, complexity and current trends of artistic production in New York.We will spend two weeks on campus doing preparatory research in areas of each student's interest in order to create the structure for an individual project or practicum. Students may choose to create a project by engaging in artistic work, research, or both. Students will be responsible for making all necessary arrangements for room and board, as well as budgeting for individual event tickets. All students will be expected to present a final report of their experience and project.After the initial two weeks of research and preparation, participants in the program will fly to New York City for six or seven weeks, where they will engage in group and individual activities, depending on each student practicum or project. Students will attend some events as a group and some related to their own projects. We will attend events in a wide range of sites, from established world-renowned institutions to emergent art spaces.Depending on the season, performance events may include events in places such as PS 122, La MAMA, The Kitchen, HERE Art Center, off-off-Broadway small theaters, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Broadway productions and Lincoln Center. Regular dance events may include modern dance performances, experimental works, festivals at the Joyce Theater, and more traditional ballet events in venues such as the New York City Ballet. Specific visual arts events may consist of trips to the gallery "scene" in Chelsea, PS1, MOMA, DIA Arts Center, The Met, under the radar spaces and other sites. We may attend poetry readings at places such as The Bowery Poetry Club, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, The St. Marks Poetry Project, The Academy of American Poets and The New York Public Library. The class will also endeavor to attend other culturally relevant institutions such as the Japan Society, the Asia Society, The Jewish Museum, The Schomburg Center, The Dwyer Cultural Center and El Museo del Barrio to experience a wide range of cultural diversity. Most weekly group activities will be followed by a discussion or seminar.We will spend the final week of the quarter back on campus in Olympia, completing final report presentations for the whole class. architecture, community studies, consciousness studies, cultural studies, dance, field studies, language studies, literature, media studies, moving image, music, queer studies, somatic studies, theater, visual arts, and writing. Ariel Goldberger Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Assessment in Literacy

Jon Davies

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 To prepare for a reading endorsement or to understand more about literacy assessment and development, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address formal and informal literacy assessment. Topics include diagnostic reading tests, informal reading inventories, cueing systems, nonfiction text features and formats, qualitative and quantitative readability assessments, and content area reading assessment. This course meets teaching requirements for Washington reading endorsement. Jon Davies Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Astronomy and Cosmology: Stars and Stories

Rebecca Chamberlain

astronomy education field studies literature philosophy philosophy of science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Evening Su2Summer 2 This intensive course will explore a variety of cosmological concepts from mythology, literature, philosophy, and history, to an introduction to astronomy, archeo-astronomy, and theories about the origins of the universe. We will employ scientific methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry based learning and engage the imagination. This class is focused on field work, and activities are designed for amateur astronomers and those interested in inquiry based science education as well as those interested in doing observation-based research or in exploring literary, philosophical, cultural, and historical Cosmological traditions.Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories under the night sky to working in a computer lab to create educational planetarium programs.  Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. Students will develop skills and appreciation for the ways we uncover our place in the universe through scientific theories and cultural stories, imagination and intellect, qualitative and quantitative processes, and "hands on" observation.We will visit Pine Mountain Observatory, and participate in field studies at the 25th Anniversary of the Oregon Star Party.  This year’s celebratory events include a presentation by a Space Shuttle Astronaut and workshops with mentors, scientists, storytellers, and astronomers. We will develop a variety of techniques to enhance our observation skills including use of star-maps and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, how to operate 8” and 10” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects, and how to use binoculars and other tools.  We will be camping and doing field work in the high desert for a week. (first session): A few students will have the opportunity to attend an invitational research conference at Pine Mountain Observatory, July. 15-20 (first session).  They must 1) be enrolled in the class or have prior experience and 2) work with the instructor to complete an independent study contract prior to the first session of summer quarter.  Since a limited number of students will be able to participate this year, students will be selected based on their background, qualifications, and interests.  Research sessions are still to be determined but may include photometry, astrometry, spectroscopy, or Binary Star Research.  Students must have the ability and interest to camp and do fieldwork in the high dessert for a week.  A planning meeting will be held on campus July 11, 6-10 pm.  Contact the instructor ASAP if you are interested. Rebecca Chamberlain Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions

Dharshi Bopegedera

chemistry 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This upper division program offers advanced studies in chemistry to prepare students for graduate studies or a career in chemistry. Based on the theme "What do chemists do?", our classroom studies will be connected with the applications chemists encounter in their everyday work. In fall quarter we will study topics in quantum mechanics and descriptive inorganic chemistry. We will study simple quantum mechanical systems, apply them to solve simple chemical problems, and investigate how they can be adapted for more complex systems. In inorganic chemistry, we will explore atomic structure, simple bonding models, molecular symmetry, group theory and its applications, molecular orbital theory and acid-base chemistry. In winter quarter we will continue our studies in quantum mechanics to include more complex systems, and investigate the use of spectroscopy to validate the quantum mechanical theories. Inorganic chemistry topics will include the study of coordination compounds and the solid state. In addition, we will begin our study of thermodynamics by exploring the laws of thermodynamics that lay the foundation in this field of study. Spring quarter will find us doing in-depth investigations of the spectrometric methods, including a detailed analysis of the high resolution infrared spectrum of a diatomic molecule. We will continue our studies in thermodynamics with topics in chemical equilibria and kinetics. In the laboratory, students will work with a selection of analytical instrumentation. This will include an exploration of the physical principles as well as analysis of samples. Students are strongly encouraged to work with individual chemistry faculty on research projects during the course of the year. The results of these projects will be presented at the annual Undergraduate Research Symposium of the Puget Sound Section of the American Chemical Society. chemistry, physics, physical science, health science, biological sciences, medicine, environmental sciences, and teaching. Dharshi Bopegedera Junior JR Senior SR
Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Inorganic Chemistry

Dharshi Bopegedera

chemistry 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Day Students are welcome to study the advanced inorganic chemistry component that is offered as part of the program.  In fall quarter we will explore atomic structure, simple bonding models, molecular symmetry, group theory and its applications, molecular orbital theory, and acid-base chemistry. In winter quarter we will study the chemistry of coordination compounds and the solid state.This is being offered for 8 credits in fall quarter and 4 credits in winter quarter. mistry, physics, physical science, health science, biological sciences, medicine, environmental sciences, and teaching. Dharshi Bopegedera Junior JR Senior SR
Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Quantum Chemistry

Dharshi Bopegedera

chemistry physics 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day Students are welcome to study the quantum chemistry component that is offered in the program. In fall quarter we will study simple quantum mechanical systems, apply them to solve simple chemical problems, and investigate how they can be adapted for more complex systems. In winter quarter we will continue the study of complex systems and investigate the use of spectroscopy to validate the quantum mechanical theories. This will be followed by in-depth investigations of the spectrometric methods including a detailed analysis of the high resolution infrared spectrum of a diatomic molecule in spring quarter. chemistry, physics, physical science, medicine, engineering, environmental science and teaching. Dharshi Bopegedera Junior JR Senior SR
Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Thermodynamics

Dharshi Bopegedera

chemistry physics 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Day Students are welcome to study the thermodynamics component that is offered as part of the program. In winter quarter we will begin our study by exploring the gas laws and the laws of thermodynamics. In spring quarter, we will apply these laws to chemical systems and investigate heats of chemical reactions, equilibria and kinetics. This is being offered for 4 credits in  winter quarter and 8 credits in spring quarter. chemistry, physics, physical science, medicine, engineering, environmental science and teaching. Dharshi Bopegedera Junior JR Senior SR
Audio Recording I, II, III

Zenaida Vergara

media arts 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening This year-long sequence of courses introduces the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media.  Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording, and audio console signal flow.  Winter continues this work while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb, and digital effects processing.  In spring, additional topics will include sound design for film with sync sound production for dialogue, Foley, sound effects, and music composition. There will also be an interview-style production meant for radio broadcast.  In each quarter, students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab assignments outside of class time. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice floor barre, developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The "Beats": A Writing and Poetry Retreat cancelled

Michael Vavrus

cultural studies literature writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su2Summer 2 The college's Organic Farmhouse will serve as our on-campus retreat environment for two consecutive weekends where we will read and write about and discuss the "Beats."  We investigate who were the "Beatniks" of the 1950s and 1960s, how they culturally revolutionized America, and what their legacy is today.  Students will research, present, discuss, and write poetry on the writings of the Beats.  This program is open to all students with an open mind who may be beginning, intermediate, or seasoned poets.  Students can expect to gain an understanding of the historical significance of the Beats and grow substantially in their poetic writing voice.  Following the on-campus retreat, students will work individually to revise their work started during the retreat.  By the end of summer students should expect to leave this course with a collection of poems.  Open to all abilities of student writers.There will be an orientation meeting Monday, July 23 from 5:30-6:30pm.  If you are unable to come to this meeting, you must contact the instructor to get information needed for the retreat. Michael Vavrus Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Behind the News: Power and Politics in Our Daily Lives

Charles Pailthorp and Matthew Smith

American studies government history law and public policy philosophy political science 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Power can be as direct as a blow to the head or as subtle as the lyrics of a song. The dimensions of power, the way it operates in the world to constrain choices and provide opportunities gives shape to our daily lives. This program will examine different ways philosophers and theorists have understood power and assessed how it is deployed in politics and practice.We look forward to close study of works by: Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Christopher Hill, Karl Marx, Adam Smith, David Harvey, Michel Foucault, Steven Lukes and others.Each student will be expected to gain authority over a controversy currently found in the news. The choice of controversies will be limited to a selection made by the faculty or suggested by a group of students. Each person will conduct their own inquiry into the chosen controversy, but each must find a small group whose members will support one another’s work. A preliminary list of possible areas: homelessness, reproduction, social revolutions, global warming, global economy, diminishing middle-class expectations, immigration, initiative campaigns, campaign finance, land policies, intellectual property and technology, collective bargaining... For others, follow the news. This work will culminate in a 15 pp. essay and a formal presentation of all work that meets a high standard.This program is an excellent choice for students new to Evergreen and for those returning to undergraduate study after a period of work or travel.Faculty will take care to introduce students to collaborative, interdisciplinary work, and research topics will be designed to make sense from a practical, applied perspective. Our understanding of power and how it is deployed will be directed towards the consequences of power in our daily lives and how our choices can help shape these outcomes. history, philosophy, political science, law, journalism, politics and government, and public policy. Charles Pailthorp Matthew Smith Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Between Image and Word

Shaw Osha (Flores) and Trevor Speller

aesthetics cultural studies literature visual arts writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day - Marlene Dumas (1984) In (1789; 1794), the English poet and painter William Blake famously presented his poems on pages surrounded by his own drawings. This kind of interrelationship of images and words is an artistic tradition that is still alive and well, in visual arts and book arts, from painting to graphic novels. This kind of work asks important questions of both literature and visual art, such as: This one-quarter, all-level program explores the relationships between visual art and the written word. Over the course of the program, we will be examining and producing singular works in which words and images each other - where one form does not privilege or illustrate the other. They both work in the service of art and aesthetics by framing and giving form to ideas. These hybrid works of language and art point to new and alternative ways of seeing, reading, and interpreting the world. We plan to take a look at the ways language has interacted with image: reading and seeing. The program work will be both creative and critical. In addition to reading and viewing artwork, criticism, and theory, students can expect to finish a small book of multi-, inter- or mixed medial writing and artwork by the end of the quarter that challenges and responds to the curriculum. The program includes lecture, seminar, and studio time.Of literary interest will be the traditions of concrete poetry, children's literature, graphic novels and book arts. Representative authors and artists may include William Blake, Lewis Carroll, Tom Phillips, John Cage, Alan Moore, Maurice Sendak, Barbara Lehman, Donald Crews, and others.Of artistic interest will be visual art that uses text and artists' books. Representative authors and artists may include Art Spiegelman, Cy Twombly, Philip Guston, Ed Ruscha, Ree Morton, Jenny Holzer, Raymond Pettibon, and others.In addition to primary works, students will be expected to read works of artistic and literary theory relating to issues germane to the program. Theorists such as Johanna Drucker, Roland Barthes, Edward R. Tufte, Roy Harris and Scott McCloud will help shape our understandings of the gaps between the image and the word. visual art, writing, literature, and critical studies. Shaw Osha (Flores) Trevor Speller Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Biology I, II cancelled

Jennifer Calkins

biology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend This two-quarter sequence in general biology will introduce students to the study of biology using evolution as a theme.  During the winter quarter we will explore the fundamental ideas of evolutionary biology and go on to investigate the structure and function of life from cellular to multicellular organisms.  We will also examine theories on the origin of life and begin to investigate the pattern of life’s evolution since its origin.  In spring quarter, thematic questions include the following: What is the pattern of life over the last 2+ billion years, what are the processes that have led to this pattern, and what is the value inherent in and the risks faced by the great variety of life on earth? Students who successfully complete this sequence will have a basic knowledge and understanding useful both for further study in biology and as part of being a biologically literate citizen who can engage with current issues with knowledge and understanding. The course will be shaped around four components: lecture, discussions, hands-on investigations (in the lab and in the field), and online conversations.  Although students will need to recognize the importance of some specific details in the study of biology, the emphasis will be on conceptual understanding.  Students will be asked to complete assignments that incorporate this conceptual understanding with their own specific interests and passions in biology. Jennifer Calkins Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Biology of Music cancelled

Martin Beagle

biology music physics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Day Su1Summer 1 The Biology of Music is a multidisciplinary course that explores how biological organisms create music. Students will develop foundational skills and knowledge in biology, physics, and music theory in addition to advancing their musicianship through in-class and private study. Previous experience in playing a musical instrument is beneficial but not required.Utilizing workshops and laboratory explorations, the course will present basic concepts and principles of biology and physiology while studies in noncalculus-based physics will inform students of the physical principles that influence the biology. Studies in introductory music theory coupled with private study will foster a new level of musical awareness. Martin Beagle Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Biology through Darwin's Lens

Jennifer Calkins

biology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend The theory of evolution provides the best framework through which we can understand the diversity of biological systems.  In this course, we will use evolutionary theory to help us explore biological patterns ranging from the structure of a cell to the organization of ecosystems as well as biological processes ranging from the replication of genetic information to the generation of energy.  In the context of our study we will investigate the diversity of biological systems, its origin, and its current threats.  More specifically, we will study the structure, information, and energetics of biological systems and will ask how the theory of evolution can explain the patterns and processes at these levels.  For example, we will ask the following questions: What are the structures of biological systems such as cells, organisms, and communities?  How do biological systems store, replicate, and share information using genetic material, neurobiological processes, and behavior?  How do systems capture, exchange, store, and utilize energy through photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and ecological exchange?This course will prepare students for further study in biology and will provide them with the biological literacy necessary to engage complex issues from cloning to conservation with knowledge and understanding.  The course will include lectures and small-group seminar discussions as well as lab, computational, and field-based projects.  Readings will include portions of a basic biology text, peer-reviewed research papers, and readings from popular science.  Students will be responsible for keeping a journal, doing the readings, participating in group discussions and projects, and completing weekly assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation, their assignments, and their performance on two exams. Jennifer Calkins Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Black and White Photography: Summerwork

Bob Haft

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 Summerwork is an intensive, hands-on program for students of all skill levels wishing to learn the basics of the 35mm camera (or larger format), darkroom techniques, aesthetics, and a short history of photography. A final project involves production of a book of photographs; each student will receive a copy at quarter’s end. Emphasis is placed on learning to see as an artist does, taking risks with one’s work, and being open to new ideas. Bob Haft Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Blood and Borders: Tradition and Transformation in Central Europe

Patricia Krafcik, Marta Botikova, Robert Smurr and Zoltan Grossman

cultural studies geography history international studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Come with us on a virtual journey from the Baltics to the Balkans. The cobblestone streets of medieval Estonia, misty Carpathian and Transylvanian mountains, and sunny shores of the Adriatic Sea await our arrival as we traverse a magnificent territory stretching from the gates of Scandinavia through the mountains, plains and forests of Slavic, Hungarian and Romanian central Europe to the portals of the once-great empires of Macedonia and the Ottoman Turks.Our theme of “Blood” examines the ethnic and cultural identities prevalent in the region and how ethno-religious and cultural nationalisms have shaped and been shaped by constructed identities as well as by regional conflicts and invading distant powers since 1848. Indeed, some of the world’s most reviled rulers and dictators, including Dracula, Hitler and Stalin, left bloody and permanent marks on this entire region.Our theme of “Borders” explores how international and regional boundaries have been drawn and redrawn and how central Europe has served as a “borderland” between Christianity and Islam, Western and Eastern Christianity, the German, Austrian, Russian and Ottoman empires, NATO and the Soviet Union, and present-day Russia and the European Union. The revolution of 1989 and the demise of Communism, initiating a new chapter in the region’s history, will be a significant focus of our study. We will examine why the numerous ethnic, national, religious and political identities often “resolved” their differences by force and violence rather than by tolerance and acceptance.Historical, cultural, geographical, economic, gender, and environmental modes of analysis will enable us to examine both previous and contemporary issues in each country in this region. Such analysis will also permit us to offer regional angles that transcend state boundaries, a particularly exciting aspect of investigation since so many of the current nation-state borders have been drawn recently and, in many cases, artificially. Abundant literary works and films from each of the region's relevant countries will offer additional valuable insights.In fall quarter, we will examine the historical background chronologically, enhanced with a study of the geography and demography of this varied region. Winter quarter will focus on a variety of fascinating themes connecting the present to the past and the future. In both quarters, students will write papers and conduct research projects that link our themes over time and on a local, national and global scale. We will use lectures, images, readings, film critique, art, maps and literature as tools in our exploration. international affairs, history, political science, geography, cultural anthropology and international business. Patricia Krafcik Marta Botikova Robert Smurr Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Book Torrent: Information Studies in the 21st Century

Julianne Unsel

history literature media studies 

Signature Required: Fall 

  SOS SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening What is the past and future of books in academic publishing and library collections today? How are human capacities altered by the use of books in comparison to other media and formats? What is the past and future of books as a medium for teaching and learning? How do print and electronic book formats compare in their utility and power for undergraduate scholarship and research?  How do they compare in their capacities for the formation, presentation, and preservation of knowledge?This program will partner students with Evergreen library faculty and staff to engage these and related questions through organized academic coursework (theory) and through an in-program internship within the Evergreen library (practice). The academic component will include seminar classes and research options in the history of print media, electronic media, and the book form. Students and faculty will experiment with and test a range of state-of-the-art e-book formats and e-readers. All e-texts and e-readers will be provided for student use by the college.Internship work will provide opportunities for students to contribute to a two-year project by library faculty and staff which will begin in Fall. The project is for the modernization and reinvention of the library and its policies, procedures, and collections in context of the capacity for scholarly work with and across various information and communication media. Students will choose and design specific work assignments within current and ongoing library operations, planning activities for the immediate and long-term future of the library, and intellectual discussion and exploration of possible futures for academic libraries and learning more generally.The academic and in-program internship components of this program will maintain thematic emphasis on the place of the library in its direct support of the college curriculum, its role in shaping the interdisciplinary pedagogy of the college, and its own character as a coordinated studies teaching institution within the college. education, history, library and information science, media studies Julianne Unsel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Brain and Mind: East-West Insights

Cindy Beck and Jamyang Tsultrim

consciousness studies philosophy physiology psychology 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend Interest in Eastern philosophy and the influence of contemplative practice on the body has been growing over the past few decades.  This class will explore Eastern models of the theory of knowledge, particularly traditional epistemological models of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies.  Class material will look at the effect these practices have on neurological function by studying neuroanatomy, brain plasticity, and the connections between sensory input and our emotions, thoughts, and actions.  Students will learn to analyze constructive emotions and thoughts and their influence on mental stability.  Students will also learn methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function.  Hands-on workshops, readings, and discussions will emphasize class concepts and help students learn to integrate Western science and Eastern philosophy. Cindy Beck Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Bryophyte Taxonomy and Ecology

Lalita Calabria

botany ecology natural history 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day The Pacific Northwest supports one of the greatest diversities of bryophytes- mosses, hornworts and liverworts - in the world. These terrestrial, epiphytic, and rock-dwelling taxa perform critical ecological roles in our forests, prairies, and urban areas. They intercept and retain nutrients and moisture from rainwater and mist, provide habitat and nesting material for invertebrates and vertebrates, and are important bioindicators of ecosystem health and global climate change.This program focuses on bryophyte taxonomy, ecology and biology. Field trips will emphasize the recognition of ecological life forms and morphological growth forms of bryophytes as well as proper collection methods. Lab activities will involve identifying collected specimens using dichotomous keys and developing proficiency in techniques for the identification of mosses such as dissection, slide-making techniques and use of compound and dissecting microscopes. Lectures will focus on readings from a bryophyte ecology textbook as well as current topics in bryophyte biology and taxonomy. Seminar readings will include a variety of essays, books and scientific papers on the economic, medicinal and aesthetic value of bryophytes. Students will conduct quarter-long group research, which may include herbaria-based taxonomic studies, moss propagation experiments, field-based floristic studies or installation of moss rooftop teaching garden on campus. Students will also contribute to the ongoing curation and databasing of the Evergreen Herbarium Bryophyte Collection. Lalita Calabria Mon Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR
Buddhist Psychotherapy

Ryo Imamura

cultural studies philosophy psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 8, 12 Evening and Weekend Su2Summer 2 Western psychology’s neglect of the living mind, both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities, has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Buddhism which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.  We will investigate the study of mind that has developed within the Buddhist tradition through lectures, readings, videos, workshops, and field trips.  Students registering for 12 credits will attend a meditation retreat and complete a research paper on meditation. Buddhist Studies, Asian psychology, consciousness studies, psychotherapy, social work Ryo Imamura Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Business and Sustainability: Myth or Method?

Bobbie McIntosh and Rebecca Chamberlain

business and management environmental studies leadership studies literature sustainability studies writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Current business and leadership programs at Evergreen support the concept of sustainability, but there is still confusion in the debate about terminology as well as what constitutes “best practices.”  In this year-long, interdisciplinary program, we will ask, “What does it mean to live sustainably on a personal, local, and global level?”  What does it mean to claim that an organization is moving toward sustainability, or is “green?”  Paul Hawken suggests, in , that our economy is shifting from human-based productivity to radical increases in resource productivity.  How is this measured?  One of the goals of this program is to develop a set of competencies that will address this need, in an increasingly changing economy and job market, as we also engage in developing a well-rounded liberal arts education.  Each of the participants will develop an economic business plan and story that will support their evolving understanding of sustainable business, green branding, and how to use effective marketing and promotional skills to create a vision for economic and social happiness.  Each business plan will contain team writing projects.  We will also develop storytelling, writing, and other academic and professional skills and tools that will enable us to create a strong foundation and to form a vision for understanding the economics of "The Green Business Myth."  We will develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills in the liberal arts, as we promote and implement concepts of social change, ethics, personal and community enrichment, and support our goals in forming pathways to move toward cultural and environmental sustainability. This program will have a thematic focus each quarter.  In the fall, we will explore the personal, heroic, and mythic journeys we go on, individually and collectively, as we pursue our outer and inner dreams.  In the winter, we will explore different historical and cultural perspectives of the American dream, and how it relates to community, family, place, and commodities of exchange, gift-giving, and reciprocity.  In the spring, we will explore home-coming, finding our deepest purpose, community service, leader as martial artist, and pathways for creating a new earth, through mindfulness practices of gratitude and appreciation.  We will explore each of these themes through the lens of literature, writing, mythology, psychology, cultural studies, and sustainable business practices. business, economics, social change and service, communications, humanities, education, leadership. Bobbie McIntosh Rebecca Chamberlain Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Business, Finance and Statistics, Oh My!

Glenn Landram and David Shaw

business and management government 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program focuses on contemporary business issues, as well as introductions to personal finance and managerial finance. It also includes basic undergraduate statistics, which will serve as a foundation for further work in advanced social sciences in any graduate program (e.g., an MBA or MPA) requiring statistics. But fear not; this material is not only useful and practical but also learnable. The program will provide the quantitative basics for the conduct and understanding of business domestically and abroad, as well as examine the tension faced by smaller businesses caught between the forces of globalization on the one hand and a desire for greater localism on the other. There will be workshops, lectures, films, guest speakers and student led sessions. Readings such as the ; the ; ; ; and will focus on increasing student familiarity with current business topics, and developing the skills to organize and analyze business and economic data. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will also be emphasized. Students will compete in an advanced business simulation in teams. The simulation will require substantial student research, including analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Students will emerge from the simulation with improved teamwork skills, as well as a greater understanding of financial statement analysis, competitive strategy, marketing, operations, and business economics. social science, business, management, and public administration. Glenn Landram David Shaw Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Business Foundations

Allen Jenkins

business and management leadership studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening This program is an introduction to management, leadership, and the basic concepts of entrepreneurship (starting, financing, growing, and running a successful business). It provides theoretical and practical frameworks for the realities of starting and running a business in a global economy.  Topics include business structure, financial management, financing operations, growth and leadership, business practices and protocol, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's world.  The program will explore how organizations are defined, legally and financially, and advantages and disadvantages of each type.  Using seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions, and assigned tasks, we will focus on strategic planning, organizational development, forecasting, budgeting, startup funding, and financial management.  Students will build the foundations for a solid understanding of how businesses work and how to manage and lead.  These foundations are essential for developing the confidence, objectivity, and vision necessary to make effective decisions both as an individual and as a leader. In fall, the program covers basic concepts and practices of entrepreneurship small business management, and leadership.  Winter covers financial and managerial accounting, financial statement analysis, and internal control systems and the significant roles they have in making sound business decisions, and in the management of a business.  Students will learn how to use QuickBooks accounting software.   In spring, the program continues its quantitative focus covering financial statement and ratio analyses to access company performance and to find the real cost of raising money (cost of capital) in the debt equity (stock) markets. This program promotes financial intelligence and quantitative reasoning using case studies as a way to "look through" nicely ordered numbers for clues to potential problems and to interpret and convey financial data clearly, concisely, and accurately. Excel is used for assignments, so the complexities of calculation will not be an impediment to learning and will allow students to concentrate on analytical thinking. business, management, marketing, entrepreneurship Allen Jenkins Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Business in a Global Context

Theresa Aragon

business and management 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend The world as we know it has changed immeasurably over the past ten years. Our horizon has been expanded through quantum advances in communication and computer technology. We are now members of a global society and as such have an intellectual responsibility to attempt an understanding of globalization. Globalization has created both opportunities and challenges for international business and will serve as the organizing framework for our study of international business. We will inform our understanding through the perspective of politics, economics, social science, culture and history. Learning in this class will be interdependent and dynamic. It will require everyone’s best effort and full commitment. Credits will be given in globalization and international business. Theresa Aragon Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR
Business Law

Natividad Valdez

business and management law and public policy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend Su1Summer 1 The class will entail an overview of contracts, employer liability, intellectual property, antitrust, and benefits. The course will incorporate real-world business scenarios, and students will learn how to apply legal principles to those situations. Students will learn how to create a business and learn how to navigate prevalent legal issues. The class will include a guest speaker from the business community. Natividad Valdez Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Business, Personal Finance and Statistics cancelled

Glenn Landram

business and management economics mathematics 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Quantitative reasoning, including an understanding of statistics, is an important foundation for business, economics and finance. This is a demanding program focusing on contemporary business issues, personal finance and basic undergraduate statistics. The statistics will also serve as a foundation for further work in a graduate program (e.g. an MBA or MPA program) requiring statistics. It will also provide the quantitative basics for anyone interested in improving their understanding of business, economics and personal finance. The program will include student-led sessions, workshops, lectures, films and guest speakers. Readings (such as the , , , and ) will focus on increasing student familiarity with and comprehension of business and financial topics from different perspectives. We will also cover the skills necessary to develop and present quantitative information. Students will complete a research project that includes a quantitative component such as inference testing, correlation or a regression analysis. The program will culminate with the students presenting their research. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will be emphasized. social sciences, quantitative methods, business, managment, public administration, and entrepreneurship. Glenn Landram Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Calculus 2 and 3

Allen Mauney

mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 The first part of the curriculum will include approximating areas, the definite integral as a limit, anti-differentiation, the product/quotient/chain rules, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, and a wide variety of applications of the integral. The program will end with various topics including Taylor polynomials, infinite series, power series, improper integrals, vectors, and multivariable calculus. Students will write exams, do homework, work collaboratively in class and present their results to their peers. Allen Mauney Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Calculus I, II, III

Vauhn Foster-Grahler

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day This year-long sequence of courses will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  In particular we will cover applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization and of integration including area, arc length, volume and distribution functions. We will gain a deep understanding of the analytical geometry of lines, surfaces and vectors in multi-dimensional space and engage in a rigorous treatment of sequences and series.  Throughout the year, we will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ceramics: Form and Function

Aisha Harrison

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ceramics: Global Traditions, Contemporary Practice

Aisha Harrison

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In , students will study global ceramic traditions, look at artists whose work is in dialogue with tradition, and create a series of pieces drawing from traditional forms or ideas.  An intensive studio practice will incorporate traditional methods, hand-building, throwing, and surface decoration, and will also explore how these methods are affected by cultural ideas.  Students will discuss readings and complete a research paper focused on issues surrounding the use of traditional forms and ideas in contemporary art. Aisha Harrison Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Ceramics: Introduction to Sculpture

Aisha Harrison

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This is an introductory studio course in forming processes in ceramics, starting with handbuilding techniques and progressing to wheel-throwing techniques for altered cylindrical forms.  Students will learn the handbuilding techniques of pinching, coil-building, slab-building, extruding, and an introduction to basic wheel-throwing.  Students will be introduced to the use of slips and low-fire glazes.  Emphasis will be on learning construction techniques, integrating the principles of three-dimensional design, and developing students’ individual sculptural concepts. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ceramics: Sculpting the Human Form

Aisha Harrison

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening In this class students will sharpen their observation skills by rendering the human form using a live model. Topics discussed will include the ethics of using the human form in art, determining if a figure is needed in a work, and the implications of using a partial or whole body. Skills covered include construction of armatures, sculpting around an armature with solid clay, hollowing and reconstruction, and techniques for sculpting problematic areas like heads, hands, and feet. A variety of surface options will also be covered including fired and room temperature glaze. Aisha Harrison Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Chemistry for Everyone

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate general chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background.  Learning experiences will focus on inorganic molecules, acids and bases, and energy.  Each learning experience will consist of a mix of lectures, workshops, presentations, labs, and discussions.  All students will be given the opportunity to make physical measurements, handle chemicals and glassware, perform chemical reactions, and learn how to put a calculator to use.  Peter Pessiki Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Chemistry of the Body

Rebecca Sunderman

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 Your body is a chemical factory.  In this program we will explore several of these chemical systems including biochemical families, vitamin uptake and storage, blood chemistry, and immunochemistry.  No previous science courses are required, but do come ready to explore the amazing world of chemistry within the human body.  This program also serves as a great review for MCAT preparation. health-related fields, teaching, chemistry, nutrition Rebecca Sunderman Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Children's Literature

Jon Davies

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 To understand children’s literature, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address literary and informational texts for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature in a variety of genres, and non-fiction texts across a range of subjects. Jon Davies Tue Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Citizen Science: Ecoliteracy

Frederica Bowcutt, Gaku Mitsumata and Jeff Antonelis-Lapp

botany ecology environmental studies field studies natural history outdoor leadership and education writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day As a learning community our central question will be: how can ordinary citizens assist in the important work of shifting society to more sustainable relations with the natural world? We will begin by examining what it means to be ecoliterate.In the fall we will focus on the natural history of the Puget Sound region and contrast that to eastern Washington’s high desert. In October the learning community will visit the sagebrush steppe of Sun Lakes State Park to gain field experience in linking plant and animal distribution patterns with environmental conditions. Through this work, students will learn how to read topographic and geologic maps, and basic mapmaking skills. Students will gain experience in conducting biodiversity assessments in the park and on campus, including vascular plants, birds, mammals and insects. The learning community will explore how ecoliterate citizens can serve as citizen scientists, for example, by helping to monitor plant and animal responses to climate change. To support their work in the field and lab, students will learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal. In the winter we will examine the relationship between people and gardens through the disciplines of garden history, children’s literature, and environmental and place-based education. Special attention will be given to urban horticulture that fosters socially just communities and an ecoliterate citizenry. Students will learn how to link scientific knowledge about soils, plants and animals with the pragmatic realities of installing and maintaining educational gardens in public settings. Lectures and labs in soil science, botany, ecology and environmental/place-based education will support this learning. Students will learn to develop K-12 curriculum for the teaching gardens on campus, and pursue opportunities to lead activities in them and the surrounding woods with local school groups. During both quarters, a significant amount of time will be dedicated to honing our ability to write an expository paper. Credit may be awarded in natural history, environmental education, expository writing, children’s literature, horticulture, garden history and botany (with a lab). This program is appropriate not only for students with interest in the natural sciences, but also for students who would not normally select academic programs in the sciences. K-12 teaching, environmental education, horticulture, natural history and ecology. Frederica Bowcutt Gaku Mitsumata Jeff Antonelis-Lapp Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Civic Intelligence and Collective Action

Douglas Schuler and John Baldridge

community studies sociology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 8, 12 Evening and Weekend We are increasingly confronted with problems that cannot be solved by individuals acting alone—from world financial crises to global warming, from peak oil to toxins in neighborhoods.  At the same time a host of cultural, political, material, and social barriers often stand in the way of working together.  How can we act collectively to address these massive challenges?  How can we develop and use the social capital we have to preserve and protect "the commons" and our shared future?  How can we develop and nurture the "civic intelligence" that will help ensure our collective actions produce the best outcomes? In this two-quarter program, we will consider and critique cases of collective action as diverse as the ongoing wave of factory takeovers in Argentina, the Spanish/Basque worker cooperative movement, the use of GIS and GPS technologies during the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and the movement to "Occupy Wall Street."  We will examine ongoing socio-environmental projects, problems, and current proposals for solutions—from the question of why an obese population still buys “French fries” to the demands for a greater public voice in shaping our economic systems, from the reintroduction of wolves in the American west to the massive proposed “geoengineering” of the earth itself (e.g. the dumping of millions of tons of iron into the ocean to recapture carbon dioxide). Through both quarters, we will use case studies to explore the nexus of the "natural" and the "human" and challenge the notion that these are separate concepts. We will gain a greater understanding of how environment and society interact.  We will investigate ways to analyze, address, and act to change both society and environment.  This approach to knowledge and action will require a re-examination of all-too-often oversimplified notions of "the commons," social capital, organized protest, and political discourse.  Both winter and spring quarters will include theoretical readings and workshops.  Spring quarter will also involve student projects with the goal of effecting real-world change. Students registering for 12 credits will work towards establishing and maintaining a Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory that supports ongoing community projects.  There will be opportunities for students to serve in various roles on different projects.  There will also be a student-led "think tank" group that produces white papers, case studies, and other resources for the projects. Douglas Schuler John Baldridge Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Civic Intelligence Research and Action Laboratory cancelled

Douglas Schuler and John Baldridge

communications community studies geography media studies sociology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend The Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory (CIRAL) program, launching in fall 2011, will integrate theory and practice in an ongoing way.  We will undertake to better understand civic intelligence while exploring ways that we can collaboratively cultivate civic intelligence.  Devoted to the theory and practice of civic intelligence, the program will evolve into a type of real-world "lab" with student leadership roles that would normally be reserved for graduate students.  A significant part of the program will ultimately be devoted to working with people and organizations that are local (including those in Thurston county but also at Evergreen itself) as well as those outside of the region or even the country.  The program will be offered every quarter for at least two years, but ideally will continue to be offered for several years.  Students can elect to take the program multiple times.  This is intended to be a long-term enterprise that promotes long-term collaboration between Evergreen students and communities around the world.  Our plan is to develop structures that aren't beholden to the academic schedule.  We plan to use this perspective to guide our own work.  For example, we try to avoid setting goals in advance (for launching projects, etc.) that align themselves specifically to academic quarter boundaries. Part of our work fall quarter will be looking at what students developed in spring 2011, including the first draft of a freely-available, Open Text Book on civic intelligence.  We will explore the meaning of civic intelligence, review examples and counter-examples of civic intelligence in order to inform our preliminary planning.  We will read texts from a variety of disciplines including sociology, geography, political science, media studies, and cognitive science, among others.  Students will be alert to examples of civic intelligence and will make this information more widely available.  In winter quarter, we will continue the exploration of what types of projects we should pursue and how to do so.  This probably means that we will begin communicating with some organizations.  Students will work in teams to formulate proposals for civic intelligence projects.  In spring quarter, we hope to actually establish working arrangements with projects, and John Baldridge will join as an additional faculty member. John will integrate diverse approaches and perspectives from geography and other social sciences into the program, including mapping, social science methodologies, place-based institutional analysis, and game theory/design.    Douglas Schuler John Baldridge Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Classics of World Cinema

Greg Mullins

media studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su2Summer 2 From the silent films of the 1920s to the French New Wave, in this course you will study classics of world cinema. We will watch films by directors such as Wiene, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, De Sica, Godard, and Kurosawa. We will focus on styles, movements, influences, and historical contexts. Please visit for more information. Greg Mullins Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Communication and Power in Education

Lester Krupp and Lori Blewett

communications education 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend This program will explore the role of power and authority in learning both inside and outside the classroom. We will look closely at the enactment of authority with particular attention to how communication and conflict patterns affect the experiences of children, teachers, parents, and administrators. How do individual persona and institutionalized identity intersect with systems of discipline and authority? How do communication practices shape power dynamics and influence learning? How can educators create collaborative learning environments in competitive contexts? How are classroom interactions linked to social relationships and expectations of society as a whole?Drawing upon published sources, students’ past educational experiences, and an examination of ongoing interactions and systemic challenges, students will investigate classroom practices that deepen interpersonal connections, define authority in developmentally healthy ways, and contribute to the formation of community.For a portion of the program, students will choose between three curricular options. One option will allow students to earn credits that may meet requirements for certain Washington State teaching endorsements. Students who choose this option will earn credits in one of the following areas: children’s literature, adolescent literature, multicultural literature, language skills/structure, civics, or Pacific Northwest History. (Please note that only those subjects with a minimum level of student interest will be offered.) As an alternative option, students can participate in a supervised group research project related to core themes of the program. The third option will be a field placement working in a local school.  Each option will constitute a four-credit portion of the work for the program.This program will serve the needs of any student who is preparing for a career in education, as well as any student interested in thinking about communication and power in relation to learning. Lester Krupp Lori Blewett Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Communication and Social Change in American History

Lori Blewett and Trevor Griffey

communications history media studies political economy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Persuasive efforts have shaped American history. The past is full of moments when individual women and men have been persuaded by others to act for a common cause, sometimes at great personal sacrifice. In this program, the ideological mechanism of persuasion, in both public and private discourse, will be the primary lens through which we analyze American history. What persuasive strategies were employed by historic social change advocates? Why were some strategies more successful than others? To help answer these questions, we will read texts that draw upon communication studies, American history, cultural studies, political economy, and social change theory. Students will also conduct their own investigations using a variety of analytical tools to examine primary historical documents including speeches, letters, news articles, advertisements, and other artifacts of persuasion. In order to foster students' capacity to engage in public debate and enhance their rhetorical skills, we will experiment with communicating in a variety of public media. In addition to writing traditional papers, students will report on their research in the form of group radio and television programs, oral presentations, and electronic news articles. Training in essential skills associated with these forms of communication will be spread throughout both quarters. In the winter, students will have the opportunity to conduct oral history interviews with contemporary social activists. Since rhetoric alone is rarely the impetus for social change, we will ground our investigations in the material history of competing social, economic, and political forces. We will study a wide range of social change efforts from across the political spectrum in order to better understand the evolution of U.S. history and its influence on current ideological conflicts and relations of power. We will give special attention to the role of the media in shaping public debate: from social movement broadsheets such as William Lloyd Garrison's to the work of muckraking journalists like Ida Tarbell, up through the present influence of corporate media and do-it-yourself blogs. Because of the media's ability to amplify, minimize, redirect, and even spark social activism, and because of the media's essential role in democratic decision-making, media history and political economy will be key elements in our investigations. communication, history, politics, rhetoric, social movement studies, journalism, and social advocacy. Lori Blewett Trevor Griffey Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Community Connections: Living and Learning at Evergreen (A)

Elizabeth Williamson and Jeff Antonelis-Lapp

  Course FR ONLYFreshmen Only 2 02 Day This two-credit course is meant to be taken . It is designed for students who want extra academic support during the fall quarter but will not interfere with your ability to enroll in other courses or programs. Class meetings will take place during all-campus governance time on Wednesday afternoons. One of the most important things Evergreen can teach you is how to take responsibility for your own education. Community Connections is designed to facilitate the transition to college, and to Evergreen in particular, by helping first year students identify pathways for self-directed learning. This set of goals will be framed by the idea that every Evergreen student participates in multiple circles of community, both at the College and in the broader Olympia area, and that these circles of community are what sustain adventurous educational endeavors.  Each student will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with a peer mentor on a regular basis; these sessions, along with weekly group meetings, will help students begin to address their particular learning needs. Students will also be invited to participate in community-based learning activities. The primary focus, however, will be on identifying the student’s individual strengths and interests. This work will culminate in a detailed reflection essay outlining the student’s academic aspirations. For some students, this will mean finding out what it might look like to pursue a targeted career path at a non-traditional college; for others, it will mean articulating a broad set of principles and values. All students must complete this essay in order to earn full credit in the course. self-directed learning. Elizabeth Williamson Jeff Antonelis-Lapp Wed Freshmen FR
Community Connections: Living and Learning at Evergreen (B)

Elizabeth Williamson and Jeff Antonelis-Lapp

  Course FR ONLYFreshmen Only 2 02 Day This two-credit course is meant to be taken . It is designed for students who want extra academic support during the fall quarter but will not interfere with your ability to enroll in other courses or programs. Class meetings will take place during all-campus governance time on Wednesday afternoons. One of the most important things Evergreen can teach you is how to take responsibility for your own education. Community Connections is designed to facilitate the transition to college, and to Evergreen in particular, by helping first year students identify pathways for self-directed learning. This set of goals will be framed by the idea that every Evergreen student participates in multiple circles of community, both at the College and in the broader Olympia area, and that these circles of community are what sustain adventurous educational endeavors.  Each student will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with a peer mentor on a regular basis; these sessions, along with weekly group meetings, will help students begin to address their particular learning needs. Students will also be invited to participate in community-based learning activities. The primary focus, however, will be on identifying the student’s individual strengths and interests. This work will culminate in a detailed reflection essay outlining the student’s academic aspirations. For some students, this will mean finding out what it might look like to pursue a targeted career path at a non-traditional college; for others, it will mean articulating a broad set of principles and values. All students must complete this essay in order to earn full credit in the course. self-directed learning. Elizabeth Williamson Jeff Antonelis-Lapp Wed Freshmen FR
Community-Based Journalism cancelled

Suzanne Simons

American studies communications community studies history writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6 4, 6 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In this hands-on writing-intensive journalism course, students will learn and practice doing community-based journalism. Specifically, we will learn and practice the fundamentals of journalism, particularly newsgathering, reporting, writing, and editing. Activities may include guest journalists, shadowing a local journalist or communications professional, and a reporting practicum on local government, events, organizations, or neighborhoods. We will also explore communication theory and the history and development of community-based journalism, particularly among communities whose voices have not traditionally been heard. Students registering for 6 credits will also do a journalism-focused internship of 40 hours during the quarter and spend at least one hour a week on internship-related assignments in conjunction with continuing journalism course work. Suzanne Simons Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Computer Science Foundations

Neal Nelson, Sheryl Shulman and Richard Weiss

computer science mathematics 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The goal of this program is for students to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in the context of the liberal arts and compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium (LACS). In all quarters the program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to operating systems. The theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem solving skills needed for computer scientists. A theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology. computer science, education and mathematics. Neal Nelson Sheryl Shulman Richard Weiss Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Computers and Cognition

Ab Van Etten

computer science consciousness studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence. Ab Van Etten Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Consciousness: Pathways to the Self

Donald Middendorf and Terry Setter

consciousness studies philosophy of science psychology 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day What is the relationship between our understanding of consciousness and our self understanding? This year-long, interdisciplinary program will provide an opportunity for students who are interested in doing intensive work in the nature of consciousness to cultivate self awareness through challenging readings, creative work in expressive arts, and self-reflection. We will examine our beliefs about the nature of reality as manifest in the expressive arts and physical reality from a variety of disciplinary viewpoints, including physics, music, psychology and philosophy. Prospective students should have a strong interest in the experiential study of the relationships between reality and consciousness as well as college-level skills in reading, writing and pursuing research topics. Effort and self-motivation will be essential for succeeding in this program.We will take an approach that welcomes the complexity of the many different views of consciousness that have been proposed by researchers, philosophers and spiritual leaders. We will use texts that cover many contemporary scientific models of consciousness and examine alternative areas of research, such as lucid dreaming and paranormal phenomena. Students will keep a structured journal of activities and practices that explores their developing understandings of the nature of consciousness. During winter and spring quarters, academic work and contemplative discipline will be integrated into our study as tools to help us understand our selves and the nature of consciousness through an in-depth study of dreams - including keeping a dream journal and a journal of experiences during contemplative practices. In spring, students will have the opportunity to pursue their interests in more individualized activities for a portion of their credits.This is an experiential and rigorous full-time program in which students will be expected to participate in all program activities, and to document 48 hours of work per week that are invested in program related activities. Students are strongly encouraged to commit to the year-long community learning process, to not work more than 15 hours per week outside of the program, and to take no more than 16 credits per quarter. Students are expected to take exams and to buy and bring the appropriate seminar books to each class. consciousness studies, philosophy of modern physics, and psychology. Donald Middendorf Terry Setter Tue Wed Thu Junior JR Senior SR
Content Area ELL Methods and Assessment

Maribel Vilchez

education 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening Participants will be introduced to teaching and assessment strategies to assist English Language Learners (ELLs) in the development of academic language and content area knowledge relevant to the Washington endorsement and Teachers of English Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) standards.  Through curriculum design, teaching demonstrations, and the use of technology, participants will practice teaching strategies relevant to specific content areas across target grade levels. Maribel Vilchez Wed Junior JR Senior SR
Coral Reef Biology cancelled

Seabird McKeon

biology marine science 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su2Summer 2 This program introduces principles of coral reef biology through in-depth field study of the coral reefs of Ofu, American Samoa. We will study the environment, taxonomy, adaptations, and ecology of reef organisms. The course will take place as a three-week stay on the island of Ofu, American Samoa, part of the U.S. American Samoa National Park.  Students must be comfortable in the water, with tropical heat, humidity, and biting insects, as much of each day will be spent snorkeling in the shallow pools of the park.  We will be staying at the .For more information and to apply to join the program, please contact the instructor: McKeonS(at)si.edu. Seabird McKeon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Core Ballet

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Su1Summer 1 This class is for people new to ballet and movement for adept dancers.  We will strengthen and explore the core body muscular system with a one hour floor barre followed by a standing barre and center work.  This class is excellent for those with injuries and low back issues as the exercises are very theraputic in nature.  Great for people who want greater flexibilty, core strength and balance.  Ballet slippers are required; dress prepared to move. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Cornerstone Seminar

Hirsh Diamant

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening For beginning, continuing, and returning students, this class will reawaken the joy, adventure, and wonder of learning. Students will learn about human development, identify their educational goals, and create an academic plan of study. Students will explore the five foci of the Evergreen curriculum: personal engagement in learning, interdisciplinary study, collaboration with faculty and peers, bridging theory and practice, and learning across significant differences. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Cornerstone Seminar

Hirsh Diamant

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening For beginning, continuing, and returning students, this class will reawaken the joy, adventure, and wonder of learning. Students will learn about human development, identify their educational goals, and create an academic plan of study. Students will explore the five foci of the Evergreen curriculum: personal engagement in learning, interdisciplinary study, collaboration with faculty and peers, bridging theory and practice, and learning across significant differences. In winter quarter, students will participate in a 3-day Tai Ji workshop. Tai Ji is an ancient health, movement, meditation system of centering. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Creating Community and Health Through Gardens

Marja Eloheimo

botany community studies health sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 In this 8-credit summer program, we will explore ways in which various types of gardens can contribute to community and health. Each week, as we visit a medicinal, edible, community, or ethnobotanical garden or urban farm, we will interview gardeners, consider themes related to sustainability, identify plants, learn herbal and horticultural techniques, and develop nature drawing and journaling skills. We will have the opportunity to expand upon these topics through reading, lecture/discussions, and workshops as well as through independent community, garden, and herbal projects and research. This program is suitable for students interested in environmental education, community development, health studies, plant studies, sustainability, ethnobotany, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Creating Dance

Robert Esposito

aesthetics dance 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The central focus of this program is modern dance as a medium to explore the creative process. Students learn methods of conceiving and shaping original choreography. Studio workshops explore sensory, emotive, cognitive, and movement experience as motivations for kinetic design. The syllabus includes daily technique class, improvisation, weekly solo and group composition assignments, rehearsals and, text and media seminars. This program involves rigorous physical practice, intellectual engagement, reading, writing, and oral seminar. The syllabus integrates modern dance and several epistemological fields, including human development, somatic therapy, sociology, art history, and poetry.Progressively designed classes in the Nikolais/Louis technique support an active exploration of the theories of choreography. Each weekly premise builds upon preceding lessons. Full participation and consistent attendance is essential. Rigorous practice and kinesiological analysis become the theoretical ground for creative articulations of performance space, time, shape, and motion. In composition classes, students are encouraged to find and develop their own central movement patterns while exploring new creative pathways. Seminars are supported by multimedia work, including movement, drawing, poetry, and music. In seminar we engage each other in multifaceted analysis, situating texts, objects, and performance works in their historical and sociocultural contexts. The syllabus includes units on injury prevention, diet, conditioning, and somatic therapy. Robert Esposito Mon Mon Tue Tue Wed Wed Thu Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Creative Writing: Act and Artifact of American Voice

Anne de Marcken (Forbes) and Jennifer Calkins

American studies cultural studies literature writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Participants in this quarter-long creative writing and literary studies program will study and practice writing across genres and movements. We will use a variety of critical frameworks to analyze, interpret, and create a diverse selection of American literature, interrogating the boundaries of nation, identity and genre. Program participants will learn about and practice the elements of narrative and lyrical discourse, developing a portfolio of short fiction, poetry, and hybrid forms. There will be an emphasis on the relationship between critical and creative thought and practice, as well as on development of a sustaining, independent creative writing practice.The program will have five major components: presentation, workshop, peer critique, seminar, and practice. Students, faculty and guest writers will gather for presentations and lectures on creative and critical texts and on ideas related to our area of inquiry. In hands-on workshops, students will develop creative and critical skills. Working in small groups, students will develop critical skills in support of one another's creative objectives. Students will gather in seminar to discuss critical and creative texts at depth in light of overarching program concerns. And finally, each student will define, develop, and maintain an independent creative writing practice to support his or her program goals. Possible texts include: Maggie Nelson's  Elaine Scarry's Alice LaPlante’s , as well as works by American writers ranging from Emily Dickinson to Claudia Rankine, from Jean Toomer to Yi Yun Li. Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Jennifer Calkins Mon Mon Tue Tue Tue Thu Thu Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Crime & Punishment (Online)

Jose Gomez

law and government policy law and public policy political science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day, Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This program will take a critical look at controversial issues in the criminal justice system, including police misconduct and interrogation, mandatory minimum sentencing, decriminalization of medical marijuana and prostitution, needle exchange programs, the insanity defense, children tried as adults, privatization of prisons, and physician-assisted suicide.  It will be taught via the Internet through a virtual learning environment (Moodle), a chat room for live webinars, and e-mail. A one-time face-to-face orientation will take place 7:00 to 9:30 pm on Monday, June 25. Contact instructor for alternate arrangements for the orientation. Jose Gomez Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Critical Ethnography: Eyes in a Complex World

Rita Pougiales

American studies anthropology community studies cultural studies field studies writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 Anthropologists are interested in uncovering the complexity and meaning of our modern lives. They do so through ethnographic research, gathering data as both "participants" and "observers" of those they are studying. Doing ethnographic research is simultaneously analytical and deeply embodied. This program includes an examination of and application of ethnographic research methods and methodologies, a study of varied theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists today to interpret and find meaning in data, and an opportunity to conduct an ethnographic project of interest. Students will read and explore a range of ethnographic studies that demonstrate what an anthropologist, what Ruth Behar calls a "vulnerable observer," can uncover about the lives of people today. Rita Pougiales Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Critical Reasoning

Stephen Beck

philosophy writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening In this intensive writing course, students will learn how to critically evaluate persuasive writing as well as how to write well-reasoned, persuasive writing of their own. Students will study both formal and informal reasoning, apply what they learn to selections of writing drawn from popular and academic sources, critique the arguments in those sources, read and critique each other's writing, and develop their own abilities to give good reasons in writing for their own views. Credit will be awarded in critical reasoning. Stephen Beck Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
CSI: Redefining Crime

Anthony Zaragoza

economics government law and government policy law and public policy political science 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 In , we will examine together how crime is defined, who defines it, who is labeled a criminal, and who receives what punishment. We'll discuss meanings of "justice," social justice, and criminal justice. We will address questions about how justice is carried out and how it could be served. We will ask questions like: Why is there a disparity in investigation and incarceration between white-collar and blue-collar criminals? Is economic inequality a crime against democracy? Are environmental catastrophes crimes? Who are the criminals? We will research specific cases. And finally, we will explore the tools needed to indict such "criminals." Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutor's Craft

Sandra Yannone

education writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course. Sandra Yannone Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Dance and Culture: Rituals of a Changing World

Robert Esposito

aesthetics art history cultural studies dance 

Signature Required: Spring 

  SOS FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening This is a full-time, one-quarter program for students ready for intermediate to advanced work in the theory and practice of dance. Student cohorts investigate a variety of dance and theatre forms around themes of cultural empowerment, freedom, belonging, and wellness. Students research the practice, history, and sociocultural forms and functions of their chosen genre, including (but not limited to) modern dance, world dance, ballet, dance theatre, Middle Eastern, Butoh, etc., and create contemporary dance theatre rituals to be shared on a regular basis in studio forums. The content of scholarly research, scores, papers, readings, critiques, and seminars is determined in collaboration between faculty and students. Students design the syllabus for their research topics and choreographic projects in an open, but structured, learning community. Activities include classes in technique, improvisation, composition, learning new and extant modern choreography, field trips, lectures, and multimedia presentations.Expect to work on program assignments 20-30 hours per week outside of scheduled class meetings. Robert Esposito Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Dangerous Ladies: A History of Significant Women of Color in the 20th Century

Barbara Laners

cultural studies gender and women's studies history sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This class will examine the role of women of color in the development of America's social, economic, legal, and political history. It will focus on issues ranging from suffrage to the civil rights movement and beyond; all aspects of the gender/racial gap in those spheres will be explored. history, law, teaching, sociology, political science, social services Barbara Laners Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Dangerous Work

Sarah Ryan and Nancy Anderson

community studies environmental studies health history law and government policy 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12, 16 8, 12, 16 Evening and Weekend How have workers, employers, and policy makers dealt with dangerous work, historically and in the present?  Why do we have laws and institutions designed to control hazardous and dangerous work and compensate workers who are injured, or their families when they're killed?  This program will look at the history of occupational safety and health efforts in the U.S., focusing on the careers of two pathbreaking individuals: public heath doctor Alice Hamilton and labor leader Tony Mazzocchi.  We will review the development of laws regulating occupational health and safety and study landmark cases and events that promoted legal protections for working people.  We'll look into the systematic disparities and inequalities in exposure to dangerous work.  We will consider the Washington State context, including the most common workplace-related health and safety concerns in our state.  Students will learn basic techniques of data interpretation related to studies of occupational health and safety. Students registered for 12 credits will participate in the weekly symposium "The Occupy Movement: Uprisings at Home and Abroad".  Topics and readings will address the national and regional Occupy movements; popular economics, the global debt crisis and neoliberalism; ecological sustainability; public and social health; communities of color and migrant labor; global solidarity from Egypt to Venezuela; the security state; cooperatives and food sovereignty; art and the Occupy movement.  Students will complete some short related assignments.Students registered for 16 credits will devote at least 20 hours per week to an internship in the field of occupational safety and health. public health, health-related fields, history, labor relations, management, environmental studies Sarah Ryan Nancy Anderson Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Dead People and their Things: Introduction to Archaeology

Ulrike Krotscheck

anthropology history 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 This course examines the material culture remains of past civilizations, including architecture, art, mortuary remains, and written sources. Our investigation will take us to every corner of the globe and to many different periods in history, from the Mediterranean to Easter Island, and from the Neolithic Middle East to Colonial America. Primarily, we explore how the remains that archaeologists find give clues to help unlock the secrets of ancient societies. In addition, we will learn about the history of archaeological investigation and discuss archaeological methods and fieldwork techniques. This program has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of archaeology. It will be of interest to any student wishing to learn more about the ancient world, history, and/or who is interested in archaeological fieldwork. As part of this course, we will visit a local archaeological lab and excavation. Ulrike Krotscheck Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Defending Mother Earth: Science, Energy and Native Peoples

Frances V. Rains and Rebecca Sunderman

Native American studies chemistry physics writing 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day This program brings together a variety of climate and energy issues occurring on Native American homelands. Students will explore the science and ethics of energy production and consumption, the environmental impacts of energy, and topics in alternative energy. For example, we will investigate the impacts of hydro-power on Native communities and cultures, while learning the science associated with this energy source. Students will also examine contemporary Native American struggles to resist cultural and environmental devastation to their communities, and their efforts to affirm tribal sovereignty and Indigenous knowledge. A solid understanding of these issues requires background in both the science of energy and knowledge of Native American Tribal sovereignty. We will approach our learning through a variety of modes, including hands-on labs, lectures, workshops, field trips, group work, research papers, and weekly seminars on a variety of related topics. chemistry, physics, Native American studies, environmentally-related fields and science education. Frances V. Rains Rebecca Sunderman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
Democracy and Free Speech

Jose Gomez

law and government policy law and public policy political science 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day May racists burn crosses to express their supremacist views? May protesters burn flags to express their opposition to government policy? The First Amendment is most vulnerable to erosion when we fail to protect expression that some or many find unpopular, offensive, repugnant, indecent, subversive, unpatriotic, heretical, blasphemous, etc. This program will be a comprehensive and critical examination of the wide range of issues implicated by the protection and censorship of expression.We will use the case method to study every major free speech opinion issued by the courts. This intensive study necessarily focuses on the last 90 years, since it was not until well into the 20th century that the United States Supreme Court began to protect speech from governmental suppression. Our study of controversies will include the new challenges presented by hate speech, government-subsidized art, political campaign spending, and new technologies such as the Internet. Students will be expected to examine critically the formalist free speech paradigms that have evolved and to question the continuing viability of the "free marketplace of ideas" metaphor.Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real free speech cases decided recently by the U.S. Court of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions. Reading for the course will include court opinions, Internet resources, and various books and journal articles on our subject. Study will be rigorous; the principal text will be a law school casebook. social sciences, constitutional law, education, journalism, public policy, political theory, history and political science. Jose Gomez Junior JR Senior SR
Developing Management Skills

Cynthia Kennedy

business and management 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This weekend-intensive program is designed for students who either are, or plan to be, in the position of managing their own work groups, heading up large companies, starting businesses that change society, managing the world's most important non-profits, or serving in government. The program will introduce basic language, concepts, tools, and problem-framing methodologies that are needed to develop management skills. The first half of the program focuses on motivating others, team-building, developing self-awareness, and communicating supportively. The second half of the program focuses on leadership, decision-making, understanding power and influence, and solving problems creatively. Students may attend either the first half, the second half, or both. Cynthia Kennedy Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
The Developing Mind

Richard McKinnon

linguistics psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Humans are born with a wealth of information about how the world is structured, ready to develop that knowledge through experience with the environment.  In this course, we'll investigate what babies know from birth and how that knowledge unfolds into mature systems such as vision, language, morality, and character.  We will compare theories that emphasize the contribution of innate knowledge with those that emphasize the role of the environment. Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Developmental Movement Therapy and The Emotional Body

Jehrin Alexandria

education health psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 This class is an in-depth study of movement and its role in the reorganization of the human brain as well as a look at contemporary works in the field of energy psychology.  We will explore the emotional issues that can occur when such organization is not complete and various techniques to address them including The Work of Byron Katie and EFT.  Students will learn to recognize normal neurological organization by studying specific developmental milestones as well as recognize gaps and abnormalities in brain development and how they impact growth, learning, and psychological well-being.  This class will be deeply experiential as well as theoretical.  Please wear comfortable clothing as there is basic movement in some classes. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Mon Tue Tue Wed Thu Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Digital Audio and Music Composition

Arun Chandra

aesthetics computer science media arts music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming  language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, AM, granular, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a  short paper on synthesis techniques.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system. The overall emphasis of the class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, along with readings in synthesis techniques and programming.  Students of all levels of experience are welcome. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Discovering the Unknown Russia

Elena Smith

cultural studies history literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 This is a fascinating course that attempts to inspire a better understanding of today's Russia and the people of Russia through a study of their history, art, and culture.  Everyone who has an interest in exploring Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks is welcome.  The students will be introduced to certain dramatic events of Russian history through film, literature, and personal experiences of the Russian people. Besides the traditional academic activities, the students will have hands-on experience of Russian cuisine, song, and dance.  Armed with an open mind and lead by a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive and learn to appreciate the similarities of American and Russian cultures. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Discrete Math

Brian Walter

mathematics 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 In this course, we'll study standard topics in discrete mathematics including logic and proof; sets, relations, and functions; combinatorics; basic probability; and graph theory.  Along the way, we'll focus on skills and techniques for problem-solving.  This is an excellent course for teachers and future teachers, people wanting to broaden their mathematical experience beyond algebra, and students considering advanced study in mathematics and/or computer science.  Brian Walter Mon Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Disturbance Ecology

Peter Impara

ecology environmental studies geography natural history 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day Most people think of a disturbance as disturbing--upsetting the natural balance, throwing into disorder, or interfering--yet disturbances are a common, regular characteristic of many eco systems. Disturbance is an important ecological process affecting ecosystems at multiple spatial and temporal scales. As disturbance plays such an important role in such processes as vegetation community patterns, successional trajectories, and other ecological patterns, understanding disturbance and its ecological influences is vital to developing a basic understanding of significant controls of ecosystem function and composition. In this program we will investigate the role of disturbance as it relates to existing, and historic, ecological conditions. We will examine how the principles of pattern – process interactions and scale are applied to the study and understanding of disturbance processes. We will also relate disturbance to historic and contemporary human resource and land use issues to study the interactions between humans and disturbance over time.Important questions for the study of disturbance include: what is the disturbance regime for a given disturbance? At what spatial and temporal scales do disturbances operate? How do disturbances affect ecological patterns and processes ? How do humans respond to, and try to control, disturbances? To address these questions we will explore disturbance by using field, class and lab approaches. We will visit several disturbance sites as well as learn methods to map and analyze disturbance patterns and the variables related to those processes. Lecture and seminars will address recent research and approaches to characterizing and studying disturbance. Students will be expected to carry out a project investigating a disturbance process and its influence on the local ecology as well as human responses to that disturbance type. Students interested in upper division science credit should be aware that upper division science credit will be awarded only for upper division work. Peter Impara Junior JR Senior SR
Do It For Free: Why and and How We Volunteer cancelled

Marla Elliott

American studies community studies cultural studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 The work you don’t get paid for can be the most rewarding. What does it mean to volunteer, and how do volunteers function in society? How do communities support and benefit from volunteers? Students in this class will study theories and history of volunteerism, work as volunteers, and synthesize theory and practice in a final paper that combines research and reflection.Learning activities will include seminar, essay writing, journal writing, guest speakers, and workshops.  Each student will find a volunteer job of their choice, complete 12 to 20 hours of unpaid work, and keep detailed qualitative and quantitative records of their volunteer experience.  This class will hold several joint class meetings with taught by Suzanne Simons.  Students enrolled in both classes will have an especially rich learning experience as well as completing about 60 hours of community-based internships or volunteer work. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Drawing a Life

Marilyn Frasca

visual arts writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 Marilyn Frasca Tue Wed Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Drawing Marathon

Shaw Osha (Flores)

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 This intensive drawing program runs for two weeks.  Open to all levels, this immersive drawing class will address the importance of drawing as the basis of understanding one's experience in the world and as a language integral to all visual art. Primarily, we will study the figure as a structure in space and mark making as a process of investigation. There will be some reading and writing as well as critiques. The Drawing Marathon will push artists to a new level of working. Shaw Osha (Flores) Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Drawing on Earth: Explorations in the Aesthetics and Dynamics of the Earth

Lucia Harrison and Abir Biswas

aesthetics art history ecology environmental studies field studies geography geology natural history visual arts writing 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day This program offers an introductory study of the Earth, through geology and art. What makes the earth a habitable planet?  What forces have shaped the geology of the Pacific Northwest?  These questions have fascinated people for centuries.  Both scientists and artists rely heavily on skills of observation and description to understand the world, and to convey that understanding to others. Geologists use images, diagrams and figures to illustrate concepts and communicate research. Artists take scientific information to inform their work, and seek to communicate the implications of what science tells us about the world. They also draw on scientific concepts as metaphors for autobiographical artworks. In the fall, we will use science and art to study basic concepts in earth science such as geologic time, plate tectonics, earth materials and how they are formed, the hydrological cycle and stream ecology. Case studies in the Cascade Mountain Range and Nisqually Watershed will provide hands-on experience.  In the winter, we further this study to include soil formation, nutrient cycling, ocean basin sand currents, and climate change. Field studies will include a trip to the Olympic Peninsula where we will observe coastal processes. Geologic time and evidence of the Earth's dynamic past are recorded in rocks on the landscape. Students will learn basic techniques in observational drawing and watercolor painting.  They will learn the discipline of keeping illustrated field journals to inform their studies of geological processes.  They will also develop finished artworks ranging from scientific illustration to personal expression. geology, environmental studies, education and visual arts. Lucia Harrison Abir Biswas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
Drawing Practices: Contemporary Applications

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Designed for intermediate to advanced drawing students, this course will focus on contemporary applications of traditional drawing practices.  Building upon observational drawing skills, students will work with invented compositions and alternative materials, investigating mark making, collage methods, and color theory.  Class time will be devoted to presentations, critiques, demonstrations, and in-class exercises.  Students will be expected to work outside of designated class time to complete their work. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Drawing Practices: Figurative Studies

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course focuses on the traditional life-drawing practices of observing and drawing the human figure from live models.  Students will use a variety of media ranging from graphite to pastels as they learn to correctly anatomically render the human form.  Homework assignments will supplement in-class instruction and visual presentations.  Several readings will also be given throughout the quarter.  While previous drawing experience is not required, it is recommended. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Drawing Practices: Foundations

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing.  Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume, and composition.  Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand-drawn imagery.  Students will work toward the development of an informed, personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists.  Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time.  Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work.  A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Drawn from Life: Art for the Uninitiated

Bob Haft

art history visual arts 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day This is an entry-level arts program for freshmen who are interested in exploring what it means to make art and to be an artist. It is designed for those to whom art is entirely foreign--but who are, nonetheless, interested in learning what it's all about--as well as for those who have already taken art courses and feel a strong affinity for it. The program will have three components: studio art, art history and literature. The studio component of the program will cover basic drawing skills, both of still lives and the human figure. Art history will consist of an introduction to Western art, and will have connections with the literature that we read. Our books may include by Kurt Vonnegut, by Chaim Potok, by Wassily Kandinsky, by John Berger, by Margaret Atwood, and by Robert Irwin. visual arts and the humanities. Bob Haft Tue Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR
Earth Science and Art cancelled

Abir Biswas and Lucia Harrison

aesthetics art history ecology education environmental studies field studies geography geology visual arts writing 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day This program offers an introductory study of the Earth, through geology and art. What makes the earth a habitable planet?  What forces have shaped the geology of the Pacific Northwest?  These questions have fascinated people for centuries. Both scientists and artists rely heavily on skills of observation and description to understand the world, and to convey that understanding to others. Geologists use images, diagrams and figures to illustrate concepts and communicate research. Artists take scientific information to inform their work, and seek to communicate the implications of what science tells us about the world. They also draw on scientific concepts as metaphors for autobiographical artworks.  We will use science and art to study basic concepts in earth science such as geologic time, plate tectonics, earth materials and how they are formed, the hydrological cycle and stream ecology. Case studies in Eastern Washington and the Columbia River Basin, as well as the Nisqually Watershed will provide hands-on experience. Geologic time and evidence of the Earth's dynamic past are recorded in rocks on the landscape. Students will learn basic techniques in observational drawing and watercolor painting.  They will learn the discipline of keeping illustrated field journals to inform their studies of geological processes.  They will also develop finished artworks ranging from scientific illustration to personal expression.  This program is not appropriate for students who have completed the fall quarter of . geology, environmental sciences, education, and visual art. Abir Biswas Lucia Harrison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
East-West Psychology: Destructive/Afflictive Cognition/Emotion

Jamyang Tsultrim

philosophy psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ecological Agriculture: Crop Botany and Plant Genetics

Martha Rosemeyer and Donald Morisato

agriculture biology botany sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day How do seeds form? How do plants develop from seeds? How do plants adapt to particular environmental conditions? The modification of plant evolution by human selection has played a major role in the history of agriculture. Ecological agriculture is based on an understanding of plant biology, either through the grazing of livestock or the growing of food crops. This program focuses on the science of crop botany and genetics as a basis for propagation, seed-saving and plant breeding. In one strand, the basic life cycle, plant physiology and reproductive botany of crop members of the plant families most important for agriculture will be explored. This systematic survey will make connections to their center of diversity and origin. In a second strand, the principles of plant breeding will be presented through an introduction to Mendelian and quantitative genetics. Some of the agricultural methods of plant reproduction, by both sexual and vegetative propagation, will be considered. Readings may include Ashworth's , Deppe's , and Nabhan's . The adaptation of crop plants to specific environments, especially in this era of climate change, becomes increasingly critical for the future of sustainable agriculture. Laboratory and field experiments, as well as field trips to local farms and plant breeding centers, will provide an applied context for our inquiry. agriculture, biology and plant breeding. Martha Rosemeyer Donald Morisato Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ecological Agriculture: Developing a Local, Sustainable Food System

Martha Rosemeyer, Thomas Johnson and David Muehleisen

agriculture biology ecology political economy sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day What is a food system? Why does it matter? A battle for the future of our food system is being waged between competing visions. On one side is the global, industrial-based system that provides large quantities of inexpensive food along with significant environmental and social impacts. The competing vision is a local, community-based system that produces higher quality, more expensive food while seeking to minimize environmental and social impacts. We will explore these competing visions from a critical perspective of social and ecological sustainability. Critical questions that will inform our inquiry include: Can a humane, socially just agricultural system that minimizes environmental degradation meet the food needs of the world? Can farmers be stewards of the soil, biodiversity and landscape? Can we grow high-quality food that is available to everyone? How did we get into this food system predicament anyway? Are local, sustainable food systems best?This program will provide a broad, interdisciplinary study of agriculture. We will emphasize developing "systems" thinking and skills associated with community work, expository writing, laboratory and library research, as well as quantitative reasoning skills. Lectures will focus on ecological principles applied to agroecosystems, soil science and fertility management, crop and livestock management, as well as local to global food system structure, socio-economic aspects of agriculture and agricultural history. Labs will provide a hands-on introduction to soil ecology and fertility. Students will identify needs, gather data and write a report of relevance to developing a sustainable local food system. Multi-day field trips will allow students to visit farms working toward sustainability, meet key players in food system change and attend meetings such as the Washington Tilth Producers conference and Eco-Farm conference in California. : The Agroecology portion of fall quarter will emphasize energy flow and biodiversity as applied to agricultural systems, using Steve Gliessman's textbook, second edition. A social science approach will focus on the role that ideas and institutions have played in shaping US agriculture. We will work toward assessing the needs of our local food system. Seminar books will support our inquiry. Field trips, as well as attending the Tilth Conference in Yakima are planned. : The agroecology portion will focus on soil science, soil ecology and nutrient cycling. We will work with civic engagement as a way to move us toward our vision. A policy workshop focusing both on local and national policy such as the 2012 Farm Bill is planned. Students will gather data and write a report on a particular aspect appropriate to developing a local food system in Thurston County. There will be an emphasis on lab exercises, critical analysis, library research and expository writing. Seminar books will again support our inquiry. A field trip to attend the Eco-Farm conference in California will be part of the curriculum. Students interested in continuing their studies of agriculture in spring quarter can continue with with Donald Morisato and Martha Rosemeyer or with Dave Muehleisen and Stephen Bramwell. Farm, nursery and garden management; agriculture, food system and environmental consulting firms; state and county agricultural and natural resource agencies; and agricultural and food justice non-profit organizations. Martha Rosemeyer Thomas Johnson David Muehleisen Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ecological Niche: The Interface of Human and Animal Behavior

Alison Styring, Steven Scheuerell and George Freeman

biology community studies cultural studies ecology environmental studies field studies health mathematics natural history outdoor leadership and education psychology writing zoology 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day The word environment encompasses multiple meanings, from the natural to the built, from the interiors of our minds to the spiritual. In each case there is a constant interface of environments with one another and with other creatures, each defining and circumscribing our experience of the world. Some of our essential questions revolve around how we define the environment and how we are shaped by as well as how we shape the environment, both natural and built. For example, does the concept of wilderness include humans? Is the ecological niche of a human essentially different from that of other living things? We will explore the habitats we occupy along with other creatures in those environments. We will explore dichotomies that foster dynamic tensions, such as the dichotomy between concepts of "natural" versus "human".  We intend to investigate these tensions through our study of psychology, personal biography, biology, environmental studies, ornithology and cultural studies. In fall quarter we will develop the foundational skills in environmental studies and psychology needed to understand and critique the writings and current research in community ecology, animal behavior and conservation biology, and to examine the conscious and unconscious, and the theories of perception and cognition in psychology. We will examine parallels and linkages among disciplines in terms of methods, assumptions and prevailing theories. In winter we'll continue building on this foundation and move ourselves from theory to practice through an emphasis on methodologies, analyses, and their underlying assumptions. In spring quarter we'll implement the skills and knowledge we've developed through specific student-directed projects and our optional field trip. The faculty will foster creativity, experimentation and imaginative processes as means of discovering and bringing a new awareness to our extraordinary world. The students will respond to the themes of the program through individual and collaborative projects. To build our learning community we will use experiential collaboration activities such as Challenge and Experiential Education as a means to develop a sense of commitment and group citizenship. We will use multicultural discussion opportunities such as Critical Moments to explore the politics of identity and meaning. We will develop our observational skills via field workshops and field trips. We will have writing and quantitative reasoning workshops to further develop students' current skills and to develop advanced skills in these areas. Students completing this program will come to a stronger understanding of their personal lives as situated in a variety of contexts. They will develop strategies for engaging in a range of settings to promote social change, in-depth personal development, increased self-awareness, critical commentary and analyses, and practices that promote stewardship of our personal lives, our immediate environment and global communities. psychology, behavioral sciences and environmental science. Alison Styring Steven Scheuerell George Freeman Mon Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR
Ecology and the Built Environment

Steven Abercrombie and Alvin Josephy

architecture ecology economics environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend An increasing understanding of our relationship with the natural environment is changing our ideas about the design and development of our human-built environment.  More than 10,000 years ago we were creating living and working spaces that mimicked nature and our local environment.  Since the beginning of the Industrial Age, this process has followed a "hard" path as developers have used electrical energy and man-made materials to solve design challenges.  Over the past two hundred years the planning and execution of our built environment at all scales has had the effect of separating humans from their natural environment.  Partly because of the impacts of our buildings on nature, we face the specter of huge changes to our natural environment during the twenty-first century. This program will explore the relationship between the natural world and the built environment by using an approach that moves from the theoretical to the practical.  The first third of the program will focus on issues familiar in the study of ecology: systems, scale, interconnection and interdependencies, and energy and material flows.  Students will be asked to define the elusive topic of sustainability; this investigation will be a key recurring theme of the program.  The middle portion of the program will be focused on the practical side of seeking sustainability in the built environment, including discussions on codes and their impact/impediment on greener buildings, various assessment tools for buildings and how they are applied, and how these ideas are playing out in the development world.  Finally, the program will drill down to the level of systems and practices including student presentations that will deal with means and methods at a functional level, investigating what makes a building product "green" and other issues. The program will include several quantitative exercises, a theme paper meant to allow the student to explore "sustainability," and a group project focused on materials for the built environment.  Field trips to experience an array of projects are planned.  The program is designed to encourage students to think of this process as being about cultural change, change in the way we build our spaces, and change in the way we use them, but above all change in the way we use our built environment to connect ourselves to nature once again. architecture, construction management, infrastructure design, sustainability studies, building science Steven Abercrombie Alvin Josephy Tue Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
E-Communications and E-Government

Larry Dzieza

  Course GRGraduate 4 04 Evening Su2Summer 2 The course will focus on understanding the role and management of technology in the public sector. Information technology is increasingly "how organizations get things done" but using IT effectively has special challenges in the public sector. These challenges include how organizations, built for stability not speed, are adapting to the rapid pace of technological change, succeeding within a risk-averse political climate, and satisfying stakeholder's and the public's high-expectations for low-cost, convenience, transparency, and protection of privacy. Finally, we will consider the contribution a new generation of workers may bring to increasing public participation and transforming service delivery. Larry Dzieza Tue Thu Graduate GR Summer2
Economics, Principles of

Tomas Mosquera

economics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Presented in a non-technical and logical manner, this introductory course will introduce you to the essentials of economic theory and policy. We will explore the fundamentals of economic theory and practice and extend these concepts to real-world applications. This course will help you acquire an understanding of micro- and macro-economic terminology, concepts, and principles. Furthermore, this course will help you realize the important role that economics plays in our lives and will help you gain a greater understanding of economic policy as well as how decisions influence the success or failure of a business. Tomas Mosquera Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ecopsychology

Susan Cummings

psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening Su2Summer 2 Mind and nature are inseparable. The natural world is not outside of us or separate from us, but it us. Ecopsychology is an exciting emerging perspective that explores the connection between psychological and ecological health. Many of our psychological ills and our addictions are directly related to our lack of awareness and our perceived disconnection from our natural origins. The very destruction of our habitat is an expression of this lack of connection to the ground of our being. There are many emerging approaches to deal with this, such as the greening of playgrounds, nature-based therapy, architecture that aims to connect us with a healthy habitat, and the exploration of our assumptions. We will explore the historical and cultural influences underlying and leading up to this perceived separation from nature, cultural differences in perspectives, assumptions in psychology, the connections between pathology and this perceived separateness from nature, and the role of connectedness with nature in child development.Students will review the literature, engage in experiential activities and projects, and brainstorm solutions. Susan Cummings Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Education, Empowerment and Critical Pedagogy

Leslie Flemmer

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 This course introduces students to the theory and the practice of critical pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning that moves instruction beyond the transmission of content. Critical pedagogy promotes the practice of freedom, collaboration, justice, and community. In this course, students will investigate theoretical perspectives around alternative, critical, and radical education through the writings of Paulo Freire, bell hooks, Henry Giroux, and Joan Wink. We will connect theoretical explorations with practical teaching applications from grades K-12. The course will operate as a learning community with all members embracing the role of both the teacher and learner. This class will include workshops, in-class teaching practices, research, and small-group work as well as critiques and presentations of the readings. Leslie Flemmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Embodying The Book

Marla Elliott and Steve Blakeslee

literature theater 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening What could be better than reading a wonderful book?  Reading it aloud! In , students will cultivate their capacity to bring literature fully to life through the medium of voice.  In a safe and supportive environment, students will approach the human voice as an instrument of expression, exploring such topics as effective sound production, enunciation, pacing, tone, emphasis, and rhythm.  Then they will apply their new learning to a range of narrative, dramatic, and poetic texts, developing the nuanced intellectual and emotional understandings necessary to forging their own meaningful interpretations.  Our ultimate goal is to deepen our connections to literature, language, and ourselves. literature, teaching, performing, fields involving public speaking Marla Elliott Steve Blakeslee Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Embracing Conflict

Mark Harrison and Theresa Aragon

business and management psychology visual arts 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Weekend Conflict is a fundamental dynamic of human experience and interaction.  It is the necessary struggle to balance concern for self with connections to others.  Because pain, suffering, and stress are deeply associated with our perception of conflict, we tend to regard conflict as a destructive or destabilizing force.Seen from another perspective, however, conflict is one of the most life-affirming forces in nature.  Without conflict, children would not develop into normal human beings. Without conflict, literature and the performing arts would be dull and insignificant.  Without conflict (and conflict resolution), we would live in a rather uneventful and humorless world. The challenge for all of us and the purpose of this program is to understand and experience conflict as an important, unavoidable, and generally useful lifeforce.  In this two-quarter program, we will explore and analyze conflict from the perspective of the in the fall and in the winter.  We will draw on a variety of sources—among them the arts, current events and politics, work and the business environment, forms of play—to learn about the nature of conflict and its role in society.  The program format will include lectures, seminars (in class and online), as well as active learning in the form of workshops, exercises, group and individual presentations, and field trips to performances.  We will focus on clarity in oral and written communication, critical analysis, and the ability to work across disciplines and significant differences. Mark Harrison Theresa Aragon Tue Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Empty Space: Movement, Dance, and Theatre

Walter Grodzik and Cynthia Kennedy

aesthetics consciousness studies cultural studies dance education media arts queer studies somatic studies theater 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program will explore the interior spaces where performances begin and the exterior spaces where performances are realized. Students will begin with movement and theatre exercises that center and focus the mind and body in order to open oneself to creative possibilities and performance. Students will also study movement/dance and theatre as a means of physical and psychological focus and flexibility that enables them to more fully utilize their bodies and emotional selves in creating theatrical performance.Through the understanding and embodiment of somatic concepts such as awareness, intention, centering, authenticity, and the interplay of mind and body, students will have the opportunity to explore creative imagination as it expresses itself from their own life processes, rather than from externally imposed images, standards and expectations. How does imagination respond to the emotional self, the physiology of the body, and the psychology of the mind? How can we become more expressive and responsive to our inner selves? Students will be invited to explore and enjoy the dance already going on inside their bodies, to learn to perceive, interpret and trust the natural intelligence of intrinsic bodily sensations. The class will use experiential techniques derived from several traditions of somatic philosophy.In seminar, students will read a broad variety of texts about creativity, movement and dance history, and performance, performance history, and Western theatre history and dramatic literature. In particular, students will read Greek tragedy and comedy, the playwrights of the Elizabethan theater, such as Marlowe and Shakespeare, and the feminist comedies of the Restoration. The realism of the Nineteenth century will be seen through the plays of Ibsen and Chekhov and other realists, and students will study, discuss and perform the multicultural theatre of the Twentieth and Twenty-First century, including theatre, drama and performance art as found in the work of Thornton Wilder, David Mamet, Tony Kushner, Caryl Churchill, Henry David Hwang and Anna Devere Smith. The discussion of dramatic literature will be framed from many viewpoints, including structuralist, feminist, Marxist, post colonial and queer.The program will include weekly seminars, workshops in movement/dance and theatre, and film screenings of various dance and theatre productions. This is an all-level program that welcomes students of all abilities that bring their excitement, commitment, discipline and creativity to the performing arts. Regular on-time attendance is fundamental to students' development and continuance in the program. teaching, theatre, expressive arts, dance and movement theory. Walter Grodzik Cynthia Kennedy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Energy Policy

Laurance Geri

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Weekend Su1Summer 1 As we approach another Presidential election, US energy policy is more unsettled and more politicized than at any time since the oil shocks of the 1970s. This course will examine how public policy in the energy sector is crafted in the U.S. and other countries. We will also explore the many dimensions of energy including sources; technologies; the operation of energy markets; and the economic, social, national security, and environmental implications of energy use. Laurance Geri Sat Sun Summer1
Energy Systems and Climate Change

EJ Zita

agriculture environmental studies physics sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day How is energy created and harvested, stored and transformed, used or abused? This program is a two-quarter study of ways energy is produced and changed, by nature and humans. This is a good program for students interested in environmental science, physics and sustainability, both mathematical and applied. We start with skill building and background study, and finish with major research projects related to energy, climate and sustainability.We will study issues of energy generation and use in society and in the natural world. One goal is for students to gain a deeper understanding of issues involved in achieving a sustainable energy society. A primary goal is illustrate the power and beauty of physics and mathematics. We will examine climate change and global warming; energy science, technology, and policy; farming, environmental studies, and sustainability; and related topics.We will study alternative energy sources such as solar, wind, geothermal and biofuels, as well as conventional sources of energy such as hydro, nuclear, gas and coal. Fundamentals of energy generation will focus on the underlying physics. In seminar, we further explore social, political and/or economic aspects of energy production and use, such as environmental and food production concerns and policies, effects of the Sun on the Earth, energy needs of developing countries, etc. We will have a strong emphasis on sustainability studies.While calculus is a prerequisite, students who already know calculus can deepen their math skills by applying them to coursework or research projects. Students who do high quality calculus-based work may earn upper-division credit.Student research projects are a major part of this program. Students choose a research question that interests them, then design and carry out their research investigations, usually in small teams. Research projects involve quantitative analysis as well as hands-on investigations. For example, research might include field work, energy analysis of an existing system (natural or constructed), and/or design of a new small-scale energy system, possibly with community applications. Past projects have included solar systems, energy generation from waste products, water purification for boats or farm composters, efficiency of campus buildings, analysis of wind and water systems, and more. Students may apply for grants for practical projects on campus.Students interested in continuing good research projects into spring should discuss options with the faculty. energy, physics, environment, climate, sustainability, teaching, farming, engineering and natural science. EJ Zita Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Entrepreneurship and Economic Development

John Filmer and Neil Delisanti

business and management communications economics 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. Strong, competent management leads to strong successful organizations. This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, economic development and basic business principles. Critical reasoning will be taught to facilitate an understanding of economics and its application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment.Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. As an effective leader/manager you must develop the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting your organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material separate the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager from the pedestrian administrator. Fall quarter will focus on these basic skills in preparation for projects and research during the winter. During winter quarter, you will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting  internships for the spring quarter. Class work both quarters will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies and field trips. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. Evergreen's management graduates enjoy a reputation for integrity and for being bold and creative in their approaches to problem solving, mindful of the public interest and attentive to their responsibilities toward the environment and their employees, volunteers, customers, stockholders, stakeholders, and neighbors. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Your competence as a manager is in the balance. business, non-profit management, and economics. John Filmer Neil Delisanti Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
Environmental Challenges and Solutions

Ted Whitesell

environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2  –  ecological restoration, sustainable agriculture, conservation, resource management, environmental health, climate impacts analysis, environmental justice, environmental advocacy, environmental education, and much more! Ted Whitesell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Environmental Health: Science, Policy and Social Justice

Cheri Lucas-Jennings

American studies Native American studies agriculture community studies cultural studies ecology economics environmental studies government health hydrology law and government policy law and public policy natural history philosophy sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This program will explore the broad conditions that shape environmental health, both for humans and within the ecosystem context. We will be moving across and between questions of science, public policy (from municipal to international) and social justice: examining the workings of non-governmental organizations.  With the use of regularly scheduled lecture, seminar, work shops and field trips, we will dedicate ourselves to bridging the understanding among scientific, policy and social perspectives. The program goals is to examine emerging strategies and solutions for ecological sustainability - from regional, community-based monitoring to UN negotiations. By means of a small group, quarter-long research project on a topical issue the chemical, biologic and physical risks of modern life will be considered, with an emphasis on industrial pollutants. We will examine models, evidence and debates about the sources, causal connections and impacts of environmental hazards. We will be learning about existing and emergent regulatory science in conjunction with evolving systems of law, regulation and a broad array of community response. This introductory, core program considers problems related to public and environmental health in a broader context of the key frameworks of population/consumption and sustainability. Throughout the program, students will learn from a range of learning approaches: computer-based analysis and collaboration with regional experts, officials and activists.     :  ? Website: public policy; communications; political science; planning; public health; law; social welfare; environmental and natural resources Cheri Lucas-Jennings Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Equatorial Studies: Sound, Science and the Western Imagination

Sean Williams, Heather Heying and Eric Stein

anthropology cultural studies environmental studies geography international studies music natural history 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day In addition to the landscape of the map, there are also landscapes of the mind. How humans conceptualize where and how they (and others) live is an elemental process that has started wars, led to new forms of cross-cultural communication, and given rise to hybridization of both populations and ideas. Our focus in this two-quarter program is to take a particular area of the world -- the equator -- and explore how various groups of people (local and foreign) have come to understand it over time. Through our work in science, the performing arts and anthropology, we will collectively engage the ways in which people connect to the natural world, the arts, and each other.Each quarter divides into sections in which we highlight a particular lens through which to view our work, or focus on ways in which our lenses overlap. For example, we will examine how anthropology and medicine have grappled with "The Tropics" as a space believed to be essentially different from "The West," raising questions about the construction of race, the body, and the category of the "primitive." We will also work with sound: playing and creating musical instruments, singing and listening to music. In an attempt to understand the relationship between humans and the world around them, we will investigate evolutionary processes that apply to plants and animals near the equator. While our studies are contextualized in regions such as Brazil and Indonesia and other equatorial locations, we will also work briefly with a few regions outside the equator by way of comparison.Weekly activities feature lectures, films and seminars. Other planned activities include field trips, workshops, collaborative presentations and guest lectures. Students are expected to focus on enhancing their college-level writing skills throughout the program; each quarter's major writing assignments will require students to revise their work and understand the process of revision. In fall quarter students will be introduced to important concepts about how to approach this material: issues of race, class and gender in a colonial context are important factors in deepening our understanding. As we move into winter quarter, students will have more chances to develop individual projects focusing on a particular area of interest. anthropology, science and ethnomusicology. Sean Williams Heather Heying Eric Stein Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Essentials of Energy: Economics, Politics, Ethics

Howard Schwartz

government sustainability studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Our interest in Essentials of Energy is learning about what it means to make the "right" energy choices. The first part of the course will cover the energy resources that are currently available. These include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and many kinds of renewable energy. We will study the availability of each (How much is there? How is it obtained? What does it cost?), their advantages and disadvantages, and their environmental consequences. We will then be in position to study policy: what mix of energy resources should we have? While we will look at the policies of other countries and the international politics of energy, our focus will be on current US policies and how to evaluate options for change. Since policy is created and implemented through politics we will then spend much of the class looking at how political and governmental institutions (and the cultures they are embedded in) produce energy policies. For the United States, we will focus on climate change and proposed responses to it. Internationally, we will look at various examples of "petropolitics" and the "resource curse," why countries that are rich in oil find it hard to use that wealth to modernize their economies or raise their citizens out of poverty. Howard Schwartz Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Ethics in the Workplace: Theory and Practice

Stephen Beck and Joli Sandoz

business and management leadership studies philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend What's the right thing to do when as an employee you witness illegal actions?  Whose interests should take priority in pricing and hiring decisions? What choices can you make when your supervisor tells you to ignore company policy?  Employees sometimes face situations such as these that suggest a conflict between being a good employee and being a good person.  We will study several approaches to ethical decision making and, through intensive writing and seminar discussions, use these approaches to clarify issues faced at work.  The shared vocabulary and frameworks we develop will allow us to talk and think about ethical issues and write and share personal workplace ethical statements.  Program work will also include reading several Washington State laws related to ethics and exploring issues, choice points, and the roles of moral reasoning and moral leadership at work.The program will meet on Wednesdays in conjunction with the course .  (You may enroll either in for 8 credits or for 4 credits, but you may not enroll in both.)  will meet additionally as a program on five Saturdays to deepen our understanding of ethical issues through writing, role-playing, playing and analyzing board games as framing ethical strategies, and other hands-on activities.  In addition, we will focus part of each Saturday meeting on building and strengthening strong college-level writing skills to prepare students for more advanced work.Credit will be awarded in philosophy (ethics) and ethical decision making. business, ethics Stephen Beck Joli Sandoz Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Europe Since 1500

Stacey Davis

history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 4, 6, 8 Day Su2Summer 2 This class surveys the social, cultural, political, intellectual, and religious history of Europe since 1500, including the Reformation, the Dutch Republic,18th-century Enlightenment and absolutism, the French Revolution, 19th-century imperialism and industrialization, the Russian Revolution, the two World Wars, and decolonization. Social, gender, and intellectual topics will be stressed. Credit possible in European history or world cultures/geography. Students enrolled for 6 credits will write several short essays; students taking 8 credits will complete a library research project. This is a companion class to "Art Since 1500." Stacey Davis Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
European Philosophy in the 20th Century

Joseph Tougas

philosophy 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This upper-division program will focus on philosophy of language and phenomenology, covering the work of Wittgenstein, Husserl, Arendt, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida and other 20th century European thinkers. Students will be expected to have some familiarity with the European philosophical tradition, and some experience reading and analyzing dense philosophical texts. The activities of the program will include close reading and analysis of primary texts within the context of their composition and the writing of reflective, argumentative and synthetic essays in response to those texts. Students will be encouraged to explore connections between the theories developed in the program readings and their own social, political and personal concerns.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in an optional field trip to the American Philosophical Association conference in Seattle, April 5-7. philosophy, psychology, social sciences, culture studies, and literary theory. Joseph Tougas Mon Wed Thu Junior JR Senior SR
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  In winter quarter, we will learn shape-note singing, an American folk choral tradition. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Examining Education: A Journey Through the Personal to the Pedagogical

Leslie Flemmer

education 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The current system of public education is under profound national debate. What is at the heart of those debates? What creates such political, social and cultural differences? What should the future of education look like? Should education continue to be a universal good (free and open to all), a personal commodity (private and exclusive), or a hybrid of reforms? What is the role of teachers and students in this dynamic tension? Finally, what role does identity formation among students and teachers have to do with any of this? One common denominator among U.S. citizens is our access to and experience with free and compulsory K-12 public education that serves the wealthiest citizens to the poorest among us. And yet, that very system that has served so many for so long is frequently attacked by politicians, business leaders, the media, and even individuals like you and me. At the heart of our nation’s debate about public education and “effective” teaching practices are the ideological differences about its purpose and intent.In winter quarter, we will continue to ask questions: Who are our students? Why should they care about school? How do teachers create a culturally responsive, democratic learning community? What approaches do teachers take to create and implement student-centered curriculum and assessments? To answer these questions, we will build upon educational frameworks such as funds of knowledge, critical pedagogy, and constructivist teaching and include an examination of practical, historical inquiry-based methodology and curriculum. The first part of winter program will be designed to prepare students to research, teach and assess social studies content around inquiry-based approaches. Students will explore the State of Washington’s social science standards, the NCSS standards, and texts included (Levstik & Barton; 2005) and (Takaki; 2008).School field experience will continue winter quarter with site visits to local public schools. These classroom experiences will serve to help inform students’ thinking as they engage in the culminating project that will involve reading, research and participation in Problem Based Learning (PBL). Ultimately, this approach will contrast teacher-centered, top/down, high stakes testing and content standards with learning and knowledge construction that comes from purposeful, active student inquiry.  Leslie Flemmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Exclusion in America: Who Belongs?

Liza Rognas

cultural studies history law and public policy political science sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Democracy assumes individual inclusion as critical components of its success as a structure of government. This program examines the tension between social, political and economic exclusion in American history and the inclusive assumptions but exclusive realities of democratic processes. Students will investigate the historical origins of exclusion in contemporary society as part of individual and group research projects.The program offers opportunities for meaningful intellectual engagement in social and institutional histories explored through program texts, informed seminar discussions, films, lecture and field trips. Student research topics may include contemporary issues related to ethnicity and race; gender and sexuality; religion; immigration and citizenship; labor and work. By integrating program materials and information with independent research, students will learn to recognize current political and social processes of exclusion and their historical roots. A specific focus on issues of justice will engage students in learning about current groups and political processes that address exclusionary policies with progressive ideas and practices. Books will include ; and . Liza Rognas Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Experience Japan

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 The Experience Japan program is an intensive, in-country introduction to the language, culture, and society of contemporary Japan. During the three-week program, students will take Japanese language classes and will attend lectures on Japanese culture and society at the Department of Comparative Cultural Studies at Tamagawa University in Tokyo. The coursework also includes field trips to sites selected for their historic, cultural, or contemporary importance. Participants live with Japanese families for the length of the program. Admission is open to all Evergreen students regardless of language ability.Interested students must contact faculty via email (ulmert[at]evergreen.edu) and pay a deposit by April 20, 2012. Explanatory meetings will be held on Monday, April 9 (1:00-3:00) and Thursday, April 12 (3:00-5:00) at SEMII B3123. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Experimental Animation Techniques cancelled

Angela Gallo

communications media arts media studies moving image visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 While all creative animation has elements of innovation, experimental animation is sometimes purely exploratory. Students will work independently and in teams exploring different experimental animation techniques by completing a series of short exercises including cut-out, pixilation, and stop-motion. Other exercises will include storyboards, lighting design, sound design, and After Effects. Final projects will be produced in groups. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 24 hours a week (and probably more!) outside of class working on assignments. No prior art or media production experience is necessary, just a desire to learn the art of animation. Angela Gallo Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Experimental Music

Ben Kamen

music 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day The aesthetic and technological experiments of 20th century American composers and performers opened the door to new modes of thinking about music. Their explorations into silence, noise, extended techniques, and electronics contributed to a fertile area of research within the musical lexicon that continues among composers and performers to this day. In the fall quarter, students will examine the music and writing of experimental composers, perform their works, and respond through composition, performance, and writing. Students will explore the boundaries of musical materials through musicianship exercises and the investigation of notational systems. In the winter quarter, students will shift their attention to the history and application of electronics in experimental music. Students will explore sound collage, algorithmic composition, sound synthesis, and interactive music through the use of MaxMSP, a visual programming language. Composers considered will include John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, James Tenney, Alvin Lucier, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich, and David Tudor. Classes will feature in-house performances, listening, seminars, and workshops on electronic and experimental music practices. Students of all levels of musical experience are welcome. Students from fall and winter are encouraged to apply for the 16-credit interdisciplinary program "Projects in Experimental Media and Music" in the spring. Ben Kamen Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Experiments in Text: Inscribing the Body

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend "The body wants to be art and fails at it."- Carla Harryman What has "the body" come to mean under neoliberal capitalism? Can art, specifically the poetic text, enact a kind of failure that is productive? Might poetry open up rather than shut down the possibility of re-imaginging bodies? In what ways is the text gendered? This class will take up "the body" as a site of radical cultural production as expansively as possible within the short time we have, considering some of the ways in which bodies are othered through language, including through discourses of disability, gender performance, and other zones of social dislocation. Each week we'll sample poetic and other work as well as build our own writing portfolios. Though this is primarily a creative writing class, our writing will push itself outside its usual modes of operation. Emphasis will be put on experiments in breaking genre and mixing media, collaborating on pieces as well as making individual works, and developing a poetics in relation to the social-political. We will discuss and critique the rich tradition of "somatic" practices in the world of performance and live art, including the work of artists such as Marina Abramovic; but we will also explore important recent experiments in poetry and prose by authors such as Hannah Weiner, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, and CAConrad. Our end goal will be to curate a show and live reading that allows us to test out some of our textual experiments. As part of the ongoing literary-politics series PRESS, visiting artists will occasionally workshop with us during the quarter.  For information on past visiting artists and collectives, visit David's public blog at . David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Experiments in Text: Performativity and the Poetics of Reclaiming Public Spaces

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend In this course, we will focus on creating--as Jules Boykoff and Kaia Sand put it--"landscapes of dissent." We will do so through creative writing while examining other art forms that are concerned with the reclamation of public, lived spaces in the wake of increasing privatization and corporatization. We'll ask whether language arts and poetics can, as poet and critic Thom Donovan writes, "provide experiments in the practical organization against anti-democratic social hierarchies and the expropriation of labor, land, and natural resources?" We'll respond to this and similar questions by building individual text arts portfolios and by collaborating in small groups on more sustained text arts projects, responding to specific readings in contemporary poetry, poetics, and text arts that seek to experiment with language made strange: on the page and off.  We will interrogate the 'artistic' and 'poetic' in relation to the 'political,' stretching our understanding of both activism and creative writing. We will do this both by making our own creative works and by surveying the work of contemporary writers, guest readers, visual artists, and scholars.  For more information on past versions of this and related courses, see: .  For more on the ongoing literary-politics series PRESS, including past visiting artists and collectives, visit David's public blog at: . David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Experiments in Text: Writing, Radical Pedagogy, and Social Change

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend "What if every communication, every encounter, were intimate? Imagine that. You have imagined being a new collectivist. Why not consider yourself one."       --from New Collectivists: Poetics of Intent If we think that language arts and social change are somehow related, how might poetry and prose model new ways of forming social relationships?  How might artistic movements help re-imagine or apprehend social structures and in so doing, help to either undermine or recapitulate dominant forms of acculturation?  In what ways might we uniquely model or contribute to the language and action of protest?  By working on our own creative writing experiments, individually and collaboratively, we will be testing our understanding of what "creative writing" can come to mean in relation to radical pedagogy and social change.  In the second half of the quarter, we'll put our ideas into practice by forming different pedagogical-social formations, facilitated by students in small groups, as an active form of asking "what could a radical pedagogy based in text arts look like/do?" As part of the ongoing literary-politics series PRESS, visiting artists will occasionally workshop with us during the quarter.  For information on past visiting artists and collectives, visit David's public blog at . David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Exploring Management

Dariush Khaleghi

business and management leadership studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 The primary goal of the Exploring Management course is to help build core management competencies for today's global and more complex workplace.  We will use hands-on approaches such as case studies, exercises, and application workshops to study issues related to planning, controlling, leading, and organizing the workplace.  The course has been designed to use conversational and interactive material to help students master fundamental management concepts.  The ultimate objective of this course is to promote critical thinking and the ability to make sound business decisions using key managerial concepts, theories, and best practices. supervision, management, leadership Dariush Khaleghi Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Fabrication of Form in Metal

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This studio course presents the opportunity for intermediate to advanced work in metal fabrication as applied to furniture, lighting, and sculptural design. Contemporary artists' work will be investigated. Students will do drawings, build models, and complete a final project of their own design. Bob Woods Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Fates of Human Societies

Dennis Hibbert

geology natural history 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend We will consider in depth the question "To what degree do environmental factors and human responses to them determine the fates of human societies?" We will work toward answering this question by drawing on archaeology, palaeoecology, palaeoethnobotany, palaeoclimatology, and zoology as we examine the past 100,000 years of the human story. Dennis Hibbert Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Field and Laboratory Biology in Southwestern Ecosystems

Dylan Fischer and Clarissa Dirks

biology botany ecology field studies zoology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The southwestern U.S. is unique in the diversity of habitats that can occur along with dramatic temperature and moisture gradients. Major advances in ecology have been made in these extreme environments, and important work in global change biology is currently being conducted in these systems. This program will use field sites in the Desert Southwest as living laboratories for investigating patterns in ecology, biology, microbiology and evolution. Students will learn about arid environments, plant ecology, field biology, and gain specialized training in microbiology or plant molecular genetics. Students will co-design field projects exploring ecological and co-evolutionary relationships at organism and molecular scales.We will use detailed studies of southwestern cottonwood trees and tardigrades (water-bears) as examples that will let us dive deeply into laboratory and field experiments.  We will pair those investigations with broader exploration of southwestern environments to learn about multiple ecosystems and organisms. Early in the program, students will learn to conduct DNS analyses on plants and microscope-based identification of microscopic animals called tardigrades (water-bears).  All students will participate in a mandatory two-week field ecology module where they will participate in a major research project examining the effects of desert-tree genetic diversity on ecosystems, learn to identify plant species of the Southwest, keep detailed field journals, conduct research projects, and survey isolated canyons for patterns related to evolutionary history.  Along the way, we will visit environmental and culturally significant sites in the Southwest, from cactus forests to canyons and mountain peaks. Finally, at the end of the quarter all students will reconvene for a program conference where students will present their research over the quarter.Our reading list will include major natural history texts related to the Southwest and evolutionary relationships for the organisms we find there. We will emphasize active participation in the scientific process and communication skills. Because of the field component of this program, students should be prepared for extensive time living and working in the field, and should be committed to working through conflicts in group dynamics. ecology, biology, botany, zoology, microbial ecology and environmental science. Dylan Fischer Clarissa Dirks Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Field Studies in Northwest Environments: Rocks, Plants and Forests cancelled

Dylan Fischer and Paul Butler

botany ecology environmental studies field studies geography natural history outdoor leadership and education 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day The Pacific Northwest provides a diversity of terrestrial habitats that are ideally suited for direct student-originated field studies. From deserts to prairies, forested ecosystems and beaches, each ecosystem reflects unique patterns of influences from geologic and biological factors. Field studies in these habitats can deepen understanding of landscape patterns, and this program will emphasize direct, student-originated field studies in four distinct locations. Students should expect to get their hands dirty working outdoors on geology and ecology projects uncovering landscape patterns in each unique habitat we visit. We will travel to sagebrush steppe, lowland prairies, managed and unmanaged forests, and coastal environments. In each location we will study geography, environmental history, ecology, biodiversity and geology. We will visit culturally significant sites, learn about native plants, and the processes that shape the physical landscape. Students will then develop a series of studies examining ecological, environmental and geological patterns. Following our study of each location, students will present the results of their field investigations in a series of mini-symposia. Students can expect to participate in seminars, lectures, field trips and research. We will learn common techniques for collecting data in forestry, plant ecology, and physical geography, plus develop methods for effective communication of the results. We will take two extended field trips (overnight to the east side of the Cascades and to the Pacific Coast) and multiple one-day field trips (to local prairies and forests). Field work will also make use of the Evergreen campus. environmental studies, ecology, geology, forestry and botany. Dylan Fischer Paul Butler Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
Film and Gender

Elizabeth Williamson

gender and women's studies media studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su2Summer 2 This course examines film through the lens of gender studies. Both topics will be covered at an introductory level, with additional support provided to students with previous experience. We will focus primarily on female-identified performers, producers, and directors working within the American mainstream and talk about how their work responds to existing conventions and constraints. There will be one screening with lecture every week; students will watch additional films at home and post weekly screening reports. More advanced students may pursue a research or screenwriting project in lieu of weekly reports. Elizabeth Williamson Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Forbidden Metaphors: Rewriting the Real in 20th Century France

Marianne Bailey, Olivier Soustelle, Judith Gabriele, Steven Hendricks and Stacey Davis

aesthetics art history cultural studies history language studies literature philosophy study abroad writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day ...man is struck dumb...or he will speak only in forbidden metaphors... Friedrich Nietzsche, "On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense" Nietzsche's critique of traditional Western values--dismantling absolutes of God, Truth, Self and Language--opened up an abyss. "Only as an aesthetic phenomenon," Nietzsche argued, would "human life and existence be eternally justified." Meaning and Self would be individually crafted, as the artist crafts a work, in the space of a human existence. Life, as Rimbaud wrote, must be remade.Inspired by this notion of remaking life along aesthetic lines, we will study literature and creative writing, critical theory and philosophy, art history and music as well as French language. Students will participate in lectures, films and workshops, and choose between seminar groups in literature and critical theory or history. Each will develop a substantive individual (or group) project, and will be able to study French language at the Beginning, Intermediate or Advanced level.To better understand Modernist and Postmodernist avant-garde, we will focus on outsider works of art and ideas in 20th century France and the post-colonial world. Like the Decadents and Symbolists, modernist artists go in quest of a pure artistic language "in which mute things speak to me," as Hofmannsthal wrote, beyond concepts and representation, privileging passion over reason. This quest is influenced by worldviews and works from the broader French-speaking world, which refocuses art on its ritual origins, and on its magical potential. "Art", in the words of Martinican poet and playwright Césaire, "is a miraculous weapon."In fall and winter, we will study aesthetic theories and works from Primitivism and Surrealism to Absurdist Drama, Haitian Marvelous and Oulipo; and writers such as Mallarmé, Jabès, Artaud, Beckett, Blanchot, Derrida, Sartre, Irigaray and Foucault. We will look at historical and cultural change from WWI through the student riots of 1968 and the multi-cultural French-speaking world of today.Key themes will include: memory and the way in which it shapes, and is shaped by, identity; concepts of time and place; and the challenges and opportunities for French identity brought by immigration. We will focus on French social, cultural and intellectual history from the 1930's to the present, exploring the myths and realities of French Resistance and the Vichy Regime during World War II; the legacy of revolutionary concepts of "universal" liberty, equality and fraternity as France re-envisioned its role in Europe and the world from the 1950s to the present, including uprisings from 1968 through today; and the impact of the Franco-Algerian war on contemporary France and the post-colonial Francophone world.In spring, students have two options. They can travel to France, where they will participate in intensive language study, perform cultural and art historical fieldwork, and pursue personal research on a "quest" of their own. Alternatively, students may remain on campus to undertake a major personal project, springing from ideas, writers and artists in prior quarters. This is an excellent opportunity to complete a substantive body of creative or research oriented work, with guidance from faculty and peer critique. Marianne Bailey Olivier Soustelle Judith Gabriele Steven Hendricks Stacey Davis Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Formation of the North American State

Jeanne Hahn

history international studies political economy political science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day history, political economy, political science, secondary education, graduate school, and informed citizenship. Jeanne Hahn Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Foundations of Health Science

Benjamin Simon, Glenn Landram and Lydia McKinstry

biochemistry biology business and management chemistry economics health mathematics physiology 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This year-long, laboratory-based program will offer students a conceptual and methodological introduction to biology and chemistry with a focus on health and medicine. We will use organizing themes that link the science of human health with the economic, financial, ethical and legal issues associated with the demand and cost of medical research and public health care. Over the course of three quarters, we will study portions of general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, general biology, microbiology, anatomy and physiology, nutrition, statistics, economics and management, and human behavior. Students will use scientific processes, quantitative reasoning and hands-on experiences to develop problem-solving skills directed at understanding these subjects in the context of human health. This program is primarily designed for students contemplating work in medicine and allied health fields, including nursing, physical therapy, midwifery, athletic training, nutrition and others. This program is also appropriate for students interested in public health or public policy who want a solid foundation in biology and chemistry or students who wish to study rigorous science as part of a liberal arts education. Program activities will include lectures, laboratories, small-group problem-solving workshops, homework, field trips and seminars. Our readings and discussions will be concerned with the economic, ethical and scientific aspects of human health as they relate to the global community as well as individuals. Students will undertake assignments focused on interpreting and integrating the topics covered. During spring quarter, students will participate in small-group collaboration on a scientific investigation relevant to the program content. Project topics will be developed under the direction of the faculty and students will describe the results of this research through formal writing and public presentation. All program work will emphasize quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and development of proficiency in scientific writing and speaking skills. Upon completion of this program students will have gained some of the prerequisites necessary for careers in the allied health fields and public health administration. Students will also be prepared for further studies in upper division science. Students who master the biology and chemistry work in this program will be prepared to enroll in the Molecule to Organism program. Students preparing for medical school will likely need further coursework in inorganic or general chemistry to fulfill prerequisites for medical school. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a working knowledge of scientific, social and economic principles relating to human health and public health care. We also expect that they will have gained an ability to apply these principles to solving real world problems relating to natural science, disease and human health. medicine and allied health fields, and public health administration. Benjamin Simon Glenn Landram Lydia McKinstry Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
French, Beginning I, II, III

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, and work regularly in small groups to develop conversational skills.  The fall class is lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun and creative activities in music, poetry, videos, and work with Internet sites.  By winter, the classes are conducted primarily in French.  Work will focus on poetry and fables with additional themes including regional French traditions, cuisine, and contemporary issues in France and the Francophone world.  In spring, students will view several Francophone films and read a book of short legends and tales from Francophone countries with basic discussions of them.  Students will expand vocabulary proficiency and accurate pronunciation as they engage in oral reading, situational role-plays, and skits from the legends.  Throughout the year, students use additional activities in the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. There is also a Mon/Wed section of the spring course available.  See Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
French, Beginning III (Mon/Wed)

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course covers the third quarter of first-year French and emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, and work regularly in small groups to develop conversational skills.  Students will view several Francophone films and read a book of short legends and tales from Francophone countries with basic discussions of them.  Students will expand vocabulary proficiency and accurate pronunciation as they engage in oral reading, situational role-plays, and skits from the legends.  Students use additional activities in the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. There is also a Tue/Thu section of this course available.  See . Judith Gabriele Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
French, Intensive

Marianne Bailey

language studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 This course is appropriate for beginners and for low and high intermediate students who wish to improve oral proficiency.  All instruction is in French.  Be prepared to work hard both in class and outside class, and to learn more French than you might imagine possible in a short five weeks. Marianne Bailey Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
French, Intermediate I, II, III

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This year-long sequence of courses in French is designed to reinforce, practice, and build upon previous skills.  The class is fast paced, interactive, and focuses on continued review of grammatical structures, conversational skills with native speakers, discussion of video segments, music, poetry, Francophone themes, and Internet news clips.  Students are expected to interact in French in discussions.  Students will increase their reading and writing skills through study of selected literary excerpts or a short novel.  Winter quarter will focus on theater with performances of short scenes.  In spring, students will view a small selection of films and discuss questions of French identity, history, and culture while learning to analyse, compare, and appreciate certain aspects of film. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
From Fragmentation to Wholeness: Developing a Systems Perspective

Kathy Kelly

business and management community studies ecology economics psychology sustainability studies 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend What is a system and how is it different from a pile of parts?  What is a whole system?  In what ways does understanding whole systems contribute to wisdom and well-being?  This two-quarter program will introduce students to general systems theory.  Students will learn basic characteristics of systems and explore systems across an array of disciplines—ecological, organizational, economic, and cosmological. Students will be introduced to tools and develop practices to help gain an understanding of complex systems and system dynamics.In winter quarter, students will work with cases from their professional or personal experience to observe and identify system dynamics and then imagine and anticipate possible interventions and consequent systemic effects.  In the spring quarter, our study will extend to understanding ourselves in relation to the systems in which we are living as we explore the nearby Nisqually River watershed to see how ecological, economic, and civic systems are interconnected.Students will be introduced to ecological economics, an analytic tool that advances a systems perspective in service of environmental conservation and development in public policy making.  Over both quarters, we will observe our class as a living system—a learning laboratory connecting theory to practice—as we develop ourselves as individuals, leaders, and participants in a learning community.  Through reading, participatory exercises, reflection, writing, stories, and expressive arts, students will cultivate a systems perspective as a way of understanding complex systems.  Students will be better able to design holistically and intervene wisely for greater well-being for themselves, their organizations, and communities.Learning Objectives:Class will meet five weekends per quarter, with online work between meetings. Kathy Kelly Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR
The Fungal Kingdom

Noelle Machnicki and Lalita Calabria

biology ecology field studies natural history 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day Fungi. What are they? Where are they and what are they doing there? How do they get their energy? What roles do they play in ecosystems? How do they grow? What do they taste like? How do they interact with other organisms? The central theme of this program is to answer these and other questions about fungi. Many people are familiar with green plants and their role in using solar energy to turn carbon dioxide, inorganic elements and water into sugars and other molecules. Fungi, which convert sugars and other organic molecules back into carbon dioxide, inorganic elements, water and energy, are less familiar. Nevertheless, fungi play pivotal roles in the various nutrient cycles within terrestrial ecosystems. They also form symbiotic relationships with plants to create mycorrhizae and have a different type of symbiotic relationship with algae to form lichens. In addition, fungi cause a wide variety of diseases that can be important in particular ecosystems as well as in agriculture and medicine. This program will focus on understanding these unique, ubiquitous and interesting organisms. We will cover fungal and lichen taxonomy, the ecology and biology of fungi and lichens, lab techniques for studying/identifying them, current research, as well as social and economic aspects. There will be an emphasis on work in the laboratory learning to classify fungi and lichens using chemical and microscopic techniques, along with a wide variety of taxonomic keys. These topics will be explored in the field, in the lab, and through lectures, workshops and student research project presentations. Students should expect to spend a minimum of 50 hours/week on program work. Students will be engaged in technical writing, library research, critical thinking and developing their oral presentation skills. ecology, biology, natural history, education, and environmental studies. Noelle Machnicki Lalita Calabria Junior JR Senior SR
Gateways: Utopias and Prisons

Arun Chandra

cultural studies music theater writing 

Signature Required: Fall Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This program offers Evergreen students the opportunity to be peer learners with incarcerated young men in a maximum-security institution. Each week the Evergreen students will visit one juvenile prison for a cultural diversity and equality workshop, and a workshop/seminar on experimental poetry and music.A fundamental principle of Gateways for Incarcerated Youth is that people have talents given to them at birth; our job is to encourage each other to search out and find our passions and gifts. Our work is guided by ideas of popular education that recognizes and values the knowledge and experience of each participant. The program works to strengthen notions of self and community through cultural awareness and empowerment. In connecting and building with people from other cultures and class backgrounds, each person becomes empowered to share knowledge, creativity, values and goals. The class will create responses to the texts, artworks, music and poetry that we discuss. We will approach the reading and creation of art with an eye towards arts' ability to project utopian possibilities and to name and resist current societal constraints. We will explore the history of both arts and prisons: how artists of the past and of today have portrayed social constraints and utopian ideals in art.The Evergreen students and the incarcerated youth will share readings, writings, music projects, and performance projects. In addition to the classes in the prison, Evergreen students will attend classes and workshops on campus.A central theme for our work will be the implementation of experimental ideas in art and in the social world: evaluating their consequences, and building on their failures. Our emphasis will be on the arts of the written word, music, and theater. Among the authors we will read will be George Jackson, Eugene Debs, Martin Luther King, M.K. Gandhi, Paulo Friere, Bertolt Brecht, Luis Valdez, Silvia Federici, Susan Parenti, and Michel Foucault. In the fall quarter, we will emphasize learning about social constraints in our society and others.  In the winter quarter, we will read and discuss utopias and envisioned societies.Since part of the class will take place in a state prison for juveniles, each student must submit an application and be interviewed by the faculty to ensure compliance with the Washington State Department of Corrections. music composition, poetry, education, and criminal justice. Arun Chandra Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Gender, Race, and Consumerism in U.S. History cancelled

Kristina Ackley

Native American studies gender and women's studies media studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 This course will examine the ways that images and ideas are disseminated through American mass media. Particularly focusing on the late nineteenth and twentieth century, we will trace the ways the newly emergent national culture drew on dominant ideas about gender and race to shape social, political, and economic relationships. We will consider the ways people actively contest the commodification of the Other. Throughout, we will be tracing the ways gender and race hierarchies intertwine with sexual regimes to form a society with shared, though contested, rules and understandings. Kristina Ackley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
General Biology

Clarissa Dirks

biology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, the scientific method, biomolecules, cell structure and function, Mendelian genetics, evolutionary biology, introduction to ecology, and plant and animal physiology. The lab component will reinforce concepts and ideas explored in lectures, readings, and workshops. This biology course is excellent preparation for students interested in taking more advanced life science courses or for future work in the areas of environmental science. Clarissa Dirks Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
General Chemistry

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening This year-long program in general chemistry provides prerequisites for many studies in science, health, and medicine as well as basic laboratory science for students seeking a well-rounded liberal arts education. Emphasis in fall quarter will be placed on calculations involving conversions, molar quantities, and thermodynamics.  Understanding atoms in terms of subatomic particles, chemical reactivity of inorganic compounds, and the gas laws will also be covered. We will end with an in-depth investigation of atomic structure and periodicity.  In the laboratory, students will routinely utilize a variety of scientific glassware and equipment and be taught how to handle chemicals safely.  Students will also learn to be observant of chemical changes and to make precise physical measurements.  Relevant scientific literature is introduced and often used to retrieve needed physical data. Winter quarter will start with a thorough investigation of how atoms unite to form molecules with a focus on covalent bonding.  Next we will focus on the role of intermolecular forces in liquids and solids.  This will be followed by chemical kinetics and an in-depth investigation of equilibrium.  We will end the quarter with an introduction to acid-base chemistry.  Labs will include titrations, crystal growth, pH titrations, and absorption spectroscopy.  An introduction to chemical instrumentation will be incorporated into lab exercises, and students will be required to utilize chemical drawing programs. Spring quarter will continue with acid-base chemistry, pH, and polyprotic acids.  Next we will look at buffers and complex ion equilibria.  We then will cover entropy and free energy followed by an introduction to electrochemistry and electrochemical cells.  Our final few weeks will be spent investigating a wide range of topics including transition metals and the crystal field model, nuclear chemistry, and other selected topics.  The lab portion of the class will include buffer making, electrochemical measurements, and the use of ion exchange columns.  In addition, students will be expected to partake in the on-campus Science Carnival as well as attend a locally held science conference. science, medicine Peter Pessiki Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
General Chemistry I with Laboratory

Dharshi Bopegedera

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 We will begin the study of general chemistry by exploring the structure of the atom and the nature of the chemical bond and then proceed towards an understanding of molecular geometry. This will lead us to discussions of the periodic table, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, and properties of gases. Time permitting other topics such as thermochemistry and kinetics may be explored.In the laboratory we will work to develop the skills needed to be successful in a chemistry lab. In particular we will focus on measurements, preparing solutions, titrations, and spectroscopy. Dharshi Bopegedera Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
General Chemistry II with Laboratory

Lydia McKinstry

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 This course is designed to offer the equivalent of the second half of a year-long course in general chemistry. The topics to be presented will include thermochemistry, properties and physical changes of matter, solution chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and aqueous equilibria. Additional topics in electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry may be presented if time permits. Course activities will include lectures, small-group problem-solving workshops, and laboratories. Laboratory work will build upon the skills learned in General Chemistry I, and provide hands-on experience with additional methods relevant to the topics presented in lecture. Lydia McKinstry Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Geographic Information Systems Intern

Dylan Fischer and Rip Heminway

computer science ecology environmental studies geography 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day The GIS internship, based in the Computer Applications Lab, is focused on developing advanced knowledge and skills in spatial data management and analysis through development of campus GIS data, database administration, and the support of research projects such as the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON) project. Through this internship students will gain advanced understanding of working with GIS software, and specifically in using GIS for natural resource applications. Specific opportunities include working in detail with LiDAR data, high quality aerial images, assessing forest canopy structure, and identifying forest canopy type using GIS software and data. This intern will also build instructional and support skills by assisting in the instruction of GIS workshops and curricular programs. GIS, environmental studies, and computer science. Dylan Fischer Rip Heminway Junior JR Senior SR
Geological Processes: A History of Earth

Abir Biswas and Christopher Coughenour

environmental studies field studies geography geology natural history sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day What are the origins of the Earth? What processes have shaped the planet’s structure over the past 4.6 billion years? Through lab and lecture, students will become familiar with how fundamental Earth materials (minerals and rocks) form and are altered by the persistent physical, chemical, and biological processes at work on our planet's surface. In this program students will study the mechanisms of changes in terrestrial and marine Earth systems and interpret geologic evidence in order to understand Earth system processes. Our approach will integrate topics in chemistry, physics, and evolutionary biology with in-depth studies of physical and historical geology. Quantitative skill development will be fundamental to this approach.After a period of on-campus skill and content building, students will participate in approximately two weeks of rigorous field work. Some students will embark on a 16-day river trip through the Grand Canyon, giving those students the opportunity to visit one of the geologic wonders of the world, access to over 1 billion years of geologic history, and study the processes currently shaping the Canyon. Other students will participate in multiple hands-on field excursions across the Pacific Northwest, studying some of the incredibly diverse landscapes and applying their knowledge about Earth system process in the field.This field-based program requires significant commitment from students, given the cost, rigors, and time away from campus. All students in the program will participate in field work though only approximately 14 students will be able to participate in the Grand Canyon river trip. The program will integrate physical geology, historical geology, quantitative skills for the earth sciences, and a field project. Students who successfully complete this program will gain a solid scientific basis for future work in all aspects of earth sciences and environmental studies. Abir Biswas Christopher Coughenour Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Geology of the Grand Canyon cancelled

Kenneth Tabbutt

field studies geology 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day, Evening and Weekend There is no better place to learn about geologic processes than boating down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon.  This intensive course will provide a foundation in physical geology and fluvial geomorphology while traveling 277 miles on a two-week dory trip.  Students must be committed to collaborating and learning.  Students will be selected through an application and interview process.  There will be mandatory orientation meetings prior to the trip and evaluation conferences upon our return. earth science, and environmental science. Kenneth Tabbutt Junior JR Senior SR
Geometry

Neal Nelson

education mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Geometry: Measuring Worlds

Allen Mauney

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Classical geometry is an organized attempt to describe, with certainty, the physical reality of our world. Students will make observations, formulate hypotheses, and compare their experience with formal geometrical statements.  After rigorously applying logic to solve concrete problems, students will consider the nature and limitations of purely rational methods to describe reality.  Theorems will be used to analyze architectural elements and the Declaration of Independence.  This class is designed for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation. natural sciences, law, medicine, teaching mathematics at all levels Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
German, Beginning I, II, III

Marianne Hoepli

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Komm und lern Deutsch! This year-long sequence of courses for beginning German students will cover basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and conversation.  Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating, and writing standard high German.  Students will also learn about culture, traditions, and customs of the German people, new and old.  Through involvement in children’s stories, music, and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions.  By the end of the year, students will improve their oral skills to the point of discussing short films and modern short stories and learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé, or a job application. Classes will use a communicative method and will move quickly toward being conducted primarily in German. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Giving Psychology Away

Mark Hurst

psychology 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Psychology is making a significant difference in peoples' lives, both in a broad manner as well as in specific application.  In this year-long program, students will: 1) examine basic empirical research, from psychology’s history to the present, that has led to creative application of the findings in individual, group, and community endeavors; 2) learn the general and specific methodology and strategies that influence individual lives as well as interpersonal interactions in public and private settings; 3) develop a personal theoretical orientation for influencing change; and 4) create a conceptual instructional module regarding a specific life domain (relationships, work, parenting, health, leisure, etc.) for implementation in a setting relevant to their future goals or careers (education, social services, business, government, criminal justice, medicine, economics, etc.).  This program is designed to foster advanced comprehension and analysis of the material, enhance critical thinking, and build a skill base that can be applied for the social good.  Each quarter builds on previous material, so the intention is for students to continue through the year, culminating in a final spring project. We will use a variety of instructional strategies such as small and large group seminars, lectures, workshops, films, role-playing, field trips, guest lectures, and videoconferences with prominent contemporary psychologists. The material covered in this program is relevant to daily living as well as preparatory for careers and future studies across all disciplines. psychology, education, health care, criminal justice, political science,  management Mark Hurst Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Global Agricultural Crisis: Agroecology and Political Economy cancelled

Martha Rosemeyer, David Muehleisen and Peter Dorman

agriculture economics international studies political science sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day We are living through the greatest change in human livelihood since hunter-gatherers became agriculturalists. Hundreds of millions of small farmers are being driven off the land around the world as the global food system is transformed according to an industrial model. In this program we will explore the meaning of this transformation – as a sweeping social upheaval, an aspect of the crisis of poverty and development, a fundamental alteration of agricultural methods, and a challenge to global ecological sustainability. We will look at the tropical agricultural systems being abandoned as well as those replacing them and the political and economic justifications given for policies that are driving these changes at national and international levels. We will examine the many alternatives emerging from sustainable agricultural and environmental movements, as well as the rediscovery of traditional methods and resurgence of food communities in both poorer and wealthier countries. A study of agroecology in fall and of basic soil science in the winter will support our understanding of these developments and policies that promote them.  Program activities will include seminars on books and papers, lectures, workshops, Excel labs, botany labs, international rural meals, farm visits, field trips, and attending conferences. agriculture, political economy, and social and environmental justice. Martha Rosemeyer David Muehleisen Peter Dorman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Global Business Tools for Sustainable Ventures

David Shaw and Zoe Van Schyndel

business and management economics history international studies political science sustainability studies 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This program is designed for junior and senior students who want to build a strong foundation in sustainable business. Students in this program will explore what it means to go beyond the traditional profit-centered approach to business. We will look at the concept of systems thinking and sustainability within an entrepreneurial process, and investigate how this concept is applicable to any discipline of business such as management, marketing and finance. We will look at sustainable entrepreneurs around the world in both the non-profit and for-profit sectors. We will learn from their experiences about opportunities and activities connected to social and environmental topics. This two-quarter program includes students designing, completing and reporting on a very substantial research project that will include conducting several weeks of research, either locally off-campus or anywhere in the U.S. During fall quarter students will build a strong foundation in research methods, finance, entrepreneurship, marketing, sustainability, and management. The final assignment for the fall quarter will be a research proposal for conducting off-campus research about a sustainable business during winter quarter.For winter quarter, students will visit a sustainable business, organization or industry in the U.S. to conduct their research. Students should expect to work eight weeks of the quarter off-campus at the organization and to remain in close virtual communication with the faculty who will be providing weekly feedback. Week 1 will be used to make final preparations for the off campus research and week 10 for presenting preliminary research findings to the class. sustainability, globalization, international business and trade, entrepreneurship, economic development, competitive advantage of nations and regions, business history, political economy of natural resources, eco-tourism and sustainable agriculture. David Shaw Zoe Van Schyndel Junior JR Senior SR
Global Health: Inequalities and Ethics

Carolyn Prouty

anthropology biology health international studies philosophy of science physiology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Day Su1Summer 1 This course draws from public health, epidemiology, bioethics, and human rights philosophy to consider health and disease in a global context. What are the social, economic, and epidemiological forces that have led to vast inequalities in health outcomes globally? As we investigate how Western ideas apply in non-Western countries, we will explore ethical dilemmas that researchers, healthcare providers, and policy makers encounter in resource-poor environments. Finally, we will examine the epidemiology, physiology, and pathology of specific conditions including HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, maternal morbidity and mortality, nutritional deficiencies, and parasitic diseases, paying particular attention to connections between infections and inequalities, malnutrition, and human rights. Carolyn Prouty Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Global Water Issues cancelled

Paul Pickett

agriculture ecology environmental studies 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 The United Nations has declared the access to affordable, clean water to be a human right. Yet around the world billions of people cannot exercise this right. In addition people in the developing world often face challenges of drought, floods, and degradation of aquatic ecosystem services. This class explores the challenges of water in developing countries, emerging issues, and potential solutions. Issues to be explored include Integrated Water Resource Management, governance, privatization, gender equality, social justice, climate change, water security, and appropriate technology. Paul Pickett Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Global Water Issues and El Salvador Field Study cancelled

Paul Pickett

agriculture ecology environmental studies land-use planning 

  Program JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4, 8 4, 8 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 The United Nations has declared the access to affordable, clean water to be a human right. Yet around the world billions of people cannot exercise this right. In addition people in the developing world often face challenges of drought, floods, and degradation of aquatic ecosystem services. This class explores the challenges of water in developing countries, emerging issues, and potential solutions. Issues to be explored include Integrated Water Resource Management, governance, privatization, gender equality, social justice, climate change, water security, and appropriate technology.Graduate students and undergraduate students registering for 4 credits will explore these topics in in the first session. Undergraduate students registering for 8 credits and graduate students (still as part of their 4 credits) will expand on the class work from first session by participating in a sustainability field study in El Salvador—a 7-day field trip to the Jiquilisco Bay region with an EcoViva ( ) delegation. Participants will live in the communities and learn about local development programs including flood preparation and recovery, sustainable agriculture, water supply infrastructure, community organizing and youth development, and environmental management (mangrove ecosystems and sea turtle conservation).Students wishing to enroll in the second session field study in El Salvador will need to pay a non-refundable deposit prior to June 1, 2012. If a minimum enrollment of seven students in the second session is not attained, the field study will be canceled.For more information, see the and . Paul Pickett Mon Wed Full
Grammar in Context

Emily Lardner

education writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 Standard written English has enough irregularities to make any careful writer or teacher nervous.  Given that it's impossible to memorize everything, what's a writer or teacher to do?  Which strategies for working on conventions of written English are most productive for you as a writer?  Which ones will engage any writers you find yourself working with?  This course is based on the premise that learning grammar happens best in the context of meaningful writing.  Expect to write, and think about writing, and develop both your grammatical vocabulary and your grammatical skills, all with the aim of becoming a more effective writer.  Class time will spent in workshops, and the on-line learning component will be used for trying out new strategies.  All writers welcome. Emily Lardner Tue Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Non-profit grantwriting and fundraising; government resource development. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Grant Writing Essentials

Sylvie McGee

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 Use hands-on practice to learn to write successful grants! We will start with an introduction to grants and their place in the development of nonprofit organizations and learn the sound planning skills needed for strong proposals. Students will write a grant for a nonprofit organization, getting feedback on each section as it is developed. A list of organizations seeking grant writing assistance will be provided**. Using interactive learning and assigned tasks, we will focus on planning, research, evaluation techniques, budgeting and how to effectively communicate issues and needs in a clear and concise manner. **NOTE: If you have a non-profit or government agency you wish to write for, you MUST contact me in advance of the first day of class, so that I can send a form to be filled out by the agency and review their readiness. Sylvie McGee Fri Sat Sun Full
The Graphic Novel cancelled

Steve Blakeslee

literature visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Note: This course has been expanded into a full-time program of the same name: , and it will also be offered as a course in summer quarter. Over the past 30 years, the graphic novel has won numerous readers with its bold topics, innovative forms, and vivid artwork. We will explore the origins, development, and unique workings of sequential narratives, from the socially conscious woodcut novels of the 1930s (e.g., Lynd Ward’s ) to the mid-century adventures of Hergé’s to the bizarre but compelling world of Jim Woodring’s . Other works will include Satrapi’s and Barry’s . Steve Blakeslee Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Graphic Novel

Steve Blakeslee

literature visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Evening Su1Summer 1 Over the past 30 years, the graphic novel has won numerous readers with its bold topics, innovative forms, and vivid artwork. We will explore the origins, development, and unique workings of these sequential narratives, from the socially conscious woodcut novels of the 1930s (e.g., Lynd Ward’s ) to the global adventures of Hergé’s to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' 1980s game-changer, . Other works will include Scott McCloud's and recent graphic memoirs. Our overall goal is to develop an informed and critical perspective on this powerful medium. Students registered for 8 credits will research a particular author-artist, genre, or theme, or develop graphic narratives of their own. Steve Blakeslee Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
The Graphic Novel: A Critical Examination

Steve Blakeslee and Tom Maddox

literature media studies visual arts writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day In the past decade, graphic novels have become recognized as an important new form of storytelling, shaping contemporary culture even as they are shaped by it. These book-length, comic-art narratives and compilations employ a complex and iconic visual  language. Combining and expanding on elements associated with literature, 2-D visual art, and cinema, the medium offers unique opportunities for reader immersion, emotional involvement, and even imaginative co-creation. We will study sequential narratives that represent diverse periods, perspectives, styles, and subject matter--from the “high art” woodcut novels of the 1930s (e.g., Lynd Ward’s ) to Art Spiegelman’s groundbreaking Holocaust memoir, , to the bizarre but entrancing alternate universe of Jim Woodring’s . While many of these works include humor, they frequently center on serious topics, including war, religious oppression, social and economic inequality, and dilemmas of ethnic and sexual identity. We will carefully examine each text at multiple levels of composition, from single frames to the work as a whole, and read selected theory, criticism, and commentary, including Scott McCloud’s and Matt Madden’s . More generally, we will work with a widely-employed model of storytelling—based on act structure, character arc, and protagonist-focused narrative—to explore the ways that stories can migrate across media and find new modes of expression. As writers, students will develop and articulate their new understandings by means of response papers, visual analyses, background research, fictional and nonfictional narratives, reflective journals, and other activities as assigned. Our studies will conclude with group projects focused on particular artists, works, and themes, or on the creation of original graphic narratives. Finally, while this is not a studio art course, we will  experiment with drawing throughout the quarter as a way to develop an artist’s-eye view of comic art. Our goal is to develop an informed and critical perspective on this powerful medium.The faculty do not assume any previous experience with comic art in general or graphic narratives in particular. Fans, skeptics, artists, and the generally curious are all welcome, provided they are ready for sustained and serious work. Steve Blakeslee Tom Maddox Mon Tue Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Great Works in the Liberal Arts cancelled

Nancy Koppelman

education history literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course introduces students to great works in fields from the Liberal Arts: literature, languages, philosophy, history, mathematics, the sciences, and the arts. Students will learn about the origins and history of liberal arts education and read works about the liberal arts by philosophers and educators. Guest speakers will introduce great works that influenced their teaching and scholarship. Each week, students will participate in seminars and write short essays, and at the last class meeting, take a final exam. This course provides an excellent introduction to the cultural traditions and range of fields that encompass a liberal arts education. any field in the liberal arts. Nancy Koppelman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Health vs. Wealth

Mary Dean

health sustainability studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access, and treatment will be reviewed. The books and  aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine", "Sick Around the World," and "Sick Around America". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Heart and Mind on Screen and Page

Tom Maddox

communications literature media studies moving image writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Storytelling has changed in extraordinary ways during the thousands of years separating preliterate tellers and singers of tales from contemporary novelists, graphic artists, or filmmakers. However, in all their work we can recognize the elements and structures of . This program is for students who want to understand these elements in order to make better stories, and who want to develop a deep, practical understanding of the structures that govern forms such as film, television, and the short story. Primarily, they will learn the grammar and practice of storywriting by examining the works of masters and attempt to apply this knowledge in their own work. Students who want to tell stories are welcome, whatever their chosen expressive mode--prose, poetry, graphics, film, television, videogame script, or any other genre or mix of media. Movies and television are media that pose unique challenges and opportunities regarding story and dramatization; they are also the dominant media of our time. They are inherently collaborative and demand specialized talents and skills from a writer, who must work within limits imposed by time, space, money, and the myriad complexities of production, as well as the formulaic expectations that have come to govern the 50-minute television drama or 22-minute comedy and the 120-minute film. Thus we will spend considerable time examining how screenplays work and discovering the conventions governing them.We will also pay attention to short stories, perhaps the most demanding story form, in order to learn from its masters how to combine economy of expression with great power. Authors will most likely include Anton Chekhov, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, Alice Munro, and Raymond Carver.Students will begin the quarter by describing a storytelling project they want to complete; then, in consultation with the faculty, they will write a project proposal detailing their goals. The projects will be the core and driving force of student work. As the quarter progresses, students also submit work in progress for ongoing critique and guidance. At the end of the quarter, they will present their finished project for group review and response.Every week students will read stories and view films or television episodes. They will also participate in weekly film and story seminars, where they will respond to the week's viewing and reading. In weekly story workshops, they will submit their work for group critique and do a series of workshop exercises. Finally, every week will end with meetings of the SIGs (special interest groups). These small groups will be defined, organized, and run by the students. This is the part of the program where students are free to define their own topic and pursue it according to their own needs. As examples, these might include short fiction, situation comedies, hard-boiled detective fiction, or graphic novels. writing, screenplay writing, American film, theory of fiction, and literary studies. Tom Maddox Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
History and Systems in Psychology

Susan Cummings

psychology 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Human Anatomy and Physiology

Cindy Beck

biology health 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6, 12 6, 12 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 Students will study the anatomy and physiology of the human body using a systems approach while exploring the interrelationship of health and disease in the human body. Each body system will be covered utilizing a traditional lecture and laboratory format.  This course meets prerequisites for nursing and graduate programs in health sciences. health and medicine Cindy Beck Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Human Geography: Cultural Interactions with the Physical Landscape

Michael Vavrus

geography history sustainability studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day, Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This course focuses on geography as a cultural encounter. We will study patterns and processes that have shaped human interaction with various environments. The course encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of geography. Central guiding questions we will be addressing in this course:This survey of human geography introduces broad concepts that are the focus of contemporary studies in geography. These concepts include Michael Vavrus Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Human Resource Management

Theresa Aragon, Cary Randow and Natividad Valdez

business and management leadership studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend This program is designed to provide a detailed overview of five specific areas of human resource management:  All areas of the program are designed to provide conceptual understanding through readings and case analyses while developing skills through practice, role plays, and simulations. Students who successfully complete the coursework in all five areas will be given a certificate of completion and should be prepared to pursue employment and professional certification in human resource management. Fall quarter focuses on the first two areas.  We will cover the basics of human resource management including strategic planning, recruitment, orientation, retention, job design, and organizational development.  We will also review aspects of labor law including the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and major employment discrimination laws including sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage standards, and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.  Students will learn how to apply these major laws to 'real-work' situations and will have a very good understanding of the major provisions. Winter quarter will focus on human resource development and training, performance management, and total compensation.  We will cover a number of training and development topics including needs analysis and instructional design and evaluation while distinguishing between leadership development and skills development.  We will also examine the components of a total compensation program: salary, benefits, and workplace environment.  Specific topics will include pay philosophies, determining job value, and strategic approaches to communication. Students who have completed Evergreen HR management courses in previous years may register for and attend the modules they have not already completed by contacting Theresa Aragon for a faculty signature. human resources Theresa Aragon Cary Randow Natividad Valdez Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Human Resource Management

Dariush Khaleghi, Cary Randow and Natividad Valdez

business and management leadership studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend This program is designed to provide a detailed overview of five specific areas of human resource management:  All areas of the program are designed to provide conceptual understanding through readings and case analyses while developing skills through practice, role plays, and simulations. Students who successfully complete the coursework in all five areas will be given a certificate of completion and should be prepared to pursue employment and professional certification in human resource management. Winter quarter focuses on the first two areas.  We will cover the basics of human resource management including strategic planning, recruitment, orientation, retention, job design, and organizational development.  We will also review aspects of labor law including the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and major employment discrimination laws including sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage standards, and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.  Students will learn how to apply these major laws to 'real-work' situations and will have a very good understanding of the major provisions. Spring quarter will focus on human resource development and training, performance management, and total compensation.  We will cover a number of training and development topics including needs analysis and instructional design and evaluation while distinguishing between leadership development and skills development.  We will also examine the components of a total compensation program: salary, benefits, and workplace environment.  Specific topics will include pay philosophies, determining job value, and strategic approaches to communication. Students who have completed Evergreen HR management courses in previous years may register for and attend the modules they have not already completed by contacting Dariush Khaleghi for a faculty signature. human resources Dariush Khaleghi Cary Randow Natividad Valdez Wed Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Human Rights and Wrongs

Greg Mullins

cultural studies literature media studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Human rights law is encoded in the spare language of treaties, but human rights practice comes alive in the materiality of daily life. After a quick tour of human rights law, we will devote our energies in this program toward understanding how human rights accrue force and meaning insofar as they are embedded in cultural practice, and specifically in cultural practices of representation. Our inquiry will be guided by these questions: How do human rights frameworks prevent or redress human wrongs (including atrocities such as torture and genocide)? What leads some people to abuse human rights, and other people to respect them? How are human rights struggles pursued using modes of visual and textual representation? What role do cultural forms such as film, literature, and public memorials play in either fostering or hindering respect for human rights? In the fall quarter, our mode of inquiry will be primarily textual. Even as we study film, photography, new media, public monuments and memory projects, that study will be accomplished by reading theoretical accounts of rights and representation. We will also read historical accounts of the rise of human rights frameworks, and we will consider a variety of critiques of human rights. Students will build a strong foundation in the theory of human rights, as well as in theories of visual and textual representation. A typical week's work will include a film screening, lecture, and seminars. Students will write two long essays, several shorter pieces, and a prospectus for a winter quarter project. In the winter quarter, we will continue to read and seminar as a group as we expand our focus to include literature. We will read Arendt by way of concentrating our inquiry around questions of judgement, we will read Dawes by way of focusing on problems of narrative, and we will take up the case study of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility on the tenth anniversary of its opening. Students will also pursue projects. Depending on student background and interests, these projects could result in a traditional research paper or in a more practical implementation of the theory they've learned (for example, a new media project). human rights, politics, philosophy, literature, film and media studies. Greg Mullins Mon Tue Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Hybrid Music I, II, III

Peter Randlette

music 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening This year-long series of courses is intended for the musician interested in exploring compositional experimentation with analog and digital synthesis technology and computer applications.  In fall, the course will focus on analog synthesis techniques, studio production, and the creation of musical pieces with a focus on new options presented by this compositional environment.  Winter will focus on building pieces from techniques of synthesis introduced in fall quarter and learning new digital synthesis techniques, different controllers and sequencers, signal processing, and surround 5.1 production skills.  Techniques will include use of percussion controllers, synthesizer voice editing, sample based applications, and plug-in signal processing.  In spring, students will develop pieces based on design problems using combinations of computer-based and analog resources covered in prior quarters.  New material will include acoustic/electronic sound source integration, mastering techniques, object-oriented voice construction, and advanced production methods.  Each quarter, students will complete projects, attend weekly seminar/lecture/critique sessions, use weekly studio times, and maintain production journals. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
I Hear America Singing: 19th Century American Literature and Culture

Susan Preciso and Marla Elliott

American studies literature music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend In this one-quarter program, students will read classics in American literature, learn about American music, and explore American culture as it was shaped in the vibrant, chaotic years that frame the Civil War.  Herman Melville, Stephen Foster, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman,  Harriet Beecher Stowe, and B.F. White are some of the authors and composers we will study.  Students will learn and participate in our exploration of American music by learning shape note singing, an American folk choral tradition.  Exploring ante and post-bellum beliefs about race and the politics of slavery will be central to our study.  Students should expect to be active participants in all program activities, which will include seminar, workshops, lectures, and films.  We will also meet for one full Saturday this quarter, which may be a field trip or other program enrichment. teaching, American studies Susan Preciso Marla Elliott Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Image and Form: Myth, Ritual, and Story

Susan Aurand and Evan Blackwell

aesthetics art history cultural studies visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Throughout history, art has given physical form to our beliefs about our origins and nature, and to our efforts to correctly position ourselves in the cosmos. This program will examine how art embodies our cultural and individual myths, rituals and stories. We will study this historical function of art and explore it in our own lives through intensive studio work in painting and ceramics.  In the fall, students will develop technical skills in painting (using watercolor, acrylics and oils), in sculptural ceramics, and in mixed media sculpture. Students will be introduced to a variety of ceramic construction processes, clay and glaze materials, firing processes, and use of studio equipment. The class will consider the characteristics and allusions of clay in all its states as a sculptural and expressive medium. Students will advance their technical skills through weekly skill workshops and assignments. In addition, each student will create a series of two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional artworks exploring a personal theme related to myth, ritual or story. In winter, the class will further develop and build on much of the work we started in the fall. We will continue to study myths, rituals and stories and examine how cultural context affects meaning in different forms of expression. Students will expand the conceptual basis of their work as they continue to explore and build skills in both painting and ceramics. Nonconventional approaches and methods of manufacture and installation in both painting and ceramic sculpture will be encouraged. Winter quarter will culminate with individual theme projects and presentation of student work. Students entering the program must have a solid background in representational drawing (including perspective, shading, and preferably some prior experience in figure drawing), but no prior experience in ceramics or painting is required.  The program is designed for students who have a strong work ethic and self-discipline. The program will function as a working community of artists. Students will be expected to work intensively in the campus studios and to be engaged and supportive of their peers. studio arts, arts education, art history, arts management, and writing for the arts. Susan Aurand Evan Blackwell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
In Our Image

Lisa Sweet, Andrew Reece and Rita Pougiales

anthropology art history community studies literature philosophy religious studies visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Making meaning of our lives and the world we inhabit is the essence of being human. Through knowledge, stories and images, we manifest what it is we hold most sacred and essential in our lives. Religion, through its liturgy, music and imagery, reflects what a people hold to be essentially human. Our work will address questions like the following: What are the fundamental mysteries humans address through religious practice and expression? What are the stories being told through artistic and written material? What is the experience of the artist creating sacred images? What are the meanings that have endured over centuries? How is it that sacred images and texts provide direction for us? Our inquiry into meaning-making will center on Christianity, one religious tradition that has been a wellspring for expressions of spiritual and moral meaning, as well as a source of insight and understanding that has inspired magnificent artistic creations and sacred texts. In fall and winter, we focus on the first thirteen centuries of the tradition, from the life of Christ to the end of the Medieval period, during which the story of Christ's life, death and resurrection helped transform the Roman Empire into Europe and "the West." During this time, Christians, like Muslims and Jews a "people of the Book," gave the world some of its most inspired, and inspiring, books: the New Testament, the works of Anselm and Augustine, Dante's , and others, which will form part of our curriculum. The role of images in religious practice will form another part of our study. We'll consider the functions of icons, reliquaries, church architecture and devotional images, created solely to express and link us to the sacred. We'll consider the strategies image-makers employed to interpret scripture and early theology, as well as the anxieties and iconoclasms provoked by images that attempt to depict God. Through readings, seminars and lectures, we'll explore the history of images and objects made before the the concept of "Art" as we understand it today was established.In spring, the focus on the history and culture of Christianity through the 14th century will be directed toward more focused topics addressing meaning-making and Christianity. Students will have the option of continuing in the program in one of the following focused, full-time disciplines or themes: recent developments in theology and philosophy (Andrew), communities of faith (Rita), or studio-practice in printmaking (Lisa). Spring components of the program will be open to both continuing and newly enrolled students. medieval history, religious studies, art history and community studies. Lisa Sweet Andrew Reece Rita Pougiales Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
In Our Image: Communities of Faith

Rita Pougiales

American studies anthropology cultural studies religious studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day “Communities of faith” are those groups of people who are dedicated to one another and to seeking the good. We will approach “faith” as a commitment to a good that can be illusive and hard to grasp, yet represents what Paul Tillich describes as an “ultimate concern.”  Faith, as such, is a matter of trust in the process of seeking that ultimate concern.  Faith, understood in this way, cuts across all dimensions of our society including those committed to political, environmental, educational, and spiritual ends.We are particularly interested in the means by which members of religious communities embody their faith and beliefs.  Our study will be largely ethnographic, looking in depth at the rituals, devotions, and practices of faith communities. In particular, we will focus on those practices that depend on the body for expression, movement and sound. Such practices are not only reflections of faith, they also expand its experience and meaning. We will look at the cultural practices, experiences and shared expectations of members of communities of faith, and attempt to understand what is meaningful for them.  We will be guided in our study of “faith” by Tillich’s and additional readings by authors Karen Armstrong and Richard Niebuhr. We will delve into the nature of communities through ethnographic and historical case studies including a medieval religious community led by Hildegard of Bingen, Orthodox fire-walking communities in rural Greece and Maine, and a contemporary Catholic convent in Mexico. In addition to these studies, each student will conduct her or his own research on a particular community of faith. religious studies and community studies. Rita Pougiales Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
In Our Image: Printmaking

Lisa Sweet

art history religious studies visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program continues work from fall and winter. This quarter we will examine the production and function of printed images in early modern Christian religious culture through readings, seminars, and developing skills with basic woodcut printmaking techniques.  Linking theory to our artistic practice, we’ll address issues including, iconoclasm, the relationship between text and images in religious practice,  image makers’ roles as translators and interpreters of scripture and religious tradition, the human desire for and anxiety about religious imagery, and we’ll explore the paradox of visually depicting that which is invisible and inexpressible.  Students should expect to spend about 70% of their time working in the printmaking studio on assignments, and 30% of their time studying assigned texts. The program will include a significant writing component synthesizing and integrating ideas covered in . Because this program is a continuation of the fall and winter themes addressed in , .  New students are welcome, but should have some existing familiarity with academic studies of Christian theology, history and/or medieval art appreciation in order to thrive in the program.  Lisa Sweet Mon Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
In Our Image: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion

Andrew Reece

philosophy religious studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Can we know God?  Or, for that matter, does such a being exist, and, if so, how do we relate to it (or Her, or Him)?  What is the distinction between faith and reason?  Between philosophy and theology?  Morality and religion?  How can one live a life of intellectual and moral integrity and a life of faith?  Do the two imply one another, or are they in conflict?  These are the central questions of this program, and in our inquiry we will raise many more, about belief, dogma, doubt, divinity, language, ritual, and meaning-making.  Our ability to raise, refine, and resolve these questions will be strengthened by our study of classic texts in the philosophy of religion from authors including Anselm, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Martin Buber, and Paul Tillich.  This program was originally planned as the third quarter of the program, which was a study of the Christian movement from its origins in Judaism and Greco-Roman culture to the time of Dante.  Partly for that reason, the authors selected are Christian and Jewish; however, this is a study not of apologetic theology but of philosophy of religion.  That is, the theories we will encounter do not necessarily defend a particular religious perspective, nor do they demand from readers extensive familiarity with scripture.  The points of view they share are not limited to those who share their faiths. Reading, discussion, and writing will be our sole modes of inquiry, and we will go about them with a level of seriousness and intensity that cannot be understated.  Students will participate in book seminars and writing seminars on every text, and they will respond to every text in essays.  Peer review and revision will also be a significant component of our work together.       Andrew Reece Mon Tue Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
In the Presence of Beauty

Robert Knapp, Suzanne Simons and Helena Meyer-Knapp

architecture cultural studies education history music visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12, 16 Day, Evening and Weekend This program will explore the idea and the experience of beauty. Our thesis is that the sense of beauty has many facets, which different cultures recognize and value differently. Individual preferences also differ, always under the influence of powerful, shared traditions of beauty. We will dramatize and investigate this by paying extensive attention to three traditions in which the faculty have professional expertise—Iran, Japan and Britain. Significant differences between these traditions and between individual student and faculty experiences in the American context will be a major occasion of collaborative and individual learning.Most class meetings will put students in the presence of beautiful art, writing, film, architecture or music; readings and seminars in criticism and cultural history and analytical and expressive writing assignments will help students develop authentic ways to articulate their descriptions and judgments. The work will lead to a major concluding project on an individually chosen instance of beauty. Students will acquire both a fuller understanding of the variety of ways one can encounter beauty, and of ways to document, appreciate and evaluate the experiences of beauty that occur.The program has two levels of enrollment: all students will meet one night per week and every Saturday for a coordinated program of lectures, seminars, films and workshops. 16-unit students will also prepare for and take two two-day visits to cultural cultural resources in Northwest cities, to be in the immediate presence of beautiful things which can come only second-hand to campus. design, art history, cultural studies, education, world history, architecture and visual arts. Robert Knapp Suzanne Simons Helena Meyer-Knapp Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
India Through Literature and Film

Karen Gaul

cultural studies media studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 India holds a fascination for many of us. Yet, whatever we may think we know about this region, the South Asian subcontinent is one of the most rapidly changing areas of the world.Novels and films offer rich windows into particular realities of life in India. In this program, we will read novels and short stories by some leading South Asian writers such as Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Rohinton Mistry, Aravind Ardiga, and others. We will also view a variety of commercial as well as ethnographic films made by Indian filmmakers.We will use ethnographic approaches to analyze these literary and filmic portrayals of Indian culture, examining gender, class and caste relations, religious conflict, and political struggle in urban and rural settings. Case studies of particular urban and rural areas will enable us to narrow our focus and gain a more specific understanding of cultural dynamics at play.We will examine the narratives of these materials as both potential sources of and rebuttals to stereotypes about Indian culture. And we will consider the media themselves, examining issues of representation, translation, interpretation, and voice. This program will be a great introduction to contemporary and historical India through the lenses of ethnography, literature, and film. Karen Gaul Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Individual Study: American Studies

Nancy Koppelman

American studies history literature philosophy 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers the advanced, highly disciplined student the opportunity to pursue a self-directed and self-constructed syllabus. The work may be completely academic in nature, or may be combined with an internship. Students interested in pursuing such work in American Studies are invited to contact me. I specialize in American history before 1920, particularly social history, industrialization, economic history, American literature, popular culture, pragmatism, and the history of technology, and how all these topics intersect with ethical concerns of the modern era. I am interested in working with students who want to study American history and culture in an effort to understand contemporary social, cultural, and political concerns. (Students interested in this offering are also encouraged to consider enrolling in , where they can pursue a major independent project as part of an ongoing learning community.) Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are encouraged to contact me via e-mail at koppelmn@evergreen.edu. Nancy Koppelman Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study : Experimental and Electronic Music

Ben Kamen

music 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Students interested in advanced independent work in experimental music, electronic music, interactive/mechatronic art, and music composition may contact the faculty with proposals for spring contracts.  Students should have prior college level experience in the area they wish to explore. Contract proposals should include both creative and research components. Ben Kamen Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Anthropology and History

Eric Stein

anthropology history 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual Studies offers opportunities for intermediate to advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Eric will sponsor student research, reading, and internships in anthropology and history, especially work related to Southeast Asia, medical anthropology, medical history, material culture, museum studies, nationalism, colonialism, gender, power, or immigration. Eric Stein Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics

David McAvity

mathematics physics 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day David McAvity Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Coastal Geology

Christopher Coughenour

environmental studies field studies geography geology marine science 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Coasts are among the most dynamic geological regimes on our planet.  A wide array of physical and biological processes shape the interface where seas meet continents.  In this contract offering, students will have the opportunity to explore several of the important physical processes of their choosing that are responsible for phenomena such as gravity waves, tides, estuarine circulation, sediment kinematics and dynamics, and the role of antecedent geology in shaping marginal marine systems.  The ultimate goal of the contract is to provide familiarity with the vocabulary and methods of the science and to foster an understanding of some of the fundamental processes that define coasts around the Pacific Northwest and the world.  This work may also incorporate a field research component, upon discussion with faculty. Christopher Coughenour Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Environmental Studies

Erik Thuesen

biology ecology environmental studies marine science zoology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Erik Thuesen Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Ethnographic Research and Writing

Samuel Schrager

American studies anthropology community studies cultural studies sociology writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This Individual Studies offering is for students with some fieldwork experience who want to undertake more advanced ethnographic study about persons, a group, an organization, a community, or a place. The focus can be on any topics meaningful to those involved in the study--for instance, cultural identity, oral history, values, traditions, equality, and everyday life. Sam will provide guidance on ethnographic method (including documentation, interpretation, and ethics) and on creative non-fiction writing for a final paper about the study. An internship or volunteer work can be linked to the project. (Students interested in this offering are also encouraged to consider enrolling in , where they can pursue a major independent project of this kind as part of an ongoing learning community.) Samuel Schrager Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Expressive Arts

Andrew Buchman

cultural studies dance music theater visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Please send me a preliminary proposal via email and I'll help you shape it.  I often recommend projects that combine some research (on an artist or style) with some creative work (a thematic portfolio or series of songs), with some technical practice (on an instrument or in a medium or style). Internships and travel/study projects are also welcome.  I'm especially interested in students who work in more than one artistic discipline intensively; for instance, music and visual art.  Drafting academic statements and investigating careers--vital parts of designing your own education--can also be credit-bearing activities. Andrew Buchman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Fiber Arts, Non-Western Art History, Native American Art, Creative Writing

Gail Tremblay

Native American studies art history cultural studies visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day In the fields listed, Gail Tremblay offers opportunities for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a connection with others who have mastered a particular skill or asked a similar or related question, and 4) an outcome that matters. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. the arts, art history, literature and creative writing, especially poetry, and the humanities. Gail Tremblay Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Genetics, Developmental Biology

Donald Morisato

biochemistry biology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and to focus on unique combinations of interesting topics.  Students are invited to submit a proposal if they are interested in investigating one of the following areas in genetics and developmental biology:  molecular mechanisms of axis determination, pattern formation, embryogenesis, stem cells, gene regulation, and epigenetic inheritance.  In order to be successful, students should have a solid background in the principles of molecular biology and be able to work independently. Donald Morisato Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Geography and Social Movements

Zoltan Grossman

American studies Native American studies geography international studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in Geography (including World Geography), Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies, or social movements should contact the faculty by email at . Zoltan Grossman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Geology, Earth Science

Abir Biswas

environmental studies field studies geology hydrology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day In the fields of geology, geochemistry, earth science, hydrology, GIS, and biogeochemistry, Abir Biswas offers opportunities for students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a time-line with expected deadlines, and 4) proposed deliverables. Areas of study other than those listed will be considered on a case-by-case basis.Self-directed and disciplined students with intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Abir Biswas Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: History, Cultural Studies

Robert Smurr

cultural studies history 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the fields of European history or cultural studies should present a well conceived contract proposal to Rob Smurr.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Robert Smurr Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: History of Science, Medicine, and Environment

Kevin Francis

environmental studies history philosophy of science 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Students may propose internships or individual learning contracts in history of science, history of medicine, ecology and evolutionary biology, or environmental studies. Note that successful 16-credit contracts involve significant reading (200-400 pages, depending on the type of material) and writing (5 pages minimum) each week; contracts for fewer credits will have proportionate expectations. Kevin Francis Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Interdisciplinary and Consciousness Studies

Ariel Goldberger

aesthetics art history community studies consciousness studies cultural studies media arts queer studies somatic studies study abroad theater visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the humanities, consciousness studies, or projects that include arts, travel or interdisciplinary pursuits are invited to present a proposal to Ariel Goldberger. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. humanities, arts, social sciences, interdisciplinary fields, and consciousness studies. Ariel Goldberger Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society and Study Abroad

Harumi Moruzzi

cultural studies history international studies language studies literature moving image 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12, 16 Day This Individual Study offers opportunities for students who are interested in creating their own courses of study and research, including internship and study abroad. Possible areas of study are Japanese studies, cultural studies, literature, art and film. Interested students should first contact the faculty via e-mail (moruzzih@evergreen.edu) before the Academic Fair for spring quarter. Japanese studies, cultural studies, international studies, literature and film studies. Harumi Moruzzi Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Landscape Ecology

Peter Impara

ecology geography 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Landscape ecology approaches ecological patterns and processes at broad spatial and temporal scales. Students interested in broad-scale spatial analysis of ecosystems as a contract option should have some experience in field data collection, spatial analysis, GIS, and ecological research. A previously determined area of study or focus is recommended.Students interested in spatial analysis of ecological and environmental patterns and processes at landscape scales for winter quarter should contact me in late fall quarter. Contracts should include a mix of research, data collection, spatial analysis and GIS, and a summary of results in a written report. Internships will be sponsored as long as the internship is focused on broad-scale ecological work and the supervisor is able to oversee work in spatial analysis. Peter Impara Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Mathematics, Computer Science

Brian Walter

computer science mathematics 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and/or to learn how to learn technical material outside of the classroom.  Students interested in a self-directed project, research, or course of study in Mathematics or Computer Science are invited to present a proposal to Brian Walter.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. mathematics, computer science Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Mathematics, Computer Science

Brian Walter

computer science mathematics 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and/or to learn how to learn technical material outside of the classroom.  Students interested in a self-directed project, research, or course of study in Mathematics or Computer Science are invited to present a proposal to Brian Walter.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. mathematics, computer science Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Mathematics, Theoretical Linguistics

Rachel Hastings

linguistics mathematics 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and/or to learn how to learn technical material outside of the classroom.  Students interested in a self-directed project or course of study in Mathematics or theoretical Linguistics are invited to present a proposal to Rachel Hastings.Students will need to have background appropriate to their goals and be able to work very independently.  Contracts in upper-division mathematics or in areas of linguistic theory such as syntax, semantics, or phonetics will be considered.  Group contracts are encouraged. Rachel Hastings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Media Studies, Community Studies

Anne Fischel

community studies media studies moving image 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day The faculty is prepared to support student learning in media theory, community studies, documentary work, or work with organizations and groups, either on a project or through internships. Proposals to work on nonfiction media projects will also be considered if you have prior coursework and/or production experience. media, journalism, community education, community organizing Anne Fischel Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Native American Studies

Frances V. Rains

Native American studies environmental studies history 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure.  Students interested in a self-directed project or research in Native American History, Native American Sovereignty, Climate Change or Environmental Studies related to Native Americans, First Nations or Indigenous Peoples should contact the faculty by email at . Frances V. Rains Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Native American Studies

Kristina Ackley

Native American studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in Native American Studies should contact the faculty by email at ackleyk@evergreen.edu. Kristina Ackley Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Native American Studies

Kristina Ackley

Native American studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in Native American Studies should contact the faculty by email at ackleyk@evergreen.edu. Kristina Ackley Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Performing Arts and Humanities

Ratna Roy

African American studies cultural studies dance international studies literature theater writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day I am interested in working with students who wish to do independent work in the Performing Arts and the Humanities. I am broadly interested in the intersections between the social and the creative worlds, as my own creative work has explicitly dealt with this intersection. As well, since my Ph.D. is in African-American Literature, I am deeply interested in minority arts, be they defined by race, gender or sexual orientation, and whether they be in writing, or in the visual or performing arts.As an artist, I have concentrated in the world of choreography, in particular, in Orissi dance from India. A strong influence on my work has been the ancient mythologies of the Indian sub-continent, and the contemporary realities of neo-colonialism and its consequences.Students interested in working with me should submit an on-line Independent Study form, available at: Click on "Online Contract Process", create a contract, then submit it to me for my review. Ratna Roy Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Performing Arts and Humanities

Ratna Roy

African American studies cultural studies dance international studies literature theater writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day I am interested in working with students who wish to do independent work in the Performing Arts and the Humanities. I am broadly interested in the intersections between the social and the creative worlds, as my own creative work has explicitly dealt with this intersection. As well, since my Ph.D. is in African-American Literature, I am deeply interested in minority arts, be they defined by race, gender or sexual orientation, and whether they be in writing, or in the visual or performing arts.As an artist, I have concentrated in the world of choreography, in particular, in Orissi dance from India. A strong influence on my work has been the ancient mythologies of the Indian sub-continent, and the contemporary realities of neo-colonialism and its consequences.Students interested in working with me should submit an on-line Independent Study form, available at: Click on "Online Contract Process", create a contract, then submit it to me for my review. Ratna Roy Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Poetics and Literary Studies

Leonard Schwartz

literature philosophy writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day  contract proposals in the area of poetics for the winter quarter. This could include literary studies of modernist figures or examinations of avant-garde movements. It could also involve projects in literary theory, continental philosophy, or theories of language. Leonard Schwartz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Poetics and Literary Studies

Leonard Schwartz

literature philosophy writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day  contract proposals in the area of poetics for the winter quarter. This could include literary studies of modernist figures or examinations of avant-garde movements. It could also involve projects in literary theory, continental philosophy, or theories of language. Leonard Schwartz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Political Economy

Anthony Zaragoza

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day, Evening and Weekend especially including political economy of racism, technology, and sports.   Anthony Zaragoza Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Political Economy, Globalization, Contemporary India

Jeanne Hahn

geography government history international studies law and government policy political science study abroad 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual Studies offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students must consult with Jeanne about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. She will sponsor student research and reading in political economy, U.S. history (especially the "Founding Period"), various topics in globalization, historical capitalism and contemporary India. political economy, U.S. history (esp. the "Founding Period"), topics on globalization, historical capitalism and contemporary India. Jeanne Hahn Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Political Economy, Social Movements, Alternate Economic Systems

Peter Bohmer

economics international studies political economy sociology 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This is an opportunity for advanced students to create their own course of study and research in political economy, social movements or related subjects.  The faculty sponsor will suppport students in carrying out studies in social movements, national or global; alternate economic systems, the 1930's, the 1960's, Latin American studies, Greece, political economy, radical and revolutionary theory; the contemporary economic crisis, poverty, racism and anti-racism, labor studies and labor history, U.S. foreign policy, Cuba, history of economic thought, the economics of inequalithy, immigration, or 20th and 21st century U.S. history. Peter Bohmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Psychology

Heesoon Jun

psychology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. This is an opportunity for students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in psychology. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Heesoon Jun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Psychology

Heesoon Jun

psychology 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. This is an opportunity for students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in psychology. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Heesoon Jun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Queer Studies, Performance

Walter Grodzik

American studies aesthetics anthropology architecture communications community studies consciousness studies cultural studies dance education field studies gender and women's studies literature media arts media studies moving image music queer studies somatic studies study abroad theater visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers individual and groups of students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Individual and groups of students interested in a self-directed project, research or internships in Queer Studies or the Performing and Visual Arts should contact the faculty by email at Walter Grodzik Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Russian/Slavic Literatures; Russian and Slavic Folklore; Eastern/Western Christianity Studies; Music Studies

Patricia Krafcik

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in exploring topics among the faculty sponsor's areas of knowledge (Russian/Slavic literatures and folklore, Christianity studies, and music) are invited to contact the faculty with proposals for individual learning contracts.  Patricia Krafcik Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Theatre and China Studies

Rose Jang

cultural studies theater 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the fields of theatre or China studies, students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Rose Jang Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Travel, Interdisciplinary Projects, Arts, and Humanities

Ariel Goldberger

aesthetics art history community studies consciousness studies cultural studies field studies media arts queer studies somatic studies study abroad theater visual arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the humanities, consciousness studies, or projects that include arts, travel or interdisciplinary pursuits are invited to present a proposal to Ariel Goldberger.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Ariel Goldberger Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Urban Planning and Community Development

Jennifer Gerend

American studies architecture community studies cultural studies environmental studies government history law and public policy sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual Studies offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students may consult with faculty about their proposed projects or internships. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. Students interested in urban planning, community and economic development, historic preservation, urban design, and urban history are encouraged to apply. Jennifer Gerend Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study: Urban Planning and Community Development

Jennifer Gerend

American studies architecture community studies cultural studies environmental studies government history law and public policy sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual Studies offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students may consult with faculty about their proposed projects or internships. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. Students interested in urban planning, community and economic development, historic preservation, urban design, and urban history are encouraged to apply. Jennifer Gerend Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study/Internships: Business, Management, Non-Profits, Seaport & Maritime Studies, International Trade

John Filmer

business and management economics maritime studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This is not a course!  There is no classroom!Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor.Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicational skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. agency administration, business, economics, leadership,  management, maritime and seaport studies, and U.S. history. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Individual Study/Internships: Sociology and Gender Studies

Toska Olson

gender and women's studies sociology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in sociology or gender studies are encouraged to apply. Successful students will be self-motivated, disciplined, and eager to engage in rigorous independent study. Toska Olson Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Innovation

EJ Zita and Mark Harrison

literature media arts moving image philosophy of science physics theater 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day What motivates and facilitates creativity, discovery, and invention, in arts and in sciences? To what extent do scientists and artists work within traditional practices or bodies of knowledge, and how do they move beyond and expand standard models or forms to achieve true innovation?What are the roles of community, genius, luck, plain hard work, and being in the right place in the right time in history? Are certain resources prerequisite, or is creativity truly democratic? Can any patterns be discerned in revolutions in science? In art? What qualifies as a revolution or innovation? We will explore questions such as these by reading (and sometimes staging) plays, fiction, philosophy, and nonfiction about arts and sciences. We will learn about the advent and development of the moving image. Students may, individually or in teams, explore and present special cases of particular interest to them, as research projects. Students will write short, thoughtful essays and responses to peers’ essays. We will learn some classical and modern physics (from dynamics to quantum mechanics and/or cosmology) using mostly conceptual methods. physics, performing and visual arts, teaching, sciences, and philosophy of science. EJ Zita Mark Harrison Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Inside Language

Diego de Acosta

communications language studies linguistics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This two-quarter program explores the fascinating world of languages.  What do you know when you know a language?  How do you get that knowledge?  Are there properties that all languages share?  How do languages change over time?  Why are half of the world's languages now under threat of extinction?  How are communities held together or torn apart by the languages they speak?  How does the way we classify the world through words circumscribe our relationships with others? We will consider these questions and others through the lens of linguistics.  Topics to be examined include:  phonetics and phonology, language change, the history of English and English dialects, language and gender, orality and literacy, wordplay, and swearing.  We will look at well-known languages and lesser-known languages and discover why they matter in our lives today.  Through the course of the program students will learn a variety of conceptual and empirical techniques, from analyzing speech sounds to interpreting the rationale behind current language policy. This program will be an intensive examination of topics requiring a significant amount of reading as well as regular problem sets and essays.  You will be expected to spend at least 40 hours per week on the program. linguistics, communication, and education. Diego de Acosta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Inside Language

Diego de Acosta

communications language studies linguistics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day What do you know when you know a language, and how do you get that knowledge? Are there properties that all languages share? How do languages change over time? Why are half of the world’s languages now under threat of extinction? How are communities held together or torn apart by the languages they speak?This one-quarter program explores the fascinating world of languages through the lens of linguistics. Topics for the quarter include: the structure of languages (phonology, morphology, and syntax); the history of English and English dialects; language attitudes and language policy in monolingual and multilingual communities; and methods for documenting languages. We will look at well-known languages and lesser-known languages and discover why they matter in our lives today. Through the course of the program, we will develop a variety of conceptual and empirical techniques, from analyzing speech sounds to interpreting the rationale behind current language legislation. This program will be an intensive examination of topics requiring a significant amount of reading as well as regular problem sets and essays. Students who took in fall-winter may not enroll in this program. Diego de Acosta Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Inside Passages: Northwest Rivers and Seas

Robert Smurr and Ted Whitesell

environmental studies field studies geography history sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This is a place-based program centered on the Salish Sea and the major watersheds of Washington State. Students will learn about our region of North America through the lenses of environmental history and cultural geography, examining changing human/environment relations over time. We will study aspects of Native culture, non-Native settlement, and modern challenges to sustainability and justice throughout the region. Particular attention will be paid to exploring our local corner of the Salish Sea region, so that students can understand their place at Evergreen within the context of broad, historical changes and the possibilities for constructing sustainable communities for the future. Multiple field trips will develop firsthand knowledge of the region's people and environments, where rivers and seas are surrounded by such diverse ecosystems as rain forests, arid basins, high mountain ranges, and wetlands. Field trips will include a canoe trip on the Columbia River, a visit to the largest dam removal project in history (in-progress on the Olympic Peninsula), and visits to inspiring restoration projects along both rural and urban shorelines and rivers. Students will be challenged to identify unifying features as well as variations in our region's environmental history and geography. Robert Smurr Ted Whitesell Tue Tue Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Instructional Methods in Literacy

Jon Davies

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 To prepare for a reading endorsement or to understand more about literacy development and instruction, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address research-based instructional practices for the teaching of reading and writing. Topics include reading, writing, and oral language strategies to support student learning, including strategies to support English language learners. Successful completion of this course may be applied toward requirements for a reading endorsement. Jon Davies Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Integrated East-West Psychology

Jamyang Tsultrim

psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Weekend Su1Summer 1 This class explores similarities and differences between Eastern and Western psychology and examines possibilities for creating an integrated approach to help to alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics. Through the integrated practice of clinical East-West counseling skills such as intentional listening/reflection, personal practice/role-play, and cultivation of insight and positive emotions, students will develop knowledge and aptitude to differentiate and apply effective counseling methods in the helping professions. counseling psychology, East-West psychology Jamyang Tsultrim Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Interactive Sound and Video

Ben Kamen

computer science media arts music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su1Summer 1 In this program, students will learn to use the Max/MSP/Jitter visual programming environment to examine the control and expression of sound and video through numbers, simple mathematics, and logic. Students will learn to operate audio and video recording equipment and develop techniques for playing back and modifying materials through algorithmic processes. Students will develop strategies for interacting with source materials in real time, using sensory data from the Arduino micro-controller platform. Creative projects, guided by reading and collaborative activities, will the be primary goal of the technical work. Ben Kamen Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Intermediate Economics: A Heterodox Approach

Tom Womeldorff

economics 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This program is designed for students who are interested in critically studying economics beyond the introductory level.  We will complete the equivalent of textbook intermediate microeconomics while critically assessing the boundaries of its usefulness and its ideological role in legitimating market solutions to complex social problems.  We will survey two additional schools of economic thought: Marxist political economy and institutional economics.  Our goal is not to choose the "right" school of thought.  Instead, we will be guided by the belief that complex and diverse questions require diverse tools; no one school of thought will be sufficient.  In the process, we will learn to be self-critical scholars, always asking of each approach: What does it illuminate and what does it obfuscate? economics, political economy, history, public administration, and business. Tom Womeldorff Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Intermediate Macroeconomics

Tom Womeldorff

economics government political economy 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day This program is designed for students who are interested in critically studying economics beyond the introductory level. In the mornings, we will complete the equivalent of textbook intermediate macroeconomics which focuses primarily on the determinants of economic growth, employment rates, inflation and income distribution.  We will assess the "appropriate" roles for the federal government in the economy (e.g., determining the right fiscal and monetary policy mix, setting exchange rates and eliminating/creating trade barriers).  A standard intermediate macroeconomics textbook and workbook will be used. While there is no specific math prerequisite, extending our math skills will be an objective of the program. In the process, we will critically assess the limits of macroeconomic theory. For example, does the theory adequately consider income distribution effects of policy options?  Do macroeconomic prescriptions contribute to gender inequalities?  To what extent do ideological predispositions intersect with the science of economics, influencing prescriptions about the size of the money supply or the judged appropriateness of tax cuts?In afternoon seminars, we will survey areas of applied macroeconomics and gain a familiarity with the various schools of thought (i.e., Keynesian, Post-Keynesian, Monetarist, Austrian and Marxian approaches). Our readings will be chosen from literature written by economists for other economists as represented in academic journals such as the . Students will be involved in selecting some of the readings.Program activities will include lectures, workshops, exams, short research papers, and seminar. Tom Womeldorff Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Interrogating Emotions

Laura Citrin and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)

American studies gender and women's studies psychology sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day   Jean-Paul Sartre (1948) What are emotions, sentiments, and feelings? From whence do emotions come? What functions do they serve, both for the individual and for society? In this full-time psychology program, we will examine the ways that emotions -emotional experience and expression- are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions. We'll cover the "big five" emotions: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride. We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions (e.g., joy, hope, interest, love) and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life." We will study the ways emotions are expressed, avoided, embraced, and rejected according to complex display rules that vary across culture and within culture based on gendered, raced, and classed social norms. Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions -our emotions. The interrogation of emotions in this program will occur via readings, lectures, films, workshops, and twice-weekly, student-led seminars. Students will also engage in the process of primary data collection for a research project centered on an emotion that is of particular interest to them. Conducting research will enable students to participate first-hand in knowledge production within the interdisciplinary domain of affect studies. Readings will be selected to provoke thought and incite debate and discussion. Possible texts include Larissa Tiedens & Colin Leach (Eds.), ; Melissa Gregg & Gregory Seigworth (Eds.), ; Sara Ahmed, ; William Miller, Tom Lutz, ; and Barbara Fredrickson, psychology, sociology, mental health, and cultural studies. Laura Citrin Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Introduction to Electronic Music I, II

Ben Kamen

music 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening In this two quarter sequence, students will explore the creative use of the music technology labs.  Original compositions will be the primary goal of the course work, with clear technical learning objectives for each assignment.  Reading and listening will provide a historical and theoretical context for the creative work.   Fall quarter will focus on the operation of mixers, tape machines, and analog synthesizers, looking to the work of early electroacoustic composers for inspiration.  In the winter, students will begin working with the computer as a compositional tool, creating sound collages and compositions using MIDI to control hardware and software instruments.  Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Introduction to Natural Science

Martin Beagle and Erin Martin

biology chemistry 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program offers an integrated study of biology and chemistry that serves as an introduction to the concepts, theories, and structures which underlie all the natural sciences. Students in this program will develop foundational scientific skills and an appreciation for the human dimensions of science. Emphasis will be placed on developing ways of thinking and methods of analysis. Further details about specific themes and topics will be added in the coming weeks. In fall quarter, we will structure our weekly learning around coordinated sequences of core modules that include lectures, workshops, laboratory and/or field work, and seminar. Much of the time will be spent in workshops where students are expected to collaborate in small groups, solving problems and discussing concepts to acquire confidence in their knowledge and real facility with scientific principles. Laboratory work that closely parallels and amplifies the core material will be an integral part of the program. Seminar will enable us to apply our growing understanding of scientific principles and methodology to societal issues, such as the impact of geoduck aquaculture on water quality and aquatic communities; the debate over unpasteurized dairy products for public consumption; and the commercial pursuit of genetically modified organisms. We will emphasize analysis of the issues through reading, discussion, and writing. All students are expected to take part in all of these core activities, but students may participate more intensively in areas of special interest through additional lab work or readings. We will continue with this format in winter quarter. In addition, students will work in small groups on a research project that allows them to pursue questions sparked by their curiosity about the natural world and provides hands-on experience in scientific method. Students who successfully complete the program will have a solid background in general biology and general chemistry. They will have also practical experience in scientific method and improved abilities to reason critically. Students who successfully complete this program will be prepared for more advanced study in science programs such as Molecule to Organism or Environmental Analysis. The main prerequisite is an eagerness to work hard and to explore the “real life” applications of the scientific method. Students should also be competent in high school algebra. biology, chemistry, environmental studies, geology, and health professions. Martin Beagle Erin Martin Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Introduction to Public Health

Nancy Anderson

health law and public policy sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend The program will provide an introduction to the scope and tools of public health.  Students will work individually and in groups to understand milestones in the history of public health, the basic tools of public health research, and the challenges to successful health promotion projects. The learning community will work in small groups to identify a significant public health problem, develop a health promotion/intervention, and consider methodology for evaluation of impact.  The program will focus on public health issues in the United States but will also draw on international examples of successful interventions. Nancy Anderson Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Introduction to Special Education and Special Education Law cancelled

Sherry Walton

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This course provides an overview of the history of special education, legislation affecting special needs students and their teachers, general considerations for working with students with disabilities, characteristics of disabilities, and responsibilities of educators. The class is intended for practicing teachers, pre-service teachers who wish to prepare for an endorsement in special education, and any individuals interested in learning more about people with disabilities, their needs, and their rights. Participants planning to take further special education courses this coming academic year should contact Maggie Foran (ForanM[at]evergreen.edu) for an endorsement application. Sherry Walton Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Irish Language and Song

Sean Williams

language studies music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 Sean Williams Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Issues in Clinical and Counseling Psychology

George Freeman

psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 This program will explore the central personality theories from a traditional perspective as well as a nontraditional perspective. We will examine the relationship of personality theories to abnormal behavior and develop an understanding of the DSM classification system and other diagnostic methods. We will use an on-line Moodle site to facilitate discussions of the texts and other pertinent issues. We will use segments of films to reinforce the theoretical and practical concepts we’re learning. George Freeman Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Japan Today: Japanese History, Literature, Cinema, Culture, Society and Language

Harumi Moruzzi and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies history international studies language studies literature moving image 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening Japan is a vital, energetic and dynamic society that is constantly reinventing itself even while struggling to maintain a semblance of cultural and social continuity from the long lost past. Meanwhile, the conception and image of Japan, both in Japan and the West, has varied widely over time mostly due to Japan’s changing political and economic situation in the world. In the late 19th century when Japan re-emerged into Western consciousness, Lafcadio Hearn, the Greek-Irish-American writer who later became a Japanese citizen, thought of Japanese society and its people as quaintly charming and adorable, whereas Americans in the 1940s viewed Japan as frighteningly militaristic and irrational. While the French semiotician Roland Barthes was bewitched and liberated by Japan’s charmingly mystifying otherness during his visit to Japan in 1966, when Japan began to show its first sign of recovery from the devastation of WWII, the Dutch journalist Karel Van Wolferen was disturbed by the intractable and irresponsible system of Japanese power in 1989, when Japanese economic power was viewed as threatening to existing international power relations. As is clear from these examples of how Japan was viewed by Westerners in the past, the idea and image of Japan is highly dependant on the point of view that an observer assumes. This is a full-time interdisciplinary program devoted to understanding contemporary Japan, its culture and its people, from a balanced point of view. This program combines the study of Japanese history, literature, cinema, culture and society through lectures, books, films, seminars and workshops, with a study of Japanese language, which is embedded in the program. Three levels of language study (1st, 2nd, and 3rd-year Japanese) will be offered for 4 credits each during the fall and winter quarters. The language component is offered by Tomoko Ulmer in the evening.     In fall quarter we will study Japan up to the end of American occupation. We will emphasize cultural legacies of the historical past.  In winter quarter, we will examine Japan after 1952. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination of contemporary Japanese popular culture and its influence on globalization. Although this program ends officially at the end of winter quarter, students who are interested in experiencing Japan in person can take Japanese language classes in Tokyo through Harumi Moruzzi’s Individual Study: Japanese Culture, Literature, Film, Society and Study Abroad in spring quarter.  Japanese literature and culture, film studies, cultural studies and international relations. Harumi Moruzzi Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Japanese, Advanced Beginning I, II, III

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This yearlong sequence covers the second year of Japanese language studies.  Students must be familiar with basic verb forms and elementary kanji letters.  Students will build on previous skills and learn new grammar and vocabulary so they can function in a variety of situations.  Classroom activities include presentations, watching film and TV clips, and discussion. Students will continue their kanji studies at their own levels in small groups.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course.  The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Japanese Anime

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Why is anime popular? What does anime reveal about Japanese life and people? We will study Japanese history and society, and learn to understand cultural references in anime. We will also learn elementary Japanese including reading and writing. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Japanese, Beginning I, II, III

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This yearlong sequence covers the first year of Japanese language studies.  Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations by learning useful expressions and basic sentence structures.  Both hiragana and katakana letters as well as elementary kanji characters will be introduced.  Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Japanese, Third Year I, II

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is for students who have taken two years of college-level Japanese.  Students will review important grammar, increase their vocabulary and strengthen their reading and writing skills.  The class is ideal for students who are preparing for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.  Students will improve their overall proficiency through a variety of activities such as watching film/TV clips, discussion, and presentations. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Jazz Dance

Kabby Mitchell

African American studies cultural studies dance history music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2, 4 2, 4 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In this course, students will learn jazz dance basics by exploring the historical aspects of the African Diaspora through movement and lectures. Students will gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will do fun yet challenging combinations, and students will write a synthesis paper at the end of the quarter. No previous experience needed. Kabby Mitchell Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Jazz: Music, History, and Culture

Chico Herbison

American studies cultural studies music writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 This course will provide an introduction to jazz music, an overview of its history and styles, and an assessment of its impact on American culture. Students will explore the musical elements of jazz; its aesthetic, cultural, and historical roots; its evolution through a variety of styles, including New Orleans, Swing, Bebop, Cool, and Avant-Garde; and the ways in which the music, its players, and its history have helped shape American culture. A musical background is not required; rather, a willingness to listen carefully will enable students to feel and appreciate what Robert G. O'Meally has called "the jazz cadence of American culture." Chico Herbison Mon Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Jewish Lives and Literatures

Richard Benton

cultural studies history religious studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day In this all-level program, we will ask the following questions: How have writing and interpretation determined and reflected what Jews and Judaism(s) are? What makes someone Jewish? What is Judaism? Is there just one, or are there multiple Judaisms? How have Jews interacted with polytheists? Christians? Muslims? How has traditional Jewish thought answered persistent questions about the existence and nature of G-d and the existence of evil? What do the traditional texts tell us in the face of new ethical challenges?For three thousand years, Jews have witnessed history through writing. Life under and alongside the empires of Egyptians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Muslims, and Northern Europeans provided the context for Jews’ deep and consistent written reflections over the nature of G-d and of humans, and the relationship between the two.Jewish writings connect ethics with literature, religion, and historical reality. They constantly interpret historical experience through the lens of G-d and Torah (Hebrew Bible), bringing ancient literature to bear on current ethical and philosophical problems, as well as on the problem of how to live everyday life.We will read and interpret the Hebrew Bible to develop literary and philosophical sensitivities that shed light on interpretations of historical experience. The Bible lies at the basis of all classical Jewish thought. Knowledge of and ability to interpret the Bible will provide the foundation for interpreting later writings. We will also read a range of Jewish commentaries, which will develop students’ abilities to follow arguments and understand writers’ presuppositions. We will explore the major genres of Jewish works—Midrash (biblical interpretation), Talmud (legal texts), Maimonides (medieval philosopher), and (medieval mysticism)—and learn the idiosyncrasies of each genre. We will examine how individuals have understood their historical circumstances with reference to Jewish writing and look at Jewish life in a number of historical contexts. Each student will develop a research project on a topic that involves Jewish culture and writing.Previous work in history, literature, ethics, religion, and/or other related fields is suggested. history, literature, sociology, community organizing, education, and law. Richard Benton Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Justice: A Relationship of Reciprocal Respect

Yvonne Peterson, Bill Arney and David Rutledge

Native American studies computer science cultural studies history law and government policy law and public policy political science psychology sociology writing 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program is for learners who have a research topic with a major focus on justice and community in mind, as well as for those who would like to learn how to do research in a learner-centered environment. Learners will be exposed to research methods, ethnographic research, interviewing techniques, writing workshops, computer literacy, library workshops, historical and cultural timelines, educational technology, and the educational philosophy that supports this program. The faculty team will offer a special series of workshops to support the particular academic needs of first and second year participants.Individual research will pay special attention to the relationship of reciprocal respect required in justice themes. Student researchers will pay special attention to the value of human relationships to the land, to work, to others and to the unknown. Research will be concentrated in cultural studies, human resource development, and ethnographic studies to include historical and political implications of encounters, cross-cultural communication, and to definitive themes of justice. We shall explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to indigenous people of the Americas.In this program, learners' individual projects will examine what it means to live in a pluralistic society at the beginning of the 21st century. Through each learner's area of interest, we will look at a variety of cultural and historical perspectives and use them to help address issues connected to the program theme. The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and learners will identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.Yvonne Peterson will facilitate a joint Theory to Praxis workshop for with students from Laws/Policies of Indian Education and Indian Child Welfare to allow for common conversation, presentations, speakers, community service and outreach to Indian communities, student presentation of academic projects, and to build a shared academic community.In fall quarter, participants will state research questions. In late fall and winter, individually and in small study groups, learners and faculty will develop the historical background for their chosen questions and do the integrative review of the literature and data collection. Ongoing workshops will allow participants to learn the skills for completing their projects. Late winter and into spring quarter, students will write conclusions, wrap up print/non-print projects, and prepare for a public presentation. The last part of spring will be entirely dedicated to presentations.In keeping with Evergreen's transfer policy, credit will not be awarded in physical education activities that are not accompanied by an academic component. education, social sciences, multicultural studies, social work, public administration, human services and the humanities. Yvonne Peterson Bill Arney David Rutledge Tue Thu Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Knowing Place: Living in the Flux and Flow of our Surroundings

Kathy Kelly

ecology economics environmental studies political science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su1Summer 1 The purpose of this program is to expand and deepen students' understanding of systems theory, especially living systems. Students will use critical and technical skills, research and field experience, and reflective practices to understand, integrate, and interpret their environment.Following a brief (re-)introduction to systems theory, we will examine the dynamics of the Nisqually watershed that includes the Olympia area. Students will become familiar with efforts for ecosystem protection and restoration and consider the implications of greater systems thinking in public policy-making. We will use an ecological economics framework that identifies nature's services and places an economic value on those services, a tool that is useful for conservation and development planning.The program engages experiential as well as cognitive learning as students participate in exercises to raise awareness of ways of being present in and perceiving the place we live. Students will develop map reading skills and practice journaling in both narrative and field journal styles as a means of recording, reflecting upon, integrating, and presenting knowledge. Readings, coupled with these exercises, will fuel discoveries about how our surroundings shape our thoughts, emotions, and actions.Field trips include a series of visits to sites within the watershed, including sensitive natural areas and places of local historic significance. Kathy Kelly Fri Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Landforms and Lifeforms

Christopher Coughenour and Peter Impara

ecology environmental studies field studies geology hydrology mathematics 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This program will merge the fields of geomorphology and ecology to provide students with a broad understanding of both how landscapes form and function and how lifeforms (microbial, plant and animal)organize themselves across this earth template. The many processes and steps in the geological evolution of an area profoundly influence the ever-changing physical environment (e.g. the soils, nutrient transport, surface and ground waters, climate, among others when taken together) and, thus, the organisms and ecosystems that so intimately interact with these environments. How species are distributed, how communities are structured, and how ecosystems function are all dependent upon interactions with the physical environment.We will cover major topics in geomorphology: plate tectonics and the large scale evolution of Earth's surface, weathering and sediment transport in the continental and marine realms, climate, and environmental controls on the physical and chemical evolution of landscapes. We will also cover important concepts in ecology and biogeography: evolution, ecosystem ecology, community ecology, population ecology, and landscape ecology. Topics that will be particularly informed by the synergy of ecology and geomorphology are early Earth evolution, climate change, extremophiles, ecological succession, and paleoecology. Students will be exposed to a variety of environments through local and overnight field trips. One multi-day field trip will involve a visit to the Death Valley National Park to observe extreme environments, geologic processes, and extremophile biology.  Group research projects will focus on studying the biology and environments of extremophiles, including but not limited to microorganisms, fungi, invertebrates, plants, and vertebrates.  Seminar readings will familiarize students with topics in environmental studies as related to ecology and/or geology. Students will be evaluated on attendance, assignments, scientific writing,field and lab work, and exams. geology, field ecology, environmental science, land management, geography, and conservation biology. Christopher Coughenour Peter Impara Junior JR Senior SR
Language Acquisition and Identity Formation

Grace Huerta

education language studies linguistics 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Evening In this program, we will explore the role of family and community in language acquisition and identity formation among English language learners (ELLs).  We will examine how such factors as history, political climate, school policies, and curriculum impact the education of language learners from adults to students in grades K-12.  We will also examine curricular designs and implementation of theory to instructional practices relevant to the Washington state English language and TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Language) standards. These ELL concepts will be analyzed through readings, group collaboration, workshops, lectures, multimedia, and seminars.  Students will lead discussions, complete reflective writing activities, conduct teaching demonstrations, and complete a community ethnography project.  Writing and research workshops will also be a focus of this program. In the fall, the program will survey the history of second language education in the United States while introducing the central issues in language acquisition research.  We will also discuss how knowledge of English language learners' lived experiences and community can inform school policies, curriculum, and instruction. In the winter, the program will focus on the study of language as a system with an emphasis on linguistic, literacy, and content-area instructional strategies.  Among the topics addressed will be English phonology, morphology, and syntax as well as implications for teaching the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  We will also examine teaching strategies for the instruction of academic language and content. education, linguistics, teaching English Grace Huerta Mon Wed Junior JR Senior SR
Language and Species

Richard McKinnon

linguistics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Humans often claim distinction as unique among the animals of the world.  This course examines this hypothesis from the perspective of communication.  What are the parameters that describe communication systems of all species?  What does it mean when bees dance, frogs croak, and humans speak?  What kinds of messages do members of various species communicate to each other?  Is human language qualitatively different from other forms of animal communication?  If so, how did it evolve to be so different and what does that mean about humans as a species?  We will employ the tools of linguistics, psychology, ethology, and anthropology to find answers to these questions. Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Language and the Evolution of Mind

Kevin Francis, David Paulsen and Rachel Hastings

anthropology biology consciousness studies linguistics philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day What does our ability to speak and understand language reveal about the human mind? How much of our knowledge of language can be attributed to an innate language capacity and how much is dependent on individual experience? How are children able to develop a detailed and abstract understanding of their native language at a very young age? And how did human language evolve in the first place? In this program we will study theories of cognition, brain structure, and consciousness as they relate to the complex phenomena of language evolution, acquisition and use.We will explore diverse kinds of evidence that shed light on the evolution of language, including recent work in evolutionary biology, animal behavior, neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, and the evolutionary genetics of language. To understand the nature of linguistic processing we will look at the structure of language and ask what capacities must be present within human cognition in order for us to produce and understand human languages. We will study the ideas of Noam Chomsky and others who argue for a "universal grammar" as an explanation of rapid language acquisition and similarity among languages. We will also examine the parallels between human language and communication in other animals. Finally, we will reflect on the strategies adopted by scientists to reconstruct events in the deep past.Program activities will include seminar, lectures and workshops. We will devote significant time to providing background material in linguistics, evolutionary biology, and cognitive neuroscience that pertains to the evolution of language. We will read scientific and philosophical material that addresses fundamental questions about consciousness, the relationship between mind and brain, and the relation between cognition and the human capacity for language. As part of this program, students should expect to participate actively in seminar, write several essays, and complete a final research project. biology, cognitive science, linguistics, philosophy and psychology. Kevin Francis David Paulsen Rachel Hastings Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Language Lifecycle: Genesis, Expansion, and Loss

Richard McKinnon

linguistics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Languages are not static systems, but exhibit a life cycle just as living organisms do. They are brought into being through pidginization and creolization, grow and change as their function changes and they attain status, and they disappear (presently at an alarming rate). In this course, we'll examine these stages in some detail, acquiring a tool set along the way that will allow participants to understand the cultural, economic, and linguistic factors involved and to appreciate the policy issues in play. Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Latino USA

Arleen Sandifer

American studies cultural studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Currently, one in every five students in elementary school in the U.S. comes from a home where Spanish is the most-spoken language.  Already Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority in several of the largest U.S. states.  What are some of the ways that this demographic shift is affecting U.S. culture?  How are Latino cultures affected/changed by their presence in the U.S.?  What are some of the issues that we need to face and resolve together as we undergo this transition?  These questions will be some of the guiding questions in this course as we study Latino culture as it exists in the U.S. while exploring how current and historical issues are framing the debates around education and immigration and what it means to be "Latino" in the U.S.  A basic knowledge of Spanish will be helpful, but not necessary. Arleen Sandifer Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Laws/Policies of Indian Education and Indian Child Welfare

Yvonne Peterson and Gary Peterson

Native American studies communications community studies cultural studies education government history law and public policy sociology writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This program will prepare learners to work effectively in institutions that have historically viewed Indians and their cultures as deficient and tried to force them into the mainstream. Learners will research the laws and policies of Indian Education and Indian Child Welfare from treaty time to present and select a topic for in depth coverage. Learners will learn techniques of "River of Culture Moments" to apply to documentary and interactive timelines. The learner-centered environment will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to research methods, ethnographic research and interviewing techniques, writing workshops, computer literacy, library workshops, educational technology, and to learn how to develop inquiry-based curriculum. Individual research projects will pay special attention to "storymaking" by looking at Indian individuals attempting to make a difference in times of political encounters with laws meant to destroy Indian culture. Ethnographic studies will include historical and political implications of encounters, and cross-cultural communication. Learners will explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to Indigenous people of the United States. Learners will meet and learn from Indian educators and social workers, attend thematic conferences on the topic, and may travel to several Indian reservations. They will explore personal culture and identity through writing and recording their own cultural framework. Spring quarter will include an option for an in-program internship. Transferable cross-cultural and identity skills will be emphasized. Students will examine their own identity, values and life histories as a basis for understanding what they bring to a cross-cultural encounter and how it affects their practice as social workers and educators. social work, K-12 education, tribal administration, social sicences, multicultural studies and human services. Yvonne Peterson Gary Peterson Mon Thu Fri Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Leader as Internal Consultant

Marcella Benson-Quaziena

business and management psychology 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend Organizations and individuals who lead them are dynamic systems that continue to change over their life spans.  This program is designed for students who wish to develop or enhance their leadership knowledge and skills through the lens of an internal consultant.  Students will examine the role of leaders as facilitators of change within organizations.  The program will concentrate on the personal and interpersonal skills essential for effective leadership and consultation.  The program will emphasize the concepts of motivation, interpersonal relationships, leadership, and organization culture.  The program will take a systemic approach to understand Self as a system, to examine purpose as an organizing force, and to explore how we can use an understanding of the connections between human systems and organizational structures to create change.  Students will be introduced to the field and practice of organizational development and use organizational theory and systems thinking to provide the context for understanding diverse organizations and for assessing leadership competency within an organizational context.  The program assumes a willingness to accept necessary changes in behavior, to practice, to apply skills, and to evaluate skill development through assessment of practice. Credits will be awarded in leadership development and organizational psychology. Marcella Benson-Quaziena Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR
Leadership for the Common Good

Dariush Khaleghi and Steven Johnson

business and management 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Today’s leadership challenges are vastly different from the past.  The most notable difference is that society seeks leaders who not only strive to meet their business obligation but also take action to benefit the society and promote the common good.  In response to such a paradigm shift, there is a need for a new generation of leaders whose personal and professional values, in addition to their compelling vision for a just and sustainable world, fuels their passion to become change agents and transformational leaders.   This course is designed for students who are interested in developing themselves as effective leaders whose mission is to serve the common good. Dariush Khaleghi Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Lifespan Developmental Psychology

Carrie Margolin

psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su2Summer 2 This course will focus on milestones of human development from conception through death. We will consider the nature of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development throughout the lifespan, addressing major theories and current research that explain how and why developmental change occurs. Some practical topics to be explored will include child rearing, learning disorders, adolescent rebellion, adult midlife crisis, and care giving for elderly parents. This course serves as a prerequisite for upper-division work and graduate school admission in psychology, education, and health care.    psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Light Step: Designing for a Sustainable World

Karen Gaul and Anthony Tindill

anthropology architecture consciousness studies cultural studies environmental studies field studies international studies sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The lessons we need for sustainable and just living already exist among many indigenous, rural and urban peoples around the world. How people construct the structure and feeling of home, or shape and contain that which is significant in their lives varies from culture to culture.  In this program we will explore practices of current and past cultures in terms of construction, energy use, technological development, subsistence practices, and equity to understand how people have lived relatively sustainably in various environments. We will consider the impact of increased technological complexity, resource extraction, production and waste streams of the industrial revolution. We will also investigate ways contemporary cultures around the world are responding by resuming, reclaiming or reinventing low-tech lifeways of the past, and/or embracing high-tech solutions of the future.The program will offer hands-on projects and theoretical perspectives in sustainable design in order to apply sustainable solutions in real-world situations. Students will have an opportunity to work with local communities to help meet design needs. Project possibilities may involve sustainable solutions on campus or in the greater South Sound community. Design projects will be developed within a context of community-defined needs. Through intensive studio time, students will learn drawing and design techniques, fundamentals of building, and skills in using a variety of tools.We will read ethnographic accounts of various cultures to understand the sustainability and justice implications of their practices. Students will have the opportunity to conduct their own ethnographic studies. An introduction to ethnographic research methods and an inquiry into critical questions in the field will help equip students to shape their own field research (in local or distant communities).Fall quarter will include the beginning of an anthropological journey to study various cultural expressions of sustainable and just living. We will learn ethnographic methods and begin to set up ethnographic projects exploring examples of sustainable solutions locally and in more distant settings. Basic approaches to sustainable design will be introduced, and projects will be formulated. Winter quarter will include implementation of design projects and community projects, and launching of ethnographic research. Spring quarter will be a period of data analysis in ethnographic projects, and completion of design projects. The program will also include experiments in sustainable living on a variety of levels. sustainable design, anthropology and community development. Karen Gaul Anthony Tindill Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Lights Out

Bret Weinstein

agriculture anthropology botany consciousness studies field studies outdoor leadership and education physics physiology somatic studies sustainability studies zoology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Complex systems can fail catastrophically. Resent catastrophic failures (such as the global financial collapse of 2008, the Gulf oil spill of 2010 and the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011) hint at the overall fragility of the systems on which civilization presently depends. Many have wondered if the larger system might be equally vulnerable to a major disruption.This program proceeds from a thought experiment: What if the lights went out and didn’t come back on? What if the gas stations ran dry and no one came to refill them? What if the store shelves went bare and stayed that way?The immediate effect would be unavoidably chaotic, disastrous and tragic. But from the chaos would likely emerge groups of people who had figured out how to provide for themselves.How would those groups be organized? What would they understand? What technologies of the past would they have resurrected, and in what form? What newer technologies would they work to retain? How would they use the rubble of modernity to enhance their lives. What would they eat and drink? How would they stay warm and fed in the winter? Would large-scale social organization arise organically, from the bottom up? How would the answers to these question differ by region?This program will not happen at the front of the room. The faculty will not present answers to these questions. The learning community will confront them together, with analytical rigor proportional to the scenario under consideration. As much as possible, we will attempt to prototype answers in the physical world, and let our successes and failures guide us toward a toolkit for survival.This program is not for passive students, or for those that prefer to stay in the abstract or metaphorical layers. It will require students to be both hard workers and careful thinkers. Students must be bold, collaborative and willing to rise to a serious challenge. Bret Weinstein Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Linguistics for Teachers and Writers

Richard McKinnon

linguistics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 Do you work intimately with language every day but would like to have a better understanding of the nuts and bolts?  This course will take you under the hood and give you the foundation you'll need to learn, teach, or create language.  We'll also look at the process of reading and its relationship to spoken language.  Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Listening to the Land

Ted Whitesell and Frances V. Rains

Native American studies environmental studies geography history sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Modern development controls and reshapes landscapes and their natural communities in many ways.  Our natural shorelines have been covered with asphalt and buildings, our rivers have been dammed, our forests have been turned into timber plantations, our wetlands have been drained, our arid basins are endless fields of intensive agribusiness, and our scenic areas have turned into tourist meccas full of roads, buildings, and fun seekers.  Is there a future for at least some landscapes where humans would behave as respectful members of diverse natural communities; where we would listen to what the land is telling us?  Many Native Americans and non-Natives have been fighting for generations to promote the wellbeing of places that are special to them, and to recover many areas that have been "developed."  This program will look at important approaches to this challenge, allowing students to discover what a sustainable and just landscape looks like -- particularly in the places that we know and love -- and how, exactly, we can help some places remain free of "progress," as commonly defined.  We will approach this topic by looking at the tensions behind the major approaches to interacting with and protecting the land by Native and non-Native peoples, investigating practices that have been called "conservation," "wilderness preservation," and "stewardship," and examining the different meanings associated with these terms.  We will look at both historic and contemporary efforts to mitigate the tensions between different approaches and competing interests and viewpoints, including interests and viewpoints grounded in race, class, gender, and culture.  A number of regional case studies of Native and non-Native practices will be used to ground our work, showing how some lands have been safeguarded, some ecosystems have been restored, and some cultural practices might be evolving in both Native and non-Native communities, leading toward sustainability, justice, and the autonomy of natural systems.  It is essential for any society that intends to be sustainable to foresee the consequences of its treatment of the natural communities where they live.  Therefore, a central concern will be that students learn from past experience how to foster a future society characterized by humility, respect, and reverence toward natural communities.Learning will take place through writing, readings, seminars, lectures, and films.  Students will improve their research skills through document review, landscape observations, critical analysis, and written assignments.  Each student will research and report on one on-going case that represents a hopeful path forward toward autonomous and just landscapes. Ted Whitesell Frances V. Rains Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Literary and Cinematic Storytelling

Eddy Brown and Marilyn Freeman

cultural studies literature media arts moving image visual arts writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day How do you distill the essence of a great story? How do you convey that essence across media boundaries? Is an adaptation a process of translation or creative destruction? How is a work rendered with an audience in mind? This two-quarter program will explore these questions by using 'adaptation' as a portal into creative writing, and literary and film analyses. Students will examine, analyze and critique a range of written works, both fiction and nonfiction, that have been adapted for the screen. We will study a variety of literary genres and art forms including: the short story, novel, biography, memoir, essay, screenplay, and film. We will follow each selected literary work from original text through screen adaptation in order to decipher and appreciate its singularity as a work of art and as a representative of its respective genre, its transformation into a cinematic production, and its relatedness to other narrations of the human experience. We will study the genesis, creative process, and presentation of each story on both the page and screen, including the consideration of its hypothetical, intended, and ideal audiences, and socio-cultural representations. In fall quarter, students will be introduced to fundamental aspects of narrative, to the principles of classical story design, and to exemplars of narrative adaptations across media. Skills will be developed in literary and film analyses through lectures, readings, screenings, seminars and critical writing assignments. Students will begin to build creative writing skills through a sequence of short-form assignments in fiction, creative nonfiction, and screenwriting, and through the practice of critiques and peer reviews. The quarter will conclude with collaborative student presentations of critiques of literary texts and their corresponding adapted films. In winter quarter studies will deepen in literary and film art and analyses in order to more fully understand the process of adapting the screenplay and the role of the screenwriter. Students will originate their own short-format projects in literary fiction or nonfiction, and develop adaptations through a series of progressive story design and writing assignments: controlling ideas, character bios, primary outlines, treatments, step-outlines, preliminary screenplays, revisions, synopses, loglines, and story reports. Students will conclude the program with staged readings of screenplay adaptations. This program is focused on literature, film, and creative writing. Students may be required to attend off-campus film screenings. Students are expected to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. literature, film, writing, and visual arts. Eddy Brown Marilyn Freeman Tue Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Looking at Animals cancelled

Ruth Hayes and Susan Aurand

media arts media studies visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Animal images are the oldest known artworks. From the painted bulls in Lascaux cave to Mickey Mouse, Godzilla, the Republican elephant and the Democratic donkey, images of animals pervade our history and culture. Our relationship to animals as the Other/Ourselves has been a major preoccupation throughout human history. What do these representations of and relationships with animals tell us about ourselves?This program is an interdisciplinary study of how we see, understand and represent animals. Through lectures, seminars and common readings, we will examine our relationships to animals as they are portrayed in art, literature and animated film. We will attempt to deconstruct assumptions that underlay how different people and cultures represent animals. We will consider ideas about human nature and the human mind that emerge from the study of animals. We will look at the portrayal of animals throughout art and media history, and we will read texts that take different approaches to representing animals, humans and the relationships between them. Through studio work in drawing, painting and animation we will explore our individual relationships to animals, both real and imagined.Through program workshops students will develop skills in 2D art (drawing, painting, mixed media) and 2D animation. As a major part of the program, each student will do an individual project that combines studio work with library research, exploring a particular animal or topic within our larger theme. visual art, animation, visual studies, media studies and education. Ruth Hayes Susan Aurand Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Looking Backward: America in the Twentieth Century cancelled

David Hitchens

American studies economics history literature 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day The United States began the 20th century as a second-rate military and naval power, and a debtor country. The nation ended the century as the last superpower with an economy and military that sparked responses across the globe. In between, we invented flying, created atomic weapons, sent men to the moon and began to explore the physical underpinnings of our place in the universe. Many observers have characterized the 20th century as "America's Century" because, in addition to developing as the mightiest military machine on the face of the earth, the United States also spawned the central phenomenon of "the mass": mass culture, mass media, mass action, massive destruction, massive fortunes--all are significant elements of life in the United States. Looking Backward will be a retrospective, close study of the origins, development, expansion and elaboration of "the mass" phenomena and will place those aspects of national life against our heritage to determine if the political, social and economic growth of the nation in the last century was a new thing or the logical continuation of long-standing, familiar impulses and forces in American life. While exploring these issues, we will use history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture and the tools of statistics to help us understand the nation and its place in the century. At the same time, students will be challenged to understand their place in the scope of national affairs; read closely; write with effective insight; and develop appropriate research projects to refine their skills and contribute to the collective enrichment of the program. There will be workshops on economic thought, weekly student panel discussions of assigned topics and program-wide discussion periods. Each weekly student panel will provide a means of rounding out the term's work and provide students with valuable experience in public speaking and presentation. the humanities and social sciences, law, journalism, history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture, cultural anthropology and teaching. David Hitchens Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Making a Difference

Emily Lardner and Gillies Malnarich

education sociology writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 8, 12 Evening and Weekend How, in the context of overwhelming social and environmental problems, do people make a difference? Where do people start, what do they need to be successful, and what does “making a difference” actually look like? The purpose of this two quarter program is to help students develop their understanding of how social change happens, to consider the possibility that Paulo Freire's notion of “critical hope” is reasonable, and to develop a deeper appreciation for an education that supports the development of habits of mind and everyday practices necessary to make a difference. In winter quarter, students will ground their studies of how social change happens in contemporary contexts. Drawing on insights gained from their studies of and the Citizenship Schools, students will develop a critical framework for analyzing and organizing approaches to topics that emerge from shared reading, from current social issues, and from students’ own experiences and interests.  Students will be working in groups to develop intensive case studies based on the program’s core questions. Likely areas for these cases include the pursuit of human rights, local responses to climate change/sea level rise, local organizing around sustainable food systems, and local and statewide efforts to provide an education of quality for students at all levels. Building on a practice started in fall quarter, the program will host a series of community conversations tied to the case studies. Students will be able to discuss core questions with community leaders—how they decide which issues to work on, which tools and strategies are most useful in that work, and the effect they hope to have on the community. We will consider critical puzzles and possibilities. Time in class is considered —a chance to pursue ideas and develop skills with others through workshops, seminars, and intensive reading/writing and analytic exercises. Students in winter will also select an additional reading to pursue with others, and design a workshop for the program at large using principles of popular education. Throughout our work together, students will have opportunities to develop their own perspectives on what is needed to make a difference in the contexts where they live and work. Students pursuing the 12 credit option will choose between an internship option or an writing intensive option. Both options will entail additional out-of-class meetings with students and with faculty, including end of day Saturday and end of class Monday evenings, plus other times to be determined by schedule and location (i.e. a Seattle writing group might find a time that is mutually convenient for meeting). education, law, community development, journalism Emily Lardner Gillies Malnarich Mon Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Managing for High Performance

Dariush Khaleghi and Steven Johnson

business and management 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend In today's rapidly changing business climate, managers are held accountable for the success of their organizations. Furthermore, they are being asked and even mandated to report their progress using hard data on regular basis.  Building high performance organizations to drive long-term success requires employee and team engagement, commitment, and productivity.  In this course students will be introduced to the performance management discipline and organizational behavior as the foundations of high performing individuals, groups, and organizations. Dariush Khaleghi Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Mapping for Change

John Baldridge

geography 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening John Baldridge Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Mapping for Change

John Baldridge

geography 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening John Baldridge Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Marine Biology of the Pacific Northwest

Gerardo Chin-Leo and Erik Thuesen

biology marine science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su2Summer 2 This program introduces principles of marine biology focusing on the marine life and marine habitats of the Pacific Northwest coast. We will study the environment, taxonomy, adaptations, and ecology of marine organisms as well as the major oceanographic features of the northwest coast. There will be various field trips including a camping trip to the Olympic Peninsula and possibly a sailboat trip. Gerardo Chin-Leo Erik Thuesen Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Marine Life: Marine Organisms and Their Environments

Erik Thuesen and Trisha Towanda

environmental studies field studies marine science 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This program focuses on marine organisms, the sea as a habitat, relationships between the organisms and the physical/chemical properties of their environments, and their adaptations to those environments. Students will study marine organisms, elements of biological, chemical and physical oceanography, field sampling methods with associated statistics and laboratory techniques. Throughout the program, students will focus on the identification of marine organisms and aspects of the ecology of selected species. Physiological adaptations to diverse marine environments will be also be emphasized. We will study physical features of marine waters, nutrients, biological productivity and regional topics in marine science. Concepts will be applied via faculty-designed experiments and student-designed research projects. Data analysis will be facilitated through the use of Excel spreadsheets and elementary statistics. Seminars will analyze appropriate primary literature on topics from lectures and research projects.The faculty will facilitate identification of student research projects, which may range from studies of trace metals in local organisms and sediments to ecological investigations of local estuarine animals. Students will design their research projects during winter quarter and write a research proposal that will undergo class-wide peer review. The research projects will then be carried out during spring quarter. The scientific process is completed when results of the research projects are documented in written papers and students give oral presentations during the last week of spring quarter. marine science, environmental science and other life sciences. Erik Thuesen Trisha Towanda Junior JR Senior SR
Marketing Authenticity: Craft, Commodity and Culture

Tom Womeldorff, Alice Nelson and Jean Mandeberg

cultural studies economics literature visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day A tourist travels from the United States to a folk festival in the Andean highlands and decides to buy a tapestry from an indigenous woman. What, exactly, is being bought and sold? From the buyer's perspective, perhaps the object serves as a memento of the trip or offers functionality as décor back home, or perhaps it represents something else: a sense of connection with the "other" a way to "help" a person in need, an "authentic" representation of a seemingly timeless culture. From the seller's perspective, the object may well express a craft tradition, often adapted to the demands of the tourist market, a way to make a living or to serve some other purpose. Whatever the case, both the buyer and the seller are enmeshed in contexts larger than themselves as individuals: cultural belief systems shaping their viewpoints and values (moral, political, and aesthetic), global capitalist pressures, and the legacies of colonialism. We will explore the intersections of cultural studies, economics, and the arts, focusing on various cases of craft production, their connections to systems of power, and the ways competing notions of "authenticity" are expressed in them. We will examine the factors shaping artistic production in each case: who or what decides the form a given craft may take, its relationship to "tradition" and who profits from its sales. We will look at the larger economic contexts shaping arts and crafts globally, such as the rise of mass-produced craft replicas and the lack of access to alternative forms of development. We will explore the links between craft and story, including the ways that literary and film representations raise pointed questions about cultural expectations and intercultural exchange. During the quarter, we will undertake two or three small projects connecting the theory and practice of aesthetic design to marketing within specific cultural contexts. Ultimately, we will ask: given all the challenges, how might specific groups use art and craftsmanship to improve their own lives? the arts, business, cultural studies, economics and international studies. Tom Womeldorff Alice Nelson Jean Mandeberg Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Marvelous Machines (Metal): Building Leonardo's Inventions

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su1Summer 1 Artist, anatomist, architect, and engineer, Leonardo da Vinci is considered the embodiment of the Renaissance Man.  Though best known as a painter, the bulk of his work was devoted to imagining and engineering complex machines made of wood and metal.  Students in this course and the complimentary course will engage in the study and construction of one or more of those marvelous machines.  In this course focusing on metal, students can expect to learn basic processes of metal fabrication. Bob Woods Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Marvelous Machines (Wood): Building Leonardo's Inventions

Daryl Morgan

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 Artist, anatomist, architect, and engineer, Leonardo da Vinci is considered the embodiment of the Renaissance Man.  Though best known as a painter, the bulk of his work was devoted to imagining and engineering complex machines made of wood and metal.  Students in this course and the complimentary course will engage in the study and construction of one or more of those marvelous machines.  In this course focusing on wood, students can expect to learn basic processes of design and fabrication in wood. Daryl Morgan Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Marxist Theory

Lawrence Mosqueda

history philosophy political economy political science sociology 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day "I am not a Marxist." -Karl Marx "The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles." -Karl Marx "Sit down and read. Educate yourself for the coming conflicts." -Mary Harris (Mother) Jones If one believes the current mass media, one would believe that Marxism is dead and that the "end of history" is upon us. As Mark Twain is reported to have said upon news accounts of his demise, "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated." The same, of course, is true for Marxist Theory. Few Americans have read more than , if that. Very few "educated" people have a clear understanding of Marx's concept of alienation, the dialectic, historical materialism, or his analysis of labor or revolutionary change. In this course we will examine the development of Marx's thought and Marxist Theory. We will read and discuss some of Marx's early and later writings as well as writings of Lenin and others. We will also explore concrete examples of how "dialectics" and "materialism" can be applied to race and gender issues. At the end of the program, students should have a solid foundation for the further study of Marxist analysis. social science and law, and education. Lawrence Mosqueda Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR
Masquerade and Metaphor

Ann Storey and Joli Sandoz

art history gender and women's studies literature visual arts 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening Using masquerade as our primary metaphor, we will take an in-depth, interdisciplinary, and multicultural approach to the study of 20th-century history, art, and literary writing by women. Cultures construct gender expectations, in part through “scripts” of femininity in ways that serve a myriad of purposes; where people identifying as girls and women reject those preconceptions but also act within them, masquerade – the adoption of pretense or disguise – becomes an inevitable part of female lives.Our work will center on studying women’s creative expression in both art and literature. We will also work with the medium of collage, make masks and use them in performance art pieces, and design and play gender-themed board games in class. The final project will be a research paper and presentation.Guiding questions: How have people identifying as girls and women expressed, defied, and transformed constructions of femininity through their art and writing? What role does masquerade play not only in women’s survival, but their flourishing? How does women’s resistance help us transform ourselves? fine arts, education, writing, history, sociology, museum work Ann Storey Joli Sandoz Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Math for Elementary Teachers

Sheryl Shulman

education mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This 8-week program is for individuals interested in learning the mathematics required for an elementary education teaching certificate. We will cover topics in problem solving, sets, fractions, algebra, statistics, mathematical reasoning and proof, geometry, number and operation, mathematical representation, and mathematical communication.  Students registering for 4 credits will study geometry and statistics. mathematics, teaching Sheryl Shulman Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
MatheMagics

Paul McCreary

mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 4, 8 Day Su1Summer 1 Each student will begin working where their current skill level is. Appropriate skill levels for the course include algebra, calculus, and any in between. We will directly confront the fears and phobias that many of us feel and help to move beyond those fears. All students will support each other and also receive tutoring help from other students in the class. Because different texts will be used for different students, please contact the instructor before purchasing a text.This course will count towards requirements for becoming elementary, middle, or high school teachers. Students registering for 4 credits will attend only Tuesday through Thursday. science, technology, mathematics, teaching Paul McCreary Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Mathematical Fiction

Brian Walter

literature mathematics 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day Mathematical principles can provide the basis for creative writing, from plot structures to themes, content, and even style. Jorge Luis Borges’s stories provide numerous examples. In “The Aleph,” the narrator attempts to describe a location from which all places can be seen simultaneously: "Mystics, faced with the same problem, fall back on symbols: to signify the godhead, one Persian speaks of a bird that somehow is all birds; Alanus De Insulis, of a sphere whose center is everywhere and circumference is nowhere; Ezekiel, of a four-faced angel, who at one and the same time moves east and west, north and south." Works like “The Aleph” not only reflect mathematical concepts but also give them flesh, rendering those abstractions poetic and tangible.The overarching question of this course, which we'll stay focused on as we read the assigned texts, is: What are the ways in which mathematical ideas can guide or influence works of fiction? We’ll see that there are a number of very different ways in which this can happen. By paying attention to this issue we’ll learn more about both literature and the nature of mathematics. This course is also the seminar portion of the program. Students who do not have some solid background in mathematics, or at least a healthy, inquisitive attitude toward mathematics, are not encouraged to take this course. Come prepared to read closely and carefully, and to think actively about mathematics and literature as part of one unified intellectual endeavor. Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Mathematical Systems

Brian Walter and Rachel Hastings

mathematics philosophy of science 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This program is built around intensive study of several fundamental areas of pure mathematics. Covered topics are likely to include Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis, Set Theory, and Combinatorics.The work in this advanced-level mathematics program is likely to differ from students' previous work in mathematics, including calculus, in a number of ways. We will emphasize the careful understanding of the definitions of mathematical terms and the statements and proofs of the theorems that capture the main conceptual landmarks in the areas we study. Hence the largest portion of our work will involve the reading and writing of rigorous proofs in axiomatic systems. These skills are valuable not only for continued study of mathematics but also in many areas of thought in which arguments are set forth according to strict criteria of logical deduction. Students will gain experience in articulating their evidence for claims and in expressing their ideas with precise and transparent reasoning.In addition to work in core areas of advanced mathematics, we will devote seminar time to looking at our studies in a broader historical and philosophical context, working toward answers to critical questions such as: Are mathematical systems discovered or created? Do mathematical objects actually exist? How did the current mode of mathematical thinking come to be developed? What is current mathematical practice? What are the connections between mathematics and culture?This program is designed for students who intend to pursue graduate studies or teach in mathematics and the sciences, as well as for those who want to know more about mathematical thinking. mathematics, physics, mathematics education, philosophy of mathematics, and history of science. Brian Walter Rachel Hastings Mon Tue Wed Thu Junior JR Senior SR
Matter and Motion

David McAvity and Rebecca Sunderman

chemistry mathematics physics 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Careful observation of the natural world reveals an underlying order, which scientists try to understand and explain through model building and experimentation. Physical scientists seek to reveal the fundamental nature of matter, its composition, and its interactions. This program lays the foundation for doing this work. Students will study a full year of general chemistry, calculus and calculus-based physics through lectures, small group workshops, labs, seminars and field trips. The material will be closely integrated thematically. In fall the focus will be on motion and energetics. In winter we'll explore the interactions of science, technology and society. Spring quarter will further delve into topics in modern physics and mathematical modeling. chemistry, engineering, mathematics, medical fields, physics and teaching. David McAvity Rebecca Sunderman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Me and the Mirror: Dance and Scenic Design cancelled

Gail Tremblay and Kabby Mitchell

dance music theater visual arts 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day This program is designed to give students a foundation in the performing arts with a focus on the relationship between dance, music, and costume and scenic design for dance productions. Performance is a time-based art where the artist uses his or her own body as an instrument to create work. Performers not only use the mirror as a tool to reflect on the visual effects they wish to create, they also use the self to hold a mirror up to nature and culture in order to create experiences for audiences of viewers that allow them to reflect on the human condition. The designer supports this work by creating environments that reinforce the visions of the performers. Fall quarter, students will study the historical origins of dance, and its connection to music and design. The program will integrate issues of race, culture and gender as part of this study. Students will be able to explore the relationships between music, dance and design in a variety of cultural contexts. They will also begin concentrated study of the historical origins of Neo-Classical ballet, with particular attention to the productions of Daighilev in Paris. Winter quarter, students will learn about important 20th and 21st Century choreographers including George Balanchine, Alvin Ailey, Jerome Robbins, Martha Graham and Twyla Tharp. Students will work in groups to study dance and choreography, music and music composition, or scenic design to prepare them to create a spring quarter production called, "Theme and Variations." Spring quarter, students will not only work collaboratively on their own dance pieces, music compositions or scenic design projects, they will also have the opportunity to work with and learn from a guest choreographer. Each quarter, students will study performances and sets documented on film and video and will take field trips to see performances that will support their work. Credits will depend on the nature of each student's work and may include dance history, music history, the history of design for dance productions, dance with a concentration on ballet, choreography, music composition, costume and scenic design. dance history, music history, dance production, ballet, choreography, music composition, and costume and set design. Gail Tremblay Kabby Mitchell Freshmen FR
The Meaning of Difference

John Gates

Native American studies cultural studies law and government policy 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Evening In this half-time program, we will explore cultural, social, and legal issues related to defined "differences" in contemporary American society including race and ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, gender, and disability.  We will also explore specific issues related to sovereignty in contemporary America from the perspective of Native American activists and scholars as well as Native Hawai'ian sovereignty proponents who envision political independence from the United States of America.  Grounding for our explorations will come from the texts by Karen E. Roseblum and Toni-Michelle C. Travis and by Walter Echo-Hawk.  Readings will examine intercultural, cross-cultural, historical, and interdisciplinary themes that are a part of the authors’ constructions of difference.  These texts will be supplemented with additional readings, U.S. Supreme Court decisions, lectures, videos, and music. John Gates Mon Wed Junior JR Senior SR
Media Artists Studio

Laurie Meeker

media arts media studies writing 

Signature Required: Fall Winter 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This is a program for advanced media students who want to continue to build their skills in media arts, history, theory and production with the support of a learning community. The focus is on the development of each student's personal style and creative approach to working with moving images and sound. This program is designed for students who have already developed some expertise in media production, are familiar with media history/theory and wish to do advanced production work that has developed out of previous academic projects or programs. Students who are interested in experimental film and digital video production, documentary, sound design, writing, photography, installation and contemporary media history/theory are invited to join this learning community of media artists. Experimental media work often requires a period of germination for new ideas, approaches and impulses to emerge. During fall, students will engage in a period of idea development and reflection, including a 2-3 day retreat for concentrated work. Each student or team of students will do extensive pre-production planning and research for a major film or digital project to be completed by the end of the academic year. One or two-quarter projects are also possible, but must include research, design, production and editing appropriate to the academic schedule. Students will be required to develop an Independent Study Plan that details the work they will complete each quarter. Fall quarter will also involve opportunities for students to expand their media skills through workshops, exercises and a collaborative project. A cinematography workshop will be offered for students to further explore and understand light, exposure and image quality in the 16mm format. Audio production workshops will be offered to expand student expertise with sound design and technology. Grant-writing workshops will result in student proposals for individual or collaborative projects. Blog and web design workshops will help students develop skills with new media technologies. Students will also work in teams of 3-4 to develop experimental projects that will enhance their collaborative skills and production experience. Students will develop two research projects during fall quarter, resulting in presentations for the learning community. Students will study contemporary media artists who have made special contributions to the development of experimental media practice and have attempted to push the technological as well conceptual boundaries of the moving image. Students will also conduct research into new and old media technologies. During winter quarter, the focus will shift from idea development to the production phase. Students will acquire all their images and production elements for their projects, which could involve production work off campus for an extended period. Students are encouraged to think creatively and broadly about their subject matter and will be able to propose media projects that may require travel. During spring quarter each student will complete post-production work, finalize their artist's portfolio, explore ways to sustain their work as media artists and participate in a public screening of their work. media arts and digital communications. Laurie Meeker Junior JR Senior SR
Media Internships

Naima Lowe and Julia Zay

media arts media studies moving image 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day The Electronic Media internships provide opportunities for in-depth learning of a variety of media skills and concepts. They require a year-long commitment for fall, winter and spring quarters. Interns enroll for 12-16 credits per quarter with room for a 4-credit part-time class or other academic components. Interns work 30 to 40 hours a week and are paid 15 to 19 hours a week, depending on credit distribution. The intern's primary responsibilities are focused on supporting instruction, maintenance and administration for specific labs, facilities, and production needs under the supervision of the staff. The interns meet weekly as a group to share skills, collaborate on projects, and to facilitate working together on productions and cross training between areas. All interns will be working in the new Center for Creative and Applied Media, the rebuilt HD video and 5.1 surround audio production studios. For specific descriptions of the internships, please refer to . media production, professional studio management, and computer applications in media art. Naima Lowe Julia Zay Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR
Media Production: Soup to Nuts

David Cramton

media arts moving image 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day and Evening Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 In 10 weeks, we will learn what it takes to take an idea and turn it into a fully realized, finished, and delivered media production utilizing field and studio techniques.  We will learn scripting, budgeting, scheduling, casting, locating, shooting, editing, and finishing video productions.  In addition to lecture and seminar, we will do hands-on exercises in the field and in the Center for Creative and Applied Media, Evergreen’s state of the art media studio.  We will bring in guest lecturers who are working professionals and experts in their fields to share tips, tricks, and techniques to aid us in the pursuit of storytelling power, and we will take field trips to see how it is done in the big leagues.  The capstone of the program will be when the entire class forms the crew of a short film, entirely written, planned, directed, edited, and finished by students.  The goals of the class are several: 1) to expose the student to the collaborative, team nature of larger scale production, 2) to empower the student with the skills and knowledge to produce their own media productions at a larger scale, and 3) for the student to experience part of the breadth of media production techniques and understand when and how to apply them in their own practice. David Cramton Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Mediaworks

Julia Zay and Naima Lowe

media arts media studies moving image 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day What does it mean to make moving images in an age described as digital, informational, postmodern and even post-postmodern? How do we critically engage with the history and traditions of media practices while testing the boundaries of established forms? What responsibilities do media artists and producers have to their subjects and audiences? In this program, students will engage with these and other questions as they gain skills in film/video history and theory, critical analysis, media production, collaboration and critique.This is an intensive full-time, two-quarter program linking media theory with practice. We will explore a variety of media modes and communication strategies, emphasizing documentary and experimental forms the material properties of sound and moving image media, and the strategies artists and media producers have employed to challenge mainstream media forms. We will experiment with alternative approaches to production, including non-fiction, abstract film, video art, alternative scripting techniques, autobiography, essay films, installations and performance. Additionally students will develop skills in analysis and criticism through screenings, readings, seminars, research and critical writing. We will also spend significant time in critique sessions discussing our creative and critical work. This, like all program activities, is designed to emphasize the importance of collaboration in the production of media.  In fall quarter students should expect to complete both short skill-building exercises and short projects. These exercises and projects will have thematic and technical guidelines that are consistent with the program curriculum, and students should expect to work collaboratively on most of them. In winter quarter students will continue to work on skill-building exercises and will complete both collaborative and solo short projects, again with guidelines that are consistent with the program curriculum.  media arts, visual arts, communications, and education. Julia Zay Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Medical Assisting, A Practical Approach

Barbara Krulich and Elizabeth McHugh

Signature Required: Fall 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 2, 4 2, 4 Day and Evening This nine-month pre-medical practicum designed for students who are interested in careers in health and medical care allows students to work closely with health care professionals in a clinical setting. During the academic year, students will receive the credits and training necessary to become licensed in the state of Washington as health care assistants. See for more information. Barbara Krulich Elizabeth McHugh Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Medicalization of America

Cindy Beck and Wenhong Wang

health sociology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening Have you ever questioned why some natural occurrences such as childbirth need routine medical intervention?  Many normal processes and many pathologies have evolved into a multibillion-dollar industry.  What are the social forces behind the medical establishment in American society?  How did we get to a place where one of the largest issues raised on a federal level is health care?  How do we decide both as a society and an individual if someone is truly ill or well? Fall quarter we will begin our exploration by looking at the conceptualization of illness and wellness, patient-health professional relationship, and the many roles assumed by each.  How do different treatment paradigms fit into the American medical model, and how does each segment of American culture fit in? Winter quarter, building upon the concepts and theories covered in fall, we will continue to explore practical issues in health, including the unequal access to health related resources, health care reform, and ethical issues such as right to life and death, etc. Through readings, discussions, and continued questioning, this program will start to dissect the many issues that contribute to the medicalization of America.  Human biology and basic pathology will be integrated into the curriculum to enhance students’ awareness of the medical model and how to navigate the health care system.  By examining social institutions and their influence on health and medical systems we will explore how illness is interpreted from both biological and sociological perspectives. social sciences, health sciences Cindy Beck Wenhong Wang Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Medicinal Botany: An Introduction

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend In this 6-credit course, students will gain an introduction to medicinal plants with a focus on plant identification and morphology (botany), medicinal concepts and practices (botanical medicine), botanical art, and working with plants in the Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden. Students will also explore selected topics such as cultural approaches to herbalism, experience/research, medicine making, body systems, seasonal health, and ethnobotanical garden care. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and projects. This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, cultural studies and botanical medicine. botany and botanical medicine, education, environmental studies, cultural studies, health-related fields Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Medicinal Botany: An Introduction

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend In this 6-credit course, students will gain an introduction to medicinal plants with a focus on plant identification and morphology (botany), medicinal concepts and practices (botanical medicine), botanical art, and working with plants in the Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden. Students will also explore selected topics such as cultural approaches to herbalism, experience/research, medicine making, body systems, seasonal health, and ethnobotanical garden care. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and projects. This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, cultural studies and botanical medicine. botany and botanical medicine, education, environmental studies, cultural studies, health-related fields Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Medicinal Botany in Spring

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies health 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend In this 6-credit course designed to follow “Medicinal Botany: An Introduction,” students will explore medicinal plants in spring with a focus on spring plant identification and flower morphology (botany), medicinal concepts and practices (botanical medicine), botanical drawing and nature journaling (art), and working with plants in the Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden. Students will also examine selected topics such as community herbalism, creating informative plant art, medicine making, the digestive system, cultural perspectives on health in spring, and ethnobotanical garden care. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and projects. This course is designed for students with background and interests in at least one of the following: botany, environmental studies, health, cultural studies and botanical medicine. This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, cultural studies and botanical medicine. Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
The Medieval Book

Nancy Bishop

art history history visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su2Summer 2 The focus of this course is the medieval manuscript and its relationship to medieval culture. Using a broadly chronological framework, we will examine different types of books produced in Europe in the Middle Ages, from Gospel books to secular romances. This study will include the text, decoration, context, and the physical book itself including some paleography and/or calligraphy. A basic understanding of history and art would be sufficient preparation. Knowledge of Latin would be helpful but is not required.Readings from reserve materials will be assigned, and it is expected that students will come to class prepared. Attendance, class participation, and mastery of concepts and vocabulary will be the basis for student evaluation.Course Goals: Nancy Bishop Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Memory Sites, Human Rights: A Digital Archive Production cancelled

Greg Mullins

American studies law and public policy philosophy 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Our work will be a continuation of the efforts begun in the program Human Rights, Memory Sites: A Digital Archive Project; we will move our collaborative research into final production. The result will be a human rights resource published on the world wide web.We aim to create a resource that not only provides information, but also stimulates public education, engagement and debate about both human rights violations and human rights remedies. Previous study of philosophy, the philosophy of art, and the aesthetic conventions and demands of web publishing should stimulate a design and product that is sophisticated, challenging and adequate to the complex task of understanding human rights in Washington state.Our production team will be drawn primarily from students who enrolled in Human Rights, Memory Sites during fall and winter; new students with select technical production skills may also be accepted into spring quarter. human rights, philosophy, digital humanities, history, museum studies, new media studies, web design and publication, American studies and politics.  Greg Mullins Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Memory Sites, Human Rights: A Digital Archive Project cancelled

Greg Mullins

American studies law and public policy philosophy 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day Students in this program will research human rights in Washington state for publication in the program's spring quarter continuation. The Human Rights Digital Archive is a web-based resource that aims to foster education, dialogue and critical debate about human rights. To ensure sophisticated and publishable research, the program will emphasize both the theory and practice of human rights. Students will collaboratively design and construct this project. To do so they will pool existing talents and skills, and will develop skills as appropriate in web design, graphic design, digital media (photography, video, audio), archival research, collecting oral histories, securing permissions, writing, editing, etc. The language of human rights evolved internationally, especially in the twentieth century, and part of our work will focus on Washington state as a translocal site, a kind of pivot between national and transnational movements and discourses and the very local level at which humans live and work. Human rights concerns in Washington state history include voting rights, civil rights, labor rights, freedom from discrimination, and many others. Our guiding questions will include: what are the origins of "rights" frameworks? How do they work as law? How do they work as politics? How do they work both internationally and locally? In order to build an intellectual foundation capable of supporting our research, we will read widely in philosophy and theory. Our concern will be not only liberalism and the political philosophy of rights, but also the philosophy of history, memory and communication. Why and how does the state sponsor historical markers, museums and memory sites? Why and how do non-state actors produce memorial practices and memory sites? How have the Internet and digital technologies changed memorial practices, and memory itself? How do new web-based aesthetic demands shape narratives and images of history and of human rights? How can the study of aesthetics and the philosophy of art advance our critical understanding of our own Digital Archive project? Each of these theoretical questions demands serious attention in its own right, and we will devote a significant portion of our time to serious (and often difficult) texts. Each quarter, these threads will grow progressively interlaced. Fall quarter we will study both theory and philosophy and pursue an intensive research program to gather sources, evidence, images, etc. in a specific area of human rights concern. Winter quarter we will sharpen the theoretical principles that support our digital memory project, and students will write, edit, revise, scan, Photoshop, and otherwise work on material for the project. This prepares students for a linked spring quarter program that will focus on production. This program requires enthusiasm for collaborating in groups, the ability to offer and receive critique, a willingness to turn one's research over to others for rewriting, editing and transformation, the flexibility to promote debate about human rights (rather than to grind ideological axes), and devotion to the principle that scholarship can provide public service of enduring value. The theoretical strands of inquiry will likewise require serious dedication. We seek a dedicated cohort who will commit to this project for the academic year. human rights, philosophy, digital humanities, history, museum studies, new media studies, web design and publication, American studies and politics. Greg Mullins Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Metal Casting

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 In this program, participants will learn about the production of sculpture as well as everyday objects through the process of casting. Students will design and construct models in plaster, clay, and wax. We will experience the process of sand casting in aluminum. We will do plaster molding, wax fabrication, and investing for (the ultimate) lost wax casting in bronze. After the work of de-gating and chasing, we will experiment with various patina applications for final presentation. This is a process-intensive studio class where we turn ideas into bronze. Beginners are welcome. Bob Woods Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer1
Metalworking

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Metalworking

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Metalworking (A)

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 4 04 Evening This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO
Metalworking (B)

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication.  Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging, and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Thu Junior JR Senior SR
Mindfulness Psychology: Contemplative Clinical Science

Jamyang Tsultrim

philosophy psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend This course will emphasize mindfulness psychology as a clinical tool as well as a method of professional self-care.  Recent research has proven the effectiveness of mindfulness training to treat conditions such as stress and pain, addictions, chronic depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and other health conditions.  Students will explore the similarities and differences between various mindfulness clinical approaches and gain practical skills to help alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics.  Students will have opportunities for personal practice, observational learning, and the development of counseling skills through role-play, reading, and discussion. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Models in Biology

Karen Hogan

biochemistry biology ecology environmental studies physiology sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend Models allow us to test our understanding of particular systems and, if the models are good, to make predictions.  Types of models include conceptual, graphical, mathematical, and systems simulation models.  In biology, processes that can be modeled range from Michaelis-Menten analysis of enzyme kinetics, to diffusion of carbon dioxide and water into and out of a leaf, to population dynamics of plant and animal species, to global climate models.   This program will look at a range of approaches to modeling different levels of biological processes.  After an introduction to modeling concepts and techniques, students will work in groups to construct models of biological processes of their own choosing.  A high level of engagement and initiative is expected in this program; upper-division credit is possible.  Students willing to share their expertise in some area of mathematics or computing are encouraged to participate. Karen Hogan Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Molecule to Organism

James Neitzel, Steven Verhey and Michael Paros

biochemistry biology chemistry health physiology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day biology, chemistry, education, medicine, pharmacy and health science. James Neitzel Steven Verhey Michael Paros Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Multicultural Counseling

Mukti Khanna

health psychology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day This program will engage in the study of Multicultural Counseling from theory, practice and application. Practice of counseling, applied cultural competency skills and evolving one's skills as a counselor will be developed throughout the yearlong program. Learning goals include acquiring a theoretical and applied understanding of psychological theory and practice from developmental, biological, cultural, emotional and social contextual perspectives. Expressive arts therapy practice and experience will be integrated in the program throughout the year. We will incorporate diverse pedagogical strategies including lecture, discussion, dialogue, seminar, films, videotaping and expressive arts therapy laboratories.During fall quarter, students will study personality theory and explore the relationship between personality theory and applied counseling skills. In winter, students will explore how research is informing evidence-based practice, as well as study the field of abnormal psychology and its interface with diverse populations. In spring, students will learn ethics in the helping professions. Social justice, multicultural counseling theory, mindfulness-based practice, integrative health and emerging therapy paradigms will be explored throughout the yearlong inquiry.In both winter and spring quarters, students will be required to complete 6-credit internships in local counseling/mental health settings, providing opportunities to integrate theory and practice. Carl Rogers (1902-1987) psychology, health, counseling, social and human services. Mukti Khanna Junior JR Senior SR
Multicultural Literature: Page to Screen cancelled

Chico Herbison

American studies cultural studies literature moving image 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su2Summer 2 This course will explore multicultural America through a close reading of four novels and one play and the viewing of their cinematic adaptations: Toni Morrison's , Amy Tan's , Daniel Woodrell's , Adrian C. Louis's , and Luis Valdez's . Students—equipped with the tools of literary and film analysis—will examine a complex array of American cultures and their multiple intersections, as well as the equally complex attempts to capture those cultural interactions in literature and on film. For their final projects, students will have the option of writing an academic research paper or a creative nonfiction piece. Chico Herbison Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer2
Multitrack Audio Production

Terry Setter

media arts music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Su1Summer 1 Su2Summer 2 This program provides instruction in the use of digital and analog recording studio equipment, microphone design and placement techniques, mixing console design, signal flow, monitoring techniques, room acoustics, and signal processing.  There will be written assignments based upon readings in Huber's , and students will present research on topics related to audio production.  Students will do at least 40 hours of recording and familiarization work in teams of two in addition to the in-class activities. We will record local musicians and produce finished mixes of the sessions. Terry Setter Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Full
Museum or Mausoleum? The Framing of Art, Culture and Neuroplasticity

Lara Evans and Sarah Williams

Native American studies anthropology art history consciousness studies cultural studies field studies gender and women's studies literature media arts media studies somatic studies visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Do museums transform living, changing cultural objects into fixed, preserved, inviolate collections? What stories do museums tell? What stories do objects embody? And what stories do we, visitors, tell ourselves? How do objects housed in museums affect our sense of self-identity? What does it take to become aware of how stories we tell both frame and are framed by objects? Is it possible to heal culture and the self through the interactions of narratives and objects? What happens to historical ideas about human consciousness when we explore the mausoleum-like exhibitions of what this consciousness has exhibited as other? What happens to consciousness when it is framed by neuroscience or to the self when it encounters thinking as an evolutionary internalization of movement?We'll explore the power of narrative objects in a variety of exhibition spaces: museums, galleries, shopping malls, book/web pages. We'll identify curiosities about the relationship between art objects and self-representation, particularly shifts in cultural influences and identities as they relate to shifts between the museological and mausoleum-like aspects of exhibition spaces. A triptych is a narrative object that uses three pictorial panels to convey movement in time, space, and states of being. A triptych, of sorts, is the focus of our fall quarter work and the model for our winter field studies. Consider our left panel: in the lives and other virtual realities of William Gibson's , the effects of narrative objects range from creative to preservative to destructive. Equally significant is how these effects are framed in movements between exhibition spaces experienced as "bird-cages of the muses" and those encountered in computer generated Joseph Cornell-like bird boxes. In the center panel is the narrative power of an artwork in Sheri Tepper's science fiction novel, . Here, alien races experience the consequences when a fresco at the heart of their cultural identity has been violently misinterpreted for a millennium. Now, the right panel. Here, in Catherine Malabou's texts the shifting movement or adaptability of self is called neuroplasticity. Her analysis of Claude Levi-Strauss' fascination with two sides--graphic and plastic--of masks illustrates her definition of neuroplasticity. We'll read this post-Derridean theory of self and do fieldwork with masks available for viewing in collections in this region. During winter quarter faculty and students will explore narrative objects and self-representation through six weeks of fieldwork in museums of their choice. Museums can be exhibitions of art, history or science; even zoos and botanical gardens can be considered museums. Students will document their research on their museum and will return to compile a multi-media presentation of their research project. In studios and workshops during fall and winter quarters students can expect to learn audio recording, digital photography, drawing with color pastels, ethnographic fieldwork, mindfulness practices (yoga, meditation), creative non-fiction writing, blogging and public speaking. During spring quarter students will have the opportunity to integrate individual and peer-group projects into a core all-program curriculum.  That is, in addition to the 8-credit all-program activities of seminar, lecture, visiting artists' lecture and film series, a retreat week, and related assignments (e.g., weekly seminar response essays, a theory as evocative object chapter, a mindmap and 3D triptych, and mid-term and final reflective and evaluative writing), each student will design an in-program individual or peer group project for 8 credits.  These projects may include (but are not limited to) the curation and/or installation of an exhibition or collection, an internship, a studio-based artistic or technical practice, community-based learning in support of Paddle to Squaxin 2012 ( ; ), or a field-based museum-related study.  Partially funded by TESC's Noosphere Award, week 7 retreat week activities will include a range of contemplative practices: 5 rhythm dance; yoga nidra; lectures with Seattle University philosopher and Zen priest, Dr. Jason Wirth; and a retreat day at SU's St. Ignatius Chapel. Students will document their individual or peer-based learning and create a multi-media presentation for week 10. art history, art, cultural studies, writing, anthropology, feminist theory and contemplative education. Lara Evans Sarah Williams Mon Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Musicianship

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening This class will help students develop free, healthy singing voices and learn fundamentals of music literacy and piano technique.  Students will develop musical skills through the use of self-paced interactive software as well as classroom instruction.  At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends.  This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day; credit will be awarded in musicianship. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Musicianship

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening This class will help students develop free, healthy singing voices and learn fundamentals of music literacy and piano technique.  Students will develop musical skills through the use of self-paced interactive software as well as classroom instruction.  At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends.  This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day; credit will be awarded in musicianship. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Myth and Idea

Leonard Schwartz, Martine Bellen and Trevor Speller

literature philosophy writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day This two-quarter program will examine the ways in which poetry and music are influenced by philosophy, and the other way around. The concentration is on a poetry devoted to the idea of myth, where myth can transform, or impeach, or pass into hoax; indeed, the subject of literary hoax and its relationship to fiction will be crucial. Some of the pairings of poets and philosophers that might be included are Fenellosa and Pound, Hobbes and Rochester, Locke and Defoe, Coleridge and Schelling, George Eliot and Ludwig Feuerbach, Walter Pater and Wilde and Swinburne, The Black Mountain Poets and Jed Rasula’s ideas on Ecopoetics, the Afro-Caribbean poet Kamau Brathwaite’s writing and thinking, Schopenhauer, the Symbolists and Richard Wagner, as well as Nietzsche's . In fall quarter we will embark on a viewing/listening of Wagner's , while winter quarter will feature a study of the Russian Futurists and their influence by, and struggle with, Marxist theory. Theories of myth to be considered include Roland Barthes , Edward Said’s , Kamau Brathwaite’s , and Nathaniel Mackey’s . The program will contain both a critical and creative component, which means we will both study texts and incorporate a poetry writing workshop into the program for those inclined to explore the language of poetry through constraint based writing exercises. There will be frequent guest speakers. literature, writing and publishing. Leonard Schwartz Martine Bellen Trevor Speller Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Native City: Histories, Policies and Images

Jennifer Gerend and Kristina Ackley

Native American studies community studies history literature political science 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day How have indigenous homelands been eroded by development and how have they endured? In what ways do Native people make urban places their own? Our program will explore the linkages between American cities and Native Americans, framing our discussion around themes of environmental and economic sustainability, social justice and education, and popular culture. Diverse concepts of "native" will be examined involving not only people but also native landscapes and species.We will consider the perceptions, realities, and shared experiences of Native, non-Native, and recent immigrants in American cities, using the lens of history, urban studies, public policy and cultural studies. We will look at alliances in areas such as environmental restoration projects, contemporary art, economic development and local governance.During the fall and winter quarters we will examine the forces that formed the cities of Seattle, Chicago and New York - and how Native life and landscapes changed as a result. Attention will be paid to both immediately apparent and curiously intertwined events and periods in history, such as Native displacement, industrialization, World's Fairs, the rise of urban planning, tourism, and the arts. Changes in the political life of Native groups will be addressed through a study of legislation and legal cases, tribal casinos, land development, environmental justice, and contemporary art. We will question how Native people are portrayed in museum environments, case studies, films, and texts.From mid-winter to mid-spring, the program will continue to deepen its exploration of these issues. Students will engage in their own qualitative work by utilizing case study methodology to carry out a project on an urban area of their choice. Workshops will develop skills in GIS (Geographic Information Systems), demographic analysis using the U.S. census, community development, policy research, film critique, interviewing and oral history. Students will use these skills to become stronger writers and researchers, and importantly, community members. We will require extensive reading and writing on these topics and students will assist in the facilitation of weekly seminars. Guest presenters, documentary films, museum exhibits, and field trips to tribal museums and urban community organizations will support our analysis throughout the year. the humanities, land use planning, government, community development, law, environmental policy, elementary and secondary education and mass media. Jennifer Gerend Kristina Ackley Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Nature and Value of Life

Stephen Beck and Karen Hogan

ecology philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend In this program we'll explore the connections between human evolutionary biology and ethics.  What are our ethical or moral values, and where do they come from?  Is it correct, as evolutionary psychologists would argue, that our fundamental ethical values are innate and function to facilitate social interactions?  In what sense, if any, are ethical claims correct or incorrect; and if they are, how can we justify them?  Are we evolutionarily unique among Earth’s species and, if so, does that uniqueness give us special moral obligations towards other species?  We will study the fundamentals of biological evolution, and we’ll read and discuss classic and modern works on moral and ethical philosophy.  Credit will be awarded in biology and ethical philosophy. Stephen Beck Karen Hogan Tue Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Nature Writing, Environmental History, and Place

Matthew Smith

environmental studies history natural history political science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day As we move into the second decade of the 21st century, environmental issues are in the mainstream. Everything from the food we eat to climate change, from the philosophy of nature to the nature of our communities, from economic policy to our understanding of earth and human history, is being rethought. It wasn't always so. Fifty years ago one would search hard to find mention of these issues in the daily press. Thirty years ago, environmental issues were not understood as demanding systemic economic, philosophical, technological and social transformation. Today that has changed. This program examines that change by looking at nature writing, environmental history and the concept of place.  Our goal will be to develop through our conversation, reading and writing a complex understanding of current environmental issues and the forces that will significantly impinge upon our lives in the coming decades.Nature writing deals with the big popular questions such as: what do we mean by nature? How can and should we value nature? How should we organize ourselves in relation to preservation and restoration of the natural world? We will investigate serious, but popular, writers who are using essays, fictions, and creative nonfiction forms to help shape a broad reflection on humans' place in nature. In the first two weeks we will take a quick look backward to Emerson, Thoreau, and Aldo Leopold.  Then we will jump forward to read texts and essays by such authors as William Cronon, Donald Worster, T.C. Boyle, Terry Tempest Williams, Patty Limerick, Seamus McGraw, Louis Warren, Michael Pollan, David Abram, David Sackman, John Vaillant and others.  Our work together is to explore these authors and others to see how they understand critical issues around place, around human and animal interaction, around the growing recognition of human-driven environmental forces--most notably with respect to water and climate change.  Throughout the quarter we will share in leading presentation of materials to the program.  We will develop short research essays (8-12 pages) that will draw upon our readings, essays, and library work.  We will use two shorter essays to help develop our thoughts about specific aspects of the author's work.Environmental history has established itself as a legitimate piece of the history profession, a significant element in the debate over environmental policy, and a major factor in the simultaneously growing recognition of globalism, regionalism and localism as critical dimensions for understanding environmental phenomena. As environmental history has become more complex, it has challenged history based fundamentally on political units and created a map that provides important underpinning of contemporary popular discussions of place-based work and action, and global concern and policy. We will explore place as a concept that brings together the complexity of the intersection of diverse factors to produce lived experience in human and natural communities.The program offers opportunities for serious conversation, focused research, and reflection on personal and collective understandings of environmental ethics and action. Each student should anticipate becoming the resident expert in the work of at least one of our authors or one major issue. social sciences and environmental history, literature, public policy and management. Matthew Smith Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR
Nature's Prose

Heather Heying

biology mathematics philosophy of science writing zoology 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day The natural world exists with or without humanity’s interpretation of it. As observers and users of symbols, it is easy to mistake ourselves for the creators and masters of what we are trying to explain. In this program, we will learn through direct experience of nature: we will learn to trust our own senses. Knowledge and interpretation will also come through writing about nature, and measuring and analyzing aspects of it. We will spend two weeks of the ten on class field trips, and individuals will develop a sense of place by finding and revisiting the same natural site every week throughout the quarter. We will focus on observation as central to a careful, critical and creative understanding of our world. We will learn the disappearing art of unitasking, of clear undivided focus. Readings will come from science, literature, and the philosophy of science; evolutionary explanations for nature’s complexity will be prominent. Students will write every week, both scientific and creative prose. If you are already a skilled writer who loves to write, you will find an outlet here. If you do not enjoy writing, or would like to further develop some basic skills, you will also find this useful, and hopefully pleasant. Similarly, we will do some math in this program. If you find numbers and their manipulation exciting, you will have fun with this. If you are a math-phobe, we will try to reveal some of its beauty and wisdom to you. Words and numbers are symbolic representations of our world; if we do not understand them, they have undue power over us. As we learn to use them as tools that we can master, they allow us to further our own understanding, experience and representation of the world. biology, communications and field research. Heather Heying Freshmen FR
Neon: Shaping Light (1st session)

Douglas Hitch

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su1Summer 1 This course introduces students to the basic skills in the fabrication of neon. Each student will learn to heat, bend, weld, and anneal glass tubing using a ribbon burner, cannon fire, and tipping torch. Students will learn the bending process for the four basic bends. Students will learn to blow bubbles and make twists in glass tubes. They will use these techniques to fabr